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Writing Worshop HS

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  • This is the FINAL draft of the HS Writing Standards PowerPoint – October 13, 2011
  • Briefly review the objectives for Day 1.
  • Direct the participants to their writing packet. Allow 5-10 minutes for the participants to complete the concept of definition map: EFFECTIVE WRITING INSTRUCTION. Ask for several volunteers to present their concept map.
  • Source: Writing Now A Policy Research Brief (2008) Directions: 1. Direct participants to their packet for the Anticipation Guide. Read each statement and direct the participants to write AGREE or DISAGREE. Allow 3-4 minutes to complete this activity. Briefly discuss. The AFTER reading column is part of the follow-up assignment and 2-paragraph reflection on the NCTE Policy Brief found at the bottom of the sheet.
  • Refer participants to the NCTE Policy Brief “Writing in a Changing World”. Orally read pages 1-3 through the “Common Myths about School-Based Writing” section. Choose any method of oral reading you prefer: jump-in reading, buddy reading or table-partner reading. Allow a brief discussion about the article. STOP at the section “Understanding Writing Now” on page 3. The reading from pg. 3 – 6 will be the basis for the home learning follow-up reflection due on Day 2,
  • Use this slide to segue to the changes in FCAT 2.0 Writing for Spring 2012.
  • Use this slide to segue into Changes in FCAT Writing. Direct participants to the letter in their packet. Remind participants that Florida is moving toward the partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers (PARCC) assessments in English Language Arts beginning in 2014-2015, and districts must begin to raise the expectations of writing to prepare for the increased rigor students will encounter with the implementation of the PARCC writing component. The State of Florida envisions a two-year approach to implement rigorous writing. This letter outlines changes for Spring 2012 and Spring 2013 and beyond.
  • Reinforce the message in Dept. of Education Memo that PARCC assessments require students to “present a clear and coherent analysis in writing, demonstrating a command of English language conventions.”
  • Remind participants that these bullets are NOT new standards in NGSSS, but rather, are being enforced more stringently.
  • Offer a few examples of contrived statistical claims or unsubstantiated generalities: 90% of the students in Miami love arroz con pollo. Over 10 million teenagers in Florida play soccer. Over 92% of the students surveyed, prefer cats over dogs
  • Stress the idea that scorers will be reading for INCREASED EXPECTATIONS in QUALITY of support and use of CONVENTIONS.
  • Provide a few examples of commonly misspelled words: your for you’re, Firt of all for First of all, or misuse of there (their or they’re). If however, a student generally spells commonly words correctly and chooses to write about a rhinoceros , but misspells this word throughout the response, the scoring will not be negatively affected. EXAMPLE of precise word choice that will NOT negatively affect the score. s ponser ( sponsor ) OR obsticule ( obstacle )
  • Briefly discuss that idea that writing is still scored for the elements of FOCUS, ORGANIZATION, SUPPORT and CONVENTIONS, but scoring decisions will included expanded expectations in support and conventions.
  • Stress the idea that the ROTE MEMORIZATION or overuse of techniques such as rhetorical questions, pretentious language and misplaced figurative devices is not the expectation for quality writing at any grade level.
  • Sept 9, 2011 Memo - Renn Edenfield - FCAT English Language Arts Coordinator A final decision was made that there will be 2 scorers on Spring 2012 FCAT Writes! This means that scores can again be half points. For example, if I give the response a 4, and you give it a 5, the final score is 4.5. School grading formula will continue to calculate the percentage of students scoring 4 and above.  
  • The FLORIDA Department of Education recognizes its critical role in providing information to schools and districts. To clarify and illustrate the increased expectations for FCAT Writing scoring in 2011-12, a documents addressing frequently asked questions and examples of student responses are available to districts via the external SharePoint site maintained by the Department’s Test Development Center at http://sharepoint.leon.k12.fl.us/tdc/external/default.aspx.
  • FCAT 2.0 Writing scoring rubrics and annotated scoring guides are posted on the Florida Department of Education website to illustrate increased expectations for 2013 and beyond.
  • Introduce the District’s Vertical Alignment and Annotation Rubric for FCAT 2.0 Writing. Model by HIGHLIGHTING the VERBS across each ELEMENT. Direct the participants to LOOK closely at the verbs within each element (focus, organization, support, conventions) and within each score point. For example, Score Point 1 – may lose focus, Score Point 2 – may lose focus, Score Point 3 – is focused, Score Point 4 – is focused; few, if any; Score Point 5 – is focused; Score Point 6 – is focused and purposeful. Discuss. Now, work together with a table partner to dig into the FCAT 2.0 Writing rubric. Notice the outcomes expected.
