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Lean Learning: Iowa Lean Consortium Presentation

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Lean is about learning, John Shook told a crowd of 200 managers from manufacturing, healthcare, government, and service organizations who had gathered for a learning session sponsored by the Iowa Lean …

Lean is about learning, John Shook told a crowd of 200 managers from manufacturing, healthcare, government, and service organizations who had gathered for a learning session sponsored by the Iowa Lean Collaborative on Oct 2, 2012.

To be successful, he said lean learning needs these characteristics:
• All learner partners actively participate
• Mutual Respect: Openness in sharing experience, knowledge, challenges, struggles;
• Teachers are learners; learners are teachers
• Problems to be addressed are important and challenging to all partners


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  • 1. Learning Lean Collaboratively John Shook Lean Enterprise Institute October 1, 2012
  • 2. First, What is Lean Thinking & Practice?Systemically develop people andcontinuously improve processes to provide value and prosperity while consuming the fewest possible resources
  • 3. Second, Why Learn Lean Collaboratively?• Lean = learning• Successful change requires dispersing learning through an organization quickly and effectively• Learning collaboratively is a way to scale learning – in an organization and beyond• So, let’s borrow the learning curve of Lean thinkers who are succeeding through collaborative learning groups
  • 4. Third, What is Collaborative Learning? Two or more individuals –learning partners – intent onlearning something together
  • 5. Collaboration is more than sharing physical space
  • 6. Learning Collaboratively is more thanlearning while occupying shared space
  • 7. Learning collaboratively means more than learning while occupying shared space
  • 8. Learning collaboratively means more than learning while occupying shared space
  • 9. Fourth, What is Collaborative Lean LearningLearning partners actively endeavor to learntogether through shared experience... P-D-S-A t LEARNING CYCLES
  • 10. Collaborative Lean LearningKnowledge is not only shared butcreated within a group where membersactively endeavor to learn lean togetherthrough shared experience. t
  • 11. Collaborative Lean LearningIndividuals working together…– capitalizing on one another’s knowledge and skill,• both technically and socially,•recognizing that learning is not just anindividual but also a social act,• to solve a problem, complete a task, orcreate a product, or answer a question.
  • 12. Elements of successful Collaborative Lean Learning• All learner partners actively participate• Mutual Respect: Openness in sharing experience, knowledge, challenges, struggles;• Teachers are learners; learners are teachers• Problems to be addressed are important and challenging to all partners: “What problem are we trying to solve?”
  • 13. Back to Lean Thinking and Practice:Every Organization Must Address… • Purpose – Provide value to customers (cost-effectively to thrive). • Process – Through value streams that are designed, operated, and improved. • People – By engaging and respecting employees and other stakeholders.  Aligning purpose, process, and people is the central task of management. 13
  • 14. Lean Transformation Social and Technical 14
  • 15. Lean Transformations: People and Process Social
  • 16. Lean Transformations: People and Process Technical
  • 17. People & Process – aligned bymanagement to achieve purpose 17
  • 18. Lean TransformationChange Culture Change SystemFirst FirstWhere Do You Start – Either? Both at once?
  • 19. The Challenge of Any Organization MUDA (Excess)Capability Demand MURI (Overburden) MURA (Instability) •Know your demand •Know your true capability (capacity) Management •Create flexibility to get them to match TIME 19
  • 20. Total System Efficiency and Effectiveness 20
  • 21. Lean Thinking & Practice:Problems, Challenges, OpportunitiesIn the face of a reality Challenge to makethat’s like this: steady progress: MUDA (Excess) Demand MURI (Overburden) 21
  • 22. Lean Transformation It’s easier to act your way to a new way of thinking than to think your way to a new way of acting.
  • 23. Lean LeadersDevelop people THROUGH getting the work done… 23
  • 24. People & Process: People learning process – process developing peopleTypical thinking observes that people develop processes. TrueAlso true is that processes develop people.People enter situations (a company) and learn the processes.Before they develop processes, they learn processes. Thatlearning process develops them.People are a product of the processes that they work.Those processes, in turn, have people dimensionsthat entail individual and collaborative learning.
  • 25. Lean Capability Development“It’s easier to act your way to a newway of thinking than to think yourway to a new way of acting.”Therefore:Build processes that developpeople as they do their work.Manage and lead accordingly.
