MSDS SDS labelling SOP GHS of classification labelling of chem

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GHS CLP REACH current regs on labeling and class of chemicals MSDS 160 pages with 60 pages of glossary contact motherhealth@gmail.com conniedello buono for MSDS authoring using current regs or …

GHS CLP REACH current regs on labeling and class of chemicals MSDS 160 pages with 60 pages of glossary contact motherhealth@gmail.com conniedello buono for MSDS authoring using current regs or standards

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  • 1. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _Contents1. Purpose............................................................................................................... 52. Scope.................................................................................................................. 53. Procedure............................................................................................................ 6 Creating or re-authoring an SDS per GHS standard.................................................................6 Update and Monitoring.............................................................................................................6 Monitoring................................................................................................................ 7 Hazard Classification................................................................................................................7 Copies of SDS...........................................................................................................................8 EU and GHS Classification...................................................................................................... 8 Other Rules in SDS Preparation............................................................................................... 8 Author and Users...................................................................................................................... 9 CLP and GHS........................................................................................................................... 9 GHS Label elements.................................................................................................................9 EC, USA, CANADA and UN Identification, Classification and Labelling of Chemicals.....11 Writing Labels........................................................................................................................ 12 Suppliers and Employers Responsibilities..............................................................12 GHS Symbols and Elements and Regulatory Changes on Labelling.....................12 Label Requirements................................................................................................12 GHS Pictograms/Symbols...................................................................................................... 13 Signal Words...........................................................................................................13 GHS Hazard Statements......................................................................................... 13 Hazard Symbols and Pictograms............................................................................14 Examples of Pictogram Description and their Hazard Classes...............................14 Precautionary Statements........................................................................................14 Hazard and Precautionary Statements.................................................................... 14 Product Identifier.................................................................................................... 15 Other GHS Guidance and Annexes........................................................................ 15 Standardized Rules of Precedence to group a product to more than one class.......15 GHS Health and Environmental Hazard Classification Criteria.............................15 What is new with CLP?.......................................................................................... 16 OSHA References...................................................................................................16 Description of Hazardous Material on Shipping Papers.........................................17 Hazardous Materials at .......................................................................................... 17 Select Carcinogens..................................................................................................18 WHMIS Classes or Classifications.........................................................................18 Hazardous Substances with Toxic Effects on Specific Organs include.................19 Chemical Safety Report (CSR) and SDS................................................................................19 Records................................................................................................................................... 19 REACH Note.......................................................................................................................... 19 Language.................................................................................................................................19 Not classified as Hazardous under CLP .................................................................................20 Downstream Users..................................................................................................................20 Downstream Legislation......................................................................................................... 20 Hazard Communication..........................................................................................................22Date Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 1 of 186
  • 2. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ Supplier Responsibilities ....................................................................................................... 22 Summary of SDS Changes According to REACH.................................................................23 What is new in REACH Safety Data Sheet?.......................................................................... 24 SDS Audit Checklist...............................................................................................................24 Classification and Labeling ....................................................................................................25 GHS/CLP Classification General Notes................................................................. 25 Table 1. Hazard Classes of the Proposed EU Regulation .....................................................26 GHS Criteria for Acute Toxicity.............................................................................................27 GHS Criteria for Skin Corrosion and other hazard class (See ghs osha comparison.pdf file).........................................................................................28 An SDS is not needed when (per OSHA’s 29 CFR 1910.1200)............................................ 28 SDS Exclusions per WHMIS .................................................................................29 An SDS is not required for (per Japan Regulatory Bodies)....................................................29 ANSI....................................................................................................................................... 30 GHS New Hazard Classifications...........................................................................................31 Changes to Supplier Labels.................................................................................................... 31 EU Labels................................................................................................................................31 SDS Form Completion and Content Summary.......................................................................31 Identify the hazards.................................................................................................31 Generic SDS Form..................................................................................................31 Newly Revised SDS................................................................................................32 When new SDS are issued on a chemical, they will be compared to previous data sheets on file and any changes will be noted and changes will be made to the labels of the chemical containers accordingly............................................................................................................32 Controlled Substances.............................................................................................32 SDS Organization (HCS/OSHA/GHS , minimum information for an SDS)..........32 Section 10: Stability and Reactivity........................................................................37 Completing the SDS Form (with examples)...........................................................................39 Section 1. Product and Company Identification....................................................39 Section 2. Hazard Identification............................................................................ 40 Section 3. Composition/Information on Ingredients...............................................42 Section 4. First Aid Measures.................................................................................44 Section 5. Firefighting Measures........................................................................... 44 Section 6. Accidental Release Measures............................................................... 47 Section 7. Handling and Storage.............................................................................47 Section 8. Exposure Controls/Personal Protection................................................. 48 Section 9. Physical and Chemical Properties..........................................................49 Section 10. Stability and Reactivity........................................................................50 Section 11. Toxicological Information...................................................................51 Section 12. Ecological Information....................................................................... 52 Section 13. Disposal Considerations.....................................................................53 Section 14. Transport Information..........................................................................53 Section 15. Regulatory Information.......................................................................56 Example: Section 15. Regulatory Information (NaOH)........................................57Date Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 2 of 186
  • 3. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ Section 16. Other Information................................................................................ 57 Exposure Scenarios, ESs (Annex).......................................................................... 59 Table A Hazard Category and SDS Template Guide............................................................ 59 Table B Composition/Information on Ingredients (CLP Labels)...........................................61 Table B1 Composition/Information on Ingredients (DPD Labels).........................................61 Table C. Concentration Limits and Hazard Class/Category per (EC) No 1272/2008............614. Regulations ....................................................................................................... 625. Sample Safety Data Sheet (SDS)..................................................................... 636. Resource Table: Preparation Resources (Other sources/link not listed in thefollowing screen shots) Document/Link................................................................. 67 SDS Sections 1- 16................................................................................................................. 67 Other Links............................................................................................................. 727. GHS Labels Sample Format.............................................................................. 738. Translation Table under Regulation (EC) No 1907/2006.................................. 76 TRANSLATION Table Translation between classification in accordance with Directive 67/548/EEC and Regulation (EC) No 1907/2006 (ANNEX VII)...........76 Translation Table between Risk Phrases................................................................ 809. Other Guidance and Notes................................................................................ 8010. Hazard Statements Table................................................................................ 81 GHS Hazard Statements General Notes................................................................................. 83 Other EU Hazard Statements..................................................................................................8411. Precautionary Statement Table....................................................................... 8412. Derivation of the Mixture Classification........................................................... 9413. EPA Outline of the Six Steps for Hazardous Waste Determination................9414. Classification Criteria, H-criterion, under LoW and DPD................................ 9515. Determination Scheme for the Classification of Waste................................... 95 Identifying Waste with the European Waste Catalogue (EWC).............................................96 Waste Classification................................................................................................................97 European Waste Catalogue (EWC 2002)............................................................................... 9716. Intermediate Translation Table LoW to CLP................................................... 98 H9 Waste Types (Infectious)................................................................................10017. United Nations Classification Recommendation on Transport of DangerousGoods.................................................................................................................. 10018. Glossary........................................................................................................ 10119. Table 2 – Incompatible Chemicals............................................................... 15420. Hazardous Waste Identification (RCRA Subtitle C)...................................... 155 More GHS Labeling Sample.................................................................................................15721. Notes from SDS Compiler’s Guide Updated August 2010.pdf (183 pages)..158 First Aid Notes......................................................................................................................158 Spillage Disposal Guide........................................................................................16022. Globally Harmonized System of Classification & Labelling of Chemicals (GHS) 164 New GHS Combination Phrases ..........................................................................................166 Abbreviations........................................................................................................................16723. Labeling and Storing of Chemicals at ........................................................... 168 Allowed Substances..............................................................................................168 Labeling of Chemicals.......................................................................................... 168 Labeling of Non- Substances................................................................................16824. Labeling and Other Forms of Warning.......................................................... 16825. Biological Waste Labeling............................................................................. 17026. Employee Training Program Sample............................................................ 170Date Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 3 of 186
  • 4. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _27. MSDS Request Letter Sample...................................................................... 17228. Hazardous Waste Tag................................................................................... 17329. Container Labeling........................................................................................ 17330. NFPA (NATIONAL FIRE PROTECTION ASSOCIATION) 704M SYSTEM. .17431. MSDS and Labeling Guideline Summary at ................................................. 17532. Notes on GHS Labels and Symbols.............................................................. 17733. GHS Symbols................................................................................................ 17734. Standards (Pesticides and other Toxics)....................................................... 178 ACRONYMS AND TERMS................................................................................178 Comparison of EPA and IARC Classification Systems for Evidence of Carcinogenicity...181 LD50 of Active Ingredients..................................................................................18235. Other Exposure Routes ................................................................................ 18236. Sample Chemical Summary of Phenobarbital Drug...................................... 18337. Hazardous to the Aquatic Environment (Chapter 4.1 GHS)..........................184 21 CFR part 809 (Labeling of In-vitro Diagnostic Products For Human Use) Notes on Reproductive Toxicity Hazard..............................................................................................184 Developmental Toxicity Assessment per 21 CFR part 809..................................................185 Special Labeling per 21 CFR part 809..................................................................................186 Methyl alcohol ( methanol ) .................................................................................186 Ethylene glycol..................................................................................................... 186Date Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 4 of 186
  • 5. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ 1. Purpose This procedure provides guidance in the preparation and update of all SDS and labels for each hazardous substance or mixture manufactured by CDD Fremont. The SDS Forms/ Templates use the GHS SDS format to allow continuous improvement for chemical hazard communication consistent in all countries such as EU, Canada, USA and other countries. This procedure details the SDS and label format in compliance with applicable laws such as CLP () and GHS (Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals). This SDS and labels procedure lists: • New classification rules and hazard classes per GHS, new label requirements, new hazard symbols/pictograms, new SDS format • Labeling procedure • hazard communication programs and SOPs 2. Scope • Safety Data Sheets (SDS) should be produced for all substances and mixtures which meet the harmonized criteria for physical, health or environmental hazards under the GHS Note: An SDS should be provided based on the following generic cut-off /concentration limits: ≥ 1% for acute toxicity, skin corrosion/irritation, serious damage to eyes/eye irritation, respiratory/skin sensitization, mutagenicity category 2, target organ toxicity (single & repeat) exposures, and hazardous to the environment; and ≥ 0.1% for mutagenicity category 1, carcinogenicity and reproductive toxicity. • The SDS should be produced for all mixtures which contain ingredients that meet the criteria for carcinogenic, toxic to reproduction or target organ toxicity in concentrations exceeding the cut-off limits for SDS specified by the criteria for mixtures. Note: An SDS is required for mixtures which contain acutely toxic substances or substances toxic to the aquatic environment in concentrations equal to or greater than 1 %. • All hazardous substance or mixture manufactured by CDD Fremont shall comply with the GHS, REACH and ANSI regulatory standards as noted in the appropriate 16 sections of the SDS Form. • The SDS provides a mechanism for transmitting appropriate safety information on substances and mixtures where:  A substance meets the criteria for classification as hazardous according to CLP (the European version of GHS).  A mixture meets the criteria for classification as dangerous according to the Dangerous Preparation Directive (DPD) 1999/45/EC.  A substance is persistent, bio-accumulative and toxic (PBT) or very persistent and very bioaccumulative (vPvB) according to the criteria given in Annex III of REACH.Date Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 5 of 186
  • 6. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ 3. Procedure Creating or re-authoring an SDS per GHS standard 1. Identify the substance or mixture and its contents. 2. Use Tables B (per DPD) and B1 Hazard Label - CLP Annex 6 excel files containing lists of hazard classification for each substance (including concentration limits, CAS and EC numbers) according to DPD and CLP/GHS regulations. 3. Based on the substance and hazard class identified in steps 1 and 2, select the SDS Template from Table A, Hazard Category and SDS Template Guide and complete Sections 1 to 16 of the SDS form. 4. Complete all the SDS Sections including Transport and Regulatory to list limitations based on concentration limits and hazard class and other supporting data (see Resource Table section for links and sources of data). 5. Only inner packages should be labeled with GHS symbols and product identifier per GHS. Harmful chemicals/mixtures with signal word Warning must not be labeled with H and P statements until 125 ml or 125 g according to GHS regulation. 6. The Regulatory department shall ensure that all hazardous substances and mixtures shall have documented and approved SDS following the SDS Form Templates. 7. Open a PCO request to document any changes (training required) and when approved, provide a pdf copy and translation in French (or other languages when applicable). Note: Hazardous substances and mixtures are listed in the National Toxicology Program (NTP) Annual Report on Carcinogens (latest edition) or have been found to be a potential carcinogen in the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) Monographs (latest editions) or by OSHA. Hazard vs Risk A hazard is an inherent (built-in) property of a material. Risk is the extent to which that material can cause harm. You can reduce or remove risks associated with a hazardous material, but you cannot remove the underlying hazard itself (unless you get rid of the hazardous material). For example, gasoline is hazardous, but it does not have a significant risk provided that proper use and storage precautions have been taken. Update and Monitoring Each approved SDS shall be updated without delay on the following occasions: • as soon as new information which may affect the risk management measures or new information on hazards becomes available • once an authorization has been granted or refused • once a restriction has been imposedDate Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 6 of 186
  • 7. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ Monitoring • The RA Dept is responsible for obtaining the SDS, reviewing them for completeness, and maintaining the data sheet system. • In the review of incoming data sheets (for raw materials from suppliers) and update/archive/creation of SDS for products, if new and significant health/safety information becomes available, this new information is passed on immediately to the affected employees and downstream users by additional training sessions, web site, and other means of communication. • Legible SDS copies for all hazardous substances to which employees of this company may be exposed are kept in (list all locations). • SDSs are readily available for review to all employees in their work area and during each work shift. If SDSs are missing or new hazardous substance(s) in use do not have SDSs, or if an SDS is obviously incomplete, please contact (person/position, RA Dept) immediately, and a new SDS will be requested from the manufacturer/supplier and/or update of current SDS from RA dept for products. • If we are unable to obtain the SDS from the vendor within 25 calendar days of the request, we will either call our local Cal/ OSHA compliance office or write to: Division of Occupational Safety and Health Deputy Chief of Health and Engineering Services P. O. Box 420603 San Francisco, CA 94142-0603 Hazard Classification • Classify, label and package substance or mixture according to CLP which has already been classified according to DSD/DPD (see Table B1). Note: Since all revised SDS will be issued before 1 June 2015, both the DSD/DPD (see Table B1) classifications and the new CLP (see Table B) classifications, including any specific concentration limits or M-factors for substances will be included. Note: According to 1999/45/EEC, if a mixture contains corrosive substances with R35 or R34 and below the concentration limits for a classification of the mixture as corrosive, such substance can contribute to the classification of the mixture as IRRITANT with R41 or R36 risk phrase (see EC 1999 45 dangerous preparations pdf file). • Review any new knowledge on hazards when they become available. Review Sections 9, 11 and 12 for consistency. What do you need to update? Any new or revised classification, including any changes of specific concentration limits or M-factors for substances, should be included in Section 2 (Hazard Identification), Section 3 (Composition / Information on Ingredients) and your new labeling in Section 15 (Regulatory Information) of your Safety Data Sheet. Issue Date and Date Last Changed (see Section 16) shall be completed and noted in each page of the SDS. Note: The information required for labels and SDS is required if a product meets the criteria for a hazard class and category.Date Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 7 of 186
  • 8. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ Copies of SDS • Copies of SDSs for all hazardous substances to which employees of Scientific may be exposed are kept in the SDS folder for the hazardous materials being used in their respective areas. • The Regulatory Department is responsible for obtaining and maintaining all SDSs for the company. • If an SDS is missing or obviously incomplete, a new SDS will be requested from the manufacturer/supplier and/or the Regulatory Department. _____(OSHA) will be notified if a complete SDS is not received. • SDSs are available to all employees in their work area for review during each work shift. • If an SDS is not available or new hazardous substance(s) in use do not have a SDS, contact a supervisor immediately. EU and GHS Classification • EU is moving ahead and has adopted GHS. Substances by Dec 1st 2010. Mixtures by June 2015. New hazard communication rules called the “Classification, Labelling and Packaging” (CLP). Transition period of two years. • GHS uses a building block approach, which allows law makers to adopt any or all of the hazard classes and categories applicable to their target population. Classifying products according to GHS methods and criteria is similar to that of the transport sector. Classification will require a “weight of evidence” evaluation where all available, relevant data must be reviewed by the supplier. A single well-conducted study may be sufficient to classify. Note: CLP includes all of the hazard classes of the UN GHS. As CLP also builds on the previous system of classification and labelling, consisting of DSD and DPD, also the EU category of danger ‘hazardous to the ozone layer’ is taken up in CLP. Hazard classifications UN GHS hazard categories not in CLP: Acute toxicity Cat. 5 for the classification of flammable aerosols Flammable liquids Cat. 4 Flammable liquids with a flash point ≤ 93ºC are used • Suppliers will need access to skilled personnel to conduct comprehensive literature searches, evaluate the quality of data, draw conclusions and document the rationale for their conclusions. Other Rules in SDS Preparation • The basic requirement for a supplier to transmit an SDS to the customer at the time of (first) sale will not change. • WHMIS will retain the rule requiring an SDS to be updated at least every three years, and whenever new hazard information about the product becomes available. • Suppliers are advised to ensure that their SDSs are prepared by persons who understand SDS content rules and the technical data included on them. • Document the references used for each SDS, at least for internal use.Date Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 8 of 186
  • 9. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ • The SDS shall be made accessible during each work shift to all employees. Note: All regular/contractor and newly hired employees in the Operations and Manufacturing departments shall receive an SDS training. Author and Users • The completed SDS Form by the trained author shall be made available in pdf and print format to all downstream users: re-importer, retailer and producer of articles. • , as the chemical manufacturer or importer, shall ensure that distributors and employers are provided an appropriate SDS with their initial shipment and with the first shipment after an SDS is updated. • , as the employer, shall have the responsibility to transform the information into suitable formats to manage risks at the specific workplace and access must be given to its workers and their representatives. • The completed SDS form shall be completed by a trained SDS author. CLP and GHS CLP is different to the current directives: • It sets criteria for both transport and supply and use • It defines further hazard classes and categories • It uses partly other criteria and other cut-offs • It uses a different approach for mixtures • It changes some labelling elements GHS includes some categories which are not part of the current EU system. CLP does not carry over those categories: • Flammable liquids Category 4 • Acute Toxicity Category 5 • Skin corrosion/irritation Category 3 • Aspiration hazard Category 2 • Acute aquatic toxicity Category 2 • Acute aquatic toxicity Category 3 It takes over the current Annex I of DSD and Title XI (Classification and Labelling Inventory) of the REACH Regulation. The CLP Regulation maintains the current level of protection by including EU “left-overs” not yet covered by the GHS. • Ozone depletion (Annex I Part 5) • Additional labelling requirements in Annex II:  EUH014 [R14] reacts violently with water  EUH066 [R66] repeated exposure may cause skin dryness or cracking GHS Label elements • Symbols (hazard pictograms) convey health, physical and environmental hazard information, assigned to a GHS hazard class and category. • Signal Words: "Danger" or "Warning" is used to emphasize hazards and indicate the relative level of severity of the hazard, assigned to a GHS hazard class and category. • Hazard Statements or standard phrases are assigned to a hazard class and category that describe the nature of the hazard (they replace the R-phrases). The actual phrase (not the code GHSNNN or HNNN or PNNN) should appear on the labels and the SDS.Date Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 9 of 186
  • 10. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ • GHS Hazard statements include Precautionary statements: prevention, response, storage, disposal. They are prescribed by class and category with new statements such as: May cause drowsiness or dizziness. May be harmful if swallowed and enters airways.Date Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 10 of 186
  • 11. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ EC, USA, CANADA and UN Identification, Classification and Labelling of Chemicals Definition of Data Components in Labels UN RTDG EC USA CANADA Format: Format: Format: Format: Size of labels Minimum label None defined Supplier Label: must appear on all varies with dimensions are controlled products received at work- transport mode defined for places; required information must be set different package aside from sales information; surrounded capacities; by WHMIS must be printed in contrasting contrasted danger colours with texts in English and French. symbols and Workplace Label: must appear on all background (black products produced in a workplace or or yellow transferred to other containers by the background) employer; may appear in placard form on products received in bulk. Data elements Data elements: Data elements: Data elements: are not 1.Chemical identity 1.Chemical identity Supplier label: mandated. The 2. Hazard symbol 2. Supplier - product identifier UN RTDG label and indication of identification - supplier identification defines hazards danger 3. Appropriate - reference to existing SDS by the use of 3. Risk phrases hazard warnings - hazard symbols symbols, colours 4. Safety phrases Employer must and for containers over 100 ml: and danger 5. Supplier ensure that labels - risk and safety phrases warning words identification (full and other forms of - first aid measures for specific address and tel no) warnings are in Workplace label: hazards 6. CA number English. - product identifier (explosives, 7. Wording EEC - information for the safe handling of the radioactive, Label where ANSI Standard Z products corrosive, etc) appropriate or 129.1.1988 defines - reference to existing SDS GHS Label acceptable - may contain MHMIS hazard symbols Placarding of precautionary and other pictograms transport units is phrases and Chemical name may be replaced by defined, hazard symbols. generic name or number in case of including form, or use GHS hazard products covered by provisions on minimum size statements. exemption for confidential business and colour of information. placards. Link: http://www.ilo.org/legacy/english/protection/safework/cis/products/safetytm/classify.htm Note: EEC number is also the CAS #Date Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 11 of 186
  • 12. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ Writing Labels Suppliers and Employers Responsibilities Suppliers retain the duty to provide the prescribed labels for their products. Employers would continue to be responsible for labels required within their workplaces. GHS Symbols and Elements and Regulatory Changes on Labelling There are two types of Labels for hazard communication: Supplier labels for controlled products that are sold to the customer, to be used in workplaces. Workplace labels for certain controlled products at the customer’s workplace. Note: Alternative means of providing workers with the information contained in GHS labels are needed usually where hazardous chemicals are transferred from an original supplier container into a workplace container or system, or where chemicals are produced in a workplace but are not packaged in containers intended for sale or supply. Label Requirements • Product Identifier (hazardous ingredients may be required) • Supplier Identifier – Specifies the name, address, and telephone number of the supplier • Hazard symbols/pictograms (square set at a point) – Pictures to identify the hazards of a product • Hazard statement – Standardized wording to describe the hazards of a product, e.g., “flammable liquid and vapour” • Precautionary statements (prevention, storage and disposal) – Recommended measures to minimize or prevent adverse effects, e.g., “keep away from open flames” • Precautionary statements (response) • Reference to SDS (retained) • Signal word (Danger or Warning) Note: WHMIS border and reference to the SDS are required on WHMIS supplier labels that are not included in GHS. Label Content Depends on Class and Category Product X Product Y (Cat. 1) (Cat. 2) Danger Warning Extremely flammable aerosol Flammable aerosol • The Product Identifier used on a label must match the identifier on the SDS. It is a name which uniquely identifies the product. GHS criteria also state that the Product Identifier may include the chemical identity of the substance, or the hazardous ingredients if the product is a mixture.Date Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 12 of 186
  • 13. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ • The Supplier Identifier must also appear on the label showing the name, address and telephone number of the manufacturer or supplier. • The GHS hazard pictograms, signal word and hazard statements should be located together on the label. • All labels (MSDS, Package Insert and other technical/marketing documents) shall comply with the requirements as defined in 21 cFR part 809 (Labeling of In-vitro Diagnostic Products For Human Use). GHS Pictograms/Symbols Go to http://www.unece.org/fileadmin/DAM/trans/danger/publi/ghs/pictograms/ for GHS pictograms. Signal Words They indicate the severity of a hazard. Depending on the category within a hazard class, the signal word will be: Danger – to indicate a severe hazard Warning – to indicate a lower serverity hazard No signal word – for certain classes and categories, a signal word will not be shown on the label. GHS Hazard Statements They are text descriptions of a product’s hazards and are assigned to a hazard class and category to describe the nature/degree of the hazards. Suppliers are required to use standardized hazard statements on their labels, according to hazard class and category of each product. Hazard statements form part of the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS). They are intended to form a set of standardized phrases about the hazards of chemical substances and mixtures that can be translated into different languages. As such, they serve the same purpose as the well-known R-phrases, which they are intended to replace. Hazard statements are one of the key elements for the labelling of containers under the GHS, along with: • an identification of the product • one or more hazard pictograms (where necessary) • a signal word – either DANGER or WARNING – where necessary • precautionary statements, indicating how the product should be handled to minimize risks to the user (as well as to other people and the general environment) • the identity of the supplier (who might be a manufacturer or importer) Each hazard statement is designated a code, starting with the letter H and followed by three digits. Statements which correspond to related hazards are grouped together by code number, so the numbering is not consecutive. The code is used for reference purposes, for example to help with translations, but it is the actual phrase which should appear on labels and safety data sheets.Date Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 13 of 186
  • 14. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ Hazard Symbols and Pictograms • shall decide the symbols to be displayed on a label once the product has been classified accordingly. GHS uses nine different symbols. Symbols are specified for each hazard class and category. Hazard symbols provide a graphical description of product hazards. • Pictograms display the symbol plus other graphical elements, such as a border, background pattern or color that conveys specific information. In GHS pictograms, all symbols are displayed within a square set at a point. In some cases, more than one hazard symbol/pictogram applies to a specific class depending on the category or type. • With GHS, some supplier labels will not have a hazard symbol/pictogram for certain categories such as: Explosives 1.5, 1.6 Organic Peroxides type G Skin corrosion/irritation category 3 Flammable gases category 2 Self-reactive substances/mixtures type G Flammable liquids category 4 Acute toxicity category 5 Serious eye damage/irritation cat 2B Toxic to reproduction affects on or via lactationHazardous to the aquatic environment Acute Category 2 and 3; Chronic category 3 and 4 Examples of Pictogram Description and their Hazard Classes Description Hazard Classes Skull and crossbones Acute toxicity (high hazard categories) Gas cylinder Gas under pressure Explosion Explosive (high hazard categories), self-reactive substances/mixtures Flame with an O Oxidizing gases/liquids/solids Environment Hazardous to the aquatic environment (high hazard categories) Precautionary Statements These statements include measures aimed at preventing or minimizing adverse effects of the product (see Precautionary Statement Table). They include safe practices for storage, handling and use of the product. Example: Keep away from heat/sparks/open flames/hot surfaces – No smoking. Hazard and Precautionary Statements • For the lists of Hazard and Precautionary statement per UN 2011 document, see Annex 3 codification of hazard statements UN 2011 pdf file. • For precautionary statements, remove duplicates and select the most protective statements when they are similar.Date Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 14 of 186