  • Directions: 1. Direct the participants to their writing packet. The facilitator will “model” the scoring process using an exemplar response. Participants will need the Vertical Alignment Rubric chart and the student response. NOTE: You may choose to use highlighters with this activity. Highlight the sentence stating the author’s position. Highlight transitions, supporting details, etc. OR you may choose to have the participants take marginal notes indicating evidence of FOSC. Score Point 4 on the Vertical Alignment chart is the State’s annotation for this paper.
  • This exemplar 10 th grade response was taken from the Writing Assessment packet for the Baseline Wtg assessment. This paper is SCORE POINT 4 – 2012 Exemplar set
  • Score Point 4 – This annotation is also on the Vertical Alignment chart for Grade 10.
  • Now the participants will score 3 exemplar papers from the calibration set provided by the State. Direct the participants to their packets for the 3 papers. Focus refers to how clearly the paper presents and maintains a main idea, theme, or unifying point. Organization refers to the structure or plan of development (sequence , cause and effect , compare and contrast , etc.) and the relationship of one point to another. Support refers to the quality of details used to explain, clarify, or define. The quality of the support depends on word choice, specificity, depth, relevance, and thoroughness. Conventions refer to punctuation, capitalization, spelling, usage, and sentence structure.
  • Explain the procedure for scoring the 3 responses from the calibration set. Distribute the Pattern Puzzle envelopes—one for every 2 participants. Explain that the 12 slips are the actual, verbatim annotations from the State for the 3 papers in the packet. The task is to “match” the State’s annotation on Focus – Organization – Support –Conventions (FOSC) for EACH paper. After the participants have “matched” a FOSC slip for EACH paper, direct them to page 23 of the packet where they will find a chart for Paper 1 – Paper 2 – Paper 3. Now, direct participants to return to Papers 1-3 and find words/phrases/sentence to further support their analysis for the Score Point. Assign a Score Point for each paper. Finally display the State’s actual comments on each paper.
  • Briefly review F – O – S - C
  • 2012 Calibration Set – Paper 12 – Score Point 4 Focus refers to how clearly the paper presents and maintains a main idea, theme, or unifying point. Organization refers to the structure or plan of development (sequence , cause and effect , compare and contrast , etc.) and the relationship of one point to another. Support refers to the quality of details used to explain, clarify, or define. The quality of the support depends on word choice, specificity, depth, relevance, and thoroughness. Conventions refer to punctuation, capitalization, spelling, usage, and sentence structure.
  • 2012 Calibration Set – Paper 18 – Score Point 6
  • 2012 Calibration Set – Paper 7 – Score Point 3
  • The following slides discuss the work of Lucy Caulkins (1986) and the Writing Process –prewriting, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing.
  • This format is drawn from the work of Lucy Caulkins and the Writing Process Workshop. While initially designed for use in elementary settings, the writing process –prewriting, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing—has application across academic levels from elementary to college.
  • Direct the participants to their writing packet. Discuss the Format of Writing Process Workshop in DEPTH. Clarify and elaborate on Caulkin’s writing process model. Some problems to consider with the Writing Process approach: Some students might take advantage of the organizational structure to use time inefficiently. (Solution: Status of the class chart) The workshop offers freedom, and some classes may become unruly. (Solution: Close teacher supervision of the class OR teacher station) Some students need substantial direct instruction on the forms and mechanics of writing. (Extensive front-loading through mini-lessons using authentic writing. If all assignments are self-generated, some students will not experience a variety of writing forms. (Solution: Best Practices such as Feature Presentation Fridays)
  • Briefly discuss the following 10 “best practices” for teaching writing.
  • Anna Jordan presented this mini-lesson at the Zelda Glazer-Eveleen Lorton Writing Institute this summer. This procedure provides a structured way for students to “look” at their personal writing style and make adjustment to provide for sentence variation and to demonstrate a personal command of language. Walk the participants through the example in their packet.
  • Direct participants to their packet. Model the revising mini-lesson using the 5 sample sentences. Explain that students will use their own sentences in class, but for this demonstration, the sentences are provided. This technique causes students to (1) reflect on their own writing, (2) uses authentic student work, and (3) mimics authentic revising and editing techniques. Extension activity is to ask students to “chart” how their writing is changing. Compare the number of words per sentence from a piece written in the fall to a piece written mid-year, and so on. Stress the idea that the goal is to increase the sophistication of writing while developing a personal writing style.
