• Save
Wuthering Heights, an FCE lesson
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Wuthering Heights, an FCE lesson

on

  • 8,818 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
8,818
Views on SlideShare
8,803
Embed Views
15

Actions

Likes
3
Downloads
76
Comments
0

2 Embeds 15

http://www.slideshare.net 13
http://markaki-students.blogspot.com 2

Accessibility

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Wuthering Heights, an FCE lesson Wuthering Heights, an FCE lesson Presentation Transcript

  • By Emily Brontë A lesson with FCE Class MARKAKI SCHOOL OF FOREIGN LANGUAGES 5/12/2008 1
  • Respect? Money? MARKAKI SCHOOL OF FOREIGN LANGUAGES 5/12/2008 2
  • Emily Jane Brontë (July 30,  1818 – December 19, 1848) was a British novelist and poet, now best remembered for her only novel Wuthering Heights, a classic of English literature. Emily was the second eldest of the three surviving Brontë sisters, being younger than Charlotte and older than Anne. She published under the masculine pen name Ellis Bell. She was born in Thornton in Yorkshire. For more information visit  en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emily_Bronte MARKAKI SCHOOL OF FOREIGN LANGUAGES 5/12/2008 3
  • Wuthering Heights is Emily Brontë's only novel. It was first published in  1847 under the pseudonym Ellis Bell, and a posthumous second edition was edited by her sister Charlotte. The name of the novel comes from the Yorkshire manor on the moors on which the story centres (as an adjective, wuthering is a Yorkshire word referring to turbulent weather). The narrative tells the tale of the all-encompassing and passionate, yet thwarted, love between Heathcliff and Catherine Earnshaw, and how this unresolved passion eventually destroys them and many around them. (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wuthering_Heights) Setting (time) : The action of Nelly's story begins in the 1770s; Lockwood  leaves Yorkshire in 1802. Setting (place) : All the action of Wuthering Heights takes place in or  around two neighboring houses on the Yorkshire moors—Wuthering Heights and Thrushcross Grange. (www.sparknotes.com/lit/wuthering/facts.html) MARKAKI SCHOOL OF FOREIGN LANGUAGES 5/12/2008 4
  • The narrative is non-linear, involving several  flashbacks, and two narrators - Mr. Lockwood and Ellen quot;Nellyquot; Dean. The novel opens in 1801, with Lockwood arriving at Thrushcross Grange, a grand house on the Yorkshire moors he is renting from the surly Heathcliff, who lives at nearby Wuthering Heights. Nelly takes over the narration and begins her story thirty years earlier, when Heathcliff, a foundling living on the streets of Liverpool, is brought to Wuthering Heights by the then-owner, the kindly Mr. Earnshaw, and raised as his own. MARKAKI SCHOOL OF FOREIGN LANGUAGES 5/12/2008 5
  • Earnshaw's daughter Catherine becomes  Heathcliff's inseparable friend. Her brother Hindley, however, resents Heathcliff, seeing him as an interloper and rival. Mr. Earnshaw dies three years later, and Hindley (who has married a woman named Frances) takes over the estate. He brutalises Heathcliff, forcing him to work as a hired hand. Catherine becomes friends with a neighbour family, the Lintons of Thrushcross Grange, who mellow her initially wild personality. She is especially attached to the refined and mild young Edgar Linton, whom Heathcliff instantly dislikes. MARKAKI SCHOOL OF FOREIGN LANGUAGES 5/12/2008 6
  • Some two years after that, Catherine agrees to marry  Edgar. Nelly knows that this will crush Heathcliff, and Heathcliff overhears Catherine's explanation that it would be quot;degradingquot; to marry him. Heathcliff storms out and leaves Wuthering Heights, not hearing Catherine's continuing declarations that Heathcliff is as much a part of her as the rocks are to the earth beneath. Catherine marries Edgar, and is initially very happy. Some time later, Heathcliff returns, intent on destroying those who prevent him from being with Catherine. Read the rest of the story at  en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wuthering_Heights MARKAKI SCHOOL OF FOREIGN LANGUAGES 5/12/2008 7
  • Now read the handout.  (extract from Chapter 9) Main topic:  Catherine‘s motives to marry Edgar Online reading:  www.literature.org/authors/bronte- emily/wuthering-heights/chapter-09.html MARKAKI SCHOOL OF FOREIGN LANGUAGES 5/12/2008 8
  • What are the reasons Catherine decides to  marry Edgar? Do you agree with her? How would you describe her character based  on this extract? What do you think about Nelly‘s reactions?  Why does Catherine‘s attitude change towards  the end of the extract? Can you predict what will happen next?  MARKAKI SCHOOL OF FOREIGN LANGUAGES 5/12/2008 9