  • 15. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ Product Identifier • A product identifier should be used on a GHS label to match the product identifier used on the SDS. “ Where a substance or mixture is covered by the UN Model Regulations on the Transport of Dangerous Goods, the UN proper shipping name should also be used on the package. • The label for a substance should include the chemical identity of the substance. For mixtures or alloys, the label should include the chemical identities of all ingredients or alloying elements that contribute to acute toxicity, skin corrosion or serious eye damage, germ cell mutagenicity, carcinogenicity, reproductive toxicity, skin or respiratory sensitization, or Target Organ Systemic Toxicity (TOST), when these hazards appear on the label. Other GHS Guidance and Annexes http://www.unece.org/fileadmin/DAM/trans/danger/publi/ghs/ghs_rev03/English/06e_an nex2.pdf Annex 1: Allocation of label elements Annex 2: Classification and labeling summary tables Annex 3: Codification of hazard statements, codification and use of precautionary statements and examples of precautionary pictograms Annex 4: Guidance on the preparation of Safety Data Sheets (SDS) Annex 5: Consumer product labeling based on the likelihood of injury Annex 6: Comprehensibility testing methodology Annex 7: Examples of arrangements of the GHS label elements Annex 8: An example of classification in the GHS Annex 9: Guidance on hazards to the aquatic environment Annex 10: Guidance on transformation/dissolution of metals and metal compounds in aqueous media Standardized Rules of Precedence to group a product to more than one class To determine label content, suppliers will follow standardized rules of precedence. Some symbols (health-related) or signal words may not be shown according to these rules. GHS rules of precedence for health hazards would result in a label with: • skull and crossbones symbol only • signal word “Danger” only • hazard statements for BOTH classes/categories • other mandatory label elements – product identifier, supplier identifier, precautionary statements Note: GHS hazard pictogram, signal word and statements should be located together on the label. GHS Health and Environmental Hazard Classification Criteria • Acute toxicity • Skin corrosion/irritation • Serious eye damage/eye irritation • Respiratory or skin sensitizationDate Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 15 of 186
  • 16. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ • Germ cell mutagenicity • Carcinogenicity • Reproductive toxicity • Specific target organ • Aspiration hazard Category 1 Danger Oral LD50=5 mg/kg bodyweight, or• Dermal LD50=50 mg/kg bodyweight, or• Inhalation (gas) LC50=100 ppm, or• Inhalation (vapour) LC50=0.5 mg/l, or• Inhalation (dust/mist) LC50=0.05 mg/l? What is new with CLP? • Aquatic Toxicity: freshwater and marine species toxicity data • Bioaccumulation: using a higher cut-off value of log Kow > 4 and BCF > 500 is intended to identify substances with a potential to bioconcentrate • Rapidly degradable vs readily degradable • Declassification from chronic categories 2 and 3 (NOECs > 1 mgL) • Classification Categories Acute Category 1 96 hr LC50 (for fish) < 1 mg/l when classifying substances as Acute Category 1 and/or Chronic Category 1, it is necessary at the same time to indicate an appropriate M-factor. Note: A substance or mixture need not be classified when it can be shown by conclusive experimental data from internationally acceptable test methods that the substance or mixture is not biologically available (GHS). Hazard Classification by Total Weight of Evidence For others, classification of a substance or a mixture is made on the basis of the total weight of evidence. This means that all available information bearing on the determination of toxicity is considered together, including the results of valid in vitro tests, relevant animal data, and human experience such as epidemiological and clinical studies and well documented case reports and observations. When it is clear that the mechanism or mode of action is not relevant to humans, the substance or mixture should not be classified. OSHA References • OSHAs Hazardous Chemicals in Labs Fact Sheet (270 K PDF download). • OSHAs page on toxic and hazardous substances including recognition, evaluation, controls, standards and more. • Appendix E of the HazCom standard has some useful guidelines for employer compliance with the standard. • Risk and Hazard: How They Differ (PDF file), by CEFIC - the European Chemical Industry Council. • Hazard vs Risk at the DEHP Information Center. • Communicating Risks and Benefits: An Evidence-Based User’s Guide at the US FDA.Date Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 16 of 186
  • 17. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ Description of Hazardous Material on Shipping Papers (49 CFR 173 - HRM US DOT Hazard Class and Definition ; Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Admin., DOT 172.202) The shipping description of a hazardous material on the shipping paper must include: 1. Identification number prescribed for the material 2. Proper shipping name prescribed for the material. 3. Hazard class or division number prescribed for the material. Except for combustible liquids, the subsidiary hazard class(es) or subsidiary division number(s) must be entered in parentheses immediately following the primary hazard class or division number. In addition: (i) The words ‘‘Class’’ or ‘‘Division’’ may be included preceding the primary and subsidiary hazard class or division numbers. (ii) The hazard class need not be included for the entry ‘‘Combustible liquid, n.o.s.’’ (iii) For domestic shipments, primary and subsidiary hazard class or division names may be entered following the numerical hazard class or division, or following the basic description. Packing group in Roman numerals, as designated for the hazardous material Note: Class 1 (explosives) materials, self-reactive substances, organic peroxides and entries that are not assigned a packing group are exempted from this requirement. The packing group may be preceded by the letters ‘‘PG’’ (for example, ‘‘PG II’’) Dangerous goods of all classes other than UN Hazard Classes 1, 2, 6.2, and 7 have for packing purposes been divided among three groups according to the degree of danger they present: - great danger: Packing Group I - medium danger: Packing Group II - minor danger: Packing Group III 4. Except for transportation by aircraft, the total quantity of hazardous materials covered by the description must be indicated (by mass or volume, or by activity for Class 7 materials) Hazardous Materials at The following materials are defined as hazardous for the purposes of this SOP: 1. Biological materials in the BSL-2 Category, or greater. 2. Chemicals listed as Select Carcinogens and Regulated Carcinogens. (See http://www.dir.ca.gov/Title8/5191.html for the Cal/OSHA criteria for select carcinogens) 3. Chemicals listed as Reproductive Toxins. (See http://www.oehha.org/prop65/prop65_list/Newlist.html#files for a list of reproductive toxins and carcinogens identified under California Proposition 65 ) 4. Chemicals listed as Toxic or Highly Toxic. (See http://www.osha.gov/pls/oshaweb/owadisp.show_document? p_table=STANDARDS&p_id=1 0100 for OSHA guidance on identifying Highly Toxic Chemicals) 5. Flammable chemicals in excess of one (1) liter by volume, or any amount of violently air reactive or water reactive chemicals. 6. Corrosive chemicals in concentrations of one (1) molar or greater.Date Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 17 of 186
  • 18. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ 7. Known significant skin or eye irritants. Note: Irritants also include chemicals/mixtures with pH values of less than 5 and higher than 9. Note: This list is to be used as a guideline. It does not supersede Cal/OSHA regulations or accepted safe work practices for specific materials. PPE and other safety measures, as appropriate, must be used to protect workers from any and all known hazards that are present in all work-related activities Select Carcinogens Select carcinogens are any substance which meets one of the following: 1. It is regulated by OSHA as a carcinogen; or 2. It is listed under the category, "known to be carcinogens," in the Annual Report on Carcinogens published by the National Toxicology Program (NTP) (latest edition);or 3. It is listed under Group 1 ("carcinogen to humans") by the International Agency for Research on Cancer Monographs (IARC)( latest editions); or 4. It is listed in either Group 2A or 2B by IARC or under the category, "reasonably anticipated to be carcinogens" by NTP. WHMIS Classes or Classifications WHMIS (Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System) uses classifications to group chemicals with similar properties or hazards. The Controlled Products Regulations specifies the criteria used to place materials within each classification. There are six (6) classes although several classes have divisions or subdivisions. Each class has a specific symbol to identify the hazard quickly. The classes are: • Class A - Compressed Gas • Class B - Flammable and Combustible Material  Division 1: Flammable Gas  Division 2: Flammable Liquid  Division 3: Combustible Liquid  Division 4: Flammable Solid  Division 5: Flammable Aerosol  Division 6: Reactive Flammable Material • Class C - Oxidizing Material • Class D - Poisonous and Infectious Material  Division 1: Materials causing immediate and serious toxic effects  Subdivision A: Very toxic material Subdivision B: Toxic material  Division 2: Materials causing other toxic effects - Subdivision A: Very toxic material Subdivision B: Toxic material - Division 3: Biohazardous Infection Material • Class E - Corrosive material • Class F - Dangerously reactive materialDate Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 18 of 186
  • 19. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ Note per DPD: If the Non-dangerous preparation (NDP) contains > or = 1% for non gaseous preparations and > or = 0,2% for gaseous preparations of at least: one dangerous substance or a substance with EU exposure limits at workplace, an SDS with "proportionate information" should be made and delivered at request. If the NDP is only affected by the Annex V of the DPD and contains a percentage of a dangerous substance or a substance with EU exposure limits at workplace, smaller than those described above, no SDS will be required. Note: Materials which fall under WHMIS follow the Transportation of Dangerous Goods Act and Regulations while they are in transport (shipment). Hazardous Substances with Toxic Effects on Specific Organs include • Hepatotoxins – i.e., substances that produce liver damage, such as nitrosamines and carbon tetrachloride • Nephrotoxins – i.e., agents causing damage to the kidneys, such as certain halogenated hydrocarbons • Neurotoxins – i.e., substances which produce their primary toxic effects on the nervous system, such as mercury, acrylamide and carbon disulfide • Agents which act on the hematopoietic system – e.g., carbon monoxide and cyanides which decrease hemoglobin function and deprive the body tissues of oxygen • Agents which can damage lung tissue – e.g., asbestos and silica Chemical Safety Report (CSR) and SDS The information in the SDS for the substance must be consistent with that provided in the CSR as well as with that provided in the registration dossier. Records as a supplier of a substance or mixture is responsible for the content of the SDS that cannot be claimed as confidential and updates are given free of charge to downstream users. Records of the SDS shall be kept for at least 10 years after the last manufacture, import, supply or use of the substance or mixture. REACH Note REACH requires you to assemble and keep available all the information necessary to carry out your duties under REACH for a period of at least 10 years after you last manufactured, imported, supplied or used a substance or mixture. You should submit this information or make it available without delay upon request to the Member State Competent Authority/ies where you are established or to the Agency (REACH Article 36) Language The SDS shall be supplied in an official language of the Member State(s) where the substance or mixture is placed on the market.Date Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 19 of 186
  • 20. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ Not classified as Hazardous under CLP Labeling on the Packaging of the Substance or Mixture not classified as hazardous under CLP but dangerous under DPD (not for public use) must have an SDS available and supplied upon request with the following information in its packaging: Per DPD: “Safety Data Sheet available for professional user on request” (see Dangerous Preparations Directive 1999/45/EC, Annex V, Part C, no. 1). Per CLP: “Safety Data Sheet available on request”(see CLP Annex II, point 2.10, text EUH210). Downstream Users Downstream users can request for the SDS where hazardous substances or mixtures are offered or sold to the general public. Downstream Legislation Provisions under Community legislation other than CLP (downstream legislation) may be triggered by the classification of the substance or mixture. The corresponding acts/laws are: • Registration, evaluation, authorisation and restriction of chemicals (REACH) • Regulation (EC) No 1907/2006 of 18 December 2006 • Control of major-accident hazards involving dangerous substances (Seveso II) • Council Directive 96/82/EC of 9 December 1996 • Plant protection products Council Directive 91/414/EEC (PPPD) of 15 July • Biocidal products Directive 98/8/EC (BPD) of 16 February 1998 • Chemical agents at work Council Directive 98/24/EC of 7 April 1998 • Carcinogens and mutagens at work Directive 2004/37/EC 29 April 2004 • Young people at work Council Directive 94/33/EC of 22 June 1994 • Pregnant and breastfeeding women at work Council Directive 92/85/EEC of 19 October 1992 • Health and safety signs at work Council Directive 92/58/EEC of 24 June 1992 • Cosmetic products Council Directive 76/768/EEC of 27 July 1976 • Toy safety Council Directive 88/378/EEC of 3 May 1988 as amended by Directive 93/68/EEC • Detergents Regulation (EC) No 648/2004 of 31 March 2004 • Eco-label award scheme Regulation (EC) No 1980/2000 of 17 July 2000 • Aerosol dispensers Council Directive 75/324/EEC of 20 May 1975. CLP Article 14 (2c) takes account of the Aerosols Directive Article 8 (1a) • Limitation of emissions of volatile organic compounds Council Directive 1999/13/EC (VOCD) of 11 March 1999 and Directive 2004/42/EC of 21 April 2004 • Ambient air quality assessment and management Council Directive 1996/62/EC of 27 September 1996 • Export and import of dangerous chemicals Regulation (EC) No 689/2008 of 17 June 2008 • Hazardous waste Council Directive 91/689/EC of 12 December 1991, including Commission Decision 2000/532/EC of 3 May 2000 • Batteries and accumulators Council Directive 91/157/EEC of 18 March 1991 • End-of-life vehicles Directive 2000/53/EC of 18 September 2000 andDate Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 20 of 186
  • 21. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ • Waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) Directive 2002/96/EC of 27 January 2002Date Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 21 of 186
  • 22. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ Hazard Communication SDS for pure substances shall include the classification according to 1272/2008 from Dec 1, 2010 until Jun 1, 2015 Sec 2 and Sec 3 shall show both old and new classification SDS for mixtures shall show the classification according to 1272/2008 from Jun 1, 2015 (Sections 2 and 3 of the SDS) • If classified under 1272/2008 before Jun 2015: Sec 2 must show product classification from both systems (1272/2008 and 1999/45/EC) • Section 3 must show substance classification from both systems (1272/2008 and 67/548/EEC) • CLP classification (sections 2 and 3) includes: Hazard statements, Hazard classes and categories • Section 15 must show the “old” label (67/548/EEC and 1999/45/EC) as long as used and the CLP (1272/2008) label when used Supplier Responsibilities • Suppliers must prepare an SDS for each controlled product. • Content of the SDS must comply with regulatory requirements (GHS, CLP). • SSDSs must be available to customers in English and French. • Suppliers must transmit SDSs to their customers. • SDS Updates are communicated to users: Distribution of updated SDS are only necessary when there are important changes in the SDS, that concerns the information on the dangerous properties and precautionary measures, e.g. new classifications or relevant and more detailed information in the different Headings. • The supplier can have one SDS prepared for other mixtures with very similar formulation, for instance different colours (nuances) and the components that make up the difference in the similar formulations do not modify the dangerous properties of the preparation. • As a supplier, you need to provide a safety data sheet in the following cases:  A substance (and from 1 June 2015 a mixture) classified as hazardous according to CLP.  A mixture classified as dangerous according to the Dangerous Preparations Directive (until 1 June 2015).  A substance that is persistent, bioaccumulative and toxic (PBT) or very persistent and very bioaccumulative (vPvB), as defined in REACH (AnneIII), or  A substance is included in the candidate list of substances of very high concern.Date Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 22 of 186
  • 23. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ Summary of SDS Changes According to REACH • The risk management measures for the identified uses with regard to human health and the environment are to be summarized in Sections 8 and 7. This includes consumer related measures communicated to a downstream user producing consumer preparation or articles. Also the relevant Derived No-Effect Levels (DNELs) and Predicted No-Effect Concentrations (PNECs) should be presented here. • The information on physicochemical properties, toxicology and eco-toxicology in the SDS is to be updated in line with the information requirements of Annex VI to XI of the REACH Regulation. • The results of the PBT and vPvB assessment are to be presented in Section 12. The information on uses advised against in Section 16 of the SDS may need to be updated depending on the outcome of the manufacturer’s Chemicals Safety Assessment (CSA). • Where Exposure Scenarios (ES) are developed as a result of conducting a chemical safety assessment in accordance with Article 14 of the REACH Regulation they must be annexed to the SDS and thereby be appropriately passed down the supply chain. The information on uses of the substance in section 1.2 of the SDS must be consistent with the short titles of the ES in the annex, indicating which uses are covered by the ES. Note: Where the information in an ES that becomes available does not affect the risk management measures and the ES contains no new information on hazards, the SDS does not have to be updated. • Since REACH includes a requirement to include the waste disposal considerations into the manufacturer’s chemicals safety assessment, section 13 of the SDS may need to be updated with substance specific waste management advice as contained in the ES. • It is important to note that now SDSs are additionally required for substances assessed to be PBTs (Persistent, Bioaccumulative and Toxic) or vPvBs (very Persistent and very Bioaccumulative), for substances included in the candidate list for potential inclusion in Annex IV of the REACH Regulation, as well as for mixtures containing any of these substances. • For further details on the obligation to provide an SDS, please consult the Guidance on information requirements and chemicals safety assessment (part G) (http://guidance.echa.europa.eu/docs/guidance_document/information_requirem ents_en.htm) and the Guidance on registration (http://guidance.echa.europa.eu/docs/guidance_document/registration_en.pdf). In addition, the Guidance for downstream users (http://guidance.echa.europa.eu/docs/guidance_document/du_en.pdf). Provides an overview on the new information in an SDS.Date Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 23 of 186
  • 24. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ What is new in REACH Safety Data Sheet? The following sections of the SDS Section 1: Identification of substance or mixture and company: • Registration No. is required (when available) • Identified uses of the substance/mixture is added • E-mail address of competent person is needed Note: Korea requires an emergency contact info of supplier based in Korea Section 2: Hazards identification: • Distinguish between mixtures that are and are not hazardous • Mention other hazards that do not result in classification (e.g., dustiness, ozone depletion) • Classification as in Title V CLP and DSD (see note) Section 3: Composition & information on ingredients: • All substances classified as hazardous or those with OELVs or PBT/vPvB need to be reported Section 7: Handling and storage: • Where CSR required, information to be consistent with Exposure Scenario (ES) • Under "Handling" include measures to protect environment • New section on "Specific uses" Section 8: Exposure controls/personal protection (If CSR is required): • DNELs and PNECs for substance shall be provided • Summary of Risk Management Measures(RMM) shall included for identified uses as set out in ES Section 11, 12: Toxicological information and Ecological information • Summaries of toxic tests and ecological tests need to be provided Section 15: Regulatory information: • Indicate if CSA has been carried out • Indicate if substance subject to authorization/restriction Section 16: Other information: • Full text of R phrases (hazard statements) to be listed • Upon revision, indicate information added/deleted/revised Note: From 1 December 2010 until 1 June 2015, substance shall be classified in accordance with both 67/548/EEC (DSD) and CLP regulation. ?? SDS Audit Checklist • Do chemical manufacturers and importers have an SDS for each hazardous chemical produced or imported into the United States? • Do employers have an SDS for each hazardous chemical used? • Is each SDS in at least English? • Does each SDS contain at least the: Identity used on the label? Chemical and common name(s) for single substance hazardous chemicals? For mixtures tested as a whole: (1) Chemical and common name(s) of the ingredients which contribute to the known hazards?Date Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 24 of 186
  • 25. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ (2) Common name(s) of the mixture itself? For mixtures not tested as a whole: (1) Chemical and common name(s) of all ingredient which are health hazards (1 percent concentration or greater), including carcinogens (0.1 percent concentration or greater)? (2) Chemical and common name(s) of all ingredients which are health hazards and present a risk to employees, even though they are present in the mixture in concentrations of less than 1 percent or 0.1 percent for carcinogens? Chemical and common name(s) of all ingredients which have been determined to present a physical hazard when present in the mixture? Physical and chemical characteristics of the hazardous chemical (vapor pressure, flash point, etc.)? Physical hazards of the hazardous chemical including the potential for fire, explosion, and reactivity? Health hazards of the hazardous chemical (including signs and symptoms and medical conditions aggravated)? Primary routes of entry? OSHA permissible exposure limit (PEL)? The American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) Threshold Limit Value (TLV)? Other exposure limit(s) (including ceiling and other short term limits)? Information on carcinogen listings (reference OSHA regulated carcinogens, those indicated in the National Toxicology Program (NTP) Annual Report on Carcinogens and/or those listed by the International Agency for Research on Carcinogens (IARC))? Classification and Labeling • A substance or a mixture fulfilling the criteria relating to physical hazards, health hazards or environmental hazards shall be classified in relation to the respective hazard classes and hazard categories. Where applicable, it is differentiated on the basis of the route of exposure or the nature of the effects. Further assigned are one or more hazard statements corresponding to each hazard category. • A substance or mixture classified as hazardous needs to be labeled. To each classification, label elements are assigned. These may comprise a hazard pictogram, a signal word, hazard statements and precautionary statements for prevention, response (in case of spillage or exposure), storage and/or disposal. Further supplemental hazard information may apply to maintain the level of protection of current EU law (e.g., EUH208 - “Contains (name of sensitizing substance: May produce an allergic reaction.”). The regulation further provides principles of precedence for the hazard pictograms, hazard statements and precautionary statements to avoid duplication or redundancy. • The following example shows the classification of TPGDA under the new legislation (Table 1). The classification is obtained from table 3.1 of Annex VI of the proposed GHS regulation for substances listed in Annex I of 67/548/EEC. Further included are the resulting label elements, except of applicable precautionary statements. For TPGDA, two pictograms and one signal word apply (reachonline: http://www.reachonline.eu/REACH/EN/REACH_EN/articleVI.html) . GHS/CLP Classification General Notes • The GHS has several health hazard endpoints, e.g., mutagenicity and target organ systemic toxicity, that do not exactly correspond to the HCS (OSHA) hazards.Date Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 25 of 186
  • 26. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ • In general the major difference between the HCS and the GHS is untested mixtures. • OSHA has a single 1% cut-off value for all health hazards, except carcinogens at 0.1%. These cut-off values require labels, MSDSs, and disclosure of hazardous components. In the GHS cut-off values for mixtures vary by endpoint. • The GHS cut-off values for labeling, MSDSs and disclosure can be different. • The GHS acute toxicity and irritant hazard determinations for mixtures have more steps. • For substances previously classified under the HCS, existing data should be accepted when these substances are classified under the GHS. Table 1. Hazard Classes of the Proposed EU Regulation 1 Physical Hazards 2. Health Hazards 2.1 Explosives 3.1 Acute Toxicity 2.2 Flammable Gases 3.2 Skin Corrosion / Irritation 2.3 Flammable Aerosols 3.3 Serious Eye Damage / Eye Irritation 2.4 Oxidizing Gases 3.4 Respiratory or Skin Sensitization 2.5 Gases under Pressure 3.5 Germ Cell Mutagenicity 2.6 Flammable Liquids 3.6 Carcinogenicity 2.7 Flammable Solids 3.7 Reproductive Toxicity 2.8 Self-reactive Substances and Mixtures 3.8 Specific Target Organ Toxicity – Single Exposure 2.9 Pyrophoric Liquids 3.9 Specific Target Organ Toxicity – Repeated Exposure 2.10 Pyrophoric Solids 3.10 Aspiration Hazard 2.11 Self-heating Substances and Mixtures 2.12 Substances and Mixtures which in contact with water emit flammable GasesDate Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 26 of 186
  • 27. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ Environmental Hazards 2.13 Oxidizing Liquids 4.1 Hazardous to the Aquatic Environment 2.14 Oxidizing Solids 2.15 Organic Peroxides Additional EU Hazard Class 2.16 Corrosive to Metals 5.1 Hazardous for the Ozone Layer Note: Some of these classes or categories thereof do not exist in the current EU system but are added aiming at consistency with Dangerous Goods legislation (e.g. gases under pressure, corrosive to metals, etc.). According to the ‘Building Block Approach’, the following GHS Hazard Categories are not part of the proposed EU regulation: • Flammable Liquids Category 4 • Acute Toxicity Category 5 • Skin Corrosion / Irritation Category 3 • Aspiration Hazard Category 2 • Acute Aquatic Toxicity Category 2 • Acute Aquatic Toxicity Category 3 GHS Criteria for Acute Toxicity Substances of this hazard class are assigned to one of five toxicity categories on the basis of LD50 (oral, dermal) or LC50 (inhalation): Category 1 LD50 < 5 mg/kg bodyweight (oral) LD50 < 50 mg/kg bodyweight (skin/dermal) LC50 < 100 ppm (gas) LC50 < 0.5 (mg/l) (vapour) LC50 < 0.05 (mg/l) (dust,mist) Category 2 LD50 > 5 and < 50 mg/kg bodyweight (oral) LD50 > 50 and < 200 mg/kg bodyweight (skin/dermal) LD50 > 100 and < 500 ppm (gas) LD50 > 0.5 and < 2.0 (mg/l) (vapour) LC50 > 0.05 and < 0.5 (mg/l) (dust, mist) Category 3 LD50 > 50 and < 300 mg/kg bodyweight (oral) LD50 > 200 and < 1000 mg/kg bodyweight (skin/dermal) LC50 > 500 and < 2500 ppm (gas) LC50 > 2.0 and < 10.0 (mg/l) (vapour) LC50 > 0.5 and < 1.0 (mg/l) (dust, mist) Category 4 LD50 between 300 and less than 2000 mg/kg bodyweight (oral) LD50 between 1000 and less than 2000 mg/kg bodyweight (skin/dermal) LC50 between 2500 and less than 5000 ppm (gas) LC50 between 10.0 and less than 20.0 (mg/l) (vapour) LC50 between 1.0 and less than 5.0 (mg/l) (dust, mistDate Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 27 of 186
  • 28. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ Category 5 LD50 between 2000 and 5000 (oral or skin/dermal) For gases, vapours, dusts, mists, LC50 in the equivalent range of the oral and dermal LD50 (i.e.,between 2000 and 5000 mg/kg bodyweight). See also the additional criteria: • Indication of significant effect in humans • Any mortality at Category 4 • Significant clinical signs at Category 4 • Indication from other studies GHS Criteria for Skin Corrosion and other hazard class (See ghs osha comparison.pdf file) An SDS is not needed when (per OSHA’s 29 CFR 1910.1200) • SDSs are one of the tools of hazardous communication standard. In its statement of purpose – 29 CFR 1910.1200 (a) (1) – the regulation clearly states that, “This transmittal of information is to be accomplished by means of comprehensive hazard communication programs, which are to include container labeling and other forms of warning, material safety data sheets and employee training.” So, SDSs are just one form of communication. Other things, like container labels, are important too, and many items that are regulated by other government agencies do not require separate SDSs. • 29 CFR 1910.1200 (b) goes into detail about what kinds of chemicals are exempt from this rule. For example, 1200 (b) (4) applies to facilities where employees handle chemicals in sealed containers but do not open them under normal conditions (such as in warehouses or even retail sales). These facilities must keep copies of SDSs they receive with hazardous shipments and must obtain an SDS for any hazardous chemicals received without one if an employee requests it. But if no SDS is received and no employee requests it, facilities are not required to have one on file. • Pesticides, insecticides, fungicides and rodenticides do not require labeling under 29 CFR 1910.1200. These labels are regulated by EPA instead of OSHA. • Chemicals and chemical mixtures defined in the Toxic Substances Control Act (15 USC 2601 et seq.) are exempt. Like the pesticides, they are regulated by EPA. • Foods, food additives, color additives, drugs, cosmetics, medical and veterinary devices and their ingredients are exempt. These items are regulated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, rather than OSHA. • Beverage alcohols including wine and malt beverages are exempt. These items are regulated under the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms. • Consumer product or hazardous consumer substance is exempt. These items are regulated by the Consumer Product Safety Commission. • Agricultural and vegetable seeds are exempt. These are regulated by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. • 12 categories of hazardous chemicals to which the regulation does not apply:  Hazardous waste (regulated by EPA)  Hazardous substance (EPA again)  Tobacco or tobacco products  Wood or wood products  Articles not of a fluid or particle natureDate Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 28 of 186
  • 29. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _  Food or alcoholic beverages intended for personal consumption  Drugs  Cosmetics packaged for sale to consumers or intended for personal use  Any consumer product  Nuisance particles that do not pose physical or health hazards  Ionizing and non ionizing radiation  Biological hazards SDS Exclusions per WHMIS 1. consumer restricted products (those products sold to people in regular stores that are already labeled following the rules of the Hazardous Products Act) 2. explosives (as defined by the Explosives Act) 3. cosmetics, drugs, food or devices (as defined by the Food and Drug Act) 4. pest control products (pesticides, herbicides, insecticides, etc) (as defined by the Pest Control Products Act) 5. radioactive materials (as defined by the Nuclear Safety and Control Act) 6. wood and products made of wood 7. a manufactured article 8. tobacco or products made of tobacco 9. hazardous wastes An SDS is not required for (per Japan Regulatory Bodies) • Medicinal products for human or veterinary use • Cosmetic products • Medical devices which are invasive or used in direct physical contact with the human body • Food or feeding stuffs • Food additive in food stuffs • Flavoring in food stuffs • Additive in feeding stuffs • Animal nutrition • An SDS is not necessary to be compiled for articles. An SDS can be compiled for marketing or logistical reasons. • Japan regulatory bodies which can be used to check whether an SDS is required: - Industrial Safety and Health Law (ISHL) - Pollutant Release and Transfer Registry (PRTR) and Promotion of Chemical Management Law - Poisonous and Deleterious Substances Control Law (PDSCL) Note: List the above regulatory bodies in Section 15 and to also include the following list: - Fire Service Law: Dangerous goods Class 4. Group 2, Flammable Liquid (not water-soluble) - Waste Disposal and Public Cleaning Law: Law article 2, paragraph 5, Enforcement Order article 2-4, Industrial waste subject to special controlDate Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 29 of 186
  • 30. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ ANSI The American National Standards Institute (ANSI) standard includes several label elements that are core to the GHS as well as other helpful elements to assist users in safe handling. The ANSI labelling standard is often used in developing consumer labels in the US as regulated by CPSC.Date Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 30 of 186
  • 31. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ GHS New Hazard Classifications • The following are GHS hazard classes that are addresses under WHMIS (Canada) but with a different name: GHS reproductive toxicity class (includes the WHMIS criteria for both teratogenicity/embryotoxicity and reproductive toxicity currently found within Class D2A) and GHS specific target organ toxicity (repeated exposure class has similar criteria to those used in WHMIS Chronic toxic effects within Class D2A and D2B). • Some of the hazard endpoints addressed in WHMIS legislation are not included in GHS: 1. Biohazard infectious material (WHMIS Class D3) 2. Products which react with water to release a toxic gas or vapour (WHMIS Class F) • The following are five new GHS hazard classes and substances which are not currently in the WHMIS:  Explosive  aspiration hazard  specific target organ toxicity – Single exposure  hazardous to the aquatic environment  hazardous to the ozone layer  substances and mixtures which when in contact with water, releases toxic gases  Biohazardous materials Changes to Supplier Labels • hazardous ingredients may have to be listed on some labels • New hazard symbols/pictograms • the use of signal words with standardized wording: Danger or Warning • the use of standardized hazard statements to replace risk phrases EU Labels Labels in the EU have chemical identity, symbols, and R/S (Risk and Safety) phrases which are hazard statements, precautionary measures and first aid. SDS Form Completion and Content Summary Identify the hazards Potential physical, health and environmental hazards associated with the substance or mixture based on collection information: physical, chemical and environmental characteristics and toxicity information. Generic SDS Form Only use one SDS for products with similar properties to cover several grades or minor variants of a material. All grades or material names must be listed on the SDS form or the SDS must clearly delineate the range of materials included.Date Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 31 of 186
  • 32. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ Newly Revised SDS When new SDS are issued on a chemical, they will be compared to previous data sheets on file and any changes will be noted and changes will be made to the labels of the chemical containers accordingly. Controlled Substances For controlled substances, Section 15, Regulatory Information of the SDS Form shall include the following: This product has been classified according o the hazard criteria of the Controlled Products Regulation (CPR) and the SDS contains all of the information required by the CPR. SDS Organization (HCS/OSHA/GHS , minimum information for an SDS) Note: No data found shall be noted in the SDS form when no applicable information is available. What is the material and what do I need to know immediately in an emergency? Section 1: Product and Company Identification • Product identifier used on the label • Other means of identification • Recommended use of the chemical and restrictions on use • Name, address, and telephone number of the manufacturer, importer, or supplier • Emergency phone number Section 2: Hazards Identification • Describe the most important hazards and adverse health effects and symptoms and other hazards not covered by GHS (dust explosion hazard). • Organ hazards should also be listed here. • GHS hazard classification, signal word (Danger, Warning), symbols (pictograms) and precautionary statements. See Section 16 for lists of hazard and precautionary statements. Example of nine GHS pictograms (a symbol plus a red border, square set at a point).Date Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 32 of 186
  • 33. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ Section 3: Composition/Information on Ingredients For Substances • The chemical identity of the substance is provided by its common chemical name, synonyms. CAS (Chemical Abstract Service) number, EC number See Table B and B1 Hazard Label - CLP Annex 6 Table 3-1 excel files for lists of CAS and other information per substance. • List the Dangerous Components first and Other Ingredients next (impurities and stabilizing additives which are themselves classified and which contribute to the classification of the substance). For Mixtures • The chemical identity and concentration or concentration ranges of all ingredients which are classified as hazardous per GHS. • Cutoff level for reproductive toxicity, carcinogenicity and category 1 mutagenicity is > 0.1% • Cutoff level for all other hazard classes is > 1% • Complete the Content % column of this Section (see SDS Templates) or the concentration range of the ingredient in the mixture. Note: For information on ingredients, the competent authority rules of Confidential Business Information (CBI) take priority over the rules for product identification. When applicable, indicate that confidential information about the composition was omitted. Product Identifiers You must use the same product identifiers on the labels as on the Safety Data Sheets for your products. Product identifiers for substances must be either (CLP Article 18): 1. a name and an identification number as given in Part 3 of Annex VI to CLP or 2. a name and an identification number as they appear in the classification & labelling inventory, as far as the substance is not included in Part 3 of Annex VI to CLP or 3. the CAS number and the IUPAC name, or the CAS number and another internationally recognized name7, if the substance is neither included in Part 3 of Annex VI CLP nor in the classification and labelling inventory managed by the Agency or 4. if no CAS number is available and none of the above apply, the IUPAC name or another internationally recognized name.Date Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 33 of 186
  • 34. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ What should I do if a hazardous situation occurs? Section 4: First Aid Measures • Describe the necessary measures (initial care that can be given without a wide selection of medications available), subdivided according to the different routes of exposure (i.e., inhalation, skin and eye contact, and ingestion) • Most important symptoms/effects, acute and delayed • Indicate if immediate medical attention is required and if delayed effects can be expected after exposure. Section 5: Fire Fighting Measures • Suitable and incompatible extinguishing media • Specific hazards arising from the chemical (e.g., nature of any hazardous combustion products) Described are the hazards associated with a chemical reaction or change in chemical form or composition that might occur under heat or fire conditions. Also described are hazards that may need to be considered while extinguishing a fire with one of the available types of extinguishing media. • Special protective actions (protective equipment and precautions) for fire-fighters (e.g., keep containers cool with water spray) Section 6: Accidental Release Measures • List personal and environmental precautions, protective equipment, and emergency procedures. Provide advice related to accidental spills and release of substances/mixtures. • Methods and materials for containment and cleaning up How can I prevent hazardous situations from occurring? Section 7: Handling and Storage • Precautions for safe handling (ventilation, prohibited procedures or equipment, etc) • Conditions for safe storage, including any incompatibilities • Material Type used for packing/container • Quantity limitsDate Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 34 of 186