  • 1. Direct the participants to return to Paper 3 from the previous activity. Following the directions on the paper. Copy the first 15 sentences. Complete the chart. What patterns emerge? How would you use this with your students to move this Score Point 3 paper to a 4-5-6 Score Point?
  • Jeff Anderson suggests the use of short, quick mini-lessons to get students to reread their work and think about how to edit their writing in ways that clarify their ideas. It is Jeff’s version of “Clean up on aisle 3!” Express-lane edits help writers focus on the editor’s checklist by moving the principles into the writer’s notebook. Jeff posits that teachers could (and do) post editing rules on their classroom walls, but student’s don’t use the charts and they certainly do not help student’s internalize the editing process. The express-lane edit is a class ritual that can be done with or without partners and gives the ever-important repetition in a meaningful (and authentic) context.
  • This shows a possible student response for the editing for apostrophes.
  • This resource was adapted from a Northern Nevada Writing Project activity. Briefly discuss the following points with the participants: Students’ abilities with the conventions of writing are as different and diverse as your students. Some come to you on the first day as good spellers. Some with the ability to correctly use periods. Some—for whatever reason—remember where to put commas. This format allows teachers to draw on the strengths of the students in their classrooms, promote independent writers, AND end up with huge chunks of your weekday nights and weekends back. HINT: Consider using Post-It notes so students can “graduate” from one category of editing into another. HINT: Adjust the chart to suit your classroom purposes: Consider adding a “Voice Tester” or “Descriptive Language Tester”, etc.
  • This “best practice” was presented by Cristine O’Hara at the Zelda Glazer – Evelyn Lorton Writing Institute. The procedure allows for a structured schedule for presenting “published” works throughout the year. While the featured practice requires 6 modes of writing (summary of a fiction , summary of nonfiction, an original poem/ essay/short story, comparison of two poems/short stories/books with a similar theme, a detailed biography, and a digital presentation) the idea can easily be adapted to individual classrooms.
  • Remind participants that Pacing Guides and Writing activities are readily available on the Division of LA/Reading home page and classzone.com
  • Remind participants that LA pacing guides are posted on the C&I site.
  • Remind participants of the resources available on classzone.com. This resource by Carol Booth Olson provides detailed lessons for student writing in response to key literature selections in the McDougal Littell anthology.
  • Bob Marzano's Power Thinking Activities , available on www.classzone.com provide extension activities for key literature selections in the McDougal Littell anthology. Remind participants the many comprehensive writing lessons are available.

Writing wkshp hs day1_instructor Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Day 1 October 13, 2011 WRITING STANDARDS WORKSHOP FOR HIGH SCHOOL
  • 2.
    • 1 . Review Research on School-based Writing
    • 2. Understand the State’s expectations for FCAT 2.0 Writing
    • Why are changes being made to the scoring of FCAT Writing in 2012?
    • How will the scoring of the spring 2012 FCAT Writing assessment change ?
    • Will the rubrics be changed for 2012 scoring?
    • What are the expectations for high scores on the writing assessment?
    • Utilize the rubric and exemplar papers to assist in writing
    • instruction
    • 4. Examine the Writing Process
    DAY 1 OBJECTIVES - EXAMINE CHANGES TO FCAT WRITING 2012 AND BEYOND
  • 3. ACTIVITY: WHAT DO YOU CURRENTLY KNOW ABOUT WRITING INSTRUCTION? Effective Writing Instruction
  • 4. ACTIVITY: ANTICIPATION GUIDE SCHOOL-BASED WRITING
  • 5. NCTE RESEARCH POLICY BRIEF - MARCH 2008
  • 6. CHANGES TO FCAT 2.0 WRITING
  • 7. STATE’S EXPECTATIONS FOR FCAT 2.0 WRITING
  • 8.
    • We must begin to increase the expectations of our current writing assessment to prepare for the increased rigor our students will encounter.
    WHY ARE CHANGES BEING MADE TO THE SCORING OF FCAT WRITING IN 2012?
  • 9.
    • Scoring will include increased attention to the correct use of standard English conventions . The scoring of this element in the past has been applied with leniency.
    • Responses will continue to be scored holistically as draft writing , but scoring will be more stringent.
    HOW WILL THE SCORING OF THE SPRING 2012 FCAT WRITING ASSESSMENT CHANGE?
  • 10.
    • Scoring will include increased attention to quality of details, requiring use of relevant, logical, and plausible support , rather than contrived statistical claims or unsubstantiated generalities .