  • 26. Lean Enterprise– the ultimate “social-technical system” • The process of doing the work is integrated with the process of improving the work • And… 26
  • 27. Lean Enterprise– the ultimate “social-technical system” • The process of doing the work is integrated with the process of improving the work, and • The operating processes ARE people development processes! 27
  • 28. Achieving Purpose, Solving Problems and Developing Capability -- Collaboratively CURRENT STANDARD CONDITION Andon A3 Lean managers establish systems to engage everyone to work together in identifying, signaling, and responding to problems.
  • 29. Achieving Purpose, Solving Problems and Developing Capability -- Collaboratively
  • 30. “Stop the Line”•Design a repeatable routine – provide training –Make success understandable and do-able•Make it easy to see problems –Anything that interrupts the routine•Make it clear what to do for problems –Contain and notify (“neither accept nor pass on…”)•Make it clear what will happen after notification –Help will come within the cycle of work•Ensure problem-solving and learning –Through structured routines for problem-solving and rapid cycles of learning
  • 31. 31john shook
  • 32. “Do not interruptwhile I am running this play.”•This enables me to perform with less chance of error,•We can identify normal fromabnormal and solve problems,•We can learn – together –intentionally. 32 john shook
  • 33. Capability Development Through Collaborative Problem Solving No Problem is a Problem! NEXT LEARN TO SEE TARGETED CONDITION GtS GtS TARGETED GtS CONDITION Tools m ble Tools /Pro nity Gap ortu Tools p CURRENT CONDITION /Op
  • 34. Collaborative Learning…members actively endeavor to learntogether through shared experience. P-D-S-A TRY – FAIL – LEARN DO – LEARN – IMPROVE t A3 KATA LAMDA OODA LEARNING CYCLES: SPIN THEM FAST SPIN THEM WILLFULLY
  • 35. When (and why) not to pursue Collaborative Learning or…What pitfalls to avoid when you do.After all, every yin has its yang.
  • 36. Collaborative Learner Beware…• Groupthink – Everyone follows an attractive thread – Design by committee • For example “limiting statements” (S Bahri) – “Democracy” to the point of lack of leadership
  • 37. Collaborative Learner Beware…• Groupthink – Everyone follows an attractive thread – Design by committee – “Democracy” to the point of lack of leadership• Brainstorming as a group becomes too easy; no individual steps up to: – take ownership – go through the intense pain of truly thinking something through deeply
  • 38. Collaborative Learner Beware…• Groupthink – Everyone follows an attractive thread – Design by committee – “Democracy” to the point of lack of leadership• Brainstorming as a group becomes too easy; no individual steps up to: – take ownership – go through the intense pain of truly thinking something through deeply• “Collaboration Fatigue” – Dr. Gigi Hirsch of MIT – Beware the trade-off between inclusiveness versus effectiveness and efficiency
  • 39. Collaborative Learning and Successful Lean Transformation• We are all teachers. We are all teaching all the time.• We can teach more effectively, or less effectively. Whether our teaching is more or less effective depends on two things: intention and skill.• Skill can be acquired, if we simply have the intention.• Thus, effective “teaching”, effective “learning”, effective “leadership” is, more than anything else, a matter of choice.
  • 40. How to transform to a lean operating and management system? Three things: 1.Intent: manifested in a willful decision 2.Process: a means by which the decision can be actualized 3.Practice, practice, practice… – Right practice – Perhaps with a coach!
  • 41. Practice, practice, practice… But, right practice, 41 john shook
  • 42. Practice, practice, practice… But, right practice, perhaps with a coach 42 john shook
  • 43. Coaching?
  • 44. Coaching?
  • 45. One-on-One Collaborative Learning Collaborative learning is effective when both mentor and mentee share nearly equal responsibilityManager interacts with Team Team Team Member takesMember with Respect: Manager Member responsibility for own Development:1)Respects their intellect by 1)Team Member defines own providing challenging career objectives assignments 1)Team Member proactively2) Engages with Team Members engages organization and to understand their struggles management with new ideas2) Supports Team Members 2)Team Member takes own to over come those struggles initiative3)Ongoing, sustained process 3)Ongoing, sustained process to develop capability to develop capability
  • 46. Collaborative Lean Learning Example:Toyota Supplier Learning Associations
  • 47. Collaborative Lean Learning Example: Toyota’s TSSCTSSC, the Toyota Production System Support Center,mission: Help North American companies to learn the ToyotaProduction System.•Over 20 years, TSSC has collaborated with more than 150organizations to learn TPS.•Organizations demonstrate dramatic improvements inProductivity, Quality, and Lead Time.•Through collaboration and learning with organizations inmany sectors, Toyota benefits by bringing this learning backinto its own organization.