  • 35. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ Section 8: Exposure Controls/Personal Protection • Describe the full range of precautionary measures to be taken during the use of the product to minimize worker exposure. • Describe engineering controls • Describe control parameters (OSHA permissible exposure limit (PEL), applicable occupational exposure limits or biological limit values) The OSHA permissible exposure limit (PEL), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) recommended exposure limit (REL), and/or the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) threshold limit value (TLV) will also be listed, if appropriate. • Engineering controls • Individual protection measures, such as personal protective equipment • Recommended monitoring procedures • Hygiene Measures Note: Engineering controls include all “built in” safety systems. These controls offer the first line of protection and are highly effective in that they generally require minimal special procedures or actions on the part of the user except in emergency situations. A fundamental and very common example is the laboratory fume hood which is very effective at containing chemical hazards and protecting users from inhalation hazards. Other examples of engineering controls include general room ventilation, flammable material storage units, and secondary containment. Section 9: Physical and Chemical Properties Appearance physical state, color Odor: If odour is perceptible, give a brief description Substances are classified as gas, liquid, or solid according to their boiling and melting points at atmospheric pressure (101.3 kPa). b.p.°C | m.p. °C gas ¦ < 15 ¦ < 15 ¦ gas or liquid ¦15 - 30 ¦ < 15 ¦ liquid ¦ >= 30 ¦ < 15 ¦ liquid or solid ¦ >= 30 ¦ 15 - 30 ¦ solid ¦ >= 30 ¦ >= 30 pH pH ranges: Boiling Point: Specify here the temperature at which the pH 0-2 Strongly acidic substance changes from liquid to gas. The boiling point of a pH 3-5 Weakly acidic substance is a special temperature with an equilibrium between pH 6-8 Neutral liquid and gaseous state. If the substance decomposes at this pH 9-10 Weakly basic temperature no equilibrium state is possible because the pH 12-14 Strongly basic substance changes in a chemical reaction. Indicates the boiling Substances or preparations with pH values point or range of the anhydrous substance at normal 0-2 or 11.5-14 may be classified as atmospheric pressure (101.3 kPa). Use one decimal. corrosive. Melting point/freezing point: Indicate the Flash point: The lowest temperature at which a liquid or solid temperature at which the solid material produces enough vapour to form a flammable air-vapour changes to a liquid. If there is a significant mixture near its surface so that it can be ignited by a spark or difference between the melting point and flame at atmospheric pressure. the freezing point, the range is given. Since flash points vary according to how they are obtained, theDate Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 35 of 186
  • 36. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ methods used are also listed. Tag Closed Cup (TCC), Pensky-Martins Closed Cup (PMCC), and Setaflash (SETA) methods are those used most extensively. Open cup oc is written as 22°F o c Flammability: Describes the ability of the Auto-ignition (decomposition) temperature: Some material to ignite and burn readily. A liquid substances have the feature of igniting in air in the absence of a or solid with a flash point above 21°C but spark or flame. less than 55°C is flammable. Highly flammable relates to substances or preparations with a flash point above 0°C but below 21°C, as well as to solids spontaneously flammable in air or which may readily ignite after brief contact with source of ignition and which continue to burn after removal of the source of ignition. Extremely flammable relates to liquids which have a flash point below 0°C and a boiling point below 35°C, and to flammable gases when liquified. Explosive properties: The concentrations Evaporation Rate for the lower and upper explosion limits. This is usually in volume percentage of air, for example, for xylene 1.1-7.0%, and for benzene 1.2-8.0%. Vapor pressure (mm Hg, @ 20°C): Flash Point is the lowest temperature at atmospheric pressure Describes the tendency of a material to (101.3 kPa) at which a liquid gives off so much combustible form a vapour. It is used for estimating the vapour at the liquid surface that this vapour, when mixed inhalation or fire hazards. intimately with air, can be ignited by a flame or spark. Round off to the nearest degree Celsius and add c.c. (closed cup) or o.c. (open cup determination method). Flash Point: Flammable gas Relative Density g/cm3: This figure Solubility(ies) in water: poor, moderate, miscible. g/100 ml indicates whether the substance floats in water at 20°C water or sinks (when the relative density is very poor (< 1 g/l) i.e. <0.1g/100 mL more than 1). Round off the value to the poor (1 - 10 g/l) i.e. 0.1 - 1 g/100 mL nearest 0.1 moderate (10 - 100 g/l) i.e. 1 - 10 g/100 mL good (100 - 1000 g/l) i.e. 10 - 100 g/100 mL very good (> 1000 g/l) i.e. >100 g/100 mL Partition coefficient: n-octanol/water Explosive limits (vol% in air) are the range in which a mixture the ratio of the solubility of a of a vapour, gas, mist, or powder with air can catch fire or substance or preparation in n-octanol to explode when ignited. The explosive limits of gases and that in water. The octanol/water partition vapours in air are given in percentage by volume. Vapour coefficient of a substance is useful as a pressure, flash point, and lower explosive limit are interrelated. means to predict soil adsorption, biological The explosive limits of powders depend on the size of the uptake, lipophilic storage, and particles. bioconcentration. Other Safety-related data: Evaporation rate, Vapor density (air = 1), Conductivity, ViscosityDate Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 36 of 186
  • 37. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ Section 10: Stability and Reactivity • Reactivity hazards Note: The information may also be based on the general data for the class or family of chemical if such data adequately represent the anticipated hazard of the substance or mixture. • Chemical stability under normal ambient and anticipated storage and handling conditions of temperature and pressure. Indicates whether the material is susceptible to dangerous decomposition and under what conditions it might occur. • Conditions to avoid that might result in a hazardous situation (e.g., heat, pressure, static discharge, shock, or vibration, inappropriate storage) • Possibility of hazardous reactions. State if the substance or mixture will react or polymerize, releasing excess pressure or heat, creating other hazardous conditions. Describe under what conditions the hazardous reactions may occur. A hazardous polymerization may result in an uncontrolled release of energy and hazardous materials. • Incompatible materials (e.g., explosion, release of toxic or flammable materials, liberation of excessive heat) Lists materials that could react with the substance. • Hazardous decomposition products or byproducts Describes hazardous materials produced from a reaction by burning, oxidation, heating or reacting with other chemicals. Is there other useful information about this material? Section 11: Toxicological Information • Description of the various toxicological (health) effects and the available data used to identify those effects, including:  Acute toxicity (LD50) If no data is available for the mixture, list the hazardous ingredients toxicological properties  Skin corrosion/irritation  Serious eye damage/irritation  Respiratory or skin sensitization  Germ cell mutagenicity  Carcinogenicity  Reproductive toxicity  STOT-single exposure  STOT-repeated exposure  Aspiration hazard  Information on the likely routes of exposure (inhalation, ingestion, skin and eye contact)  Symptoms related to the physical, chemical and toxicological characteristics following exposure related to the intended useDate Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 37 of 186
  • 38. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _  Delayed and immediate effects and also chronic effects from short- and long-term exposure (list animal data, species clearly identified)  Numerical measures of toxicity (such as acute toxicity estimates) Note: Toxic or Safe if properly used is not acceptable description. Note: If mixture has not been tested for its health effects as a whole then information on each hazardous ingredients listed should be provided except when: - information is duplicated - it is unlikely that these effects will occur at the concentrations present - predicting the interactions between ingredients is extremely difficult; information on interactions is not available Section 12: Ecological Information (Non-mandatory) • Description of the most important features that may have an impact on the environment, an assessment of the possible effects, behavior and environmental fate of the substance/mixture. • Aquatic Ecotoxicity, LC50 (fish) • Persistence and degradability (via biodegradation, oxidation, hydrolysis) If half-lives are quoted, indicate if half-lives refer to mineralization or to primary degradation • Bioaccumulative potential (BCF – bioconcentration factor or Octanol-water coefficient (KOW ). • Mobility in soil (KOW ). • Other adverse effects (such as hazardous to the ozone layer; for aerosols and halogenated hydrocarbons) as measured by global warming potential, photochemical ozone creation potential, ozone depletion potential Section 13: Disposal Considerations • Description of waste residues and information on their safe handling and methods of disposal, including the disposal of any contaminated packaging Note: Discourage sewage disposal. Section 14: Transport Information • UN transport hazard class and packing group listed as UN number , UN Proper Shipping Name, Transport Hazard class, Packing group • Environmental hazards (e.g., Marine pollutant (Yes/No)) • Transport in bulk (according to Annex II of MARPOL 73/78 (International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships, 1978) and the IBC Code(International Code for the Construction and Equipment of Ships Carrying Dangerous Chemicals in Bulk – International Bulk Chemical Code) )Date Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 38 of 186
  • 39. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ • Special precautions which a user needs to be aware of, or needs to comply with, in connection with transport or conveyance either within or outside his premises • Hazardous Matl Table 172_101tb.pdf file contains a list of hazardous material and their proper shipping names • http://ecfr.gpoaccess.gov/cgi/t/text/text-idx? c=ecfr&rgn=div5&view=text&node=49:2.1.1.3.8&idno=49 49 CFR Part 172 This part lists and classifies those materials which the Department has designated as hazardous materials for purposes of transportation and prescribes the requirements for shipping papers, package marking, labeling, and transport vehicle placarding applicable to the shipment and transportation of those hazardous materials Section 15: Regulatory Information • Safety, health and environmental regulations specific for the product • Relevant national and/or regional information on the regulatory status of the substance or mixture Note: Include whether the substance is subject to any prohibitions or restrictions in the country or region into which it is being supplied. Section 16: Other Information • Hazard (HNN and description) and Precautionary statements (PNNN and description) • Date of preparation and revision information of the SDS Completing the SDS Form (with examples) Section 1. Product and Company Identification • The identity (GHS product ID) of the substance or mixture should be exactly as found in the label. If one generic SDS is used to cover several minor variants or a substance or mixture, all names of the variants should be listed on the SDS. For example: Product Name HbA1c Calibrator Catalog Number _________ Synonyms HbA1c Calibrator A, HbA1c Calibrator B Intended Use This product is intended for use with the __ System as EDIA Calibrator for__ This test kit should be handled only by qualified personnel trained in laboratory procedures and familiar with their potential hazards. Specific warnings are given in the instructions for use. The absence of a specific warning should not be interpreted as an indication of safety. GHS/WHMIS/EU: Relevant identified uses example: Flame retardant, antioxidantDate Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 39 of 186
  • 40. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ Name, address, telephone number, emergency telephone number of manufacturer, supplier, distributor, employer or other responsible party. Email address of competent person for SDS should be listed following the telephone number of the supplier. The supplier can be the manufacturer, importer, only representative, downstream user or distributor. Section 2. Hazard Identification • Describe the physical and other hazards including potential health/environmental effects of the substances or mixtures and the appropriate warning information associated with those hazards. Identified substances or mixtures are classified as dangerous or not according to Directive 1999/45/EC or hazardous or not per CLP. • Indicate the status of the material with respect to the HCS (OSHA Regulatory Status). The HCS status (i.e., hazardous or nonhazardous) can be placed on the section’s first page and be very helpful to determine whether formal training and other activities under the HCS are required. • Three suggested phrases are: 1) This material is not considered hazardous by the OSHA Hazard Communication Standard (29 CFR 1910.1200). 2) While this material is not considered hazardous by the OSHA Hazard Communication Standard (29 CFR 1910.1200), this SDS contains valuable information critical to the safe handling and proper use of the product. This SDS should be retained and available for employees and other users of this product. 3) This material is considered hazardous by the OSHA Hazard Communication Standard (29 CFR 1910.1200). 4) This preparation is classified as hazardous under U.S. OSHA 29 CFR 1910.1200; E.C. Directive 1999/45/EC; Canadian R.S. 1985, c. H-3; U.K. CHIP 2002 No. 1689; and/or U.N. GHS ST/SG/AC 10/30 (see Section 15, Regulatory Information). None of the components present in this preparation at concentrations equal to or greater than 0.1% are listed by IARC, NTP, OSHA or ACGIH as a carcinogen. Note: HCS/Mexico: Identify if listed as carcinogen by OSHA, IARC or NTP • Sequence of Preparation in Collecting SDS Information. Section 2 is suggested to be the last step in data collection of the SDS after completing the other sections in the following order: Section 1 > Section 3. Sections 9, 10, 11 and 12 > Sections 14 and 15 > Section 8 > Section 7 . Sections 4, 5, and 6 > Section 13 > Section 16 and Section 2. • Routes of exposure: Inhalation, skin absorption and eye/skin contact This information identifies the relevant route of entry into the body which may cause harm. Use knowledge of physical properties of the substance and how it usually is handled to judge whether inhalation, skin and ingestion are significant routes of exposure. This information suggests what types of personal protective equipment, for example gloves, respirators, or both, are needed.Date Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 40 of 186
  • 41. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ • Label Elements must be consistent with the corresponding label affixed to the product. Label elements according to the DPD: - Symbol(s) in black and white - Indication(s) of danger - Risk phrase(s) (R) or hazard statements as a code Note: See Section 16 for full texts of Safety phrases: - Safety phrase(S) or precautionary statement in full • Label elements according to the CLP: - Symbol(s) in black and white - Indication(s) of danger - Hazard statements (H) as a code and followed by the text Note: See Section 16 for full texts of Precautionary statements (P) in full Example of Substance Classification listed in Section 2: Section 2 Classification according to Regulation (EC) No 1272/2008 [CLP] Flam. Liq 2, H225 Acute Tox. 3, H301 STOT SE 1, H370 Aquatic Acute 1, H400 (M-Factor (self-classification) = 10) Classification according to Directive 67/548/EEC (see Section 16 for full text of risk phrases) Highly flammable F R11 Toxic T R23/24/25 Other Hazards example: Risk of blindness after swallowing the product Substance meets the criteria for vPvB according to Regulation (EC) No 1907/2006, Annex III Substance is phototoxic Example Product XYZ is an untested mixture of four chemicals. Liquid with a flash point of 220°F Composition: Chemical A = 50% Chemical B = 25% Chemical C = 23.5% Chemical D = 1.5% Hazard Information: Chemical A: Severe eye and severe respiratory tract irritant per supplier SDS Chemical B: Non-hazardous Chemical C: Mild eye irritation dermal LD50 = 500 mg/kg liver damage noted on subchronic study Chemical D: Supplier SDS indicates reproductive effects based on animal data Example WARNING! The chemical, physical and toxicological properties of this preparation have not been thoroughly characterized. Avoid contact with eyes and skin. Do not ingest or inhale. Toxic by ingestion. Harmful by inhalation and in contact with skin. May cause severe eye irritation. Preparation appearance: clear, pink liquid.Date Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 41 of 186
  • 42. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ Note: The above text is an example of precautionary statement list. Example Product SOL is a water insoluble solvent with a specific gravity less than 1. Liquid with a flash point of 150°F Composition: Chemical SOL = 100% Hazard Information: Chemical SOL is a low viscosity, combustible, organic solvent that can cause CNS depression if inhaled, aspiration pneumonitis if aspirated in lungs, and deflating of the skin upon prolonged or repeated skin contact. Electrostatic charge may be generated during pumping. Note: Classification per DPD The procedure under Annex II, Part A of Dir. 1999/45/EC ("Procedure for evaluation of health hazards") foresees that the evaluation has to proceed "stepwise as follows". In practice it means that it is necessary to start with the most dangerous category "very toxic" going down to "harmful" and to check step by step if the preparation (depending on the substances contained) will be very toxic, toxic or harmful, in this order. Classification shall be done on basis of dangerous substances present in the product. The R phrases selected should be those applicable to the substance(s) present in the concentration which gives rise to the most severe classification. Section 3. Composition/Information on Ingredients Differentiate hazardous ingredients from non-hazardous ingredients. Some classes of materials are reaction products of two or more materials or complex substances where the identity of individual components maybe unknown or may vary. Complex chemical mixtures that are recognized as single substances maybe listed as a single component. If cited, hazards are attributed to a component of the complex substances or mixture.Date Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 42 of 186
  • 43. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ Listing Components: Hazardous components plus other significant components Full disclosure of components (based on risk?) All names of T+, T, Xn, C substances that contribute to the classification of the prep as T+, T, Xn, C should be given, even if they are below their Xn, Xi limits and they should be stated per Directive 1999/45/EC. Hazard Codes: The following table lists the data elements documented in the SDS Form for substances and mixtures. EC Concen- Hazard Hazard Signal Chemical ID/UN #/EINECS trationIndex # % Conc CAS# Class & Statement Word No.(Canada) or Limits Category Code (EU) Code ELINCS # Hazardous Ingredient613-169- 9-vinycarbazole 216-055-0 1484- Muta. 2 H341 GHS0800-6 13-5 Xn Other Ingredients PBT NA PBT- substance Where: PBT-substance is a substance with a Community workplace exposure limit. NA: not applicable or not necessary Japan: UN No. and KA-Shin-Ho Registry No. GHS/EU: List the chemical identity and concentration or concentration ranges of all ingredients which are hazardous and are present above their cut-off levels. WHMIS: List the generic chemical identity and Registry Number for trade secret ingredients registered with the Hazardous Materials Information Review Commission. List the hazardous ingredients (Controlled Products) present at 1.0% or more or 0.1% or more as appropriate, by weight - ingredients present which are on the WHMIS Ingredient Disclosure List, at or above the minimum concentration specified on the list - ingredients with unknown toxicology properties - ingredients the supplier believes maybe harmful Impurities Additive Quantity Labelling Symbols: C and E (as in Directive 67/548/EEC) Specific Limits: yes R-Phrases S-PhrasesDate Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 43 of 186
  • 44. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ Section 4. First Aid Measures 1. Describe the first aid measures (by route of exposure) as to whether: • immediate medical attention is required and if delayed effects can be expected after exposure • movement of the exposed individual from the area to fresh air is recommended • removal and handling of clothing and shoes from the individual is recommended • personal protective equipment for first aid responders is recommended Inhalation:_________ Skin and eye contact:__________ Ingestion:________________ 2. Describe the most important symptoms and effects, both acute and delayed. 3. Indication of immediate medical attention and special treatment needed. Include information on clinical testing and medical monitoring for delayed effects, specific details on antidotes (where they are known and contraindications) For some substances or mixtures, it may be important to emphasize that special means to provide specific and immediate treatment shall be available at the workplace. GHS/EU: Indicate if doctor is needed. GHS/Mexico: Indicate any antidotes needed. Section 5. Firefighting Measures • List flammable properties information such as flash point and upper and lower flammable (explosive) limits and method of determination When flammable vapors are mixed with air in the proper proportions, the mixture can be ignited by a spark or flame. The range of concentrations over which the flash will occur is designated by the Lower Explosive Limit (LEL) and the Upper Explosive Limit (UEL). Flammable limits (explosive limits) are expressed in percent by volume of vapor in air. • List generally applicable control measures, firefighting procedures • List suitable extinguishing media The selection of fire extinguishing media is based on the type of chemical, its physical properties and flammable characteristics. The most common types of extinguishing media are water, CO 2, dry chemical and foam. • GHS: List unsuitable extinguishing media (which shall not be used for safety reasons) • List protective equipment and precautions for firefighters • List hazardous combustion products • HCS/GHS/Mexico: List specific physical and chemical hazards arising from the chemical (e.g., combustion products, resulting gases)Date Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 44 of 186
  • 45. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ • WHMIS/EU: List explosion data: 1. Sensitivity to static discharge 2. Sensitivity to mechanical impact Products of Combustion/Special Hazards example: May produce toxic fumes or carbon monoxide if burning. Produces oxides of sulphur and nitrogen on combustion. Advice for firefighters example: Keep containers cool with water spray. Wear special PPE such as boots, overalls, gloves, eye and face protection and breathing apparatus. • List NFPA Hazard Ratings Example: NFPA Hazard Ratings: Health: 2 Fire: 2 Reactivity: 0 0 = minimal, 1 = slight, 2 = moderate, 3 = serious, 4= severe North American Emergency Guidebook: DOT “ Combustible Class II” for transport by truck or ocean ONLY Fire Hazard rating (Red section of the diamond) is assigned a number from 0 to 4 based upon the Flash Point (FP) of the chemical as follows: 4—FP below 73°F ; extremely flammable gas or liquid 3—FP 73°F to 100°F ; flammable 2—FP 100°F to 200°F ; combustible, requires moderate heating to ignite 1—Slightly combustible ; requires strong heating to ignite 0—Will not burn under normal conditions The colors indicate: - the relative risk to health H (blue) - the flammability F (red) - the instability or reactivity R (yellow) - possible specific hazards (white) Each of the first three aspects is assigned a value from 0 to 4, the greater the risk, the higher the value assigned. Labelling with the so-called hazard diamond is used frequently on fixed installations. The meaning of the numbers in hazard categories H, F, and R is summarized in National Fire Protection Association, NFPA Standard 704. In addition, decomposition products arising from a fire are sometimes included among the health hazards. The fourth space of the diamond is used for special hazards. The NFPA specifies these special hazards as follows: - Materials which demonstrate unusual reactivity with water shall be identified with the letter W with a horizontal line through the centre; - Materials which possess oxidizing properties shall be identified by the letters OXY; or - Materials possessing radioactivity hazards shall be identified by the standard radioactivity symbol. Reactivity Hazard rating (Yellow section of the diamond) isDate Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 45 of 186
  • 46. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ assigned a number of 0 to 4 based upon the reactivity data of the chemical as follows: 4—Chemical may detonate ; explosive at room temperature 3—Chemical may detonate in the presence of shock and/or heat under confinement or mixed with water 2—Chemical is prone to violent chemical change (unstable) ; may react with water 1—Chemical may react if heated or mixed with water 0—Chemical is stable; does not react with water NFPA Health Hazard Rating of "3" (for a gas): Per NFPA 704, Identification of the Hazards of Materials for Emergency Response, any gas whose LC50 (see definition) for acute inhalation toxicity is greater that 1,000 ppm but less than or equal to 3,000 ppm. NFPA Health Hazard Rating of "4" (for a gas): Per NFPA 704, Identification of the Hazards of Materials for Emergency Response, any gas whose LC50 (see definition) for acute inhalation toxicity is less than or equal to 1,000 ppm. Health Hazard rating (Blue section of the diamond) is assigned a number of 0 to 4 based upon the health hazard data of the chemical as follows: 4— Extreme, highly toxic and maybe fatal on short-term exposure 3— Serious, toxic and full protective suit and breathing apparatus should be worn 2— Moderate, breathing apparatus and face mask should be worn 1— Slight, breathing apparatus maybe worn 0— Minimal, no precautions necessary Specific Hazard rating (White section of the diamond) specifies the specific chemical hazard such as: OXY — Oxidizer ACID – Acid ALK — AlkaliDate Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 46 of 186
  • 47. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ COR — Corrosive W — Use no water — Radiation Section 6. Accidental Release Measures • List personal and environmental precautions (e.g., Personal: removal of ignition sources, provision for sufficient ventilation/respiratory protection, control of dust, prevention of skin and eye contact Environmental precautions: keeping away from drains, surface- and ground-water and soil, possible need to alert the neighborhood) • List methods for clean up and containment (e.g., use of absorbent material such as sand, diatomaceous earth, acid binder, universal binder, sawdust reduction of gases/fumes with water, dilution). • EU: List prohibited materials Methods and materials for containment and cleaning up example: Containment techniques: - bunding, covering drains - capping procedures Spill Cleaning Procedures: - neutralization techniques - decontamination techniques - cleaning techniques - vacuuming techniques - equipment required for containment/clean up - advice/indications like “never use… Example: Shut off all sources of ignition. Wear appropriate personal protective equipment. Absorb with spill pillow or other absorbent and place in closed container for later disposal. Section 7. Handling and Storage • List generally applicable precautions for safe handling and use, including appropriate hygienic practices • List storage requirements and conditions • GHS/EU: Identify incompatible materials or ignition sources • EU: List special packaging materials Examples of Precautions for safe handling: Do not handle until all safety precautions have been read and understood. (P202) Wash hands thoroughly after handling. (P264) Do not eat, drink or smoke when using this product. (P270) Note: Where chemical safety report or a registration is required, the information in this section shall be consistent with the information given, for the identified uses and exposure scenarios set out in the annex of the Material Safety Data Sheet. • Storage: Give advice, if relevant, on quantity limits under storage conditions. In particular indicate any special requirements such as type of material used in the packaging/containers of the substance/mixture. • Specific uses: For end products designed for specific uses, recommendations shall refer to the identified use(s) and be detailed and operational.Date Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 47 of 186
  • 48. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ Section 8. Exposure Controls/Personal Protection • List occupational exposure limits and/or biological limit values listed by OSHA include PELs, ACGIH or established company limits and for Japan include Japanese Industrial Health Organization limits. Give information on currently recommended monitoring procedures. Note: Cal/OSHA has listed established PELs, STELs and Ceiling exposures for chemical contaminants identified in CCR Title 8 Section 5155 (Airborne Contaminants) Table AC-1 ( http://www.dir.ca.gov/Title8/ac1.pdf ). Note: Where a chemical safety report (CSR) is required, the relevant DNELs and PNECs for the substance shall be given for the exposure scenarios set out in the annex to the Material Safety Data Sheet. Include in this section a summary of the risk mgt measures (when a CSR exist). For mixtures, include values of constituent substances. • Occupational exposure controls: use of adequate equipment and materials, adequate ventilation and appropriate organizational measures and use of personal protective equipment (PPE) (for eye/face, skin and respiratory and for general hygiene considerations) • Mexico: list component concentration that is Immediately Dangerous to Life and Health (IDLH) • Exposure controls (means the full range of specific risk mgt measures to be taken during use in order to minimize worker and environmental exposure) Personal Protection example: GLOVES: Wear appropriate chemical resistant ( nitrile) gloves. RESPIRATOR: Consider the need for appropriate protective equipment, such as self- contained breathing apparatus, adequate masks and filters. Safety goggles Apron, boots and full protective suit Exposure guidelines example: methylchemical – TWA: 100 ppm, STEL: 150 ppm (OSHA and ACGIH) ethylchemical – TWA: 50 ppm, STEL: N.E. propylchemical – TWA: 200 ppm, STEL: 250 ppm (skin) (OSHA and ACGIH) butylchemical – TWA: 250 ppm (ACGIH) Exposure Guidelines There are no ACGIH, NIOSH, OSHA or country-specific occupational exposure limits currently established for components present in this preparation at concentrations equal to or greater than 1% (0.1% if carcinogen). Engineering Controls Provide adequate mechanical ventilation to keep airborne concentrations low. Facilities storing or using this preparation should be equipped with an eyewash fountain.Date Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 48 of 186
  • 49. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ Section 9. Physical and Chemical Properties • The information in this section should be consistent with the information provided in a registration where one is required. List only properties where data is available. • List properties for each reagent listed in one SDS when two reagents are included in an SDS. • List the following properties Appearance/color Physical State Odor, Odor Threshold pH in aqueous soln, % conc Melting point/freezing point Flash point (for water-reactive liq; per GHS) Evaporation rate Vapour pressure (at 20°C) Vapour density Boiling point/range (for water-reactive liq) Freezing/melting point Flammability (solid, gas) Upper/lower flammability or explosive limits Auto-ignition temperature Decomposition temperature Specific gravity (per Canada and Japan) Evaporation rate Relative density (°C) Water solubility Partition coefficient n-octanol/water Viscosity (mm2/s) Explosive properties Oxidizing properties Other Information: Miscibility Conductivity Gas group Safety information on Redox potential Melting point/range Fat solubility Note: If the pH is < 2 or > 11.5 the product should be classified as corrosive unless an in vitro test (as described in the criteria) proves otherwise. • It is not necessary to list the following properties if data are not available or not applicable. heat value volatile organic compounds (VOC) content softening point pour point viscosity bulk density percent volatile saturated vapor concentration (include reference temperatures) molecular weight (per Mexico) % volatility (per Mexico) molecular formula sublimation point liquid conductivityDate Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 49 of 186
  • 50. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ metal corrosion rate particle size/particle size distribution minimum ignition energy (MIE) minimum explosive concentration (MEC) dust deflagration index (Kst) • List the composition of the constituent/ impurity/ additive of the mixture even when there are unknown hazard data. For each constituent/ impurity/ additive, fill in the following tables. The information is particularly important for the main constituent(s) and for the constituents (or impurities) with unknown hazard. Mixture Ingredient Weight (%) Classification Ingredient information Ingredient 1 4 Skin Category 1 pH = 1.8 Ingredient 2 5 Skin Category 2 - Ingredient 3 5 Skin Category 3 - Ingredient 4 86 - No data available Mixture Information The mixture has a pH = 4.0 Section 10. Stability and Reactivity • State the stability of the substance or mixture and the possibility of hazardous reactions occurring under certain conditions of use and also if released into the environment. Example Hazardous Polymerization: Will Not Occur Stability: Stable Hazardous Decomposition/Combustion Products: Carbon oxides Conditions and Materials to Avoid: Heat, flame, sources of ignition. Oxidizing agents, Reducing agents, Acids • GHS/Mexico: List chemical stability • List conditions to avoid/conditions under which the product is chemically unstable • List reactivity and hazardous (spontaneous polymerization) • List incompatible materials (if available, with brief description) which may cause dangerous reactions • HCS: List organic peroxides • List Hazardous decomposition products (from storage or handling) [e.g., Thermal decomposition can lead to release of irritating gases and vapours.] List hazardous materials produced in dangerous amounts upon decomposition, addressing the following: - the need for and the presence of stabilizers - the possibility of a hazardous exothermic reaction - safety significance, if any, of a change in physical appearance of the substance or mixture - hazardous decomposition products, if any, formed upon contact with water - possibility of degradation to unstable productsDate Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 50 of 186
  • 51. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ Section 11. Toxicological Information • Describe the toxicological health effects which can arise if the user comes into contact with the substance (per specific substance listed in the contents) or mixture. If a CSR is required, the information should be consistent with it. • GHS: List routes of exposure, symptoms and immediate/delayed effects • Acute dose effects: Effects that occur rapidly (immediate effect) as a result of a single or short-term exposure. (e.g., LD50, LC50). Representative results of toxicological studies conducted with the material or its listed components, usually in rats, mice or rabbits. • List chronic exposure • List aspiration hazard effects: Effects following the entry of a liquid or solid chemical directly through the mouth or nose, or indirectly from vomiting, following ingestion, into the trachea and lungs. • List repeated dose effects: Effects occurring in experimental animals as a result of repeated daily exposure. (e.g., NOAEL, LOAEL) • List skin irritation effects: Reversible inflammatory effects on living tissue at the site of contact. • List skin corrosive effects: Visible irreversible destruction to tissue at the site of contact. • List sensitization effects (skin and respiratory): The development of an allergic reaction in a substantial proportion of exposed people or animals after repeated exposure. • List carcinogenic effects: The development of cancer in animals or humans. • List neurological effects: Effects on the structure or function of the nervous system. Effects on the nervous system and/or the production of emotional or behavioral abnormalities. • List mutagenic effects: The alteration of genetic material. • List reproductive effects: Adversely affecting the ability of an organism to reproduce. Hazard classification for reproductive toxicity: 1. Adverse effects: a. on sexual function and fertility b. on development 2. Effects on or via lactation • List developmental effects: Birth defects or other effects on the developing embryo or fetus. • List target organ effects: Effects on organ(s) or organ systems by direct or systemic exposure. • List teratogenicity • List aquatic toxicity and other Ecotoxicity info (derived from Annexes VII to XI) • GHS/WHMIS/EU: Name of toxicologically synergistic productsDate Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 51 of 186
  • 52. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ Example: Other chemical Ingredient(s) not classified as carcinogen(s) by OSHA, NTP, ACGIH, or California. Ethanol, 2-propanol & Methanol are listed as RTK in Massachusetts, Pennsylvania & New Jersey. Toxicological Data Ingredient information Ingredient Weight (%) Test data Ingredient 1 16 LD50 1,600 mg/kg Ingredient 2 4 Acute toxicity range estimate 300 < LD50 < 1,200 Ingredient 3 80 LD50 1,050 mg/kg Section 12. Ecological Information • List assessment of the possible effects and environmental fate • List results of PBT and vPvB assessment Note: Where a CSR is required, the results of the PBT and vPvB assessment must be given. • Describe mobility, chemical degradation and aquatic toxicity • List Ecotoxicity and chemical fate data: Briefly discuss the acute and chronic effects of the product and/or its components • Toxicity to terrestrial and aquatic plants and animals (e.g., algae, invertebrates, fish and birds) Acute/Prolonged Toxicity to Fish Type: flow through Species: Leuciscus idus melanotus Exposure period: 48 hrs LC50 = 189 mg/L • Toxicity to beneficial microorganisms (e.g., soil and sewage treatment microorganisms) • Persistence/Degradability: Discuss the material’s potential to degrade or be removed by biological and/or chemical processes and its potential to persist in the environment. • Potential to undergo photolysis and/or hydrolysis • Potential for and rate of microbial degradation in soil, water or sediment • Products of degradation and their potential Ecotoxicity [Mexico: Ecotoxicity and chemical fate data established by the Secretariat of Urban Development and Ecology] • Bioaccumulation/Accumulation: Discuss the potential of the material and/or its degradation products to accumulate/bioconcentrate in plants, invertebrates, fish and other aquatic organisms. Note: Bio-accumulative potential: The potential of the substance or mixture to accumulate in biota and pass through the food chain, with reference to the Kow (Octanol/Water of physical/chemical properties) and BCF. — Bioconcentration factor (BCF) — Octanol/water partition coefficient — Mobility in environmental media: Discuss the mobility of the material (and/or its degradation products). — The media/compartments (air, soil/sediment, water) into which the material partitionsDate Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 52 of 186