    • The quality of the support depends on word choice, specificity, depth, relevance, and thoroughness.
    MORE CHANGES IN THE SCORING OF THE SPRING 2012 FCAT WRITING ASSESSMENT
  • 11.
    • The rubrics will not be changed for 2012 FCAT Writing scoring.
    • The scorer training will change ; scorers will be trained to judge the total piece of writing in terms of predefined criteria of focus, organization, support and conventions with an increased expectation of overall control of the quality of support and the correct use of conventions .
    WILL THE RUBRICS BE CHANGED FOR 2012 SCORING?
  • 12.
    • Although spelling will continue to be considered in scoring, it is the preponderance of commonly used words ( mony for money or luch for lunch) being misspelled that could impact the score.
    WILL MISSPELLED WORDS NEGATIVELY AFFECT THE SCORE?
  • 13.
    • Although responses receiving high scores are not perfect, the writing demonstrates overall control of the following 4 elements:
    • elaboration should include concrete details and pertinent information, helping the reader to construct mental images;
    WHAT ARE THE EXPECTATIONS FOR HIGH SCORES ON THE WRITING ASSESSMENT?
  • 14.
    • clear precise word choice and consistent tone , rather than sudden bursts of elevated, contrived use of vocabulary or discordant use of creative writing strategies;
    • variation in sentence structures and styles that add rhythm and depth to quality of the response;
    • overall control of the basic conventions of English.
  • 15.
    • Timed - 45 minutes
    • Single prompt per
    • grade level
    • Expository
    • Persuasive
    • Holistically Scored by 2 readers
    • Scores can again be half points. For example, if reader 1 gives the response a 4, and reader 2 give it a 5, the final score is 4.5.
    • School grading formula will continue to calculate the percentage of students scoring 4 and above.
    PERFORMANCE BASED WRITING
  • 16. VERTICAL ALIGNMENT TO SHOW APPLICATIONS OF THE HOLISTIC RUBRIC FOR FCAT WRITING FOR 2012
  • 17. LOOKING AT EXEMPLAR AND CALIBRATION SETS
  • 18.  
  • 19.
    • Persuasive Prompt
    • We all know that school activities can be expensive.
    • Think about a time when you were asked to help raise money for your school.
    • Now write to convince the school board whether or not schools should ask students to raise money for school activities.
    • 1 . Score the Exemplar Responses using the Holistic Rubric for FCAT Writing 2.0.
    • Write annotations by culling words/phrases from the response.
    • FOCUS
    • ORGANIZATION
    • SUPPORT
    • CONVENTIONS
    ACTIVITY: EXEMPLAR RESPONSE
  • 20.
    • Determine the Score Point using the Vertical Alignment Holistic FCAT 2.0 Rubric
    2012 EXEMPLAR PAPER
  • 21. EXEMPLAR PAPER SCORE POINT ANNOTATION
  • 22. ACTIVITY: SCORE THE 3 EXEMPLAR PAPERS
  • 23.
    • Distribute a Pattern Puzzle envelope to each pair of
    • participants.
    • 2 . The 12 slips are the actual, verbatim annotations from the
    • State for the 3 papers in your packet.
    • The task is to “match” the State’s annotation on Focus –
    • Organization – Support – Conventions (FOSC) for EACH
    • paper.
    • After you have “matched” a FOSC slip to EACH paper, find
    • the chart on page 23 of the packet.
    • Return to each paper and find words/phrases/sentences to further support your analysis for the Score Point.
    • 6 . Finally assign a Score Point for each paper.
    ACTIVITY: PATTERN PUZZLE
  • 24.
    • Focus refers to how clearly the paper presents and maintains a main idea, theme, or unifying point.
    • Organization refers to the structure or plan of development (sequence , cause and effect , compare and contrast , etc.) and the relationship of one point to another.
    • Support refers to the quality of details used to explain, clarify, or define. The quality of the support depends on word choice, specificity, depth, relevance, and thoroughness.
    • Conventions refer to punctuation, capitalization, spelling, usage, and sentence structure.
    F O S C
  • 25. PAPER 1 Score Paper 1 using the Holistic Rubric for FCAT Writing 2.0
  • 26. PAPER 2
    • Score Paper 2 using the Holistic Rubric for FCAT Writing 2.0
    • FOCUS
    • ORGANIZATION
    • SUPPORT
    • CONVENTIONS
  • 27. PAPER 3
    • Score Paper 3 using the Holistic Rubric for FCAT Writing 2.0.