  • 48. Collaborative Lean Learning
  • 49. PDCA Standardized Work for Collaboration (from BAMA Example) Participant Participant Participant Focus: xx Target: xx Try Who is the coach?Learn Who is the architect? What is the process (the Standard Work)? Host Each participant Collaborative activity takes home at one location
  • 50. Intent is to support deep thinking Self-Learning Individual, intentional PDCA Learning Cycles Supported by skillful coaching What is my target condition? How do I improve this situation? Try P A D Struggle to do C -Why?! Reflect
  • 51. Group Learning, Individual learning…• Early childhood education is largely collaborative as teachers take young students through group discovery learning activities.• By high school, the learning has become individual-based. Everything I Know About Lean I learned in First Grade – by Robert Martichenko
  • 52. IBM Collaborates with State to Bring PDCA to Vermont 1-8 Schools
  • 53. What will you do?Find someone to learn with:…NOW Assignment
  • 54. What will you do?Assignment – One MinuteOne thing you will do this week aboutthe one thing you wish to change
  • 55. Follow the Learner: Dr. Sami Bahri “One idea, one person, every day”Dr. Sami Bahri“Learn at least one “green” thing every day”- Yellow is theory- Red is to avoid- Green is to do
  • 56. What will you do?Assignment – One MinuteOne thing you will do this week aboutthe one thing you wish to changeOne more minute: share that withthe learning partner sitting besideyou and discuss how your partnercan help you with that problem
  • 57. The following slides contain supplemental Information about the Lean EnterpriseInstitute and its mission, basicapproach, and major activities.
  • 58. Lean Enterprise Institute• Founded in 1997 by Dr. James Womack, principle scientist of the MIT research that resulted in “The Machine That Changed the World”• Non-profit education and research institute• Based in Cambridge MA, with 17 global affiliates• Over 230,000 members from all industries• Mission: Advance Lean Thinking and Practice in all things, everywhere
  • 59. Lean Enterprise Institute Digital books, Industry courses, social Networking networkingPublications www.lean.org Education: public and in- community with house workshops Coaching over 200,000 members
  • 60. Since its founding in 1997, LEI has …•Changed the language of management•Registered over 230,000 Lean Thinking Practitioners and Leaders to its online Lean Community.•Sent over 100 e-letters to over 150,000 subscribers•Trained almost 20,000 people at public workshops•Moderated eight online Forums with nearly 17,000 subscribers.•Delivered onsite training to over 2,000 people at over 100 companies.•Partnered with companies committed to implementing and spreading the methodology for creating alean enterprise through experiments and shared learning.•Collaborated with over 50 independent faculty members.•Developed over 40 workshops for executives, managers, and technical professionals at everyexperience level in manufacturing, service, healthcare, and administrative value streams.•Produced 20 webinars on a wide range of lean management topics.•Produced 20 publications and sold over 600,000 books, workbooks, and training aids.•Hosted eight major Summit conferences with more than 7,000 attendees.•Created a web site with thousands of pages of resources•Founded the Lean Educators Academic Network.•Founded the Healthcare Value Leaders Network, including the first Healthcare TransformationSummit.•Formed the Lean Global Network, a network of 17 not-for-profit institutes on six continents. Andsupported over 40 world-wide events since LGN was officially formed in 2007.
  • 61. Lean Production, Lean Thinking, Lean Practice, Lean Learning
  • 62. Lean Enterprise Institute Individuals, Lean Thinking Individuals,Organizations Everywhere Organizations LEI Publish books, web, appsManagement Systems Develop Education programs Share Operating Systems learning with community Lean Community Co-Learning Hands-on Collaboration LEI establishes a limited number of collaborative learning partnerships with organizations committed to lean transformation.
  • 63. Lean Transformation Model SITUATIONAL APPROACH - Value-Driven Purpose - “WHAT PROBLEM ARE WE TRYING TO SOLVE?” Clear Roles and PROCESS Responsibilities CAPABILITYIMPROVEMENT DEVELOPMENT Continuous, Sustainable real, practical improvement changes to capabilityimprove the way in all peoplethe work is done at all levels LEADERSHIP MANAGEMENT Lean Thinking and Practice
  • 64. LEI High-Level Transformation Model• Basic Approach in all cases: PDCA – The art and craft of science• Specific Approach in each case: Situational, determined by asking – “What problem are we trying to solve?” What business need? – “Where can we run initial trials?” - even when going big• TWO Pillars: Process Improvement and Capability Development – Process Improvement Change • Start with the work – find problems, gaps, obstacles – Individual level, system level – Capability Development • Problem-solving, improvement capability • At all levels• Ownership clarity: Clear Roles and Responsibilities – Internal: executive sponsor, improvement leader, team members – External: project coach, mentor, architect
  • 65. Transformation Model Questions1. What problem are we trying to solve? What is the purpose of this transformation? – At both macro and micro levels1. What specific process improvements are being implemented? How is the actual work being improved?2. What capability enhancements are required and being achieved?3. What role is leadership taking? Is ownership clear?4. What basic philosophy or thinking underlies this transformation?