  • 53. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ — The rate of movement through soil/sediment and/or groundwater — Adsorption and desorption in soil — The potential to reach groundwater and its expected effects — Other adverse effects: A material’s environmental impact may not be limited to the above information. Section 13. Disposal Considerations • List waste disposal and waste disposal of packaging: include information on safe handling and residues when disposal of substances and mixtures presents a danger. • Specify the appropriate methods of disposal of both substance or mixture and any contaminated packaging (e.g., recycling, land- filling, incineration, etc). Where an exposure assessment or Chemical Safety Report is required, the waste management measures must be consistent with the exposure scenarios in the ES Annex. • EPA Hazardous Waste Numbers (P List) : http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title40-vol26/xml/CFR- 2011-title40-vol26-sec261-33.xml EPA Hazardous Waste Numbers (D List, toxic) http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title40-vol26/xml/CFR- 2011-title40-vol26-sec261-24.xmlb • Example Recover or recycle if possible. Disposal should be in accordance with applicable regional, national and local laws and regulations. Local regulations may be more stringent than regional or national requirements. The information presented below only applies to the material as supplied. The identification based on characteristic(s) or listing may not apply if the material has been used or otherwise contaminated. It is the responsibility of the waste generator to determine the toxicity and physical properties of the material generated to determine the proper waste identification and disposal methods in compliance with applicable regulations. If the material as supplied becomes a waste the following hazardous waste characteristic(s) or hazardous waste listing applies: insert regional, national or local hazard waste characteristic or hazardous waste listing information. Section 14. Transport Information • Indicate any special precautions needed when transporting either within or outside the user’s premises. • List UN number, class, proper shipping name, packing group and marine pollutant information as needed by some of the following transport-related regulations: IMDG (sea), ADR (road, Council Directive 94/55/EC), RID (rail, Council Directive 96/49/EC and ICAO/IATA (air). See Title 49: Transportation, Subpart C— Shipping PapersDate Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 53 of 186
  • 54. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ Note: Class 3 – Assignment of packing group based on Flash Point (per 173.121) Packing Group Flash Point Initial Boiling Point I <35°C (95°F) II <23°C (73°F) >35°C (95°F) III >23°C, <60.5°C (141°F) >35°C (95°F) < = less than < = less than, or equal to > = more than > = more than, or equal to Packing groups indicate the degree of danger presented by the material. Packing groups are not assigned to all classes of materials. The shipper is responsible for determining the appropriate packing group. Packing Group I PG I Great Danger Packing Group II PG II Medium Danger Packing Group III PG III Minor Danger • Example: US DOT (ground) Proper shipping description: Flammable liquids, n.o.s. (contains Component A, Component B), 3, UN 1993, II. DOT Classification Surface Transportation: Non-Bulk Containers (</= 119 gal. cap.): Flammable liquid, n.o.s. (Xylene, trimethylbenzene), 3, UN1993, PGIII Bulk Containers (>119 gal.cap.): RQ Flammable Liquid, liquid, n.o.s. (Xylene, trimethylbenzene), 3, UN1993, PGIII Do not ship by air. B/L Freight Classification Insecticides, nos, O/T Poison Basic Shipping Description: International Air Transport Association (IATA) Dangerous Goods Classification UN Number: UN 3316 Proper Shipping Name: Chemical Kit Hazard Class: 9 Hazard Label: Miscellaneous Packing Group: PG III Packaging Instruction: Y915 Special Provisions: A44 (excepted quantities) U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) Consumer Commodity, ORM-DDate Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 54 of 186
  • 55. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ Note: For bulk transportation of chemical products, if the recipient is only a transport element, which means, it contains the preparation only during the transportation of the goods, DGT (Dangerous Goods Transport) legislation should be applied in labelling and SDS should be delivered to the final destiny. If the recipient is also the final package of the preparation, which means, it is left at final destiny to contain the product, then this packaging should be labelled according to the DGT legislation and the Directive 1999/45/CE and SDS should be delivered to final destiny. Note: Packing Group (PG) is assigned based on the degree of danger presented by the hazardous material PG I: great danger PG II: medium danger PG III: minor danger n.o.s. means not otherwise specified. Corrosive liquid, n.o.s. means that the actual chemical name for that corrosive liquid is not listed in the regulations; therefore, a generic name must be used to describe it on shipping papers. Transportation information provided is for reference only. Customer is urged to consult 49 CFR 100 - 177, IMDG, IATA, EC, United Nations TDG, and WHMIS (Canada) TDG information manuals for detailed regulations and exceptions covering specific container sizes, packaging materials and methods of shipping. More Example: Shipping Name/ Number DOT/UN/NA/IMO for NaOH: IMO 8.0 Sodium hydroxide solid Sodium hydroxide solution UN 1823 Sodium hydroxide, solid UN 1824 Sodium hydroxide solution IATA: Shipping Name: Non hazardous for transport. Not regulated (Aqueous solution <24% alcohol) UN Number: NA Shipping/Hazardous Class: NA Packing Group: NA Note: Shipping regulations are based on combinations of criteria such as Excepted Quantity, Class and packaging according to DOT, IATA and (49) CFR. Over pack may be required. Additional information: This product may be shipped as part of chemical kit composed of various compatible dangerous goods for analytical testing purposes. Then this kit would have the following classification: Shipment Name: Chemical Kit Hazard Class: 9 UN Number: 3316Date Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 55 of 186
  • 56. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ Section 15. Regulatory Information • Indicate if a Chemical Safety Assessment has been carried out for the substances (or a substance in preparation). • Give the health, safety and environmental information shown on the label according to Directives 67/548/EEC and 1999/45/EC. • State if there are any provisions for substances or mixtures in relation to protection of man or environment including relevant National laws. See list_of_lists_CERCLA RCRA excel file for lists of substances under the CERCLA and EPCRA list or http://epa.gov/emergencies/tools.htm#lol • Describe information on substances subject to authorization and details about any authorization granted or denied. GHS and EU: Information according to the Directives relating to the classification, packaging and labeling of dangerous substances and preparations. Example: Safety, health and environmental regulations specific for the substance or mixture EU Directives 67/548/EEC and 1999/45/EC (including amendments) EU Regulation (EC) No.1907/2006 (REACH), No 1272/2008 (CLP) Chemical Safety Assessment In accordance with REACH article 14, a Chemical Safety Assessment has been carried out for Potassium sulfate and Potassium nitrate. --------------------------------------------------------- TSCA: All ingredients are listed on the TSCA inventory. This material is in compliance with the Toxic Substance Control Act (15 USC 26C1-2629) CERCLA Reportable Quantity: - Transit Reportable Quantities: Xylene 56 gal (212 liters) Ethylbenzene 2010 gal (7604 liters) Cumene 27129 gal (102658 liters) Benzene 47596 gal (180102 liters) Canadian WHMIS Classification: B3 combustible liquid product or D 2 B “other toxic effects” & “B3” combustible Japan METI: This product requires notification in Japan Australia: All components are in compliance with the chemical notification requirements in Australia. -------------------------------------------------------- Example: US Federal Regulations: This preparation is a component of an FDA-regulated in vitro diagnostic device. Inventory - United States - Section 8(b) Inventory (TSCA) Sodium nitrite 7632-00-0 Present U.S. - CERCLA/SARA - Hazardous Substances and their Reportable Quantities Sodium nitrite 7632-00-0 100 lb final RQ; 45.4 kg final RQ U.S. - CERCLA/SARA - Section 313 - Emission Reporting Sodium nitrite 7632-00-0 1.0 % de minimis concentration US State Regulations:Date Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 56 of 186
  • 57. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ U.S. - California - 8 CCR Section 339 - Directors List of Hazardous Substances Sodium nitrite 7632-00-0 Present -------------------------------------------------------- International Regulations: If approved for European Communities use, this product is regulated under the In Vitro Diagnostic Medical Devices Directive (98/79/EC). Canada - WHMIS - Ingredient Disclosure List Sodium nitrite 7632-00-0 1 % EU - Dangerous Substances Directive (67/548/EEC) - Annex I - Classification Sodium nitrite 7632-00-0 O;R8_T;R25_N;R50 -------------------------------------------------------- • WHMIS: If a controlled substance exist, the following statement should be stated: This product has been classified according to the hazard criteria of the Controlled Products Regulation (CPR) and the SDS contains all of the information required by the CPR EU: Restrictions on Use (or limit values for exposure at the place of work) Example: Section 15. Regulatory Information (NaOH) United States TSCA - Inventory: Listed Designated as a hazardous substance under section 311 (b)(2)(A) of the Federal Water These regulations apply to discharged Water standards: Pollution Control Act and further regulated by of sodium hydroxide. [40 CFR 116.4] the Clean Water Act Amendments of 1977 and 1978. Persons in charge of vessels or facilities are required to notify the National Response Center (NRC) immediately, when there is a release of The toll free telephone number of the CERCLA the designated hazardous substance, in an NRC is (800) 424-8802. amount equal to or greater than its reportable quantity of 1,000 lbs or 453 kg. SARA Title III Section 311/312 - Categories: Acute reactive Caustic soda is subject to Tier I and/or Section 312 - Inventory Reporting: Tier II annual inventory reporting. Caustic soda is subject to Form R Section 313 - Emission Reporting: reporting requirements. Other Regulations Canada WHMIS: Section 16. Other Information • Indicate any other information which the supplier assesses as being of importance for the health and safety of the user and for the protection of the environment. • Describe in full the full text of any hazard statements and precautionary statements. For a revised SDS, describe details of any revisions added, deleted or revised.Date Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 57 of 186
  • 58. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ • Communication of SDS changes shall be made by the supplier within the preceding 12 months. Example: This SDS has been revised in the following section(s): 1. PRODUCT AND COMPANY IDENTIFICATION 9. PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL PROPERTIES • Sources of key data used to compile the SDS should also be listed in this section. • Further Information This SDS has been prepared in accordance with the ANSI Z400.1 format. Every effort has been made to adhere to the hazard criteria and content requirements of the U.S. OSHA Hazard Communication Standard, Canadian Controlled Products Regulation (CPR), UK Chemical Hazard Information and Packaging Regulations, European Communities REACH Regulation, and UN Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals. • Disclaimer Disclaimer Example TF Corp provides the information contained herein in good faith, in compliance with the Occupational Safety Health Act of 1970, but makes no representation as to its comprehensiveness or accuracy. This document is intended only as a guide to the appropriate precautionary handling of the material by a properly trained person using this product. TF Corp warrants that this product is of merchantable quality. The implied warranty of fitness for a particular purpose is limited to the extent the products are used for the purpose or uses described on the products label or in any written instructions or materials distributed to the buyer by TF Corp and is hereby disclaimed should buyer use the products in a manner inconsistent with this uses or purposes described therein. In no event shall TF Corp maybe liable for any consequential, exemplary, or incidental damages incurred by buyer even if it has been advised of the possibility of such damages. Disclaimer Example The information contained herein has been compiled from data presented in various technical sources believed to be accurate. This information is intended to be used only as a guide and does not purport to be complete. TFS Inc makes no warranties and assumes no liability in connection with the use of this information. It is the user’s responsibility to determine the suitability of this information and to assure the adoption of necessary precautions.Date Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 58 of 186
  • 59. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ Exposure Scenarios, ESs (Annex) • Include exposure scenarios for PBT or vPvB substances for which a chemical safety assessment is required by REACH and has been completed and for the following hazard classes: hazard classes 2.1 to 2.4, 2.6 and 2.7, 2.8 types A and B, 2.9, 2.10, 2.12, 2.13 categories 1 and 2, 2.14 categories 1 and 2, 2.15 types A to F - hazard classes 3.1 to 3.6, 3.7 adverse effects on sexual function and fertility or on development, 3.8 effects other than narcotic effects, 3.9 and 3.10 - hazard class 4.1 - hazard class 5.1 • An SDS shall be completed for mixtures not classified as dangerous but contain individual concentration of > 1% by weight for non-gaseous preparations and > 0.2% by volume for gaseous preparations posing health or environmental hazards or presents community workplace exposure limits. Disclosure limit set by regulation in Japan, Industrial Safety and Health Law (ISHL): - Mutagenic substance: 0.1% - Human carcinogenic substances or suspected human carcinogen: 0.1% - Respiratory and skin sensitizing substances: 0.1% - Toxic substances to human reproduction or suspected toxic substances to human reproduction: 0.1% - Other hazardous Substances: 1% Table A Hazard Category and SDS Template Guide Select (Hazard Category and SDS File Template) the appropriate SDS template for a substance or mixture classified according to the hazard category listed in the first column. Hazard SDS File Template Hazard Category Category: (Emergency Guide Template #) EPA - OSHA Toxic and corrosives TOX, COR SDS Template for Corrosive Toxic 153 Other test kits TOX, COR SDS Template potassium cyanide cyclohex SDS Template sodium azide SDS Template digoxin Infectious-biological substances Infectious SDS Template calibrator and other test kits substances and other substances of human/animal origin Infectious Subs LTE SDS Template Infectious substances 158 Flammable liquid FL LIQ SDS Template Flammable Liquid 127 Flammable and corrosive liquid FL, COR SDS Template Corrosive Flammable 132 Toxic Flammable solids WR, TOX ,FL SDS Template flammable solids toxic wet desensitize Explosive 113Date Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 59 of 186
  • 60. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ Hazard SDS File Template Hazard Category Category: (Emergency Guide Template #) EPA - OSHA Water miscible noxious flammable FL, COM, WR SDS Template flammable liq polar liquid water immiscible noxious 129 Toxic corrosive non-combustible TOX, COR SDS Template for Non-Combustible Toxic Corrosive 154 Oxidizers OX, COM SDS Template for Oxidizers 140 Toxic oxidizers OX, TOX SDS Template for Oxidizers Toxic 141 Toxic corrosive non combustible TOX, COR SDS Template Toxic Corrosive Water water sensitive COM sensitive 157 Oxidizing gases n refrigerated liquid OX REF SDS Template oxidizing gases and refrigerated Liquid 122 Toxic combustible subs TOX, COM SDS Template for Combustible Toxic Subs 152 Non-Combustible Toxic NCOM, TOX SDS Template for Non-Combustible Toxic 151 Org Peroxides heat contamination Org Sens F SDS Template Org Peroxides heat friction sensitive contamination friction sensitive 146 Corrosive Toxic COR TOX SDS Template for Corrosive Toxic 153 flammable liq non polar water FL NP NOX SDS Template flammable liq non polar immiscible noxious water immiscible noxious 130 Oxidizers Toxic OX TOX SDS Template for Oxidizers Toxic 141 flammable corrosive gases FL COR SDS Template flammable corrosive gases 118 Flammable Toxic FL TOX SDS Template Flammable Toxic 131 Oxidizers OXX SDS Template for Oxidizers 140 Flammable Liquid FLAM SDS Template Flammable Liquid 127 gases compressed or liquefied COMP SDS Template gases compressed or refrigerant liquefied refrigerant gases 126 irritating IRR SDS Template irritating 159 Hazard Category Comparison for Reporting Under Sections 311 and 312 ----------------------------------------------------------------------- Consolidated (from 23) EPAs hazard categories - OSHAs hazard categories ----------------------------------------------------------------------- FL: Flammable Fire Hazard............................... COM: Combustion Liquid PY: Pyrophoric OX: Oxidizer EX: Explosive Sudden Release of Pressure................ CG: Compressed Gas UR: Unstable Reactive.................................. OR: Organic Peroxide WR: Water Reactive HT: Highly Toxic : Immediate (Acute) Health Hazards.......... TOX: ToxicDate Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 60 of 186
  • 61. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ IRR: Irritant SEN: Sensitizer COR: Corrosive AE: Other hazardous chemicals with an adverse effect with short term exposure. CHR: Carcinogens Delayed (Chronic) Health Hazard........... LTE: Other hazardous chemicals with an adverse effect with long term exposure Note: (Hazard categories as defined in 40 CFR 370.66) The two health hazard categories and three physical hazard categories are a consolidation of the 23 hazard categories defined in the OSHA Hazard Communication Standard, 29 CFR 1910.1200. Table B Composition/Information on Ingredients (CLP Labels) Snapshot Chemical Content EC No CAS No Hazard Labelling (R for Concent GHS name % Classification & risk phrases; S ration Symbol Category for safety Limits and Word phrases)/Hazard Statement hydrogen 0.00% 215- 1333-74-0 Flam. Gas 1 H220 GHS02 605-7 Press. Gas GHS04 Dgr Link: G:Regulatory AffairsMSDSConnie - MSDS draftsForm and SOP Table B Hazard Label - CLP Annex 6 Table 3-1 Table B1 Composition/Information on Ingredients (DPD Labels) Snapshot Chemical Content EC No CAS No Hazard Labelling (R for Concentration name % Classification & risk phrases; S Limits Category for safety phrases)/Hazard Statement hydrogen 215-605- 1333-74-0 F+; R12 F+ 7 R: 12 S: (2-)9-16-33 Link: G:Regulatory AffairsMSDSConnie - MSDS draftsForm and SOP Table B1 Hazard Label - CLP Annex 6 Table 3-2 Table C. Concentration Limits and Hazard Class/Category per (EC) No 1272/2008 Concentration Hazard Class/Category Limit % Acute toxicity, category 1, 2 and 3 > 0, 1 Acute toxicity, category 4 >1 Skin corrosion/irritation, category 1A, 1B, 1C and 2 >1 Serious damage to eyes/eye irritation, category 1 and 2 >1 Respiratory/skin sensitization > 0, 1 Germ cell mutagenicity category 1A and 1B > 0, 1 Germ cell mutagenicity category 2 >1 Carcinogenicity category 1A, 1B and 2 > 0, 1 Reproductive toxicity, category 1A, 1B, 2 and effects on or via lactation > 0, 1 Specific target organ toxicity (STOT) >1 Specific target organ toxicity (STOT) – repeated exposure, category 1 and 2 >1 Aspiration hazard > 10 Hazardous to the aquatic environment – Acute category 1 > 0, 1 Hazardous to the aquatic environment – Chronic category 1 > 0, 1Date Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 61 of 186
  • 62. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ Hazardous to the ozone layer > 0, 1 Substances that are persistent, bio-accumulative and toxic or very > 0, 1 persistent and very bio-accumulative per Annex III 4. Regulations Regulation Description Number/Directive REACH Corrigendum to Regulation (EC) No 1907/2006 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 18 December 2006 concerning the Registration, Evaluation, Authorization and Restriction of Chemicals (REACH), 1907/2006 establishing a European Chemicals Agency, amending Directive 1999/45/EC and repealing Council Regulation (EEC) No 793/93 and Commission Regulation (EC) No 1488/94 as well as Council Directive 76/769/EEC and Commission Directives 91/155/EEC, 93/67/EEC, 93/105/EC and 2000/21/EC. CLP Regulation (EC) No 1272/2008 of the European Parliament and of the 1272/2008 Council of 16 December 2008 on classification, labeling and packaging of substances and mixtures, amending and repealing Directives 67/548/EEC and 1999/45/EC, and amending Regulations (EC) No 1907/2006 67/548/EEC Dangerous Substances Directive Classification, Packaging and Labelling of Dangerous Preparations Directive 1999/45/EC by European Parliament and Council Directive 98/24/EC Chemical Agents Directive 2000/39/EC 2006/15/EC and Occupational exposure limits 2009/161/EU Protection of workers from risks related to exposure to carcinogens or 2004/37/EC mutagens at work Improvements in the safety and health of pregnant workers who have 92/85/EEC recently given birth and women who are breastfeeding 89/686/EEC Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) 96/35/EC and 2000/18/EC Classification of the various modes of transport 2008/68/EC Inland transport of dangerous goods Waste 2006/12/EC and 2008/98/EC Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System (WHMIS) is implemented through coordinated federal, provincial and territorial legislation. WHMIS Supplier labeling and SDS requirements are set out under the Hazardous Products Act and associated Controlled Products Regulations. Labeling of In-vitro Diagnostic Products For Human Use 21 CFR part 809 http://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/cdrh/cfdocs/cfcfr/CFRSearch.cfm? fr=809.10 US CPSC, FHSA regulations, 16 CFR 1500 et seq. (2009). US DOL, OSHA’s Hazard Communication Standard, 29 CFR 1910.1200 et seq. (2009). Other US Regulations US DOT Hazardous Materials regulations, 49 CFR 170-178.(2008). US EPA, FIFRA regulations, 40 CFR 158 et seq.(2009). US EPA, Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) regulations, 40 CFR 798 et seq.(2009)Date Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 62 of 186
  • 63. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ 5. Sample Safety Data Sheet (SDS) Section 1: Product and Company IDENTIFICATION XYZ Company Phone Number: (800) 123-1234 123 Main St. 24 hr. emergency phone number: (800) 123-4567 Hometown, USA 12345-1234 Product Name XYZ Chemical Product Code: 67890 Issue Date: September 2, 2009 Supersedes Date: January 2, 2004 Section 2: HAZARDS IDENTIFICATION Flam. Liq. 2, H225 Acute Tox. 3, H301 Acute Tox. 3, H311 Acute Tox. 3, H331 STOT SE 1, H370 Aquatic Acute 1, H400 (M-Factor (self-classification) = 10) EMERGENCY OVERVIEW Appearance/Odor: Colorless, free-flowing liquid with sweet odor.  WARNING! FLAMMABLE LIQUID AND VAPOR CAUSES SEVERE EYE AND RESPIRATORY TRACT IRRITATION AND CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM DEPRESSION CAUSES SKIN IRRITATION  HARMFUL IF SWALLOWED OR ABSORBED THROUGH SKIN  MAY CAUSE LIVER DAMAGE BASED ON ANIMAL DATA  POSSIBLE REPRODUCTIVE HAZARD – MAY CAUSE ADVERSE REPRODUCTIVE EFFECTS  BASED ON ANIMAL DATA, HIGHLY TOXIC TO FISH This product does not contain any carcinogens or potential carcinogens as listed by OSHA, IARC or NTP. Section 3: COMPOSITION/INFORMATION ON INGREDIENTS Component CAS # % by Wt. Component A 123-45-6 60 – 90 Component B Trade Secret 5 –15 Component C None Trade Secret Component D 987-65-4 0.1 Section 4: FIRST AID MEASURES Eye Contact Immediately flush eyes with water for at least 15 minutes. Get medical attention. If easy to do, remove contact lenses. Skin Contact Immediately flush skin with plenty of water for at least 15 minutes while removing contaminated clothing and shoes. Get medical attention. Wash clothing before reuse. Destroy contaminated shoes. Inhalation Remove to fresh air. If not breathing give artificial respiration. If breathing is difficult, give oxygen. Call a physician. Ingestion If swallowed, call a poison control center or physician immediately. Do NOT induce vomiting unless directed to do so by a physician. Never give anything by mouth to an unconscious person. Note to Physicians This product is not an inhibitor of cholinesterase. Treatment with atropine and oxides is not indicated.Date Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 63 of 186
  • 64. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ Section 5: FIRE FIGHTING MEASURES HMIS Rating: Health: 4 Fire: 4 Reactivity: 3 NFPA Rating: Health: 4 Fire: 4 Reactivity: 1 Suitable Extinguishing Media: CO2, water fog. Unsuitable Extinguishing Media: Alcohol foam. Products of Combustion: Oxides of carbon, nitrogen, sulfur. Protection of Firefighters: Vapor can form explosive mixture and re-ignite. Cool and use caution when approaching fire-exposed containers. Vapors may be irritating to eyes, skin and the respiratory tract. Firefighters should wear self-contained breathing apparatus and full fire-fighting turnout gear. Section 6: ACCIDENTAL RELEASE MEASURES Personal Precautions: Use personal protection recommended in Section 8. Environmental Precautions: This material is a water pollutant. Do not let spilled or leaking material enter waterways. Methods for Containment: Absorb spilled liquid in suitable material. Methods for Clean-Up: Eliminate all ignition sources. Cover with absorbent or contain. Collect and dispose. Wash residue with soap and water. Do not rinse to drain. Other Information: Spills of this material do not need to be reported to the National Response Center. Section 7: HANDLING AND STORAGE Handling Do not get in eyes. Do not breathe vapor or mist. Avoid contact with skin. Use in well ventilated areas. Wash thoroughly after handling. Keep away from heat, sparks and flame. Use grounding and bonding connection when transferring this material to prevent static discharge, fire or explosion. Storage Store in a cool, well ventilated area. Store away from incompatible materials. Keep container closed when not in use. Product residue may remain in empty containers. Observe all label precautions until container is cleaned, reconditioned or destroyed. Residual vapors may explode on ignition. Do not cut, drill, grind or weld on or near this container. Section 8: EXPOSURE CONTROLS/PERSONAL PROTECTION Exposure Guidelines Component A Not established. Component B TWA: 100 ppm (OSHA), TWA: 50 ppm (ACGIH) Component C TWA: 50 ppm (Manufacturer’s suggested limit) Component D TWA: 200 ppm (ACGIH), STEL: 250 ppm (skin) (ACGIH) Engineering Controls: Provide local exhaust ventilation. Eye/face Protection: Wear chemical splash goggles and face shield. Skin Protection: Wear chemical resistant clothing such as gloves, apron, boots or whole bodysuits made from neoprene, as appropriate. Respiratory Protection: Use NIOSH-approved air-purifying respirator with organic vapor cartridge or canister, as appropriate. General Hygiene Considerations: Wash thoroughly after handling. Have eye-wash facilities immediately available Section 9: PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL PROPERTIES Color: Colorless Odor: Sweet Physical State: Liquid. Freezing Point: < -25°F (< -32°C) Boiling Point: 165°F (74°C) Flash Point: 60 °F (107 °C) (TCC) Upper Flammability Limit: 12.0% @ 122°F (50°C) Lower Flammability Limit: 6.5% @ 122°F (50°C) Vapor Pressure: 85 mmHg @ 68°F (20°C) Vapor Density: 4.8Date Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 64 of 186
  • 65. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ Specific Gravity: 0.9 @ 60°F (15°C) Solubility (water): Negligible. Partition Coefficient (n-octanol/water): log KOW = 2.49 Percent Volatile, wt.%: 100 Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) content, wt.%: 100 Section 10: STABILITY AND REACTIVITY Possibility of Hazardous Reactions: Will not occur. Stability: Stable. Conditions to Avoid: Keep away from heat, sparks and flames. Incompatible Materials: Strong acids and bases. Strong oxidizing and reducing agents. Hazardous Decomposition Products: Ethylene oxide @ 100°F (38°C). Section 11: TOXICOLOGY INFORMATION ACUTE EFFECTS Oral LD50: > 5,000 mg/kg (rats) Dermal LD50: > 2,000 mg/kg (rabbits) September 2, 2009 Inhalation: In humans, irritation occurs at 200 ppm. CNS depression occurs at concentrations > 10,000 ppm however, motor skills may be impaired at 1,000 ppm. Eye Irritation: In humans, irritation occurs at 200 ppm. Primary Irritation Score 80/110. Severely irritating to the rabbit eye. Skin Irritation: Primary Irritation Score 4.0/8.0. Moderately irritating to rabbit skin. Sensitization: Not expected to cause skin or respiratory sensitization based on similarities to other tested materials of similar composition. CHRONIC EFFECTS Carcinogenicity: No carcinogenic effects noted in rats exposed to 10 ppm in drinking water for 2 years. Liver Effects: Hepatic necrosis related to treatment was seen in mice exposed to 1800 mg/kg through dermal exposure for 90 days. Mutagenicity: Negative in Ames test with and without metabolic activation. Reproductive Effects: Testicular effects were seen in rats administered 1000 mg/kg by gavage daily for 90 days. Section 12: ECOLOGICAL INFORMATION Ecotoxicity: Highly toxic to fish. 96 hour LC50 = 0.5 mg/L (fathead minnow) Persistence/ Degradability: Degradation is expected under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Bioaccumulation/ Accumulation: No appreciable bioconcentration is expected in the environment. log Kow = 2.49. Mobility in Environment: Appreciable volatilization is expected from water to air. Section 13: DISPOSAL CONSIDERATIONS Disposal: RCRA Hazardous Waste (ID# 0001). Dispose of in accordance with federal, state and local regulations. Empty containers must be triple-rinsed prior to disposal. Disposal Methods Example for NaOH Put into large container containing water. Neutralize with HCL (hydrochloric acid). Discharge into the sewer with sufficient water. Dilute greatly (< pH 9) before discharge. Section 10: STABILITY AND REACTIVITY Stability: Stable under normal conditions (70F (21C) and 14.7 psig (760 mmHg). Conditions to Avoid: Cylinder contents are pressurized. Do not expose to sudden shock or sources of heat. May form explosive mixtures with air. Incompatible Materials: Can react explosively when combined with air. Hazardous Decomposition Products: Carbon dioxide, nitrogen oxides Possibility of Hazardous Reactions: Can react explosively when combined with air.Date Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 65 of 186
  • 66. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ Section 11: TOXICOLOGICAL INFORMATION Effects of Exposure Inhalation: May be fatal if inhaled. Signs and symptoms of exposure may include coughing, gasping, choking and difficulty breathing. Symptoms may be delayed. Eyes: No specific hazard known. May cause transient irritation. Skin: No specific hazard known. May cause transient irritation. Ingestion: not applicable. Toxicity Data Inhalation LC50 (4 hrs): 75 ppm (rats) Subchronic effects: A two week inhalation study in rats exposed to 12 ppm unobtainium gas for 8 hrs/day, 5 days/week resulted in liver effects including elevated levels of hepatic enzymes, fat accumulation, hepatic degeneration and severe centrilobular necrosis. A 90-day study in rats exposed to 8 ppm unobtainium gas for 8 hrs/day, 5 days/week resulted in liver effects similar to those seen in the two week study. In addition, effects on blood (decreased white blood cells and lymphocytes), kidney (evidence of degeneration and necrosis) and lung (increased lung weight, hyperplasia, and decreased lung function) were also observed. Section 12: ECOLOGICAL INFORMATION Aquatic Toxicity: No data available. Terrestrial Toxicity: No data available. Persistence and degradability: Mobility: No data available. Bioaccumulation: No data available. Section 14: TRANSPORTATION INFORMATION US DOT (ground) Proper Shipping Description: UN 1993, Flammable liquids, n.o.s. (contains Component A, Component B), 3, II. Canadian TDG (ground) Proper Shipping Description: See US DOT ICAO (air) Proper Shipping Description: See US DOT Section 14: TRANSPORT INFORMATION US DOT: UN Number: 1953 Proper shipping name: Compressed gas, toxic, flammable, n.o.s. (contains unobtainium) Class: 2.3 (2.1) Packaging group: none IATA: UN Number: 1953 Proper shipping name:. Compressed gas, toxic, flammable, n.o.s. (contains unobtainium) Class: 2.3 (2.1) Packaging group: none IMDG: UN Number: 1953 Proper shipping name: Compressed gas, toxic, flammable, n.o.s. (contains unobtainium) Class: 2.3 (2.1) Packaging group: none TDG: UN Number: 1953 Proper shipping name: Compressed gas, toxic, flammable, n.o.s. (contains unobtainium) Class: 2.3 (2.1) Section 15: REGULATORY INFORMATION Global Inventories TSCA: United States Listed DSL: Canada Listed ENCS: Japan Listed AICS: Australia Listed EINECS: European Union ListedDate Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 66 of 186
  • 67. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ California Safe Drinking Water and Toxic Enforcement Act of 1986 (Proposition 65): This product contains chemicals known to the state of California to cause birth defects or other reproductive harm. WHMIS: Canadian Workplace Hazardous Material Information System: B3: combustible liquid D2A: very toxic material Section 15: REGULATORY INFORMATION US Federal Regulations California Safe Drinking Water and Toxic Enforcement Act of 1986 (Proposition 65): This material is not known to contain any chemicals currently listed as carcinogens or reproductive toxins. International Regulations Canadian Workplace Hazardous Material Information System (WHMIS): D1A, D2A International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC): Group 3 Section 16: OTHER INFORMATION Prepared by Company Name, Technical Expert The information contained in this document applies to this specific material as supplied. It may not be valid for this material if it is used in combination with any other materials. It is the user’s responsibility to satisfy oneself as to the suitability and completeness of this information for its intended use. 6. Resource Table: Preparation Resources (Other sources/link not listed in the following screen shots) Document/Link SDS Sections 1- 16 Link/Resource 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 Gen 1. X x x x x x 2. X X x x 3. X X x x 4. X X x x 5. X X x x 6. X X x x 7. x x x x x x x x x x x x x 8. x x x x x x x x x x x x x x 9. x 10. x x x x x x x x 11. x x 12. x x x x x 13. x 14. x x x x x x x 15. x x 16. x x x x x x x x x x x 17. x 18. x x x x x x 19. x 20. x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x 21. x x x x x x x 22. x x x x 23. x x 24. x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x 25. x x 26. x xDate Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 67 of 186
  • 68. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ Link/Resource 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 Gen 27. x 28. x 29. x 30. x 31. x 32. x x 33. x 34. x 35. x x 1. EINECS , EU inventory of existing chemical substances http://esis.jrc.ec.europa.eu/home.php Toxicity, exposure and Ecotoxicity values http://hazmap.nlm.nih.gov/cgi-bin/hazmap_generic? tbl=TblAgents&id=481 2. G:Regulatory AffairsSDS Tables B and B1 Hazard Label - CLP Annex 6 Tables 3-1 and 3.2 excel files containing lists of hazard classification (including concentration limits, CAS and EC numbers) per CLP/GHS (see file G:Regulatory AffairsReferenceshazard class statement CLP GHS with transport data.pdf) http://eur-lex.europa.eu/LexUriServ/LexUriServ.do?uri=OJ:L:2008:353:0001:1355:en:PDF list of Precautionary Statements 3. eChemPortal - The Global Portal to Information on Chemical Substances http://www.echemportal.org/echemportal/index?pageID=0&request_locale=en 4. European Chemical Substances Information System includes substance Data Sheet: CAS, EINECS, ELINCS, NLP, BPD, PBT, CLP/GHS, HPV-LPV and IUCLID Data Sheet http://esis.jrc.ec.europa.eu/index.php?PGM=ein 5. ECHA classification and labelling inventory http://www.echa.europa.eu/ search for class, labeling and chemical info , Chemical information for selected substance including GHS and DSP/DPD labeling and hazard class http://echa.europa.eu/clp/c_l_inventory_en.asp 6. International Program on Chemical Safety INCHEM - lists the summary of data reported and evaluation (i.e., carcinogenicity, exposure data) http://www.inchem.org 7. International Chemical Safety Cards (ICSC) listing SDS data for a substance http://www.ilo.org/dyn/icsc/showcard.home 8. GESTIS, German database http://gestis-en.itrust.de/nxt/gateway.dll/gestis_en/000000.xml? f=templates$fn=default.htm$3.0 includes more than 7,000 hazardous substances (enter the substance name in the search field) with classification, labeling, limit values, measuring methods, PPE, workplace limit values and occupational medicine with detailed toxicological data link http://www.inchem.org/documents/sids/sids/64175.pdf 9. Other Chemical Databases and Sites: http://www.chemindustry.com/category/87.html lists suppliers MSDS 10. List International Chemical Safety Card Information and search for chemical properties of substances from NIOSH NIOSH Pocket Guide to Chemical Hazards http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/npg/default.html http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/ipcsneng/neng0751.html Exposure Limits 11. EPA provides human health assessment information http://www.epa.gov/iris/subst/0191.htm 12. Regulatory and Toxicology information per substance and emergency guide http://environmentalchemistry.com/yogi/chemicals/ 13. Risk Codes for common substances from NASCO http://www.nascoinc.com/chemchart/ChemChart.pdfDate Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 68 of 186
  • 69. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ 14. Chemical Profile http://scorecard.goodguide.com/chemical-profiles/summary.tcl? edf_substance_id=20830-75-5#hazards 15. California PELs / exposure limits http://www.dir.ca.gov/title8/ac1.pdfUseful Links - Toxicology and Ecotoxicology 16. Data bank of the National Library of Medicines (NLM) Toxicology Data Network (TOXNET®). It focuses on the toxicology of the potential hazard of a chemical substance. It is constantly upgraded with information about human exposures, industrial hygiene, handling procedures in case of emergency, environmental destiny, regulatory prescription, etc. http://toxnet.nlm.nih.gov/cgi-bin/sis/htmlgen?HSDB The HSDB is accurately reviewed by a cross-disciplinary commission of experts (the Scientific Review Panel (SRP)). The HSDB is organized in individual chemical entries, and it contains more than 5000 entries. http://toxnet.nlm.nih.gov/cgi-bin/sis/htmlgen?TOXLINE Database of the NLM that gives bibliographic information about the biochemical, pharmacological, physiological and toxicological effects of drugs and other chemicals. It contains more than 4 millions bibliographic quotations, and lots of them are also provided with abstract and /or glossary and CAS number.Useful Links - Classification and Labelling 17. List the classification (DPD) of the substance http://apps.kemi.se/nclass/default.aspUseful Links - Chemicals Identification 18. Chemical Dictionary which contains identificative information (CAS number, molecular formulas, names, synonyms, structure) for about 350.000 chemical contained in the National Library of Medicine (Medline, Toxline, HSDB, etc) and also in the EINECS http://chem.sis.nlm.nih.gov/chemidplus Also list toxicity data http://chem.sis.nlm.nih.gov/chemidplus 19. Short lists of chemical properties http://www.caslab.com 20. Lists chemical and safety-related properties including lists of manufacturers and their MSDS http://www.chemicalbook.com 21. List all emergency guides for each common substances per hazard class (378 pages) http://www.tc.gc.ca/media/documents/canutec-eng/erg2008eng.pdf 22. LIST OF LISTS , Consolidated List of Chemicals Subject to the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA), Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) and Section 112(r) of the Clean Air Act. The presence of EHSs in quantities at or above the Threshold Planning Quantity (TPQ) requires certain emergency planning activities to be conducted. Releases of reportable quantities (RQ) of EHSs are subject to state and local reporting under section 304 of EPCRA http://www.gecap.org/pdf/list_of_lists.pdf . 23. U list and P list 40 CFR 261, list of regulatory bodies, hazardous waste disposal and management http://www.hercenter.org/hazmat/hazdeterm.cfm 24. University of Vermont – SIRI MSDS – a searchable MSDS site by chemical name http://hazard.com/msds/ 25. EPA Chemical Fact Sheets http://www.epa.gov/enviro/html/emci/chemref/ by chemical name which directs you to this link for chemical profile http://scorecard.goodguide.com/chemical-profiles/ lists regulatory and chemical data 26. Hazardous Chemical Information International Chemical Safety – Chemical propertiesDate Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 69 of 186