  • This video belongs to a BBC series and depicts  the entire discussion between Catherine and Nelly. Find out what Catherine says about Heathcliff.  You Tube link:  www.youtube.com/watch?v=AR3ho8ohOa4&fea ture=related MARKAKI SCHOOL OF FOREIGN LANGUAGES 5/12/2008 10
  • 'This is nothing,' cried she: 'I was only going to say that heaven did not seem to be my home; and I broke my heart with weeping to come back to earth; and the angels were so angry that they flung me out into the middle of the heath on the top of Wuthering Heights; where I woke sobbing for joy. That will do to explain my secret, as well as the other. I've no more business to marry Edgar Linton than I have to be in heaven; and if the wicked man in there had not brought Heathcliff so low, I shouldn't have thought of it. It would degrade me to marry Heathcliff now; so he shall never know how I love him: and that, not because he's handsome, Nelly, but because he's more myself than I am. Whatever our souls are made of, his and mine are the same; and Linton's is as different as a moonbeam from lightning, or frost from fire.' MARKAKI SCHOOL OF FOREIGN LANGUAGES 5/12/2008 11
  • ‗Every Linton on the face of the earth might melt into nothing before I could consent to forsake Heathcliff. Oh, that's not what I intend - that's not what I mean! I shouldn't be Mrs. Linton were such a price demanded! He'll be as much to me as he has been all his lifetime. Edgar must shake off his antipathy, and tolerate him, at least. He will, when he learns my true feelings towards him. Nelly, I see now you think me a selfish wretch; but did it never strike you that if Heathcliff and I married, we should be beggars? whereas, if I marry Linton I can aid Heathcliff to rise, and place him out of my brother's power.' MARKAKI SCHOOL OF FOREIGN LANGUAGES 5/12/2008 12
  • What were the use of my creation, if I were entirely contained here? My great miseries in this world have been Heathcliff's miseries, and I watched and felt each from the beginning: my great thought in living is himself. If all else perished, and HE remained, I should still continue to be; and if all else remained, and he were annihilated, the universe would turn to a mighty stranger: I should not seem a part of it. - My love for Linton is like the foliage in the woods: time will change it, I'm well aware, as winter changes the trees. My love for Heathcliff resembles the eternal rocks beneath: a source of little visible delight, but necessary. Nelly, I AM Heathcliff! He's always, always in my mind: not as a pleasure, any more than I am always a pleasure to myself, but as my own being. MARKAKI SCHOOL OF FOREIGN LANGUAGES 5/12/2008 13
  • What was Catherine‘s dream?  How does it relate to her marriage to Edgar?  How does she really feel about Edgar? What  metaphors does she use to express that? What deeper reasons does she have for  marrying him? How does she feel about Heathcliff? How does  she express that? How will this love story end in your opinion?  MARKAKI SCHOOL OF FOREIGN LANGUAGES 5/12/2008 14
  • ‗Wuthering Heights‘ performed by  Hayley Westenra: www.youtube.com/watch?v=pkTF5DRBxpI The song was initially performed and written  by Kate Bush who derived her inspiration from this novel. For more information about the song visit:  en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wuthering_Heights_(song) MARKAKI SCHOOL OF FOREIGN LANGUAGES 5/12/2008 15
  • Out on the winding, windy moors Ooh, it gets dark! It gets lonely, We'd roll and fall in green. On the other side from you. You had a temper like my I pine a lot. I find the lot jealousy Falls through without you. Too hot, too greedy. I'm coming back, love, How could you leave me, Cruel Heathcliff, my one dream, When I needed to possess you? My only master. I hated you, but I loved you, too. Too long I roamed in the night. I'm coming back to his side, to Bad dreams in the night put it right. You told me I was going to lose I'm coming home to wuthering, the fight, wuthering, Leave behind my wuthering, Wuthering Heights, wuthering Wuthering Heights. Ooh! Let me have it. Let me grab your soul away. Heathcliff, it's me, I‘m Cathy, Ooh! Let me have it. I've come home and I´m so cold, Let me grab your soul away. let me in your window You know it's me--Cathy! MARKAKI SCHOOL OF FOREIGN LANGUAGES 5/12/2008 16
  • ―. . . Heathcliff . . . shall never know how I love him . . . he's more myself than I am. Whatever our souls are made of, his and mine are the same . . .‖ ―My love for Heathcliff resembles the eternal rocks beneath: a source of little visible delight, but necessary. Nelly, I AM Heathcliff! He's always, always in my mind: not as a pleasure, any more than I am always a pleasure to myself, but as my own being.‖ Catherine Earnshaw MARKAKI SCHOOL OF FOREIGN LANGUAGES 5/12/2008 17