    • FOCUS
    • ORGANIZATION
    • SUPPORT
    • CONVENTIONS
  • 28. CALIBRATION PAPER 1 – SCORE POINT 4
  • 29. CALIBRATION PAPER 2– SCORE POINT 6
  • 30. CALIBRATION PAPER 3– SCORE POINT 3
  • 31.
    • “ It is terribly important for kids to read and write for the reasons that people the world over read and write, which is to communicate, to be delighted, to laugh.”
    • - Lucy Caulkins
    WRITING PROCESS WORKSHOP
  • 32.
    • Is an instructional model that views writing as an ongoing process in which students plan, draft, revise, edit, and publish their writing.
    • Allows students to be at various stages of the writing process at one time.
    • Is based on collaboration with peers and teachers.
    • Focuses primarily on what children want to communicate.
    • Allows for student choice.
    WRITING PROCESS WORKSHOP…
  • 33. FORMAT OF WRITING PROCESS
  • 34.
    • Create an inviting classroom.
    • Establish Writing Workshop routines that meet everyday.
    • Teach Writer’s Craft Techniques using the Writing Process and students’ developmental writing needs.
    • Provide opportunities for authentic writing.
    • Provide diverse reading materials modeling the importance of craft and ideas (mentor or stimulus text).
    BEST PRACTICES FOR TEACHING WRITING
  • 35.
    • Make teacher and peer response an integral part of writing instruction, intermittently throughout the writing process.
    • Use many techniques for responding including student /teacher conferences, peer conferences and author’s chair.
    • Students should revise after responses/conferring with peer readers.
    • 10 . Create a safe environment for students to share their
    • work.
    BEST PRACTICES FOR TEACHING WRITING
  • 36.
    • Use this sample mini-lesson from Anna Jordan to model revising draft writing.
    • Apply this idea to other pieces by following the steps .
    REVISING MINI-LESSON
  • 37.
    • Clearly number the sentences in your essay.
    • Highlight the first four words in each sentence.
    • Complete the chart with the required information.
    • What patterns appear in your writing?
    ACTIVITY - REVISING
  • 38.
    • Find Paper 3 from the Exemplar Calibration Set.
    • Follow the 4 steps as outlined.
    ACTIVITY: REVISING MINI-LESSON
  • 39.
    • Explain Express-Lane Edits from Jeff Anderson’s book Mechanically Inclined .
    • Practice this idea using the first-draft writing.
    ACTIVITY: EXPRESS-LANE EDIT MINI-LESSON
  • 40. SAMPLE EXPRESS-LANE EDIT RECEIPT
  • 41.
    • Complete the chart at your table. Discuss how/why you assigned the sub-categories
    • How do you currently use your students as peer reviewers?
    • How might this resource be adapted for the grade level you currently teach?
    SUGGESTIONS FOR ENGAGING STUDENTS
  • 42.
    • Each Friday a group of students will be assessed on their speaking, writing, listening, and presentation skills.
    • The class will be divided into two rotating groups (A and B). Basically, students will be speaking to the class every other Friday .
    • Assignments cannot be repeated. Students select the assignment , but the genre (end product) must vary weekly.
    • Weekly the class will vote on the “Best” presentation. The “Best” presenter for the week receives a free home learning pass.
    FEATURE PRESENTATION FRIDAYS
  • 43. FINDING RESOURCES
  • 44. WEEK 14 – GRADE 10 PACING GUIDE
  • 45.
    • OBJECTIVES
    • Students will review figurative language and cite examples from the piece
    • compare and contrast how Angelou describes herself and how she describes Mrs. Flowers
    • write an essay that compares the descriptions
    CAROL BOOTH OLSON LESSONS
  • 46.
    • Activity 1 - Analyzing Errors
    • Activity 2 – Abstraction
    BOB MARZANO’S POWER THINKING ACTIVITIES
  • 47.
    • Reflection on NCTE Policy Brief
    • Due October 18
    • Provide a short reflection on ways you will incorporate and implement what you have learned about effective writing practices.
    • Things that make you go Ummmm!??!
    • How will this policy brief impact your writing instruction?
    FOLLOW-UP ASSIGNMENT
  • 48. DIVISION OF LANGUAGE ARTS/READING
    • Dr. Sharon Scruggs-Williams
    • Instructional Supervisor
    • North & North Central Region
    • Dr. Erin Cuartas
    • Instructional Supervisor
    • South Central & North Central Region
    • Laurie Kaplan
    • Instructional Supervisor
    • South Region
    • 305-995-3122