  • 70. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ Information available in a number of languages http://ull.chemistry.uakron.edu/erd/ 27. Pesticide and Other Chemical Information (Standards, glossary) http://extoxnet.orst.edu/ 28. Public Health Agency of Canada – Biosafety MSDS Data Base http://www.phac- aspc.gc.ca/lab-bio/res/psds-ftss/index-eng.php 29. UC San Diego Poison Information Center http://health.ucsd.edu/specialties/poison/Pages/default.aspx 30. Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry – Chemical Hazard and Toxicity Information http://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/ 31. Material Data Safety Sheets on the Internet http://www.ilpi.com/msds/ 32. Toxicity info for some drugs http://www.pesticideinfo.org/List_ChemicalsAlpha.jsp? ChemName=G 33. Short term toxicity (fish) excel file - LC50 toxicity database short term fish 34. DSL Canada list , an excel file - DSL maximal_list DSL Canada 35. http://oehha.ca.gov/scripts/cal_ecotox/chemicaldescription.asp Ecotox California Database ReportAmerican National Standards 1. ANSI Z400.1-2004, Hazardous Industrial Chemicals – Material Safety Data Sheets Preparation. 2. ANSI Z129.1-2006. Hazardous Industrial Chemicals – Precautionary Labeling. 3. ANSI Z535.1-2006, Safety Color Code. 4. ANSI Z535.2-2007, Standard for Environmental and Facility Signs. 5. ANSI Z535.3-2007, Standard for Criteria for Safety Symbols. 6. ANSI Z535.4-2007, Standard for Product Safety Signs and Labels. 7. ANSI Z535.5-2007, Standard for Accident Prevention Tags (for Temporary Hazards)GHS and Other Regulations 1. http:// www.unece.org/trans/danger/adnger.htm GHS text, UN paper and reports http://www.unece.org/trans/danger/publi/ghs/pictograms.html pictograms of hazards and precautionary phrases and other labeling diagrams 2. http://eur-lex.europa.eu/LexUriServ/LexUriServ.do?uri=OJ:L:2004:090:0015:0047:EN:PDF REGULATION (EC) No 574/2004 amending Annexes I and III to Regulation (EC) No 2150/2002 of the EC or http://eur-lex.europa.eu/LexUriServ/LexUriServ.do?uri=OJ:L:2010:253:0002:0041:EN:PDF (EU) No 849/2010 of 27 September 2010 amending Regulation (EC) No 2150/2002 of the European Parliament and of the Council on waste statistics Link: http://epp.eurostat.ec.europa.eu/portal/page/portal/waste/documents/GUIDANCE %20DOC.PDF 3. http://www.osha.gov/SLTC/hazardcommunicaations/global.html OSHA GHS information http://www.osha.gov/pls/oshaweb/owadisp.show_document?p_table=standards&p_id=10099 Guidance for Hazard Determination for Compliance with the OSHA Hazard Communication Standard (29 CFR 1910.1200) 4. http://www.hse.gov.uk/ghs/implications.htm CLP website with list of symbols, Safety and Risk phrases 5. http://www.epa.gov/oppfead1/international/globalharmon.htm EPA GHS information 6. http://www.hazmat.dot.gov/regs/intl/globharm.htm DOT GHS information 7. http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/ewh-semt/occup-travail/whmis-simdut/ghs-sgh/index_e.html Canada GHS informationDate Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 70 of 186
  • 71. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ 8. http://www.ghsinformation.com GHS information from http://www.sitehawk.com/ghs_home.html 9. http://eur-lex.europa.eu/it/index.htm Website for free access to European Union regulations and other public EU documents. It contains about 2.815.000 documents. The data bank is updated daily. The website is translated in any of the 23 languages of the European Union. 10. http://eur-lex.europa.eu/LexUriServ/LexUriServ.do?uri=OJ:L:2006:396:0001:0849:EN:PDF for REACH standards Note: The required SDS format and content are defined by Article 31 and Annex II of REACH which is in line with Annex 4 of the GHS as well as the CLP regulation 11. http://ec.europa.eu/enterprise/sectors/chemicals/files/reach/anii-rev-sds-comparison_en.pdf Comparison between the revised Annex II to REACH (as it will apply as of 1 December 2010), the relevant part of the UN GHS and the original Annex II to REACH (as applied since 1 June 2007). http://www.repre.net/ja/pdf/CLP_intoroduction117p%20ENGLISH.pdf for CLP standards 12. REACH Guidance: DG Enterprise -http://ec.europa.eu/enterprise/reach/index_en.htm - overview and links to further information, including additional guidance 13. http://ecfr.gpoaccess.gov/cgi/t/text/text-idx? c=ecfr&sid=f3fc1aeedcb0cc87bf4367f0a9cc03d0&rgn=div5&view=text&node=40:26.0.1.1.2& idno=40 cFR Title 40: PART 261—IDENTIFICATION AND LISTING OF HAZARDOUS WASTE, Appendix VIII to Part 261—Hazardous Constituents 14. http://ec.europa.eu/enterprise/reach/ghs_guidance_helpdesks_en.htm 15. Other resource: ANL Chemical Management System https://www.cms.anl.gov SIRI MSDS Index http://hazard.com/msds/ Health Canada http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/pphb-dgspsp/new_e.html MSDS Resource Library at READE: http://www.reade.com/MSDS_Links.html TOXNET, National Library of Medicine http://toxnet.nlm.nih.gov/ 16. CLP/GHS (Classification, Labelling and Packaging of substances and mixtures) CLP implements the Globally harmonized System (GHS), Regulation (EC) No 1272/2008 17. ASTM E502-07e1, Standard Test Method for Selection and Use of ASTM Standards for the Determination of Flash Point of Chemicals by Closed Cup Methods (2007). 18. ASTM D56-05, Standard Test Method for Flash Point by Tag Closed Cup Tester. 19. ASTM D93-08, Standard Test Method for Flash Point by Pensky-Martens Closed Cup Tester. 20. ASTM D3278-96(2004)e1, Standard Test Methods for Flash Point of Liquids by Small Scale Closed Cup Apparatus. 21. NFPA 30-2008, Flammable and Combustible Liquids Code. 22. National Fire Protection Association Standard 430, Code for the Storage of Liquid and Solid Oxidizing Materials, 2004 edition. 23. National Fire Protection Association. Fire Protection Guide to Hazardous Materials (contains complete text of NFPA 49, 325M, 491M and 704). 13th Edition.Date Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 71 of 186
  • 72. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ Other Links  http://www.oehha.ca.gov/prop65/prop65_list/files/P65single031612.pdf Proposition 65 List of cancer causing substances  http://ecfr.gpoaccess.gov/cgi/t/text/text-idx? c=ecfr&rgn=div8&view=text&node=40:24.0.1.1.28.4.19.6&idno=40 Tolerance and exemptions for chemicals (pesticides)  http://scp.eionet.europa.eu/useful_links European Topic Centre on Sustainable Consumption and Production contains links on EU waste management and other topics.  http://www.doeni.gov.uk/niea/hazguide_ni_classification_of_hw_version_1_may_200-2.pdf N Ireland Classification of Wastes  http://www.unece.org/fileadmin/DAM/trans/danger/publi/unrec/rev13/English/00E_Intro.pdf Recommendations on the Transport of Dangerous Goods  http://www.tc.gc.ca/eng/tdg/clear-part2-339.htm Transport of Dangerous Goods Canada  Hazardous Materials: Harmonization With the United Nations Recommendations, International Maritime Dangerous Goods Code, and the International Civil Aviation Organization Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods by Air https://www.federalregister.gov/articles/2011/01/19/2010-33324/hazardous-materials- harmonization-with-the-united-nations-recommendations-international-maritime  29 CFR 1910.1030 Toxic and Hazardous Substances - Bloodborne pathogens http://www.osha.gov/pls/oshaweb/owadisp.show_document? p_table=STANDARDS&p_id=10051 http://www.osha.gov/Publications/osha3186.html Model Plans and Programs for the OSHA Bloodborne Pathogens and Hazard Communications Standards  Laboratory Biosafety Manual 3rd edition, World Health Organization, 2004 (Biosafety7 manual.pdf ) The following references (links provided) are used to determine which substances are select carcinogens by Cal/OSHA’s classification:  OSHA Carcinogen List ( http://web.princeton.edu/sites/ehs/labsafetymanual/sec7j.htm ) Annual Report on Carcinogens published by the National Toxicology Program (NTP), including all of the substances listed as "known to be carcinogens" and some substances listed as "reasonably anticipated to be carcinogens" http://ntp.niehs.nih.gov/index.cfm? objectid=32BA9724-F1F6-975E-7FCE50709CB4C932  International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), including all of Group 1 "carcinogen to humans" by the International Agency for Research on Cancer Monographs (IARC) (Volumes 1-48 and Supplements 1-8); and some in Group 2A or 2B, "reasonably anticipated to be carcinogens" by the National Toxicology Program (NTP), and causes statistically significant tumor incidence in experimental animals in accordance with any of the following criteria: (i) after inhalation exposure of 6-7 hours per day, 5 days per week, for a significant portion of a lifetime to dosages of less than 10 mg/m3; (ii) after repeated skin application of less than 300 mg/kg of body weight per week; or (iii) after oral dosages of less than 50 mg/kg of body weight per day ( http://monographs.iarc.fr/ENG/Classification/crthgr01.php )Date Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 72 of 186
  • 73. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ 7. GHS Labels Sample Format Date Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 73 of 186
  • 74. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _Date Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 74 of 186
  • 75. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _Date Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 75 of 186
  • 76. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ 8. Translation Table under Regulation (EC) No 1907/2006 The table below lists the translation matrix of a classification made for a substance or a mixture under Directive 67/548/EEC or Directive 1999/45/EC, respectively, into the corresponding classification under this Regulation (EC) No 1907/2006. Whenever data for the substance or mixture are available, an evaluation and classification shall be done in accordance with Articles 9 to13 of Regulation No 1907/2006. TRANSLATION Table Translation between classification in accordance with Directive 67/548/EEC and Regulation (EC) No 1907/2006 (ANNEX VII) 67/548/EEC EC 1272/2008 CLP Reg Aquatic Environment ( CLP ) Categories Hazard Statement (H) “ dangerous for the “hazardous to the aquatic environment” environment Risk-phrases Signal Word: Danger, Warning Safety-phrases Precautionary Statement (P) N; R50 Aquatic Acute 1 H400 N; R50-53 Aquatic Acute 1 H400 Aquatic Chronic 1 H410 N; R51-53 Aquatic Chronic 2 H411 R52-53 Aquatic Chronic 3 H412 R53 Aquatic Chronic 4 H413 N; R59 Ozone EUH059 Non-aquatic Hazardous to the ozone layer environment “Dangerous for the ozone layer” Classification Physical state Hazard Class-and-Category Hazard under Directive of the (per EC 1907/2006) statement 67/548/EEC substance when relevant E; R3 No direct translation possible. O; R7 Org. Perox. CD H242 Org. Perox. EF H242 O; R8 gas Ox. Gas 1 H270 O; R8 liquid, solid No direct translation possible. O; R9 liquid Ox. Liq. 1 H271 O; R9 solid Ox. Sol. 1 H271Date Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 76 of 186
  • 77. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ Classification Physical state Hazard Class-and-Category Hazard under Directive of the (per EC 1907/2006) statement 67/548/EEC substance when relevant No direct translation possible. Correct translation of F; R11, liquid is: F; R11 liquid - Flam. Liq. 1, H224 if initial boiling point ≤ 35°C - Flam. Liq. 2, H225 if initial boiling point > 35°C F; R11 solid No direct translation possible. No direct translation possible. F+; R12 gas Correct translation of F+; R12, gaseous results either in Flam. Gas 1, H220 or Flam. Gas 2, H221. F+; R12 liquid Flam. Liq. 1 H224 No direct translation possible. Correct translation of R10, liquid is: - Flam. Liq. 1, H224 if flashpoint < 23 °C and initial boiling point ≤ 35°C R10 liquid - Flam. Liq. 2, H225 if flashpoint < 23°C and initial boiling point > 35 °C Flam. Liq. 3, H226 if flashpoint ≥ 23°C No direct translation possible. Correct translation of R10, liquid is: - Flam. Liq. 1, H224 if flashpoint < 23 °C and initial R10 liquid boiling point ≤ 35°C - Flam. Liq. 2, H225 if flashpoint < 23°C and initial boiling point > 35 °C - Flam. Liq. 3, H226 if flashpoint ≥ 23°C No direct translation possible. Correct translation of F; R11, liquid is: F; R11 liquid - Flam. Liq. 1, H224 if initial boiling point ≤ 35°C - Flam. Liq. 2, H225 if initial boiling point > 35°C F; R11 solid No direct translation possible. No direct translation possible. F+; R12 gas Correct translation of F+; R12, gaseous results either in Flam. Gas 1, H220 or Flam. Gas 2, H221. F+; R12 liquid Flam. Liq. 1 H224 F+; R12 liquid Self-react. CD H242 Self-react. EF H242 Self-react. G none F; R15 No translation possible. F; R17 liquid Pyr. Liq. 1 H250 F; R17 solid Pyr. Sol. 1 H250 Xn; R20 gas Acute Tox. 4 H332 (1) Xn; R20 vapours Acute Tox. 4 H332 (1) Xn; R20 dust/mist Acute Tox. 4 H332 Xn; R21 Acute Tox. 4 H312 (1) Xn; R22 Acute Tox. 4 H302 (1) T; R23 gas Acute Tox. 3 H331 (1) T; R23 vapour Acute Tox. 2 H330 T; R23 dust/mist Acute Tox. 3 H331 (1)Date Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 77 of 186
  • 78. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ Classification Physical state Hazard Class-and-Category Hazard under Directive of the (per EC 1907/2006) state- 67/548/EEC substance ment when relevant T; R24 Acute Tox. 3 H311 (1) T; R25 Acute Tox. 3 H301 (1) T+; R26 gas Acute Tox. 2 H330 (1) T+; R26 vapour Acute Tox. 1 H330 T+; R26 dust/mist Acute Tox. 2 H330 (1) T+; R27 Acute Tox. 1 H310 T+; R28 Acute Tox. 2 H300 (1) R33 STOT RE 2 H373 (3) C; R34 Skin Corr. 1B H314 (2) C; R35 Skin Corr. 1A H314 Xi; R36 Eye Irrit. 2 H319 Xi; R37 STOT SE 3 H335 Xi; R38 Skin Irrit. 2 H315 T; R39/23 STOT SE 1 H370 (3) T; R39/24 STOT SE 1 H370 (3) T; R39/25 STOT SE 1 H370 (3) T+; R39/26 STOT SE 1 H370 (3) T+; R39/27 STOT SE 1 H370 (3) T+; R39/28 STOT SE 1 H370 (3) Xi; R41 Eye Dam. 1 H318 R42 Resp. Sens. 1 H334 R43 Skin Sens. 1 H317 Xn; R48/20 STOT RE 2 H373 (3) Xn; R48/21 STOT RE 2 H373 (3) Xn; R48/22 STOT RE 2 H373 (3) T; R48/23 STOT RE 1 H372 (3) T; R48/24 STOT RE 1 H372 (3) T; R48/25 STOT RE 1 H372 (3) R64 Lact. H362 Xn; R65 Asp. Tox. 1 H304 R67 STOT SE 3 H336 Xn; R68/20 STOT SE 2 H371 (3) Xn; R68/21 STOT SE 2 H371 (3) Xn; R68/22 STOT SE 2 H371 (3) Carc. Cat. 1; R45 Carc. 1A H350 Carc. Cat. 2; R45 Carc. 1B H350 Carc. Cat. 1; R49 Carc. 1A H350i Carc. Cat. 2; R49 Carc. 1B H350i Carc. Cat. 3; R40 Carc. 2 H351 Muta. Cat. 2; Muta. 1B H340 R46 Muta. Cat. 3; Muta. 2 H341 R68 Repr. Cat. 1; R60 Repr. 1A H360F (4) Repr. Cat. 2; R60 Repr. 1B H360F (4) Repr. Cat. 1; R61 Repr. 1A H360D (4) Repr. Cat. 2; R61 Repr. 1B H360D (4) Repr. Cat. 3; R62 Repr. 2 H361f (4) Repr. Cat. 3; R63 Repr. 2 H361d (4)Date Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 78 of 186
  • 79. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ Classification Physical state Hazard Class-and-Category Hazard under Directive of the (per EC 1907/2006) state- 67/548/EEC substance ment when relevant Repr. Cat. 1; R60 Repr. 1A H360FD - 61 Repr. Cat. 1; R60 Repr. 1A H360FD Repr. Cat. 2; R61 Repr. Cat. 2; R60 Repr. 1A H360FD Repr. Cat. 1; R61 Repr. Cat. 2; R60 Repr. 1B H360FD – 61 Repr. Cat. 3; R62 Repr. 2 H361fd – 63 Repr. Cat. 1; R60 Repr. 1A H360Fd Repr. Cat. 3; R63 Repr. Cat. 2; R60 Repr. 1B H360Fd Repr. Cat. 3; R63 Repr. Cat. 1; R61 Repr. 1A H360Df Repr. Cat. 3; R62 Repr. Cat. 2; R61 Repr. 1B H360Df Repr. Cat. 3; R62 N; R50 Aquatic. Acute 1 H400 Aquatic Acute 1 H400 N; R50-53 Aquatic Chronic 1 H410 N; R51-53 Aquatic Chronic 2 H411 R52-53 Aquatic Chronic 3 H412 R53 Aquatic Chronic 4 H413 N; R59 Ozone EUH059 Note 1 For these classes, it is possible to use the recommended minimum classification as defined in section 1.2.1.1 in Annex VI. Data or other information may be available to indicate that reclassification in a more severe category is appropriate. Note 2 It is recommended to classify in Category 1B even if it also could be possible that 1C could be applicable for certain cases. Going back to original data, may not result in a possibility to distinguish between Category 1B or 1C, since the exposure period has normally been up to 4 hours according to Regulation (EC) No 440/2008. However, for the future, when data are derived from tests following a sequential approach per Regulation (EC) No 440/2008, Category 1C should be considered. Note 3 The route of exposure could be added to the hazard statement if it is conclusively proven that no other routes of exposure cause the hazard. Note 4 Hazard statements H360 and H361 indicate a general concern for both the reproductive properties related to fertility and developmental effects; "May damage/Suspected of damaging fertility or the unborn child". According to the classification criteria (Annex I, section 3.7) the general hazard statement can be replaced by the hazard statement indicating only the property of concern, in case either fertility or developmental effects are proven to be not relevant.Date Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 79 of 186
  • 80. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ Translation Table between Risk Phrases The table below list the assigned hazard category under Directive 67/548/EEC and supplementary labeling requirements under Regulation (EC) No 440/2008 Directive Directive This Regulation This Regulation 67/548/EEC 67/548/EEC R1 EUH001 R44 EUH044 R6 EUH006 R29 EUH029 R14 EUH014 R31 EUH031 R18 EUH018 R32 EUH032 R19 EUH019 R66 EUH066 R39-41 EUH070 9. Other Guidance and Notes Guidance on how to compile a SDS is detailed in Annex II of REACH (as amended , http://eur- lex.europa.eu/LexUriServ/LexUriServ.do?uri=OJ:L:2010:133:0001:0043:EN:PDF ). When REACH came into force it introduced some changes to the format of SDS. The main differences compared to the old (CHIP - UK) style SDS are: • An email contact address should be included in section 1, for competent person(s) to respond with appropriate advice. • An SDS should be supplied in an official language of the Member State(s) where the substance or mixture is placed on the market (unless the relevant Competent Authority in the Member State(s) concerned has indicated otherwise). In addition, SDSs for substances or mixtures containing substances that have been fully registered under REACH will require: • Inclusion of registration numbers where appropriate (see also section on confidentiality provisions). • Inclusion of the identified use(s) and uses advised against in Section 1. • Inclusion of exposure scenarios including any risk management measures required, in an Annex to the SDS. The information in the SDS should be consistent with the information in the chemical safety report (CSR) for that substance, or a mixture if a CSA for the mixture is available. • Inclusion of the relevant DNELs (see definitions) and PNECs (see definitions) for that substance in Section 8.Date Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 80 of 186
  • 81. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ 10. Hazard Statements Table H200 Unstable explosives. H201 Explosive; mass explosion hazard. H202 Explosive, severe projection hazard. H203 Explosive; fire, blast or projection hazard. H204 Fire or projection hazard. H205 May mass explode in fire. H220 Extremely flammable gas. H221 Flammable gas. H222 Extremely flammable aerosol. H223 Flammable aerosol. H224 Extremely flammable liquid and vapour. H225 Highly flammable liquid and vapour. H226 Flammable liquid and vapour. H228 Flammable solid. H240 Heating may cause an explosion. H241 Heating may cause a fire or explosion. H242 Heating may cause a fire. H250 Catches fire spontaneously if exposed to air. H251 Self-heating: may catch fire. H252 Self-heating in large quantities; may catch fire. In contact with water releases flammable gases which may ignite H260 spontaneously. H261 In contact with water releases flammable gases. H270 May cause or intensify fire; oxidiser. H271 May cause fire or explosion; strong oxidiser. H272 May intensify fire; oxidiser. H280 Contains gas under pressure; may explode if heated. H281 Contains refrigerated gas; may cause cryogenic burns or injury. H290 May be corrosive to metals. H300 Fatal if swallowed. H301 Toxic if swallowed. H302 Harmful if swallowed. H304 May be fatal if swallowed and enters airways. H310 Fatal in contact with skin. H311 Toxic in contact with skin. H312 Harmful in contact with skin. H314 Causes severe skin burns and eye damage. H315 Causes skin irritation. H317 May cause an allergic skin reaction. H318 Causes serious eye damage.Date Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 81 of 186
  • 82. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ H319 Causes serious eye irritation. H330 Fatal if inhaled. H331 Toxic if inhaled. H332 Harmful if inhaled. H334 May cause allergy or asthma symptoms or breathing difficulties if inhaled. H335 May cause respiratory irritation. H336 May cause drowsiness or dizziness. May cause genetic defects <state route of exposure if it is conclusively proven that no other routes of H340 exposure cause the hazard>. Suspected of causing genetic defects <state route of exposure if it is conclusively proven that no other routes of H341 exposure cause the hazard>. May cause cancer <state route of exposure if it is conclusively proven that no other routes of H350 exposure cause the hazard>. Suspected of causing cancer <state route of exposure if it is conclusively proven that no other routs of H351 exposure cause the hazard>. May damage fertility or the unborn child <state specific effect if known > <state route of exposure if it is conclusively proven H360 that no other routes of exposure cause the hazard>. Suspected of damaging fertility or the unborn child <state specific effect if known> <state route of exposure if it is conclusively proven H361 that no other routes of exposure cause the hazard>. H362 May cause harm to breast-fed children. Causes damage to organs <or state all organs affected, if known> <state route of exposure if it is conclusively H370 proven that no other routes of exposure cause the hazard>. May cause damage to organs <or state all organs affected, if known> < state route of exposure if it is conclusively proven that no other routes of H371 exposure cause the hazard>. Causes damage to organs <or state all organs affected, if known> through prolonged or repeated exposure <state route of exposure if it is conclusively H372 proven that no other routes of exposure cause the hazard>. May cause damage to organs <or state all organs affected, if known> through prolonged or repeated exposure <state route of exposure if it is conclusively proven H373 that no other routes of exposure cause the hazard>. H400 Very toxic to aquatic life. H410 Very toxic to aquatic life with long lasting effects. H411 Toxic to aquatic life with long lasting effects. H412 Harmful to aquatic life with long lasting effects. H413 May cause long lasting harmful effects to aquatic life. EUH001 Explosive when dry. EUH006 Explosive with or without contact with air. EUH014 Reacts violently with water.Date Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 82 of 186
  • 83. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ EUH018 In use may form flammable/explosive vapour-air mixture. EUH019 May form explosive peroxides. EUH044 Risk of explosion if heated under confinement. EUH029 Contact with water liberates toxic gas. EUH031 Contact with acids liberates toxic gas. EUH032 Contact with acids liberates very toxic gas. EUH066 Repeated exposure may cause skin dryness or cracking. EUH070 Toxic by eye contact. EUH071 Corrosive to the respiratory tract. EUH059 Hazardous to the ozone layer. GHS Hazard Statements General Notes Hazard statements form part of the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS). They are intended to form a set of standardized phrases about the hazards of chemical substances and mixtures that can be translated into different languages. As such, they serve the same purpose as the well-known R-phrases, which they are intended to replace. Hazard statements are one of the key elements for the labelling of containers under the GHS including: • an identification of the product • one or more hazard pictograms (where necessary) • a signal word – either DANGER or WARNING – where necessary • precautionary statements, indicating how the product should be handled to minimize risks to the user (as well as to other people and the general environment) • the identity of the supplier (who might be a manufacturer or importer) Each hazard statement is designated a code, starting with the letter H and followed by three digits. Statements which correspond to related hazards are grouped together by code number, so the numbering is not consecutive. The code is used for reference purposes, for example to help with translations, but it is the actual phrase which should appear on labels and safety data sheets.[4]Date Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 83 of 186
  • 84. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ Other EU Hazard Statements Some other hazard statements intended for use in very specific circumstances have also been retained under the CLP Regulation.[6] Note that, in this case, the numbering of the EU specific hazard statements can coincide with GHS hazard statements if the "EU" prefix is not included. • EUH201: Contains lead. Should not be used on surfaces liable to be chewed or sucked by children.  EUH201A: Warning! Contains lead. • EUH202: Cyanoacrylate. Danger. Bonds skin and eyes in seconds. Keep out of the reach of children. • EUH203: Contains chromium(VI). May produce an allergic reaction. • EUH204: Contains isocyanates. May produce an allergic reaction. • EUH205: Contains epoxy constituents. May produce an allergic reaction. • EUH206: Warning! Do not use together with other products. May release dangerous gases (chlorine). • EUH207: Warning! Contains cadmium. Dangerous fumes are formed during use. See information supplied by the manufacturer. Comply with the safety instructions. • EUH208: Contains <name of sensitising substance>. May produce an allergic reaction. • EUH209: Can become highly flammable in use.  EUH209A: Can become flammable in use. • EUH210: Safety data sheet available on request. • EUH401: To avoid risks to human health and the environment, comply with the instructions for use. 11. Precautionary Statement Table P101 If medical advice is needed, have product container or label at hand. P102 Keep out of reach of children. P103 Read label before use. P201 Obtain special instructions before use. P202 Do not handle until all safety precautions have been read and understood. P210 Keep away from heat/sparks/open flames/hot surfaces. – No smoking. P211 Do not spray on an open flame or other ignition source. P220 Keep/Store away from clothing/…/combustible materials. P221 Take any precaution to avoid mixing with combustibles… P222 Do not allow contact with air. Keep away from any possible contact with water, because of violent reaction and P223 possible flash fire. P230 Keep wetted with… P231 Handle under inert gas. P232 Protect from moisture. P233 Keep container tightly closed. P234 Keep only in original container. P235 Keep cool. P240 Ground/bond container and receiving equipment.Date Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 84 of 186
  • 85. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ P241 Use explosion-proof electrical/ventilating/lighting/…/ equipment. P242 Use only non-sparking tools. P243 Take precautionary measures against static discharge. P244 Keep reduction valves free from grease and oil. P250 Do not subject to grinding/shock/…/friction. P251 Pressurized container: Do not pierce or burn, even after use. P260 Do not breathe dust/fume/gas/mist/vapours/spray. P261 Avoid breathing dust/fume/gas/mist/vapours/spray. P262 Do not get in eyes, on skin, or on clothing. P263 Avoid contact during pregnancy/while nursing. P264 Wash … thoroughly after handling. P270 Do no eat, drink or smoke when using this product. P271 Use only outdoors or in a well-ventilated area. P272 Contaminated work clothing should not be allowed out of the workplace. P273 Avoid release to the environment. P280 Wear protective gloves/protective clothing/eye protection/face protection. P281 Use personal protective equipment as required. P282 Wear cold insulating gloves/face shield/eye protection. P283 Wear fire/flame resistant/retardant clothing. P284 Wear respiratory protection. P285 In case of inadequate ventilation wear respiratory protection. P231+P232 Handle under inert gas. Protect from moisture. P235+P410 Keep cool. Protect from sunlight. P301 IF SWALLOWED: P302 IF ON SKIN: P303 IF ON SKIN (or hair): P304 IF INHALED: P305 IF IN EYES: P306 IF ON CLOTHING: P307 IF exposed: P308 IF exposed or concerned: P309 IF exposed or if you feel unwell: P310 Immediately call a POISON CENTER or doctor/physician. P311 Call a POISON CENTER or doctor/physician.Date Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 85 of 186
  • 86. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ P312 Call a POISON CENTER or doctor/physician if you feel unwell. P313 Get medical advice/attention. P314 Get medical advice/attention if you feel unwell. P315 Get immediate medical advice/attention. P320 Specific treatment is urgent (see … on this label). P321 Specific treatment (see … on this label). P322 Specific measures (see … on this label). P330 Rinse mouth. P331 Do NOT induce vomiting. P332 If skin irritation occurs: P333 If skin irritation or rash occurs: P334 Immerse in cool water/wrap in wet bandages. P335 Brush off loose particles from skin. P336 Thaw frosted parts with lukewarm water. Do no rub affected area. P337 If eye irritation persists: P338 Remove contact lenses, if present and easy to do. Continue rinsing. P340 Remove victim to fresh air and keep at rest in a position comfortable for breathing. If breathing is difficult, remove victim to fresh air and keep at rest in a position P341 comfortable for breathing. P342 If experiencing respiratory symptoms: P350 Gently wash with plenty of soap and water. P351 Rinse cautiously with water for several minutes. P352 Wash with plenty of soap and water. P353 Rinse skin with water/shower. Rinse immediately contaminated clothing and skin with plenty of water before P360 removing clothes. P361 Remove/Take off immediately all contaminated clothing. P362 Take off contaminated clothing and wash before reuse. P363 Wash contaminated clothing before reuse. P370 In case of fire: P371 In case of major fire and large quantities: P372 Explosion risk in case of fire. P373 DO NOT fight fire when fire reaches explosives. P374 Fight fire with normal precautions from a reasonable distance. P375 Fight fire remotely due to the risk of explosion. P376 Stop leak if safe to do so. P377 If eye irritation persists: P378 Use … for extinction. P380 Evacuate area. P381 Eliminate all ignition sources if safe to do so.Date Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 86 of 186
  • 87. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ P390 Absorb spillage to prevent material damage. P391 Collect spillage. P301+P310 IF SWALLOWED: Immediately call a POISON CENTER or doctor/physician. P301+P312 IF SWALLOWED: Call a POISON CENTER or doctor/physician if you feel unwell. P301+P330+P331 IF SWALLOWED: rinse mouth. Do NOT induce vomiting. P302+P334 IF ON SKIN: Immerse in cool water/wrap in wet bandages. P302+P350 IF ON SKIN: Gently wash with plenty of soap and water. P302+P352 IF ON SKIN: Wash with plenty of soap and water. IF ON SKIN (or hair): Remove/Take off immediately all contaminated clothing. Rinse P303+P361+P353 skin with water/shower. IF INHALED: Remove victim to fresh air and keep at rest in a position comfortable for P304+P340 breathing. IF INHALED: If breathing is difficult, remove victim to fresh air and keep at rest in a P304+P341 position comfortable for breathing. IF IN EYES: Rinse cautiously with water for several minutes. Remove contact lenses, P305+P351+P338 if present and easy to do. Continue rinsing. IF ON CLOTHING: rinse immediately contaminated clothing and skin with plenty of P306+P360 water before removing clothes. P307+P311 IF exposed: Call a POISON CENTER or doctor/physician. P308+P313 IF exposed or concerned: Get medical advice/attention. P309+P311 IF exposed or if you feel unwell: Call a POISON CENTER or doctor/physician. P332+P313 If skin irritation occurs: Get medical advice/attention. P333+P313 If skin irritation or rash occurs: Get medical advice/attention. P335+P334 Brush off loose particles from skin. Immerse in cool water/wrap in wet bandages. P337+P313 If eye irritation persists: Get medical advice/attention. P342+P311 If experiencing respiratory symptoms: Call a POISON CENTER or doctor/physician. P370+P376 In case of fire: Stop leak if safe to do so. P370+P378 In case of fire: Use … for extinction. P370+P380 In case of fire: Evacuate area. P370+P380+P375 In case of fire: Evacuate area. Fight fire remotely due to the risk of explosion. In case of major fire and large quantities: Evacuate area. Fight fire remotely due to the P371+P380+P375 risk of explosion. P401 Store … P402 Store in a dry place. P403 Store in a well-ventilated place. P404 Store in a closed container. P405 Store locked up. P406 Store in corrosive resistant/… container with a resistant inner liner. P407 Maintain air gap between stacks/pallets. P410 Protect from sunlight. P411 Store at temperatures not exceeding …°C/…°F. P412 Do not expose to temperatures exceeding 50°C/ 122°F.Date Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 87 of 186
  • 88. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ P413 Store bulk masses greater than … kg/… lbs at temperatures not exceeding …°C/…°F. P420 Store away from other materials. P422 Store contents under … P402+P404 Store in a dry place. Store in a closed container. P403+P233 Store in a well-ventilated place. Keep container tightly closed. P403+P235 Store in a well-ventilated place. Keep cool. P410+P403 Protect from sunlight. Store in a well-ventilated place. P410+P412 Protect from sunlight. Do no expose to temperatures exceeding 50°C/ 122°F. P411+P235 Store at temperatures not exceeding …°C/…°F. Keep cool. P501 Dispose of contents/container to … P370+P378 In case of fire: Use for extinction: P370+P378a In case of fire: Use for extinction: CO2, powder or water spray. P370+P378b In case of fire: Use for extinction: Special powder for metal fires. P370+P378c In case of fire: Use for extinction: CO2, sand, extinguishing powder. P370+P378d In case of fire: Use for extinction: Water. P370+P378e In case of fire: Use for extinction: Water haze. P370+P378f In case of fire: Use for extinction: Water spray. P370+P378g In case of fire: Use for extinction: Foam. P370+P378h In case of fire: Use for extinction: Alcohol resistant foam. P370+P378i In case of fire: Use for extinction: Fire-extinguishing powder. P370+P378j In case of fire: Use for extinction: BC powder. P370+P378k In case of fire: Use for extinction: ABC powder. P370+P378l In case of fire: Use for extinction: Carbon dioxide. P370+P378m In case of fire: Use for extinction: Limestone powder. P370+P378n In case of fire: Use for extinction: Cement. P370+P378o In case of fire: Use for extinction: Sand. P370+P378p In case of fire: Use for extinction: Dry sand. P378 Use for extinction: P378a Use for extinction: CO2, powder or water spray. P378b Use for extinction: Special powder for metal fires. P378c Use for extinction: CO2, sand, extinguishing powder. P378d Use for extinction: Water. P378e Use for extinction: Water haze. P378f Use for extinction: Water spray. P378g Use for extinction: Foam. P378h Use for extinction: Alcohol resistant foam. P378i Use for extinction: Fire-extinguishing powder. P378j Use for extinction: BC powder. P378k Use for extinction: ABC powder. P378l Use for extinction: Carbon dioxide. P378m Use for extinction: Limestone powder. P378n Use for extinction: Cement. P378o Use for extinction: Sand.Date Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 88 of 186
  • 89. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ P378p Use for extinction: Dry sand. P380 Evacuate area. P381 Eliminate all ignition sources if safe to do so. P390 Absorb spillage to prevent material damage. P391 Collect spillage. Storage precautionary statements P401 Store in accordance with local/regional/national/international regulations. P401a Store in accordance with local/regional/national/international regulations. P402 Store in a dry place. P402+P404 Store in a dry place. Store in a closed container. P403 Store in a well-ventilated place. P403+P233 Store in a well-ventilated place. Keep container tightly closed. P403+P235 Store in a well-ventilated place. Keep cool. P404 Store in a closed container. P405 Store locked up. P406 Store in corrosive resistant container with a resistant inner liner. P407 Maintain air gap between stacks/pallets. P410 Protect from sunlight. P410+P403 Protect from sunlight. Store in a well-ventilated place. P410+P412 Protect from sunlight. Do no expose to temperatures exceeding 50°C/ 122°F. P411 Store at temperatures not exceeding ... °C/ ...°F. P411+P235 Store at temperatures not exceeding ... °C/ ... °F. Keep cool. P411a Store at temperatures not exceeding $°C. P411a+P235 Store at temperatures not exceeding $°C. Keep cool. P411b Store at temperatures not exceeding $°F. P411b+P235 Store at temperatures not exceeding $°F. Keep cool. P412 Do not expose to temperatures exceeding 50°C/ 122°F. P413 Store bulk masses greater than ... kg/ ... lbs at temperatures not exceeding ... °C/ ... °F. P413a Store bulk masses greater than $ kg at temperatures not exceeding $°C. P413b Store bulk masses greater than $ lbs at temperatures not exceeding $°F. P420 Store away from other materials. P420a Store away from foodstuffs. P420b Store away from flammable substances. P420c Store away from oxidizing agents. P420d Store away from reducing agents. P420e Store away from water. P420f Store away from metals. P420g Store away from acids. P420h Store away from caustic solutions. P422 Store contents under ... P422a Store contents under inert gas. P422b Store contents under protective gas. P422c Store contents under solvent. P422d Store under water. P422e Store in petroleum. P422f Store in nitrogen. Disposal precautionary statements P501 Dispose of contents/container to ... P501a Dispose of contents/container in accordance with local/regional/national/international regulations.Date Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 89 of 186
  • 90. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ P502 Refer to manufacturer/supplier for information on recovery/recycling. Hazard Statements Physical hazards H200 Unstable explosives. H201 Explosive; mass explosion hazard. H202 Explosive, severe projection hazard. H203 Explosive; fire, blast or projection hazard. H204 Fire or projection hazard. H205 May mass explode in fire. H220 Extremely flammable gas. H221 Flammable gas. H222 Extremely flammable aerosol. H223 Flammable aerosol. H224 Extremely flammable liquid and vapour. H225 Highly flammable liquid and vapour. H226 Flammable liquid and vapour. H227 Combustible liquid. H228 Flammable solid. H240 Heating may cause an explosion. H241 Heating may cause a fire or explosion. H242 Heating may cause a fire. H250 Catches fire spontaneously if exposed to air. H251 Self-heating: may catch fire. H252 Self-heating in large quantities; may catch fire. H260 In contact with water releases flammable gases which may ignite spontaneously. H261 In contact with water releases flammable gas. H270 May cause or intensify fire; oxidizer. H271 May cause fire or explosion; strong oxidizer. H272 May intensify fire; oxidizer. H280 Contains gas under pressure; may explode if heated. H281 Contains refrigerated gas; may cause cryogenic burns or injury. H290 May be corrosive to metals. Health hazards H300 Fatal if swallowed. H300+H310 Fatal if swallowed or in contact with skin. H300+H310+H330 Fatal if swallowed, in contact with skin or if inhaled. H300+H330 Fatal if swallowed or if inhaled. H301 Toxic if swallowed. H301+H311 Toxic if swallowed or in contact with skin. H301+H311+H331 Toxic if swallowed, in contact with skin or if inhaled. H301+H331 Toxic if swallowed or if inhaled. H302 Harmful if swallowed. H302+H312 Harmful if swallowed or in contact with skin. H302+H312+H332 Harmful if swallowed, in contact with skin or if inhaled. H302+H332 Harmful if swallowed or if inhaled. H303 May be harmful if swallowed. H304 May be fatal if swallowed and enters airways. H305 May be harmful if swallowed and enters airways. H310 Fatal in contact with skin.Date Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 90 of 186
  • 91. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ H310+H330 Fatal in contact with skin or if inhaled. H311 Toxic in contact with skin. H311+H331 Toxic in contact with skin or if inhaled. H312 Harmful in contact with skin. H312+H332 Harmful in contact with skin or if inhaled. H313 May be harmful in contact with skin. H314 Causes severe skin burns and eye damage. H315 Causes skin irritation. H316 Causes mild skin irritation. H317 May cause an allergic skin reaction. H318 Causes serious eye damage. H319 Causes serious eye irritation. H320 Causes eye irritation. H330 Fatal if inhaled. H331 Toxic if inhaled. H332 Harmful if inhaled. H333 May be harmful if inhaled. H334 May cause allergy or asthma symptoms or breathing difficulties if inhaled. H335 May cause respiratory irritation. H335+H336 May cause respiratory irritation. May cause drowsiness or dizziness. H336 May cause drowsiness or dizziness. H340 May cause genetic defects. H340-EG May cause genetic defects . H340a May cause genetic defects. H341 Suspected of causing genetic defects. H341-EG Suspected of causing genetic defects . H341a Suspected of causing genetic defects. H350 May cause cancer. H350-EG May cause cancer . H350a May cause cancer. H350i May cause cancer by inhalation. H351 Suspected of causing cancer. H351-EG Suspected of causing cancer . H351a Suspected of causing cancer. H360 May damage fertility or the unborn child. H360+H362 May damage fertility or the unborn child. May cause harm to breast-fed children. H360-EG May damage fertility or the unborn child . H360a May damage fertility or the unborn child. H360D May damage the unborn child. H360Df May damage the unborn child. Suspected of damaging fertility. H360F May damage fertility. H360Fd May damage fertility. Suspected of damaging the unborn child. H360FD May damage fertility. May damage the unborn child. H361 Suspected of damaging fertility or the unborn child. H361-EG Suspected of damaging fertility or the unborn child . H361a Suspected of damaging fertility or the unborn child. H361d Suspected of damaging the unborn child. H361f Suspected of damaging fertility. H361fd Suspected of damaging fertility. Suspected of damaging the unborn child. H362 May cause harm to breast-fed children. H370 Causes damage to organs. H370-EG Causes damage to organs .Date Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 91 of 186