  • 66. External Support for Lean Transformations• “The value of external support of any Lean Transformation is determined by happens after the support ends” – Dan Jones  So: Define what should ideally happen when support ceases.  Then: Determine what needs to happen for that to happen?• LEI engagement with any organization is defined by the answer to those questions.  Define (together with the organization) the ideal and target conditions  Then provide support:  As little as possible  As much as necessary
  • 67. Sr. Mgmt. System Kaizen Eliminate Muri and MuraMiddleMgmt. Point Kaizen Eliminate MudaFrontLines FOCUS 67
  • 68. Lean Transformation: Impact and Roles of Different Organizational Levels Role Impact MUST PROVIDE VISION SENIOR Likes the results AND MOTIVATION MANAGEMENTMUST LEAD THE ACTUALOPERATIONAL CHANGE MIDDLE Often left battered MANAGEMENT and confused… Likes theMUST “DO” VALUE-CREATING FRONT LINES involvement Different Responsibilities at Different Levels 68
  • 69. Muri: overburden Mura: variation Muda: waste Role Problem: Impact MURI & MURA MUST PROVIDE VISION SENIOR Likes the results AND INCENTIVE MANAGEMENT Problem: MURA & MURIMUST LEAD THE ACTUALOPERATIONAL CHANGE MIDDLE Needs the right tools MANAGEMENT and skills to be Problem: successful MUDA Likes theMUST “DO” VALUE-CREATING FRONT LINES involvement The right focus and process at the right level 69
  • 70. Muri: overburden Mura: variation Muda: waste PDCA process: Role Hoshin Kanri Problem: Impact MURI & MURA MUST PROVIDE VISION SENIOR Likes the results AND INCENTIVE PDCA process MANAGEMENT Problem: VSM and A3 MURA & MURIMUST LEAD THE ACTUALOPERATIONAL CHANGE MIDDLE Needs the right tools MANAGEMENT and skills to be PDCA process: Standardized Work Problem: successful MUDA Likes theMUST “DO” VALUE-CREATING FRONT LINES involvement The right focus and process at the right level 70
  • 71. Lean PurposeEnterprise (Why) Mission/Values Vision/True North Line of Sight Strategy Development and Deployment Capability People to ID & Solve Process Problems (What) (How) PDCA Thinking •Horizontal flow of value at the pull of the customer • Make People Before •Workplace Management Making Products through Standardization & • Engaged and Involved Visualization • Challenging & Coaching •Relentless elimination of • Teamwork waste, overburden and unevenness •Lean Tools and Practices
  • 72. Plan-Do-Check-Act Improvement Cycle
  • 73. Plan-Do-Check-Act Learning Cycle Adapt Fast Study Cycles
  • 74. LEI has sponsored the founding of three organizations to promote lean thinking through a collaborative process•Lean Global Network to advance the applicationof lean thinking in every endeavor, everywhere•Lean Education Academic Network - LEAN - toadvance lean thinking in education•Healthcare Value Network to advance leanthinking in healthcare
  • 75. The Lean Global Network LGN is a network of non-profit, mission-driven institutes taking responsibility for bringing lean thinking and practices to their countries and the worldWe believe lean thinking and practice can: – Improve the performance of organisations and raise living standards – Meet growing aspirations while minimising resource use and environmental impact – Provide more fulfilling work and continuing development for everyone – Enable consumers to create more value in their increasingly busy livesLean Global Network
  • 76. Lean Global NetworkLGN – A Global Network of Lean Enterprise Institutes
  • 77. Global Collaboration
  • 78. John Shook• Currently leader of the Lean Enterprise Institute• Eleven years with Toyota in Japan and the USA • Production and management system transfer • Engineering and PD system transfer • Toyota Production System dissemination• U of Michigan – seven years Director of “Japan Technology Management Program”; created and taught Industrial Engineering “lean” course• Consultant for 15 years