  • 92. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ H370a Causes damage to organs. H371 May cause damage to organs. H371-EG May cause damage to organs . H371a May cause damage to organs. H372 Causes damage to organs through prolonged or repeated exposure. H372-EG Causes damage to organs through prolonged or repeated exposure . H372a Causes damage to organs through prolonged or repeated exposure. H373 May cause damage to organs through prolonged or repeated exposure. H373-EG May cause damage to organs through prolonged or repeated exposure . H373a May cause damage to organs through prolonged or repeated exposure. Environmental Hazards H400 Very toxic to aquatic life. H401 Toxic to aquatic life. H402 Harmful to aquatic life. H410 Very toxic to aquatic life with long lasting effects. H411 Toxic to aquatic life with long lasting effects. H412 Harmful to aquatic life with long lasting effects. H413 May cause long lasting harmful effects to aquatic life. H420 Harms public health and the environment by destroying ozone in the upper atmosphere. European Union Hazard Statements EUH001 Explosive when dry. EUH006 Explosive with or without contact with air. EUH014 Reacts violently with water. EUH018 In use may form flammable/explosive vapour-air mixture. EUH018a In use may form explosive vapour-air mixture. EUH018b In use may form flammable vapour-air mixture. EUH019 May form explosive peroxides. EUH029 Contact with water liberates toxic gas. EUH030 Can become highly flammable in use. EUH031 Contact with acids liberates toxic gas. EUH032 Contact with acids liberates very toxic gas. EUH044 Risk of explosion if heated under confinement. EUH059 Hazardous to the ozone layer. EUH066 Repeated exposure may cause skin dryness or cracking. EUH070 Toxic by eye contact. EUH071 Corrosive to the respiratory tract. EUH201 Contains lead. Should not be used on surfaces liable to be chewed or sucked by children. Warning! Contains lead. EUH201A Warning! Contains lead. EUH202 Cyanoacrylate. Danger. Bonds skin and eyes in seconds. Keep out of the reach of children. EUH203 Contains chromium (VI). May produce an allergic reaction. EUH204 Contains isocyanates. See information supplied by the manufacturer. EUH205 Contains epoxy constituents. See information supplied by the manufacturer. EUH206 Warning! Do not use together with other products. May release dangerous gases (chlorine). EUH207 Warning! Contains cadmium. Dangerous fumes are formed during use. See information supplied by the manufacturer. Comply with the safety instructions. EUH207-EG Warning! Contains cadmium. Dangerous fumes are formed during use. See informationDate Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 92 of 186
  • 93. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ supplied by the manufacturer. Comply with the safety instructions. EUH208 Contains (name of sensitising substance). May produce an allergic reaction. EUH208-EG Contains (name of sensitising substance). May produce an allergic reaction. EUH209 Can become highly flammable in use. EUH209a Can become highly flammable in use. EUH209b Can become flammable in use. EUH209A Can become flammable in use. EUH210 Safety data sheet available on request. EUH401 To avoid risks to human health and the environment, comply with the instructions for use.Date Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 93 of 186
  • 94. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ 12. Derivation of the Mixture Classification 2. Classification via application of substance criteria is not possible since test data (other than a pH) was not provided for the mixture. 3. The overall mixture pH of 4.0 does not result in classification in Category 1 since this does not fall within the criteria of pH ≤ 2 or pH ≥ 11.5. 4. Classification via the application of bridging principles is not possible since data on a similar mixture was not provided. 5. Classification of the mixture based on ingredient data can be considered. 6. Ingredient 1 with a pH = 1.8 is an ingredient for which additivity might not apply. Expert judgment would be needed to determine whether or not additivity applies, which is to be based on the knowledge of the ingredients. Note: Given the limited information in this example, the classifier of this mixture chose to apply non-additivity as a conservative approach - without information on the mode of action of ingredient 1, the mixture could be corrosive regardless of the overall pH. (i.e. “A mixture containing corrosive or irritant ingredients that cannot be classified based on the additivity approach due to chemical characteristics that make this approach unworkable, should be classified as skin category 1A, 1B or 1C if it contains ≥ 1% of a corrosive ingredient and as skin category 2) 13. EPA Outline of the Six Steps for Hazardous Waste Determination The process to determine whether a waste is hazardous are listed below, expressed as a series of questions (http://www.hercenter.org/hazmat/hazdeterm.cfm#mixture ): 1. Is it "solid waste"? (Does it meet the regulatory definition of a "solid waste"?) 2. Is it excluded? (Does it fall under a regulatory exemption?) 3. Is it listed? (Is it included in a specific list of wastes?) 4. Is it characteristic? (Does it have a specific set of properties?) 5. Is it a mixture? (Even if not itself hazardous, is it mixed with hazardous wastes?) 6. Is it derived from a hazardous waste? 7. Mixture: If a hazardous waste and a non-hazardous waste are mixed, the resulting mixture may inherit the hazardous classification. The rules are different for listed and characteristic wastes. - Mixing in any amount of a listed waste will cause the mixture to be considered hazardous. - Mixing in a characteristic waste will cause the mixture to become hazardous only if the mixture itself exhibits the characteristic.Date Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 94 of 186
  • 95. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ 14. Classification Criteria, H-criterion, under LoW and DPD Source: Review of European List of Waste Nov 2008 ( low_review_oekopol.pdf file) Link: http://ec.europa.eu/environment/waste/pdf/low_review_oekopol.pdf H-criterion 67/548/EEC R- Criteria LoW Concentration Concentration phrases in addition leading to same leading to to revised class ‘dangerous’ in WFD lowest concentration H8, R34 causes R35 > 1% R34 and R35 - > R35: 1%, R34: corrosive burns, R35 R34 > 5% 10% 5% causes severe CLP: 1 and 5% burns 15. Determination Scheme for the Classification of Waste Its search and decision making scheme offered in the first two steps for the identification of the waste is identical with the approach in point three of the introduction section of the LoW. In case the waste has a mirror entry the following decision tree is followed (see also Annex 6.3): • Step 1: Waste with a flash point below 55°C is hazardous. • Step 2: The composition of the waste, i.e. the contained substances and their concentrations, is determined and further assessed on the basis of the R-phrases. • Step 3: Comparison of the contained substances with the substances in Annex 2 of the Dutch guideline. • Step 4: Comparison of the contained substances with the substances in Annex 1 of the Substance Directive. • Step 5: Determination of R-Phrases on the basis of existing data (physical chemical properties, toxicity, ecotoxicity). Note: In step 5 a scheme with all R-phrases and the respective concentration levels offers a guidance to decide the hazardousness. In a separate table substances, which render the waste hazardous, are connected to R-phrases, H-criteria and limit values, where available. A second table is structured according to the R phrases.Date Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 95 of 186
  • 96. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ Identifying Waste with the European Waste Catalogue (EWC) There are three methods when searching for an EWC code. The first 2 of them are online tools: • First Method - Use our online EWC Code Lookup tool to follow the recommended three steps laid out by EA at http://www.chemrec.co.uk/hazwaste/ewc_look_up.asp • Second Method – Search the whole catalogue for keywords such as “engine oil” or “solvents”: In some cases it might be easier to do a text search of all the waste types available and then try and work back to the closest EWC match – our online text search tool will allow you to do this at same link as above - http://www.chemrec.co.uk/hazwaste/ewc_look_up.asp • Third Method – Obtain or download a copy of the full list of wastes from the Environment Agency on 08708 502 858 or download it (WM2 - Interpretation of the definition and classification of hazardous waste technical guidance) and follow the methodology described there, which we have summarised as: The EWC will assist in identifying hazardous wastes and in completing consignment notes with the six digit code provided for each waste type. Codes ending with 99 are normally not used unless no other code can be found (non descriptive). Step I: Identify your Industry/Source/Process. Find the sub-group of that Industry and finally you will be presented with a list of wastes and you should choose the closest match to the waste you have – the one selected is the EWC code. Go to Step 2 if you have made a choice using a code ending 99. Step II: Identify the generic waste group and choose the closest match to the waste you have – the one selected is the EWC code. If you had a code in step 1 ending 99 and have not found a suitable code or cannot find an appropriate code then go to: Step III: Identify the specific waste if no code can be found and only then use the 99 codes of the appropriate chapter. The Hazardous Waste Regulations 2005, in line with other recent Environment Agency documents, are placing the emphasis on Waste Producers to classify their waste correctly. In order to classify a waste you can get the full advice from the EA website - go to their home page here and enter "Technical Guidance WM2 Hazardous Waste" into search box (they keep moving the pages)Date Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 96 of 186
  • 97. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ Waste Classification To classify the waste you will need to at the least provide: • Provide a Description • Identify an EWC Code If Hazardous: • Describe the Physical State • Identify a Hazard Code • Describe the Process • Identify the Chemicals which are hazardous and their concentrations • You then need to consider if the waste is Hazardous for Carriage, if so then identify:  UN number  Class  Packaging Group  Special Handling Requirements European Waste Catalogue (EWC 2002) The EWC 2002 details a series of steps for identifying wastes in the catalogue and determining whether a waste may be covered by a hazardous waste entry. The EWC 2002 consists of 20 chapters that relate to the processes that generated the waste or to the specific waste types. The chapters are given two-digit number ranging from 01 to 20. These chapters must be used in a specific order of preference to classify your waste. Each chapter contains sub-chapters that are identified by four-digits. Within each sub-chapter is a list of unique six digit codes for each waste. The following steps must be used to identify the correct 6-digit code for a waste: 1. Find out whether the waste was produced from the source described in chapters 01 to 12 or 17 to 20. If so, work out the appropriate six-digit code of the waste. At this point, codes ending in ‘99’ cannot be chosen. 2. If there is no appropriate waste code in 01 to 12 or 17 to 20, you must now look at chapters 13, 14 and 15 to identify the waste. 3. If none of these codes apply, use chapter 16 to identify the waste. 4. If the waste is not in chapter 16 either, the 99 code (wastes not otherwise specified) must be used in the section of the list that matches the activity identified above in 1. The different wastes produced by one organisation may be described in several of the chapters. Some of the 6-digit codes in the List of Wastes have an asterisk next to them. These are the hazardous wastes. Wastes without an asterisk are not hazardous waste. The List of Wastes is reproduced in Appendix A of our technical guidance WM2: Interpretation of the definition and classification of hazardous waste. In WM2 some entries are coloured red and blue:Date Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 97 of 186
  • 98. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ • the entries in red are known as “Absolute” hazardous wastes; • the entries in blue are known as “Mirror” hazardous wastes; “Absolute Entries” Certain wastes marked with an asterisk (*) are deemed by the agencies to be hazardous regardless of their composition or the concentration of any “dangerous substance” within the waste – they are automatically considered hazardous. Such wastes have been termed “absolute” entries in WM2 and are coloured red for clarity. 16. Intermediate Translation Table LoW to CLP The list below describes the properties of waste which render it hazardous per Directive 2008/98/EC (Translation between Hazard Classification per Directive 67/548/EEC and Regulation 1272/2008 of the European Union): • H 1 ‘Explosive’: substances and preparations which may explode under the effect of flame or which are more sensitive to shocks or friction than dinitrobenzene. • H 2 ‘Oxidizing’: substances and preparations which exhibit highly exothermic reactions when in contact with other substances, particularly flammable substances. • H 3-A ‘Highly flammable’: liquid substances and preparations having a flash point below 21 °C (including extremely flammable liquids), Or substances and preparations which may become hot and finally catch fire in contact with air at ambient temperature without any application of energy, or solid substances and preparations which may readily catch fire after brief contact with a source of ignition and which continue to burn or to be consumed after removal of the source of ignition, or gaseous substances and preparations which are flammable in air at normal pressure, or substances and preparations which, in contact with water or damp air, evolve highly flammable gases in dangerous quantities. • H 3-B ‘Flammable’: liquid substances and preparations having a flash point equal to or greater than 21 °C and less than or equal to 55 °C. • H 4 ‘Irritant’: non-corrosive substances and preparations which, through immediate, prolonged or repeated contact with the skin or mucous membrane, can cause inflammation. • H 5 ‘Harmful’: substances and preparations which, if they are inhaled or ingested or if they penetrate the skin, may involve limited health risks. • H 6 ‘Toxic’: substances and preparations (including very toxic substances and preparations) which, if they are inhaled or ingested or if they penetrate the skin, may involve serious, acute or chronic health risks and even death. • H 7 ‘Carcinogenic’: substances and preparations which, if they are inhaled or ingested or if they penetrate the skin, may induce cancer or increase its incidence. • H 8 ‘Corrosive’: substances and preparations which may destroy living tissue on contact. • H 9 ‘Infectious’: substances and preparations containing viable micro-organisms or their toxins which are known or reliably believed to cause disease in man or other living organisms. • H 10 ‘Toxic for reproduction’: substances and preparations which, if they are inhaled or ingested or if they penetrate the skin, may induce non-hereditary congenital malformations or increase their incidence. • H 11 ‘Mutagenic’: substances and preparations which, if they are inhaled or ingested or if they penetrate the skin, may induce hereditary genetic defects or increase their incidence. • H 12 - Waste which releases toxic or very toxic gases in contact with water, air or an acid.Date Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 98 of 186
  • 99. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ • H 13 ‘Sensitizing’: substances and preparations which, if they are inhaled or if they penetrate the skin, are capable of eliciting a reaction of hypersensitization such that on further exposure to the substance or preparation, characteristic adverse effects are produced. • H 14 ‘Ecotoxic’: waste which presents or may present immediate or delayed risks for one or more sectors of the environment. • H 15 Waste capable by any means, after disposal, of yielding another substance, e.g. a leachate, which possesses any of the characteristics listed above.Date Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 99 of 186
  • 100. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ Notes: H12 The guidance document UK 2005B states that one of the following risk phrases has to be identified for a substance or preparation in the waste if the waste is to have the potential to exhibit hazard H12: R29 Contact with water liberates toxic gas Substances and preparations which in contact with water or damp air evolve very toxic/toxic gases in potentially dangerous amounts. Examples of such substances include aluminium phosphide and phosphorous pentasulphide. R31 Contact with acids liberates toxic gas Substances or preparations which react with acid to evolve toxic gases in dangerous amounts. Examples of such substances include sodium hypochlorite and barium polysulphide. R32 Contact with acids liberates very toxic gas Substances or preparations which react with acid to evolve very toxic gases in dangerous amounts. Examples of such substances include salts of hydrogen cyanide, sodium azide. Any combined risk phrase including R29, R31 or R32 with other risk phrases indicates the potential to exhibit Hazard H12. A special case is the combined risk phrase: R15/29 Contact with water liberates toxic, extremely flammable gas H9 Waste Types (Infectious) Most wastes from these activities bear the risk of being infectious and have to be assessed for infectiousness. Wastes from health care classified as infectious are assigned either to LoW-code 18 01 03 (waste from human health care) or to code 18 02 02 (waste from animal health care). 17. United Nations Classification Recommendation on Transport of Dangerous Goods Link: http://www.unece.org/fileadmin/DAM/trans/danger/publi/unrec/rev13/English/00E_Intro.pdfDate Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 100 of 186
  • 101. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ List of Classes 1. EXPLOSIVES 1.1. Substances and articles which have a mass explosion hazard 1.2. Substances and articles which have a projection hazard but not a mass explosion hazard 1.3. Substances and articles which have a fire hazard and either a minor blast hazard or a minor projection hazard but not a mass explosion hazard 1.4. Substances and articles which present no significant hazard 1.5. Very insensitive substances which have a mass explosion hazard 1.6. Extremely insensitive articles which do not have a mass explosion hazard 2. GASES 2.1. Flammable gases 2.2 Non-flammable, non-toxic gases 2.3. Toxic gases 3. FLAMMABLE LIQUIDS 4. FLAMMABLE SOLIDS 4.1. Flammable solids 4.2. Substances liable to spontaneous combustion 4.3. Substances which in contact with water emit flammable gases 5. OXIDIZING SUBSTANCES; ORGANIC PEROXIDES 5.1. Oxidizing substances 5.2. Organic peroxides 6. POISONOUS (=TOXIC) SUBSTANCES 6.1. Toxic substances 6.2. Infectious substances 7. RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL 8. CORROSIVE SUBSTANCES 9. MISCELLANEOUS DANGEROUS SUBSTANCES 18. GlossaryTerm DescriptionACGIH (American The ACGIH is an organization of government and academic professionalsConference of engaged in occupational safety and health programs. ACGIH establishesGovernmental Industrial recommended occupational exposure limits for chemical substances andHygienists) physical agents known as Threshold Limit Values. See Glossary term “TLV”.40 CFR 355 PART 355—EMERGENCY PLANNING AND NOTIFICATIONATE Acute Toxicity EstimateADR European Agreement concerning the International Carriage of Dangerous Goods by RoadADN European Agreement concerning the International Carriage of Dangerous Goods by Inland WaterwaysACGIH Carcinogen 1 = Confirmed Human 2 = Suspected Human 3 = Confirmed Animal 4 = Not Classifiable 5 = Not SuspectedAcid Acids are materials that have a pH of less than 7. Acids with a pH in the 0 to 2 range are considered corrosive and will cause severe damage to skin and eyes. Compare to Glossary term “alkali.”acute effect An adverse effect of short duration on a human or animal, that usually occurs rapidly as a result of an acute exposure. The terms “acute effect” and “immediate effect” are often used interchangeably. See also OSHA HCS,Date Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 101 of 186
  • 102. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _Term Description Appendix A. See Glossary terms “immediate health effect”, “acute exposure” and “chronic effect”Acute vs chronic health Short term vs long-term health effectseffectsacute exposure A single, short-term exposure to a substance (usually less than 24 hours).ADN The European Agreement concerning the International Carriage of Dangerous Goods by Inland Waterways annexed to resolution No. 223 of the Inland Transport Committee of the Economic Commission for Europe, as amended.ADR The European Agreement concerning the International Carriage of Dangerous Goods by Road under framework Directive 94/55/EC, as amended.Acute Effects Adverse symptoms that occur immediately or shortly after an exposure to a chemical. Common symptoms of acute exposure include headache, dizziness, or nausea.acute toxicity Adverse effects on health caused by a single dose of, or short exposure to a chemical. The health effects usually occur rapidly or relatively immediately after the exposure.ACTION LEVEL A concentration designated in Title 8, California Code of Regulations for a specific substance, calculated as an eight (8)-hour time weighted average, which initiates certain required activities such as exposure monitoring and medical surveillance.Activated Carbon A highly adsorbent form of carbon used to remove odors and toxic substances from liquid or gaseous emissions. In waste treatment, it is used to remove dissolved organic matter from waste drinking water. It is also used in motor vehicle evaporative control systems.adequate ventilation A condition falling within either or both of the following categories (1) Ventilation to reduce levels of air contaminant below that which may cause personal injury or illness. (2) Ventilation sufficient to prevent accumulation to a concentration of contaminant vapor in air at a level in excess of 25 percent of the level set for the lower flammable limit as described in ANSI/NFPA 30. See Glossary term “ventilation”.Aerosol A suspension of tiny particles or droplets in the air, such as smoke, dusts, mists or fumes. These particles may be inhaled or absorbed by the skin, and can sometimes cause adverse health effects for workers. Fog and smoke are common examples of natural aerosols fine sprays (perfumes, insecticides, inhalants, antiperspirants, paints, etc.) are manufactured. Small particles, usually in the range of 0.01 to 100 micrometers, dispersed in air includes liquid (mist) and solid particles (dust).AICS Australian Inventory of Chemical Substances.Air Pollutant Any substance in air that could, in high enough concentration, harm man, other animals, vegetation, or material. Pollutants may include almost any natural or artificial composition of airborne matter capable of being airborne. They may be in the form of solid particles, liquid droplets, gases, or in combination thereof.Air-Purifying Respirator A respirator that uses chemicals to remove specific gases and vapors from the air or that uses a mechanical filter to remove particulate matter. An air- purifying respirator must only be used when there is sufficient oxygen to sustain life and the air contaminant level is below the concentration limits ofDate Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 102 of 186
  • 103. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _Term Description the device. See also Chemical Cartridge Respirator.AIHA (American Industrial A professional organization that, among other things, develops and publishesHygiene Association) airborne chemical exposure limits known as the WEEL guide. See Glossary term “WEEL”.allergic reaction See Glossary term “sensitizer”.ALD Approximate Lethal Dose (see Glossary term LDLo).Alkali Alkalies (or bases) are materials that have pH values greater than 7. Alkalies with pHs between 12 to14 are considered to be corrosive and will cause severe damage to skin and eyes. Compare to Glossary term “acid.”Antagonism The effect of one material or chemical that tends to counteract the effect of another material or chemical. Literally, antagonism means to work against.Alloy A metallic material, homogeneous on a macroscopic scale, consisting of two or more elements so combined that they cannot be readily separated by mechanical means alloys are considered to be mixtures for the purposes of CLP.ANSI American National Standards Institute is a privately funded, voluntary membership organization that identifies industrial and public needs for national consensus standards and coordinates development of such standards.Antidote A specific treatment or remedy used to counteract or prevent the adverse health effects of a chemical. The administration or giving of an antidote may require the services of medically trained personnel.Appearance A description of a substance at normal room temperature and normal atmospheric conditions. Appearance includes the color, size, and consistency of a material.Article An object which during production is given a special shape, surface or design which determines its function to a greater degree than does its chemical composition. OSHA defines an article as follows: A manufactured item other than a fluid or particle (i) which is formed to a specific shape or design during manufacture (ii) which has end use function(s) dependent in whole or in part upon its shape or design during end use and (iii) which under normal conditions of use does not release more than very small quantities, e.g., minute or trace amounts of hazardous chemicals and does not pose a physical or health hazard to employees.Asphyxia A lack of oxygen or excess of carbon dioxide in the body that results in unconsciousness and often death and is usually caused by interruption of breathing or inadequate oxygen supply. [5] Can be induced by choking, drowning, electric shock, injury or inhaling toxic gases. (Example lay language suffocation.)Asphyxiant Material causing chemical suffocation. A vapor or gas that can cause unconsciousness or death by suffocation due to lack of oxygen. Most simple asphyxiants are harmful to the body only when they become so concentrated that they reduce oxygen in the air to dangerous levels of 18 percent or lower. The normal level of oxygen in the air is about 21 percent. Asphyxiation is one of the principal potential hazards of working in confined and enclosed spaces.Aspiration The entry of a liquid or solid chemical directly through the mouth or nose, or indirectly from vomiting, following ingestion, into the trachea and lungs.aspiration hazard A compound that presents the potential for aspiration (inhaling liquids into the lungs) during or following ingestion. Compounds recognized as presenting an aspiration hazard include lowviscosity hydrocarbons or nonemulsion-typeDate Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 103 of 186
  • 104. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _Term Description liquid chemical products that contain 10 percent or more hydrocarbons by weight and have a viscosity of less than 100 Saybolt Universal Seconds (SUS) or approximately 20 centistokes [cSt] at 100°F) .ASTM (formerly known as A source of voluntary consensus standards for material, products, systemsthe American Society for and services. ASTM is a resource for sampling and testing methods, healthTesting and Materials) and safety aspects of materials, safe performance guidelines and effects of physical and biological agents and chemicals.Asymptomatic Showing no symptoms.Ataxia Loss of reflexes or muscular coordination. Signs can include twitching, stumbling or unsteady walk and shaking (Example lay language loss of muscle control (indicate muscles involved, e.g., staggering gait).)ATM Atmosphere, a unit of pressure equal to 760 mmHg (mercury) at sea level.Auto-ignition point (auto- The minimum temperature required to initiate or cause self-sustainedignition temperature) combustion in any substance in the absence of a spark or flame. This varies with the test method. Some examples: acetone 538°C (1000°F), ethyl ether 180°C (356°F), phenol 715°C (1319°F). See Glossary term “flash point”.Atrophy Decrease in the size of an organ or tissue from its normal size. (Example lay language shrinkage or wasting away of (organ or tissue).)autoignition temperature See Glossary term “autoignition point”.bioaccumulation (factor) A measure of the uptake and retention of a substance by an aquatic organism from its surrounding media and food.biodegrade The process whereby a chemical is broken down or decomposes through biological processes (e.g. by action of microorganisms) into other chemicals.Base A substance that produces hydroxide ions (OH-) in aqueous solution. The pH values of bases are between 8 and 14. Strong bases have a higher pH and are more corrosive than weak bases. Examples of strong bases include sodium hydroxide, and ammonium hydroxide. See also pH, Acid, Alkali, Corrosive.Bio-accumulative The property of a substance causing it to build up in fatty tissues of living organisms (including humans), it is easier taken up than excreted. The concentration of such a chemical will then be higher in the organism than in the surrounding medium.bioaccumulation (factor) A measure of the uptake and retention of a substance by an aquatic organism from its surrounding media and food.Biocidal product Any substance, other than the active substance, which has an inherent capacity to cause an adverse effect on humans, animals or the environment and is present or is produced in a biocidal product in sufficient concentration to create such an effect.Biodegradable Capable of being broken down into non harmful products by the action of living things.Biodegradation A measure of the ability of a substance to decompose through biological processes. biodegrade The process whereby a chemical is broken down or decomposes through biological processes (e.g. by action of microorganisms) into other chemicals.Biohazards Biological substances that could pose a threat to health.Biohazardous Infectious These materials are organisms or the toxins they produce that can causeMaterials diseases in people or animals. Included in this division are bacteria, viruses, fungi and parasites. As these organisms can live in body tissues and fluids,Date Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 104 of 186
  • 105. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _Term Description they should be treated as toxic. Urine and feces should be treated as toxic only if they are visibly contaminated with blood. Biohazardous infectious materials are usually found in a hospital, health care facility, laboratories, veterinary practices and research facilities. Workers in these places do not usually know which tissues or fluids contain dangerous organisms. For this reason, the workers assume that every sample is dangerous and proper protection is used all the time. Examples of biohazardous infectious materials include the AIDS/HIV virus, Hepatitis B and salmonella. The symbol for this division looks like three "c"s joined together with a little circle in the middle all inside a circle.Blood agents Substances that injure a person by interfering with cell respiration (the exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide between blood and tissues). Hydrogen cyanide (AC) and Cyanogen chloride (CK) are blood agents.Bioaccumulate The process whereby a chemical is taken up and retained by an organism directly from the surrounding environment and from food.Bioconcentration The build-up of a chemical in plants and animals to levels above what is found in the surroundings.Biological Incidents Characterized by the onset of symptoms in hours to days. Typically, there will be no characteristic signatures because biological agents are usually odorless and colorless. Because of the delayed onset of symptoms in a biological incident, the area affected may be greater due to the movement of infected individuals.BOD Test (Biochemical An empirical bioassay procedure that measures the dissolved oxygen thatOxygen Demand) microbial life consumes while assimilating and oxidizing the organic matter.boiling point Generally, the temperature at which a liquid rapidly becomes a vapor. Since the boiling point is the temperature at which the liquid’s vapor pressure equals the surrounding atmospheric pressure, the boiling point will vary with changes in atmospheric pressure. Mixtures do not normally have a distinct boiling point. Water 100°C (212°F) Ethylene Glycol (Antifreeze) 197°C (387°F)bonding (equipotential Electrically connecting all metallic non-current carrying items in a work area orbonding) building as protection from electric shock. Its purpose is to equalize the electrical potential between the objects to prevent a static discharge when transferring a flammable liquid from one container to another. The conductive path is provided by clamps that make contact with the charged object and a low resistance flexible cable which allows the charge to equalize. See Glossary term “grounding”.burning rate The time it takes a sample of solid material to burn a prescribed distance. The results are given in units of distance/time.bradycardia Slow heart rate.bronchitis Inflammation of the mucous membrane of the bronchial tubes (larger air passages of the lungs). It may be caused by disease, or physical or chemical irritants. Signs are generally that of a chest cold and may also include chest pain and coughing. (Example lay language inflammation of lungs.)bulk density Mass of solid material (e.g., powdered, granulated, pulverized, pelletized, etc.) per unit of volume.building block approach The introduction of the UN GHS hazard classes in the EU is based on the so- called “building block approach”, allowing the different countries and jurisdictions to introduce those hazard classes and categories in domestic law which they consider relevant. CLP includes all of the hazard classes of the UNDate Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 105 of 186
  • 106. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _Term Description GHS. As CLP also builds on the previous system of classification and labelling, consisting of DSD and DPD, also the EU category of danger ‘hazardous to the ozone layer’ is taken up in CLP. It is expected that a corresponding hazard class will be adopted at UN level soon. Hazard classifications UN GHS hazard categories not in CLP: Acute toxicity Cat. 5 for the classification of flammable aerosols Flammable liquids Cat. 4 Flammable liquids with a flash point ≤ 93ºC are usedbund A provision of liquid collection facilities which, in the event of any leak or spillage from tanks or pipe work, will capture well in excess of the volume of liquids held. Example: An embankment, bunded areas should drain to a capture tank which should have facilities for water/oil separation.burning rate The time it takes a sample of solid material to burn a prescribed distance. The results are given in units of distance/time.Byproduct A chemical substance produced without a separate commercial intent during the manufacture, processing, use or disposal of another chemical substance or mixture.cc Cubic centimeter is a volume measurement in the metric system that is equal in capacity to one milliliter (ml). One quart is about 946 cubic centimeters (0.946L).CCP Commercial Chemical ProductCEN European Committee for StandardisationC&L Classification and LabellingCLP Classification Labelling Packaging Regulation Regulation (EC) No 1272/2008CAS# Chemical Abstracts Service number. Chemical Abstracts Service is an organization under the American Chemical Society. CAS abstracts and indexes chemical literature from all over the world in "Chemical Abstracts." "CAS Numbers" are used to identify specific substances as substances often have a number of synonyms.COM European CommissionCMR Carcinogen, Mutagen, or Reproductive ToxicantCSA Chemical Safety AssessmentCSR Chemical Safety Report°C (degree Celsius) A unit of temperature where water boils at 100°C and freezes at 0°C. To convert °C to °F, multiply the °C by 9/5 and add 32.CAA (Clean Air Act) An air-quality statute administered by US Environmental Protection Agency.California Restricted Waste Code #Wastes 711 Liquids with cyanides > 1000 mg/l 721 Liquids with arsenic > 500 mg/l 722 Liquids with cadmium > 100 mg/l 723 Liquids with chromium (VI) > 500 mg/l 724 Liquids with lead > 500 mg/l 725 Liquids with mercury > 20 mg/l 726 Liquids with nickel > 134 mg/lDate Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 106 of 186
  • 107. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _Term Description 727 Liquids with selenium > 100 mg/l 728 Liquids with thallium > 130 mg/l 731 Liquids with polychlorinated biphenyls > 50 mg/l 741 Liquids halogenated organic compounds > 1000 mg/l 751 Solids or sludges with halogenated organic compounds >1000 mg/kg 791 Liquids with pH < 2 792 Liquids with pH < 2 with metals 801 Waste potentially containing dioxins Hazard Codes for all Chemicals at Inventory, Fremont EX – explosives FS=flammable solid; FL=flammable liquid; CL=combustible liquid; NFG=nonflammable gas;W=water reactive; UR=unstable reactive; OX=oxidizer; OPX=organic peroxide; PYR= pyrophoric; CRY=cryogenic; COR=corrosive; RAD=radioactive; IRR=irritant; OHH=other health hazard; TOX=toxic; HTOX=highly toxicCANUTEC (Canadian A national center established by Transport Canada to assist emergencyTransport Emergency response personnel in handling dangerous goods emergencies. CANUTECCenter) has a 24-hour telephone number [613-996-6666 (collect calls accepted)] to help respond to chemical transportation emergencies for companies who have registered with them for this service. Their emergency response staff is bilingual (French and English).Candidate List A list of substances within REACH meeting the criteria of Substances of Very High Concern, and proposed by either the European Commission or the EU Member states. These substances are candidates for REACH Authorisation.CARACAL Competent Authorities for REACH and Classification and Labelling in the EU Member Statescarcinogen A substance or agent that causes cancer based on human or relevant animal data. The HCS defines a chemical as a carcinogen or potential carcinogen if NTP, IARC and/or OSHA (29 CFR 1910 subpart Z) establishes that a chemical is a carcinogen or a potential carcinogen. Other regulatory bodies (e.g., EPA) and non-governmental organizations (e.g., ACGIH) also identify and classify carcinogens. Carcinogens are regulated by OSHA and are listed in the National Toxicology Program Annual Report of Carcinogens.CAA (Clean Air Act) An air-quality statute administered by US Environmental Protection Agency.Carcinogen A substance or agent that causes cancer based on human or relevant animal data. The HCS defines a chemical as a carcinogen or potential carcinogen if NTP, IARC and/or OSHA (29 CFR 1910 subpart Z) establishes that a chemical is a carcinogen or a potential carcinogen. Other regulatory bodies (e.g., EPA) and non-governmental organizations (e.g., ACGIH) also identify and classify carcinogens.Caustic See Glossary term “alkali” or base."C" OR CEILING A description usually seen in connection with a published exposure limit. It refers to the concentration that should not be exceeded, even for an instant. It may be written as TLV-C or Threshold Limit Value - Ceiling. (See also Threshold Limit Value).Ceiling Limit (PEL or TLV) The maximum allowable human exposure limit for an airborne substance which is not to be exceeded even momentarily. See also PEL and TLV.Centigrade Centigrade, a unit of temperature. To convert from centigrade to Fahrenheit, multiply the temperature given in centigrade degrees by 9, divide that number by 5, then add 32.Central Nervous System The brain and spinal cord. These organs supervise and coordinate the activity of the entire nervous system.Date Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 107 of 186
  • 108. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _Term DescriptionChemical Incidents Characterized by the rapid onset of medical symptoms (minutes to hours) and easily observed signatures (colored residue, dead foliage, pungent odor, dead insects and animals).Chemical substance Any organic or inorganic substance of a particular molecular identity, including any combination of such substances occurring in whole or in part as a result of a chemical reaction or occurring in nature, and any chemical element or uncombined radical, except that ‘‘chemical substance’’ does not include: (1) Any mixture. (2) Any pesticide when manufactured, processed, or distributed in commerce for use as a pesticide. (3) Tobacco or any tobacco product. (4) Any source material, special nuclear material, or byproduct material. (5) Any pistol, firearm, revolver, shells, or cartridges. (6) Any food, food additive, drug, cosmetic, or device, when manufactured, processed, or distributed in commerce for use as a food, food additive, drug, cosmetic, or device.CC (closed cup) A test procedure used in flash point measurements using a closed cup.bulk density Mass of solid material (e.g., powdered, granulated, pulverized, pelletized, etc.) per unit of volume.°C (degree Celsius) A unit of temperature where water boils at 100°C and freezes at 0°C. To convert °C to °F, multiply the °C by 9/5 and add 32.CANUTEC (Canadian A national center established by Transport Canada to assist emergencyTransport Emergency response personnel in handling dangerous goods emergencies. CANUTECCenter) has a 24-hour telephone number [613-996-6666 (collect calls accepted)] to help respond to chemical transportation emergencies for companies who have registered with them for this service. Their emergency response staff is bilingual (French and English).CAS # Chemical Abstracts Service Registry number (CAS) A CAS registry number designates a single substance or a complex and variable substance with a unique chemical name. Chemical Abstracts Services registration number. A unique number assigned to each substance submitted to CAS and used worldwide to positively identify chemicals.CAUTION Signal word used in labeling that indicates a potentially hazardous situation that, if not avoided, may result in minor or moderate injury. Also, see Glossary terms “DANGER” and “WARNING” .ceiling value The maximum airborne concentration for a biological or chemical agent that should not be exceeded. Also see Glossary terms “PEL” and “TLV”.CEPA (Canadian The major Canadian federal environmental protection legislation thatEnvironmental Protection combines several pieces of legislation to create a comprehensive approach toAct) the environmental protection of Canada. CEPA encompasses the life-cycle management approach to chemicals and requires the compilation of the Domestic and Nondomestic Substances Lists (DSL and NDSL respectively).CFR (Code of Federal An annual publication of Federal agency regulations that have beenRegulations) promulgated under United States Law. The CFR is divided into titles according to broad subject matter categories (e.g. Title 29 – Labor, contains OSHA regulations and standards, including HCS Title 40 – Protection of Environment, contains EPA regulations Title 49 – Transportation, contains DOT regulations). NOTE – New and revised regulations not yet published in the CFR are found in the Federal Register.CERCLA Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980. The Act requires that the Coast Guard National Response Center beDate Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 108 of 186
  • 109. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _Term Description notified in the event of a hazardous substance release. Also referred to as “Superfund”. Administered by US EPA, CERCLA was created to address the past disposal and clean up of inactive or abandoned hazardous waste sites. CERCLA provides EPA with enforcement authority to ensure that responsible parties pay the cleanup costs of remediating a site contaminated with hazardous substances.CFR Code of Federal Regulations. A collection of the regulations that have been promulgated under United States Law.ceiling value The maximum airborne concentration for a biological or chemical agent that should not be exceeded. Also see Glossary terms “PEL” and “TLV”.central nervous system The portion of the nervous system consisting of brain and spinal cord.(CNS)Chemical The term “chemical”, as used in this Standard, includes a single chemical substance or a mixture of substances. Note OSHA defines a chemical as any element, chemical compound or mixture of elements and/or compounds.Chemical Cartridge A respirator that uses various chemical substances to purify inhaled air ofRespirator certain gases and vapors. This type respirator is effective for concentrations ten times or more times (depending on the type of respirator) the TLV of the contaminant, if the contaminant has warning properties (odor or irritation) below the TLV. See also Air-Purifying Respirator.chemical family A group of substances that have a similar chemical structure. Example acetone, methyl ethyl ketone (MEK) and methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK) are members of the “ketone” family acrolein, furfural and acetaldehyde are members of the “aldehyde” family.chemical name The scientific designation of a chemical in accordance with the nomenclature system developed by the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) or the Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS) rules of nomenclature, or a name which will clearly identify the chemical for the purpose of conducting a hazard evaluation.chronic effect An adverse effect on a human or animal in which symptoms develop slowly and/or recur frequently following chronic exposure. This also applies to persistent adverse health effects resulting from short-term exposures. See also OSHA HCS, Appendix A. See Glossary terms “chronic exposure” and “acute effect”.chemical manufacturer An employer with a workplace where chemical(s) are produced for use or distribution.CHEMTREC (Chemical A national center administered by the American Chemistry Council (ACC) thatTransportation provides 24-hour immediate emergency response information for accidentalEmergency Center) chemical releases. CHEMTREC has a 24-hour toll-free telephone number (800-424-9300) for shippers who register their products for emergency response service.Chronic Effect Adverse symptoms of chemical exposure that develop slowly over a long period of time (weeks, months or years) due to repeated long-term exposure to a substance. Examples include cancer or damage to certain internal organs. Also see Acute Effect.chronic exposure A continuous or repeated exposure (usually low level) to a substance over a relatively long period of time. See Glossary term “acute exposure”.chronic toxicity Adverse (chronic) effects resulting from repeated doses of, or exposures to, a substance over a prolonged period of time. .Clean Water Act Federal law enacted to regulate/reduce water pollution. CWA is administered by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.Date Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 109 of 186
  • 110. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _Term DescriptionCLP or CLP Regulation Regulation (EC) No 1272/2008 on Classification, Labelling and Packaging of Substances and MixturesCMR A substance or mixture which is carcinogenic, mutagenic or toxic to reproduction. CMR is the abbreviation for Carcinogenic, Mutagenic and toxic to Reproduction, chemicals with inherent properties which can cause cancer, alter DNA or damage reproductive systems. Part of the REACH Substances of Very High Concern.Combustible A substance capable of fueling a fire. Also a term used to classify certain liquids on the basis of their flashpoint. For liquids, a liquid with a flash point above 100°F (37.8°C) but below 200°F (93.3°C). Non-liquid substances such as wood and paper are classified as "ordinary combustibles" by NFPA. See Glossary term “flammable liquid”.combustible liquid (ANSI) Any liquid having a flash point above 140°F (60°C) and below 200°F (93.3°C). Note, however, that a flammable liquid with flash point at or above 100°F (38°C) but not more than 140°F (60°C) may be considered a “combustible liquid” for purposes of this Standard if it meets the DOT requirements for “combustible liquid” [See 49 CFR 173.120(b)(2)]. OSHA Any liquid having a flash point at or above 100°F (37.8°C), but below 200°F (93.3°C), except any mixture having components with flash points of 200°F (93.3°C) or higher, the total volume of which make up 99 percent or more of the total volume of the mixture. DOT Any liquid that does not meet the definition of any other [DOT] hazard class and has a flash point above 140°F (60°C) and below 200°F (93°C).Commerce Means trade, traffic, transportation, or other commerce (1) between a place in a State and any place outside of such State, or (2) which affects trade, traffic, transportation, or commerce between a place in a State and any place outside of such State.common name Any designation or identification such as code name, code number, trade name, brand name or generic name used to identify a chemical other than by its chemical name. [10] For example, the common name for dimethyl ketone is acetone. See Glossary term “identity”.compressed gas (OSHA) (i) A gas or mixture of gases having, in a container, an absolute pressure exceeding 40 psi at 70°F (21.1°C) OR (ii) A gas or mixture of gases having, in a container, an absolute pressure exceeding 104 psi at 130°F (54.4°C) regardless of the pressure at 70°F (21.1°C) or A liquid having a vapor pressure exceeding 40 psi at 100°F (37.8°C) as determined by ASTM D-323-72. Compressed Gas Material or mixture meeting criteria in § 173.115(b), (absolute pressure of 280 kPa [41 psia]) at 20°C [68° F] or greater).closed system An engineering control method that uses equipment designed and operated to prevent potential human exposure and release of a chemical into the environment.combustible dust A solid material composed of distinct particles or pieces, regardless of size, shape, or chemical composition, which presents a fire or deflagration hazard when suspended in air or some other oxidizing medium over a range of concentrations. See Glossary term “explosive dust”.Component A single chemical substance (e.g. methanol), or a complex and variableDate Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 110 of 186
  • 111. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _Term Description substance that cannot be described in terms of a single structure but under certain conditions can be considered as a single entity (e.g. alcohols, C11- C15-branched).combustible liquids A liquid having a vapor pressure exceeding 40 psi at 100°F (37.8°C) as determined by ASTM D323-72 (DOT).compressed gas (nonflammable, nonpoisonous compressed gas-including compressed gas, liquefied gas, pressurized cryogenic gas in solution, asphyxiant gas and oxidizing gas) Any material (or mixture) which (1) exerts in the packaging an absolute pressure of 280 kPa (41 psia) at 68°F and (2) does not meet the definition of Division 2.1 or 2.3. (liquefied) A gas which in a packaging under the charged pressure, is partially liquid at a temperature of 68°F (20°C). (non-liquefied) A gas, other than in solution, which in a packaging under the charged pressure, is entirely gaseous at a temperature of 68°F (20°C).Concentration The relative amount of a substance when combined or mixed with other substances. Examples: 2 ppm hydrogen sulfide in air, or a 50 percent caustic solution.Conditions to Avoid Conditions encountered during handling or storage that could cause a substance to become unstable.Container Any bag, barrel, bottle, box, can, cylinder, drum, reaction vessel, storage tank, or the like that contains a hazardous chemical. Pipes or piping systems and engines, fuel tanks or other operating systems in a vehicle, are not considered to be containers.Controlled Substance (a) Any narcotic, depressant, stimulant, or hallucinogenic drug, or any other drug, other substance, or immediate precursor included in Schedules I, II, III, IV, or V of section 202 of the Controlled Substance Act (Title 21 U.S. Code (USC) Section 812) except exempt chemical preparations and mixtures, and excluded substances listed in 21 CFR 1308; (b) Any other drug or substance that the U.S. Attorney General determines to be subject to control pursuant to Subchapter I of the Controlled Substance Act (21 USC 801 et seq.); or (c) Any other drug or substance that by international treaty, convention, or protocol is to be controlled by the United States. 21 CFR 1316CPR Canadian Controlled Products Regulations.critical temperature (Tc) The temperature at and above which vapor of a substance cannot be liquefied, no matter how much pressure is applied.CWA (Clean Water Act) A water quality statute administered by the US EPA.Common Name A name used to identify a chemical other than its chemical name (e.g., code name, code number, trade name, brand name, or generic name). See Generic.concentration limit A threshold of any classified impurity, additive or individual constituent in a substance or in a mixture that may trigger classification of the substance or the mixture.Consumer Excluded from the definition of downstream userconsumer commodity (DOT) A material that is packaged and distributed in a form intended or suitable for sale through retail sales agencies or instrumentalities for consumption by individuals for purposes of personal care or household use. This term also includes drugs and medicines.Date Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 111 of 186
  • 112. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _Term DescriptionCorrosive (OSHA) A chemical that causes visible destruction of, or irreversible alterations in, living tissue by chemical action at the site of contact. This term shall not refer to action on inanimate surfaces. (DOT) Corrosive material means a liquid or solid that causes full thickness destruction in human skin at the site of contact within a specified period of time, or a liquid that has a severe corrosion rate on steel or aluminum based on the criteria in 49 CFR 173.137(c)(2). Corrosive is the name given to materials that can cause severe burns to skin and other human tissues such as the eye or lung, and can attack clothes and other materials including metal. Corrosives are grouped in this special class because their effects are permanent (irritants whose effects may be similar but temporary are grouped in Class D-2). Common corrosives include acids such as sulphuric and nitric acids, bases such as ammonium hydroxide and caustic soda and other materials such as ammonia gas, chlorine, and nitrogen dioxide.Corrosive to metals Materially damaging, or even destroying, metals by chemical action of a substance or a mixtureCPSA (Consumer The umbrella statute of the Consumer Product Safety Commission. ItProduct Safety Act) established the agency and defines its basic authority.cryogenic liquid (DOT) A refrigerated liquefied gas having a boiling point colder than -130°F (-90°C) at 101.3 kPa (14.7 psi) absolute.cut-off value A threshold of any classified impurity, additive or individual constituent in a substance or in a mixture, above which threshold these shall be taken into account for determining if the substance or the mixture shall be classified.Cyanosis A bluish discoloration of skin and nails caused by a deficiency of oxygen in the blood.conjunctivitis Inflammation of the mucous membrane lining the eyelid and covering the eyeball.consumer commodity A material that is packaged and distributed in a form intended or suitable for sale through retail sales agencies or instrumentalities for consumption by individuals for purposes of personal care or household use. This term also includes drugs and medicines (DOT) .cornea Outer fibrous part of the eyeball which covers the iris and pupil.CPR Cardio-pulmonary resuscitation.cutaneous See Glossary term “dermal”. [7] (Example lay language of the skin.)Derived No Effect Level Derived No Effect LevelDPD Dangerous Preparations Directive 1999/45/ECDSD Dangerous Substances Directive 67/548/EECDU Downstream UserDUCC Downstream Users of Chemicals Co-ordination platformDANGER Signal word used in labeling that indicates an imminently hazardous situation which, if not avoided, will result in death or serious injury. This signal word is to be limited to the most extreme situations. See Glossary terms “CAUTION” and “WARNING.”dangerously reactive A chemical that falls within any of the following categories a chemical thatchemical undergoes a violent self-accelerating exothermic reaction with commonDate Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 112 of 186
  • 113. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _Term Description materials or by itself, or under conditions of shock/impact, pressure or temperature or a chemical that reacts with common materials (such as air, moisture) or reacts with itself, to release a gas or a type or in quantities that present an immediate hazard.dangerous when wet A DOT term that is synonymous with “water reactive material”. See Glossary term “water reactivity”.DEA (Drug Enforcement America’s primary drug law enforcement agency.Administration, USDepartment of Justice)Decomposition Breakdown of a material or substance (by heat, chemical reaction, electrolysis, decay or other processes) into parts or elements or simpler compounds.Decontamination The removal of hazardous substances from employees and their equipment to the extent necessary to preclude the occurrence of foreseeable adverse health effects.density The mass (weight) per unit volume of a substance.delayed hazard The inherent property of a chemical to cause an adverse effect that manifests itself after a relatively long period of time following exposure. Chronic effects such as carcinogenicity, teratogenicity and certain target organ/system effects are examples of delayed hazards.density The mass (weight) per unit volume of a substance.Deposition For environmental purposes, entrance of a substance into any environmental media.derived-from rule EPA created the derived-from rule which states that any material derived from a listed hazardous waste is also a listed hazardous waste.Dermal Relating to the skin.Dermatitis Inflammation, irritation or reddening of the skin.Description of Properties • Physical Hazards: Chemical compounds possess inherent properties,(MSDS Section 9 which determine the type and degree of the hazard they represent.Physical and Chemical Evaluating risks of an incident depends on understanding theseProperties) properties and their relationship to the environment. • Solubility: The ability of a solid, liquid, gas or vapor to dissolve in a solvent is solubility. An insoluble substance can be physically mixed or blended in a solvent for a short time but is unchanged when it finally separates. The solubility of a material is important when determining its reactivity, dispersion, mitigation and treatment. Solubility is generally given in parts per million (ppm). • Density: The density of a substance is its mass per unit volume, commonly expressed in g/cc. • Specific gravity: Specific gravity is the ratio of the density of a substance to the density of water. If the specific gravity of a substance is greater than 1 it will sink in water. The substance will float in water if its specific gravity is less than 1. • Vapor density: The vapor density is the density of a gas compared to the density of air. If the density of a gas is greater than that of air then the gas will tend to pocket and settle into the lowest points. If the vapor density is close to air or lower than air then the gas will disperse. If the vapor or gas displaces oxygen in the low spots then it can become an asphyxiant problem. If the gas or vapor is an explosive, when it pockets it will become an explosive hazard.Date Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 113 of 186
  • 114. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _Term Description • Flashpoint. If the ambient temperature in relation to the material of concern is right, then it may give off enough vapor at its surface to allow ignition by an open flame or spark. The minimum temperature at which a substance produces sufficient flammable vapors to ignite is its flashpoint. If the vapor does ignite, combustion can continue as long as the temperature remains at or above the flashpoint. The relative flammability of a substance is based on its flashpoint. An accepted relation between the two is: • Highly flammable: Flashpoint <100 F • Moderately flammable: Flashpoint >100 F & <200 F • Relatively inflammable: Flashpoint >200 F • Chemical Hazards: Hazardous conditions which may exist as a result of the chemical nature of substances may be summarized as fire hazards, explosive hazards, corrosive hazards, and chemical reactivity. • Fire hazards Combustibility: The ability of a material to act as a fuel, that is, to burn. Materials that can be readily ignited and sustain a fire are considered to be combustible, while those that cannot are called noncombustible. Three elements are required for combustion to occur: fuel, oxygen, and heat. The concentration of the fuel and the oxygen must be high enough to allow ignition and maintain the burning process. Combustion is a chemical reaction that requires heat to proceed. Heat is supplied by the ignition source and is maintained by the combustion, or it must be supplied from an external source. The relationship of these three fire components forms a triangle. If one leg of the triangle is removed, then the fire can be extinguished. For example, water applied to a fire removes the heat, thereby extinguishing the fire. When a material generates enough heat by itself to self-ignite and combust, spontaneous combustion occurs, either as a fire or explosion (e.g. diesel greater than 140 degrees Fahrenheit is combustible.) • Flammability: The ability of a material (liquid or gas) to generate a sufficient concentration of combustible vapors under normal conditions to be ignited and produce a flame. It is necessary to have a proper fuel-to-oxygen (oxygen) ratio (% fuel in air) to allow combustion. A flammable material is considered highly combustible if it can burn at ambient temperatures. But a combustible material is not necessarily flammable because it may not be easily ignited or the ignition maintained. Pyrophoric materials will ignite at room temperature in the presence of a gas or vapor or when a slight friction or shock is applied. The substances listed below are either easily ignited (pyrophorics), require little oxygen to support combustion, have low flammability limits and explosive limits and a wide flammable and explosive range. • Flammable liquids—Aldehydes, ketones, amines, alcohols, aliphatic/aromatic hydrocarbons. • Flammable solids—Phosphorous, dusts of magnesium, zirconium, titanium, aluminum and zinc. • Water Reactive Flammable Solids—Potassium, sodium, lithium.Date Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 114 of 186
  • 115. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _Term Description • Pyrophoric liquids—Organometallic compounds, dimethyl zinc, tributyl aluminum. Some of the hazards related to fires and explosions can cause physical destruction due to shock waves, heat, and flying objects. Secondary fires can be created as well as other flammable conditions. Toxic or corrosive compounds may also be released to the surrounding environment as well. • Explosives: An explosive is a substance that undergoes a very rapid chemical transformation producing large amounts of gases and heat. The gases produced, for example, nitrogen, oxygen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and steam, due to the heat produced, rapidly expand to velocities exceeding the speed of sound and create both a shockwave (high pressure front) and noise. The main categories of explosives are listed below. • High or detonating—produces a shock wave followed by combustion. • Primary high explosive—detonation occurs in a short time. Examples: lead azide, mercury fulminate, and lead styphnate. • Secondary high explosive—needs a booster to detonate. Examples: Tetryl, cyclonite, dynamite and TNT • Low or deflagrating—Explosive rate very fast. Combustion followed by a shock wave. Examples: smokeless powder, magnesium, and molotov cocktail. • Corrosive Hazards: Corrosion is a process of material degradation. Upon contact, a corrosive material may destroy body tissues, metals, plastics, and other materials. Corrosivity is the ability of material to increase the hydrogen ion concentration of a material or to transfer electron pairs of or from itself or another material. A corrosive material is a reactive compound or element that produces a destructive chemical charge in the material it is acting on. Common corrosives are: • Acids—Acetic acid, nitric acid, hydrochloric acid, sulfuric acid. • Bases—Potassium hydroxide, sodium hydroxide, calcium hydroxide. • Halogens—bromine, chlorine, fluorine, iodine. Skin irritation and burns are typical results when the body contacts an acidic or basic corrosive material. The measure of an acid or a base is the pH scale. The pH scale ranges from 0 to 14 with a pH <7 being acidic and a pH>7 being basic. The lower the pH of the acid the more acidic is the material, and the higher the pH of the base the more alkaline is the material. A pH of 7 is considered neutral. • Chemical Reactivity - Reactivity hazards: A reactive material is one that undergoes a chemical reaction under specified conditions. Generally, the term "reactive hazard" is used to refer to a substance that undergoes a violent or abnormal reaction in the presence of water or under normal ambient atmospheric conditions. Among this type of hazard are the pyrophoric liquids which will ignite in air at or below normal room temperature in the absence of added heat, shock or friction, and the water-reactive flammable solids which will spontaneously combust upon contact with water. • Compatibility: If two or more hazardous materials remain in contact indefinitely without reaction, they are compatible. Incompatibility,Date Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 115 of 186
  • 116. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _Term Description however, does not necessarily indicate a hazard. For example, acids and bases (both corrosive) react to form salts and water, which may not be corrosive. The compatibility of materials must be determined before the materials are used or stored. Some examples of incompatibilities are sulfuric acid and plastics (toxic gas or vapor is produced), Acids and metal (flammable gas or vapor is produced), chlorine and ammonia (chlorine gas is created, toxic gas). There are many other incompatibilities that may be found. Check to make sure that the materials used for a project are compatible. • Biological hazards/agents are living organisms that can cause sickness or death to exposed individuals. Biological hazards can cause infection or disease to persons who are exposed. Biological hazards may involve plants or animals including microorganisms. Biological hazards, such as disease causing agents, may be present at a hazardous waste site or involved in a spill. Like chemical hazards, they can be dispersed throughout the environment via wind and water. Many biological agents require a carrier to inoculate a person. For instance, rabid rodents at a landfill may be a biological hazard. Deer carry ticks that may have Rocky Mountain Spotted fever prairie dogs will not. The same personal protective requirements for a response to a chemical hazard apply to biological hazards. Body coverings and respiratory protective equipment might have to be utilized. Especially important is the need to maintain personnel cleanliness. Before eating, drinking or smoking residual contamination should be washed off. • Bloodborne Pathogen hazards are a subset of biological hazards, which are regulated by a program that is beyond the scope of hazard communication training. Those individuals who may come into contact with bloodborne pathogens need to be trained in accordance with this standard.developmental effects (EPA) Effects of a substance on developing organisms following exposure to the pregnant females, including death, structural abnormalities or altered growth, and maternal effects. See Glossary term “developmental toxicity”.developmental toxicity Broadly defined to include any effect interfering with normal development and includes embryotoxic/fetotoxic effects, teratogenic effects or other effects that occur before and after birth. See also Glossary term “teratogen”. (EPA) Adverse effects on the developing organism that may result from exposure prior to conception (either parent), during prenatal development, or postnatally until the time of sexual maturation. The major manifestations of developmental toxicity include death of the developing organism, structural abnormality, altered growth, and functional deficiency.Distributor Any natural or legal person established within the Community, including a retailer, who only stores and places on the market a substance, on its own or in a mixture, for third parties Basic guidance to Regulation (EC) No 1272/2008 on Classification, Labelling and Packaging of substances and mixtures 107. (OSHA) A business other than a chemical manufacturer or importer, which supplies hazardous chemicals to other distributors or to employers.developmental toxicity Broadly defined to include any effect interfering with normal development andDate Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 116 of 186
  • 117. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _Term Description includes embryotoxic/fetotoxic effects, teratogenic effects or other effects that occur before and after birth. See Standard Section 5.1.3.3. See also Glossary term “teratogen”. (EPA) Adverse effects on the developing organism that may result from exposure prior to conception (either parent), during prenatal development, or postnatally until the time of sexual maturation. The major manifestations of developmental toxicity include death of the developing organism, structural abnormality, altered growth, and functional deficiency.DOT (Department of The United States’ Federal agency with the primary regulatory andTransportation) enforcement authority, regarding the transport (by air, land, and water) of hazardous materials.differentiation means distinction within hazard classes depending on the route of exposure or the nature of the effectsDike An embankment or ridge of either natural or man-made materials used to prevent the movement of liquids, sludges, solids, or other materials.Disposal The discharge, deposit, injection, dumping, spilling, leaking, or placing of any solid waste or hazardous waste into or on any land or water so that such solid waste or hazardous waste or any constituent thereof may enter the environment or be emitted into the air or discharged into any waters, including ground waters.dose-response Relationship between the dose of a toxic chemical and the incidence of anrelationship adverse effect. This is a fundamental law of toxicology expressed as, "The dose makes the poison." For any poison, there exists a threshold dose below which adverse effects do not occur.Downstream user Any natural or legal person established within the Community, other than the manufacturer or the importer, who uses a substance, either on its own or in a mixture, in the course of his industrial or professional activities. A distributor or a consumer is not a downstream user. A re-importer, exempted pursuant to Article 2(7)(c) REACH Regulation, shall be regarded as a downstream user. A user of a chemical produced by a manufacturer. This can be a formulator, article manufacturer or a consumer.DPD The “Dangerous Preparations Directive (1999/45/EC)”DSD The “Dangerous Substances Directive (67/548/EEC)”DSL (Domestic A list of chemical substances that may be used commercially in Canada.Substance List)Dust Solid particles generated by handling, crushing, grinding, rapid impact, detonation or decrepitation of organic or inorganic materials, such as rock, ore, metal, coal, wood, and grain. Dusts do not tend to flocculate, except under electrostatic forces they do not diffuse in air but settle under the influence of gravity. See Glossary terms “combustible dust” and “explosive dust.”dysplasia Abnormal development or growth of an organ, tissues, or cells.dyspnea Difficulty in breathing labored breathing or shortness of breath often associated with lung or heart disease.EC Annex 1 Index ###- Annex I of Directive 67/548/EEC contains a list of harmonised classifications###-##-# and labellings for substances or groups of substances that are legally binding within the EU. The EC number has replaced the EINECS / ELINCS / NLP number designation. Entries (i.e., substance/substances indicated by the same Index number) in Annex I are listed according to the atomic number of the most characteristic element of the substances properties. Index number for each substance is in the form of a digit sequence of the type ABC-RST-VW-Y, where: - ABC is either the atomic number of the most characteristic chemical elementDate Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 117 of 186
  • 118. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _Term Description (preceded by one or two zeros to make up the sequence) or the usual class number for organic substances (cf. Appendix I), - RST is the consecutive number of the substance in the series ABC, - VW denotes the form in which the substance is produced or placed on the market, and - Y is the check-digit calculated in accordance with the ISBN (International Standard Book Number) method.EC/EINECS # [###-###- This is the reference number used in the European Inventory of Existing#] Commercial Chemical Substances between 1 January 1971 and 18 September 1981. It has been replaced by the EC number. The EINECS number is a seven-digit system, separated into 3 groups by hyphens of the type XXXXXX-X, which starts by: - 2 or 3 (2XX-XXX-X or 3XX-XXX-X) for chemical substances belonging to EINECS (Existing Chemicals), - 4 (4XX-XXX-X) for chemical substances belonging to ELINCS (New Chemicals), - 5 (5XX-XXX-X) for chemical substances belonging to NLP (No-Longer Polymers).EC # European Commission registration number. The unique number under which a substance is registered in the European UnionECHA The European Chemicals Agency in Helsinki, Finland, established to oversee and implement the REACH systemEEA European Economic Area (EU + Iceland, Liechtenstein and Norway)ECB European Chemicals BureauECHA European Chemicals AgencyEC-number EINECS and ELINCS Number (see also EINECS and ELINCS)EDC Endocrine Disruptor Chemicals. A substance that disrupts or alters the hormonal systems in the body, causing widespread effects throughout the organism. These effects can be observed at extremely low doses.EINECS European Inventory of Existing Commercial SubstancesEQS Environmental Quality StandardES Exposure ScenarioExt-SDS Extended Safety Data Sheet (SDS with ES attached)EU European UnionEWC European Waste Catalogue (replaced by LoW )EC50 (effective A calculated value, derived experimentally, which represents a concentrationconcentration) that would affect 50% of the tested population. Compare to Glossary term “IC50”.ED50 (effective dose) The calculated dose, derived experimentally, which would produce a specified effect in 50% of the test population.ELINCS European List of notified Chemical SubstancesEN European StandardEP European ParliamentEcotoxicity The potential of a chemical to cause a toxic effect on an environmental organism other than humans.EDI (Electronic Data A standardized format for transmitting information electronically.Interchange)EEGL Emergency Exposure Guidance Level. (NRC).EEC (European EINECS (European Inventory of Existing Chemical Substances A static listDate Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 118 of 186
  • 119. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _Term DescriptionEconomic Community) of chemical substances, identified by EINECS and CAS Registry Numbers that were in the European Union market between January 1, 1971, andFormer name of the September 18, 1981.European Union (EU).EINECS European Inventory of Existing Commercial Chemical SubstancesELINCS (European List of A dynamic list of chemical substances, identified by EINECS Numbers, onNotified Chemical which notifications have been made to the European Union since SeptemberSubstances) 18, 1981.Employee (OSHA) A worker who may be exposed to hazardous chemicals under normal operating conditions or in foreseeable emergencies.employer (OSHA) A person engaged in a business where chemicals are either used, distributed, or are produced for use or distribution, including a contractor or subcontractor.ENCS (Existing and New A list of chemical substances that may be used commercially in Japan.Chemical Substances)Endocrine disruptor A substance that disrupts or alters the hormonal systems in the body causing widespread effects throughout the organism. These effects can be observed at extremely low doses.Equivalent level of The safety net of the REACH regulation for substances which do notconcern automatically fall into the categories CMR, PBT or vPvB, but is of equivalent level of concern in terms of the potential damage it may cause.environmental fate The expected result when a chemical is released to the air, water or soil. Types of data -Test subjects (genus, species, sex, etc.) -Test substance (purity) -Test type (LC50, log Kow, g/ml solubility) -Duration of exposure (hours, days)environmental medium Segment(s) or “compartment(s)” of the environment (e.g., air, water, soil, or(media) sediment).environmental hazard The adverse effects (measured as ecotoxicity) that may result from exposures (related to persistence and bioaccumulation potential) to a chemical or physical agent present in the environment. The types of data to consider in the evaluation include but are not limited to - Pollutant aquatic distribution and fate -Acute and chronic flora and fauna data (e.g., ecotoxicity) -Bioconcentration (individual) potential -Bioaccumulation (food chain) - BiodegradationEPA (Environmental A US Federal agency with regulatory and enforcement authority onProtection Agency) environmental matters. Administers FIFRA, CWA, CAA, RCRA, TSCA, CERCLA and other environmentally related acts.EPA 4-stage classification EPA has established a 4-stage classification system to address the levels ofprotection system protection afforded by respiratory and chemicalprotective clothing combinations commonly used by HAZMAT responders. The four classes, in descending order of protection, are called levels A through D. The EPA definitions do not address NFPA clothing; however, the equivalent NFPA suit is specified below. Level A includes a fully encapsulating chemical-resistant suit (equivalent to an NFPA vapor-protective suit) and a pressure-demand SCBA. Level B includes a nonencapsulating chemical-resistant suit (equivalent to an NFPA splash-protective suit) and an SCBA.Date Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 119 of 186
  • 120. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _Term Description Level C includes a nonencapsulating chemical-resistant suit (equivalent to an NFPA splash-protective suit) and an air-purifying respirator. Level D consists of work clothes that do not provide any specific respiratory or skin protection.EPCRA Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act See Glossary term “SARA Title III”.Epidemiology The branch of science concerned with the study of disease incidence and distribution in a general population.ERPG One hr exposure limit 1 = mild transient health effects or objectionable odor 2 = impaired ability to take protective action 3 = life threatening health effects [Emergency Response Planning Guidelines, AIHA, 2005]EPA hazardous waste The number assigned by EPA to each hazardous waste listed in 40 CFR partnumber 261, subpart D, of this chapter and to each characteristic identified in part 261, subpart C. EPA has four hazardous waste characteristics: ignitability, Corrosivity, reactivity and toxicity. The ignitability characteristic identifies wastes that can readily catch fire and sustain combustion (Flashpoint <140 º F) - D001. The corrosivity characteristic identifies wastes that are acidic or alkaline (basic, aqueous pH < 2 or > 12.5, D002) . Such wastes can readily corrode or dissolve flesh, metal, or other materials. The reactivity characteristic identifies wastes that readily explode or undergo violent reactions or react to release toxic gases or fumes (water reactive, D003). When hazardous waste is disposed of in a land disposal unit, toxic compounds or elements can leach into underground drinking water supplies and expose users of the water to hazardous chemicals and constituents. Toxic wastes exceed the regulatory limits for contaminants under the TCLP or “7-11 test” analysis) - D004 - D043.epistaxis Nosebleed hemorrhage from the nose.erythema Redness of the skin.ESIS European chemical Substances Information System. An IT System with information on chemicals related to Biocidal Products, PBTs vPvBs, Classification and Labelling, Export and Import of Dangerous Chemicals and HPV/LPV substances.EU (European Union) Successor governmental body of the European Economic Community (EEC).Explosive (OSHA) A chemical that causes a sudden, almost instantaneous, release of pressure, gas and heat when subjected to sudden shock, pressure, or high temperature. [6] (DOT) Any substance or article, including a device, which is designed to function by explosion (i.e., an extremely rapid release of gas and heat) or which, by chemical reaction within itself, is able to function in a similar manner even if not designed to function by explosion.Explosive article An article containing one or more explosive substancesExplosive limits Same as flammable limits. The range of concentration of a flammable gas or vapor (percentage by volume in air) in which an explosion can occur upon ignition in a confined area.Explosive substance A solid or liquid substance (or mixture of substances) capable by chemical reaction of producing gas at such a temperature and pressure and at such a speed as to cause damage to the surroundings. Pyrotechnic substances are included even when they do not evolve gases.explosive dust A combustible dust that with confinement and in the presence of a suitableDate Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 120 of 186
  • 121. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _Term Description ignition source will explode when suspended in air in adequate concentrations. See US CSB, 2005. See also Glossary term “combustible dust”.explosive limits Also known as "flammable limits." See Glossary term “flammable limits”.Exposure (OSHA) Exposure or exposed means that an employee is subjected in the course of employment to a hazardous chemical that is a physical or health hazard and includes potential (e.g., accidental or possible) exposure. “Subjected” in terms of health hazard includes any route of entry (e.g., inhalation, ingestion, skin contact or absorption).extremely flammable Any liquid having a flash point less than 20°F (-6.7°C) or any liquid having aliquid flash point of less than 141°F (60.5°C) and a boiling point of less than 95°F (35°C).extremely hazardous A chemical identified by EPA under Section 302 of EPCRA (SARA Title III)substance (EHS) and listed in 40 CFR 355 Appendix A and B. Hazardous Substances (per California Hazard Communication Regulation) Any hazardous substances listed in: 1. The Hazardous Substances List (T8 CCR, Section 339), commonly known as “The Director’s List of Hazardous Substances” 2. 29, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 1910, Subpart Z, “Toxic and Hazardous Substances,” Occupational Safety and Health Administration (federal OSHA); and T8 CCR, Section 5155, “Air Contaminants” 3. Threshold Limit Values for Chemical Substances in the Work Environment, American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH), 1991– 1992 4. Sixth Annual Report on Carcinogens, National Toxicology Program (NTP), 1991 5. Monographs, International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), Vols. 1–53 and Supplements 1–8. World Health Organization Material Safety Data Sheets as reproductive toxicants or cancerproducing substances 7. T22 CCR, Section 12000, under the Safe Drinking Water and Toxic Enforcement Act of 1986 (Proposition 65), “Chemicals Known to the State to Cause Cancer or Reproductive Toxicity,” a list published at least once a year by Cal/EPA’s Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment And any other substances that present a physical or health hazard as determined by scientific evidence. Note: Safe Drinking Water and Toxic Enforcement Act of 1986 requires Cal/EPA to publish annually a list of Proposition 65 chemicals known to the State to cause cancer or other reproductive toxicity ( http://www.oehha.ca.gov/prop65/prop65_list/files/P65single061110.pdf ).Eye irritation The production of changes in the eye following the application of test substance to the anterior surface of the eye, which are fully reversible within 21 days of applicationFDA (Food & Drug The US Federal agency with regulatory and enforcement authority regardingAdministration) human and veterinary drugs, biological products, medical devices, the nation’s food supply, cosmetics, and products that emit radiation.Fire Service Law (Japan, Class 1 oxidizing solidsdangerous goods) Class 2 combustible solids Class 3 spontaneously combustible materials and water reactive materials Class 4 flammable liquidsDate Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 121 of 186
  • 122. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _Term Description Class 5 self-reactive materials Class 6 oxidizing liquidsfirst aid Immediate medical or safety measures that can be administered to or self- administered by a person who has been adversely exposed to a hazardous chemical. First aid can include measures such as stopping the exposure and using materials generally available (e.g., water to flush eyes) to reduce or eliminate adverse health effects.Flammable Liquids with a flash point below 100° F (also called combustible). A material that is easily ignited and burns with extreme rapidity.Flammability NFPA flammability code 0 = will not burn 1 = must be preheated 2 = high ambient temp required 3 = may ignite at ambient temp 4 = burn readily Flash Point 4: Below 73° F 3: Below 100° F 2. Below 200° F 1. Above 200° F 0. Will not burnflammable aerosol An aerosol that, when tested by the method described in 16 CFR 1500.45, yields a flame projection exceeding 18 inches at full valve opening, or a flashback (a flame extending back to the valve) at any degree of valve opening.flammable gas (OSHA) (a) A gas that, at ambient temperature and pressure, forms a flammable mixture with air at a concentration of thirteen (13) percent by volume or less or (b) A gas that, at ambient temperature and pressure, forms a range of flammable mixtures with air wider than twelve (12) percent by volume, regardless of the lower limit. (DOT) A material which is a gas at 68°F (20°C) or less and 101.3 kPa (14.7 psi) of pressure. A material which has a boiling point of 68°F (20°C) or less at 101.3 kPa (14.7 psi) and a) is ignitable at 101.3 kPa (14.7 psi) when in a mixture of 13% or less by volume with air or b) has a flammable range at 101.3 kPa (14.7 psi) with air of at least 12% regardless of the lower limit.flammable liquid (OSHA) Liquid, flammable means any liquid having a flashpoint below 100°F (37.8°C) except any mixture having components with flashpoints of 100°F (37.8°C) or higher, the total of which make up 99 percent or more of the total volume of the mixture. [10] A flammable liquid (Class 3) means a liquid having a flash point of not more than 60°C (140°F) or any material in a liquid phase with a flash point at or above 37.8°C (100°F) that is intentionally heated and offered for transportation or transported at or above its flash point in a bulk packaging, with the following exceptions (1) Any liquid meeting one of the definitions specified in 49 CFR 173.1115 (2) Any mixture having one or more components with a flash point of 60°C (140°F) or higher, that make up at least 99 percent of the total volume of the mixture, if the mixture is not offered for transportation or transported at or above its flash point (3) Any liquid with a flash point greater than 35°C (95°F) which does not sustain combustion according to ASTM D-4206. A procedure for determining if a material sustains combustion when heated under test conditions and exposed to an external source of flame is provided in Appendix H of this 49 CFR 173.120 (4) Any liquid with a flash point greater than 35°C (95°F) and with a fire point greater than 100°C (212°F) according to ISO 2592Date Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 122 of 186
  • 123. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _Term Description (5) Any liquid with a flash point greater than 35°C (95°F) which is in a water- miscible solution with a water content of more than 90 percent by mass.flammable limits (or explosive limits) It is the range of concentration of a flammable gas or vapor (percentage by volume in air) in which an explosion can occur upon ignition in a confined area. The minimum and maximum concentrations of vapor in air below and above which propagation of flame does not occur, usually expressed in terms of percent by volume of the vapor or gas in air. Lower Flammable Limit (LFL) The lowest concentration of a flammable vapor or gas/air mixture that will ignite and burn with a flame. Upper Flammable Limit (UFL) The highest concentration of a flammable vapor or gas/air mixture that will ignite and burn with a flame.GES Generic Exposure ScenarioGHS Globally Harmonized System of classification and labeling of chemicalsLower Flammable Limit The lowest concentration of a flammable vapor or gas/air mixture that will(LFL) ignite and burn with a flame.Upper Flammable Limit The highest concentration of a flammable vapor or gas/air mixture that will(UFL) ignite and burn with a flame. flammable solid A solid which is readily combustible, or may cause or contribute to fire through friction. (OSHA) A solid, other than a blasting agent or explosive as defined in 29 CFR 1910.109(a), that is liable to cause fire through friction, absorption of moisture, spontaneous chemical change, or retained heat from manufacturing or processing, or which can be ignited readily, and when ignited, burns so vigorously and persistently as to create a serious hazard. A chemical shall be considered to be a flammable solid, if when tested by the method described in 16 CFR 1500.44, it ignites and burns with a self- sustained flame at a rate greater than one-tenth of an inch per second along its major axis. (DOT) See 49 CFR 173.124(a).flash point The minimum (lowest) temperature at which a liquid or solid gives off a vapor in sufficient concentration that, when the vapor combines with air near the surface of the liquid or solid, a flammable mixture is formed. Hence, the lower the flash point, the more flammable the material. It is tested by one of the following: 1. Tag closed cup tester (in accordance with ANSI/ASTM D56) is for liquids with a viscosity of below 5.5 centistokes at 104°F (40°C), or below 9.5 centistokes at 77°F (25°C) and a flash point below 200°F (93°C) that do not contain suspended solids and that do not have a tendency to form a surface film under test conditions. 2. Pensky-Martens closed cup tester (in accordance with ANSI/ASTM D93- 02a) is for liquids with a viscosity greater than 5.5 centistokes at 104°F (40°C) that contain suspended solids and that tend to form a surface film under test conditions. 3. Setaflash closed-cup apparatus (in accordance with (ASTM D3278) is for liquids having flash points between 32°F (0°C) and 230°F (110°C) and a viscosity lower than 150 stokes at 77°F (25°C). For mixtures, if the result of the test by any of these methods is above 100°F (37.8°C), evaporate a fresh sample to 90% of the original volume and retest. The lower of the two values shall be taken as the flash point.foreseeable emergency (OSHA) Any potential occurrence such as, but not limited to, equipment failure, rupture of containers, or failure of control equipment which could result in an uncontrolled release of a hazardous chemical into the workplace.formula, chemical A written representation using symbols of a chemical entity or relationship.Date Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 123 of 186
  • 124. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _Term Description There are several kinds of formulas (1) Empirical. Expresses in simplest form the relative number and the kind of atoms in a molecule of one or more compounds it indicates composition only, not structure. (2) Molecular. Shows the actual number and kind of atoms in a chemical entity (i.e., a molecule, group, or ion). (3) Structural. Indicates the location of the atoms, groups, or ions relative to one another in a molecule, as well as the number and location of the chemical bonds. (4) Generic. Expresses a generalized type of organic compound in which the variables stand for the number of atoms or for the kind of radical in a homologous series. (5) Electronic. A structural formula in which the bonds are replaced by dots indicating electron pairs, a single bond being equivalent to one pair of electrons shared by two atoms.freezing point Temperature at which a liquid substance becomes a solid. See Glossary term “melting point”.fume Airborne particulate formed by the condensation of solid particles from the gaseous state. Usually, fumes are generated after initial volatilization from a combustion process, or from a melting process (such as metal fume emitted during welding). Usually less than 1 micron in diameter. Related Discussion: The substance or mixture can be absorbed through the body by inhalation. Gas, vapour, mist, or finely dispersed solids will enter the body mainly through inhalation Gas: a substance which at ambient temperature and pressure appears as a gas, meaning that the molecules of the substances travel freely in open space. Vapour: the gas of a substance which is formed above a liquid or solid by evaporation. Evaporation means the release of molecules from the liquid or solid. Evaporation decreases with increasing boiling point and can generally be regarded as negligible if the boiling point exceeds 350°C. Mist: a suspension of liquid particles in the air, formed by condensation of a vapour. Fume: a suspension of liquid or solid particles in the air formed by condensation of vapours from heated metals or of vapours produced by a decomposition reaction. Moisture in the air often promotes the formation of mists and fumes by reactions with the vapours. Dust-cloud: fine particles of powder of a solid substance, dispersed in the air. Aerosol: a suspension of liquid or solid particles in the air. Mist, fume and dust-cloud are more or less covered by the term aerosol. Example: If LC50 (4hr) inhalation, mammals (rat)* according to OECD guidelines and GHS 3.1.2.3, for aerosols or particulates <= 5 mg/l or for gases <= 5000 ppm or vapours <= 20 mg/l.Gas A substance which (i) at 50 °C has a vapour pressure greater than 300 kPa or (ii) is completely gaseous at 20 °C at a standard pressure of 101.3 kPa.gastric lavage Medical procedure involving irrigation or washing out of the stomach.gavage Forced feeding, especially through a tube passed into the stomach. [14]GHS The Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals containing harmonized classification criteria and hazard communicationDate Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 124 of 186
  • 125. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _Term Description elements. Details are describe in the UN Purple Book. Hazards are arranged into 3 general groups containing hazard classes: physical hazards – 16 classes , health hazards – 10 classes and environmental hazards – 2 classesHH Human HealthHWD Council Directive 91/689/EEC of 12 Dec 1991 on hazardous waste Directive (91/689/EEC)harmonized classification The decision on classification for a particular hazard of a substance is taken at Community level. All suppliers must use a harmonized classification and labeling of a substance. Harmonized classification and labeling under DSD normally comprised all categories of danger.hazard Hazard refers to the intrinsic properties of a substance which are always present. See also "Risk". It is the inherent property of an agent or situation having the potential to cause adverse effects when an organism, system or (sub) population is exposed to that agent. A chemical can be classified as a health hazard, physical hazard and/or an environmental hazard. Hazards can be either immediate or delayed. Note: Comments point at the confusion deriving from reference to a likelihood, which points at risk rather than hazard. Use and disposal enter in the definition of risk rather than hazard.Hazard Communication An OSHA regulation issued under 29 CFR Part 1910.1200. It details theStandard (HCS) regulatory requirements for manufacturers, importers and employers regarding chemical hazards evaluation, hazard communication and workplace training, and includes the prerequisites for SDSs and chemical labeling in the workplace.Hazard pictogram (sometimes also referred to as “pictogram” in this document) means a graphical composition that includes a symbol plus other graphic elements, such as a border, background pattern or colour that is intended to convey specific informationHazard category The division of criteria within each hazard class, specifying hazard severityHazard class The nature of the physical, health or environmental hazardHazard statement A phrase assigned to a hazard class and category that describes the nature of the hazards of a hazardous substance or mixture, including, where appropriate, the degree of hazard (per CLP). Risk phrase is used per DSD/DPD.hazard determination See Glossary term “hazard evaluation”. hazard evaluation The process of evaluating all relevant data and producing scientifically sound conclusions that identify the specific hazards of a particular chemical(s). May also be called “hazard determination”.hazardous Fulfilling the criteria relating to physical hazards, health hazards or environmental hazards, laid down in parts 2 to 5 of Annex I of CLP. The capability of a chemical to produce an adverse effect on human health or the environment based on the chemical’s inherent physical, chemical, and toxicological properties. Note also that the term “hazardous” may be used in conjunction with other words (e.g., “hazardous chemical”, “hazardous material”, etc) that are defined by many laws and regulations including OSHA (29 CFR), DOT (49 CFR), CERCLA (40 CFR) and RCRA (40 CFR).hazardous chemical Any chemical which presents a physical, health and/or environmental hazard.Hazardous Material Property that is deemed a hazardous material, chemical substance or mixture, or hazardous waste under the Hazardous Materials Transportation Act (HMTA), the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), or the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA).3 Generally, a hazardous material hasDate Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 125 of 186
  • 126. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _Term Description one or more of the following characteristics: a) a flash point below 200°F (93.3°C), closed cup, or is subject to spontaneous heating; b) subject to polymerization with the release of large amounts of energy when handled, stored, or shipped without adequate controls; c) in the course of normal operations, may produce fibers, dusts, gases, fumes, vapors, mists, or smokes that have one or more of the following characteristics: (1) causes 50 percent fatalities to test animals below 500 mg/kg of animal weight when a single oral dose is used (LD50); (2) is a flammable solid or a strong oxidizing or reducing agent; (3) causes first-degree burns to skin in a short time exposure, or is systemically toxic by skin contact; (4) has a permissible exposure limit (PEL) below 1,000 ppm for gases and vapors, below 500 mg/mm3 for fumes, or below 10 mg/m3 or 2 fibers/cm3 for dust; (5) causes occupational chemical dermatitis, which is any abnormality of the skin induced or aggravated by the work environment that includes, but is not limited to, primary irritant categories, allergic sensitizers, and photosensitizers; d) radioactive to the extent that it requires special handling; e) a recognized carcinogen according to OSHA regulations at 29 CFR 1910; or f) special characteristics that, in the opinion of the holding agency (see definition), could be hazardous to health, safety, or the environment if improperly handled, stored, transported, disposed of, or otherwise improperly used. Hazardous materials (see definition) are hazardous wastes when one or both of the following is true: 1. They have passed through the disposition cycle without having been successfully reutilized, transferred, donated, or sold, and the holding agency declares an intent to discard them. 2. They are no longer usable for their intended purpose, a valid alternate purpose, or resource recovery. Solid (non-hazardous) wastes, as defined at 40 CFR 261.2, become hazardous wastes when: 1. they exhibit one or more of the characteristics of ignitability, corrosivity, reactivity, or EP [Extraction Procedure] toxicity; or 2. they are predetermined hazardous wastes upon generation as listed in 40 CFR 261, Subpart D.Hazardous Operations Includes process operations that are subject to regulatory actions because of the presence of one or more specific hazardous materials or types of materials that meet or exceed established thresholds or guidelines. These include operations with chemicals governed by: • 29 CFR 1910.119, Process safety management of highly hazardous chemicals or 40 CFR 68.67 Chemical accident prevention provisions – Process hazards analysis; • hazard category 1, 2, or 3 nuclear operations, as defined in 10 CFR 830, Nuclear Safety Management; • operations involving beryllium, as defined by 10 CFR 850, Chronic beryllium disease prevention program; • facilities with “significant” fire hazards as defined by DOE O 420.1B, Facility Safety;Date Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 126 of 186
  • 127. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _Term Description • hazardous waste operations as defined in 29 CFR 1910.120, Hazardous waste operations and emergency response; and • activities subject to National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) environmental assessment or environmental impact statement as defined in 10 CFR 1021.400.hazardous polymerization An uncontrolled polymerization reaction (see glossary term) that generates and releases dangerous amounts of heat and pressure. Such reactions may be initiated by chemical catalysts or physical agents such as heat or radiation (including sunlight). Such reactions may occur in reaction vessels or in other containers (including shipping containers).HCS See Glossary term “Hazard Communication Standard”.health hazard A chemical for which there is statistically significant evidence based on at least one study conducted in accordance with established scientific principles that acute or chronic health effects may occur in exposed employees. The term, health hazard, includes chemicals that are carcinogens, toxic or highly toxic agents, reproductive toxins, irritants, corrosives, sensitizers, hepatotoxins, nephrotoxins, neurotoxins, agents that act on the hematopoietic system and agents that damage the lungs, skin, eyes, or mucous membranes. Information concerning chronic health hazards can be found in numerous resources such as Tomes®, the ACGIH Guide to Occupational Exposure Threshold Limit Values, and the NIOSH Pocket Guide to Chemical Hazards.Health and safety study Means any study of any effect of a chemical substance or mixture on health or the environment or on both, including underlying data and epidemiological studies, studies of occupational exposure to a chemical substance or mixture, toxicological, clinical, and ecological, or other studies of a chemical substance or mixture, and any test performed under the Act. Chemical identity is always part of a health and safety study.hematopoietic system System responsible for the formation of blood cells.Henry’s Law Constant The value (H) at a given temperature that is indicative of the volatility of the substance. Henry’s law states that the mass of a soluble gas that dissolves in a finite mass of liquid at a given temperature is very nearly directly proportional to the partial pressure of that gas. This means that the Henry’s law constant (H) can be related to solubility and vapor pressure at a given temperature.hepatotoxin A substance that can cause liver damage.Highly toxic chemical (OSHA) A chemical that falls within any of the following categories - A chemical that has a median lethal dose (LD(50)) of 50 milligrams or less per kilogram of body weight when administered orally to albino rats weighing between 200 and 300 grams each. - A chemical that has a median lethal dose (LD(50)) of 200 milligrams or less per kilogram of body weight when administered by continuous contact for 24 hours (or less if death occurs within 24 hours) with the bare skin of albino rabbits weighing between two and three kilograms each. - A chemical that has a median lethal concentration (LC(50)) in air of 200 parts per million by volume or less of gas or vapor, or 2 milligrams per liter or less of mist, fume, or dust, when administered by continuous inhalation for one hour (or less if death occurs within one hour) to albino rats weighing between 200 and 300 grams each. A toxic chemical is a chemical that a medical lethal dose LC50 of more than 50 mg per kg (ppm) of body weight, when administered orally to albino rats weighing between 200 and 300 grams each.Date Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 127 of 186
  • 128. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _Term DescriptionHMIS® (Hazardous A system, developed by the National Paint and Coatings Association,Material Information designed to inform workers of the hazards of the chemicals they use and ofSystem) means of protecting themselves from those hazards. It uses a numerical rating to indicate the level of hazard. It addresses acute health, flammability and physical hazards.Hazardous Materials A data repository of SDS information maintained by the Defense GeneralInformation System) Supply Center.Hazard communication The provisions of § 721.72(d) requiring employees to be provided withprogram information on the location and availability of a written hazard communication program.hydrolysis A chemical decomposition by which a compound is split into other compounds by reacting with water decomposition in the environment via reaction with water.IARC (International A scientific panel of the World Health Organization (WHO) that evaluates andAgency for Research on classifies the carcinogenic potential of chemicals and processes. classifiesCancer) chemicals as established (1), probable (2a), or possible (2b) human carcinogens, or (3) not classifiableIgnitable waste A waste is considered "ignitable" under RCRA if it is: - a liquid with flash point under 140oF, or - a non-liquid, but susceptible to vigorous burning by friction, water absorption, or spontaneous chemical change, or - a flammable compressed gas, or - a strong oxidizerIMDG Code The “International Maritime Dangerous Goods Code” for the transport of dangerous goods by seahypersensitivity The condition where the body is excessively sensitive (overreacts) to the effects of a substance (e.g., skin exposure to nickel may cause the immune system to become hypersensitive and cause an allergic reaction). The hypersensitive response may be immediate (within minutes after exposure to substance) or delayed (hours after exposure).IARC (International A scientific panel of the World Health Organization (WHO) that evaluates andAgency for Research on classifies the carcinogenic potential of chemicals and processes.Cancer)Lethal Concentration 50 The concentration of chemical in the air or water (administered by inhalation)(LC50) in ppm or mg/m3 that is expected to cause the death of 50% of the animals within a specified time. An LC50 is similar to LD50, but is used when the dose received by the animal is not known. When animals are exposed to chemicals via the air they breathe or in the water in which they live, the precise dose that is absorbed into the body is unknown. The results of acute inhalation studies and/or acute aquatic toxicity studies are therefore reported as an LC50, not an LD50.Lethal Dose 50 (LD50) The dose of a toxicant that will kill 50% of test organisms within a designated period of time. The lower the LD 50, the more toxic the compound." [EPA] The dose is administered by any route other than inhalation.IATA International Air Transport AssociationICAO-TI Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods by AirIMDG International Maritime Dangerous GoodsIMSBC International Maritime Solid Bulk CargoesIUCLID International Uniform Chemical Information DatabaseIUPAC International Union for Pure Applied ChemistryIC50 (inhibition A calculated concentration, derived experimentally, at which a substanceDate Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 128 of 186
  • 129. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _Term Descriptionconcentration) would inhibit or prevent a specific effect in 50% of the tested population. Compare to Glossary term “EC50”.identity Any chemical or common name which is indicated on the safety data sheet (SDS) for the chemical. The identity used shall permit cross-references to be made among the required list of hazardous chemicals, the label and the SDS. See Glossary terms “common name” and “specific chemical identity”.IDLH (immediately (OSHA) An atmosphere that poses an immediate threat to life, would causedangerous to life and irreversible health effects, or would impair an individual’s ability to escapehealth) from a dangerous atmosphere. 29 CFR 1910.120.(NIOSH) Immediately A condition that poses a threat of exposure to airborne contaminants whenDangerous To Life or that exposure is likely to cause death or immediate or delayed permanentHealth adverse health effects or prevent escape from such environment. NIOSH Respirator Decision Logic (DHHS [NIOSH] Publication No. 87-108, NTIS Publication No. PB-91-151183)INCHEM Refers to an Internet based tool providing a range of chemical safety related information produced by International Programme on Chemical Safety and the Canadian Centre for Occupational Healthimmediate hazard The inherent property of a chemical to cause an adverse effect that manifests itself soon after exposure. As used in this Standard, immediate hazard includes acute toxicity and physical hazards. See Glossary terms “acute toxicity” and “physical hazard”.immediate health effects Adverse health effects that manifest themselves soon after an acute exposure.importer The first business with employees within the Customs Territory of the United States, which receives hazardous chemicals produced in other countries for the purpose of supplying them to distributors or employers within the United States.Impurity A chemical substance which is unintentionally present with another chemical substance.incompatible Materials that could cause dangerous reactions by direct contact with one another. [7] When such materials or classes of chemicals react with other materials or substances, a hazardous situation could result, causing fire, explosion or the formation of toxic materials.inflammable A synonym of flammable. Sometimes erroneously interpreted as “not flammable”. The term “flammable” should be used instead of “inflammable” to avoid confusion that could potentially cause catastrophic effects, injury or death.ingestion The taking of a substance into the body (stomach) through the mouth swallowing.inhalation The breathing in of air, gas, vapor, mist, fume or suspended particulates.in silico Mathematical modeling based on chemical structure to predict biological, toxicological and physiochemical activity of a substance. See Glossary terms SAR or QSAR.intermediate A substance that is manufactured for and consumed in or used for chemical processing in order to be transformed into another substance (hereinafter referred to as ‘synthesis’)in vitro Experiments with cells or tissues from organisms conducted outside of the organism.in vivo Experiments in living organisms.Date Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 129 of 186
  • 130. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _Term DescriptionIP (intraperitoneal) Injection into the peritoneal cavity. A route of administration.iritis Inflammation of the iris, usually marked by pain, congestion of the ciliary region, photophobia, contraction of the pupil and discoloration of the iris.irritant A non-corrosive chemical that causes a reversible inflammatory effect on living tissue by chemical action at the site of contact. Irritants can affect the eyes, skin, respiratory and digestive tracts. (OSHA) A chemical is an eye irritant if determined by using the procedures in 16 CFR 1500.42 or other appropriate techniques. Also, note that according to OSHA, an irritant is a non-corrosive chemical, which causes a reversible inflammatory effect on living tissue at the site of contact (e.g., eyes, skin, or respiratory tract). This may include defatting agents, which by removal of natural skin oils, cause irritation following prolonged or repeated exposure. Materials with Draize skin tests scores below two are not generally considered skin irritants, while scores of five or above generally indicate severe skin irritants. The degree of irritation is determined by using recognized guidelines or other appropriate techniques.irritation Condition caused by an irritant that is manifested by redness, itching, discomfort, soreness, roughness, or inflammation of a tissue.ISO (The International A non-governmental organization which, since 1947, has published more thanOrganization for 16,000 international standards, ranging from activities such as agriculture andStandardization) construction, environmental (ISO 14000), quality (ISO 9000), to medical devices and information technology. ISO 11014 is the standard for “Safety data sheet for chemical products — Content and order of sections”.IUCLID The International Uniform Chemical Information Databasejaundice A sign of liver damage, characterized by yellow appearance of the skin and eyes.Kow octanol-water partition coefficientlabel The display of written, printed, or graphic signs, pictures or symbols, which is intended to provide information and which is affixed to, printed on, or attached to the immediate chemical container, as well as on any outside packaging. Note The HCS defines “label” as any written, printed, or graphic material displayed on or affixed to containers of hazardous chemicals.Label element One type of information that has been harmonised for use in a label, (e.g., hazard pictogram, signal word)labeling A term which encompasses container labels and all other documents that contain precautionary and hazard communication information. These other documents may include SDS, product literature, technical brochures, training materials, process standards and other types of communication. A descriptive name, identification number, instruction, or caution to be placed directly on the primary hazardous material container.LC50 (lethal The calculated concentration of chemical in the air or water that causes deathconcentration) to 50 percent of the animals. An LC50 is similar to LD50, but is used when the dose received by the animal is not known. When animals are exposed to chemicals via the air they breathe or in the water in which they live, the precise dose that is absorbed into the body is unknown. The results of acute inhalation studies and/or acute aquatic toxicity studies are therefore reported as an LC50, not an LD50. Lethal concentration calculated of a material in air that is expected to kill 50Date Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 130 of 186
  • 131. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _Term Description percent of a group of test animals with single exposure (usually 1 or 4 hrs, expressed as ppm for gases and vapors or as milligrams of material per liter of air, mg/l or milligrams of material per cubic meter of air, mg/m3)LCLO (lethal The lowest concentration of a substance in air which has been reported toconcentration low) have caused death in humans or animals. The reported concentrations may be entered for periods of exposure that are less than 24 hours (acute) or greater than 24 hours (subacute and chronic).LD50 (lethal dose) A single calculated dose of a material expected to kill 50 percent of a group of test animals. The LD50 dose is usually expressed as milligrams or grams of material per kilogram of animal body weight (mg/kg or g/kg). The material may be administered by mouth or applied to the skin.LDLO (lethal dose low) The lowest dose of a substance introduced by a route, other than inhalation, over any given period of time in one or more divided portions and reported to have caused death in humans or animals.LEL or LFL (lower The lowest concentration (lowest percentage of the substance in air) that willexplosive limit, or lower produce a flash of fire when an ignition source (heat, arc, or flame) is present.flammable limit, of a (see UEL).vapor or gas)lethargy A lowered level of consciousness marked by listlessness, drowsiness and apathy. (Example lay language fatigue or slowness, tiredness.)local health effect An adverse health effect that occurs primarily at the site of contact or exposure.LOCAL EXHAUST A ventilation system that captures and removes the contaminants at the pointVENTILATION (Also they are being produced before they escape into the workroom air. Theknown as exhaust system consists of hoods, ductwork, a fan, and possibly an aircleaningventilation) device. Advantages of local exhaust ventilation over general ventilation include: it removes the contaminant rather than dilutes it, requires less airflow and, thus, is more economical over the long term; and the system can be used to conserve or reclaim valuable materials; however, the system must be properly designed with the correctly shaped and placed hoods, and correctly sized fans and ductwork.LoW List of Wastes (see http//ec.europa.eu/environment/waste/framework/list.htm ) Commission Decision of 3 May 2000 replacing Decision 94/3/EC establishing a list of wastes pursuant to Article 1(a) of Council Directive 75/442/EEC on waste and Council Decision 94/904/EEC establishing a list of hazardous waste pursuant to Article 1(4) of Council Directive 91/689/EEC on hazardous waste, European list of waste, 2000/532/ECLR Lead RegistrantLiquid A substance or mixture which at 50 °C has a vapour pressure of not more than 300 kPa (3 bar), which is not completely gaseous at 20 °C and at a standard pressure of 101.3 kPa, and which has a melting point or initial melting point of 20 °C or less at a standard pressure of 101.3 kPa. A viscous substance or mixture for which a specific melting point cannot be determined shall be subjected to the ASTM D 4359- 90 test or to the test for determining fluidity (penetrometer test) prescribed in section 2.3.4 of Annex A of the European Agreement concerning the International Carriage of Dangerous Goods by Road (ADR)LOAEL (lowest observed Lowest observed dose level at which a substance produces an adverse effectadverse effect level) in a given experimental study.LOEL (lowest observed Lowest observed dose level at which a substance produces an effect in aDate Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 131 of 186
  • 132. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _Term Descriptioneffect level) given experimental study.M-factor A multiplying factor. It is applied to the concentration of a substance classified as hazardous to the aquatic environment acute category 1 or chronic category 1, and is used to derive by the summation method the classification of a mixture in which the substance is presentmaterial All types of classifications of chemicals, such as products, raw materials, isolated manufacturing intermediates, as well as hazardous and non- hazardous chemicals. Also included are items that may normally be considered non-hazardous, but may give off hazardous chemicals during customary and reasonably foreseeable use and emergencies, handling and storage such items are not subject to the article exemption under the HCS (29 CFR 1910.1200).Manufacturer Any natural or legal person established within the Community who manufactures a substance within the Community.Manufacturing Production or extraction of substances in the natural state.mechanical irritation Irritation of the skin (or other tissues) caused by the physical forces of a solid substance directed against tissue (e.g. scratching, abrading, chafing, cutting).melting point The melting point or freezing point of a pure substance is the temperature at which its solid and liquid phases are in equilibrium at atmospheric pressure. The terms melting point and freezing point are often used interchangeably, depending on whether the substance is being heated or cooled.METI Japanese Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry.microorganisms A microbiological entity, cellular or non-cellular, capable of replication or of transferring genetic material (includes algae, bacteria, fungi, parasites, plasmids, prions, viruses, rickettsia, and genetically modified variants thereof). "viable" - microorganisms that have been killed are not considered infectious. Viability relates solely to the state of the organism at the point and time of the production of the waste. "or their toxins" - Toxins produced by microorganisms render the waste infectious even if the producing organism is no longer present. “ cause disease“ - This includes any disease regardless of severity. “man or other living organisms" - This includes animals, but not plants. “H9 ‘Infectious’: substances containing viable micro-organisms or their toxins which are known or reliably believed to cause disease in man or other living organisms.” H10 “Toxic for reproduction": substances and preparations which, if they are inhaled or ingested or if they penetrate the skin, may induce non-hereditary congenital malformations or increase their incidence H11 "Mutagenic": substances and preparations which, if they are inhaled or ingested or if they penetrate the skin, may induce hereditary genetic defects or increase their incidence H12 Waste which releases toxic or very toxic gases in contact with water, air or an acid H 15 Waste capable by any means, after disposal, of yielding another substance, e.g. a leachate, which possesses any of the characteristics listed above. H13 H 13 "Sensitizing": substances and preparations which, if they areDate Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 132 of 186
  • 133. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _Term Description inhaled or if they penetrate the skin, are capable of eliciting a reaction of hypersensitisation such that on further exposure to the substance or preparation, characteristic adverse effects are produced H14 "Ecotoxic": waste which presents or may present immediate or delayed risks for one or more sectors of the environment H13 Waste capable by any means, after disposal, of yielding another substance, e.g. a leachate, which possesses any of the characteristics listed abovemg/m3 Milligrams per cubic meter of air at 20 °C and 101.3 KPamineralization In environmental terms, the final result of ultimate biodegradation complete conversion of the substance to basic compounds such as carbon dioxide, water and inorganic compounds.mist Liquid droplets suspended in air generated by condensation from the gaseous to the liquid state or by breaking up a liquid into a dispersed state by splashing, foaming, atomizing, or the like.mixture A mixture or solution composed of two or more substances (Note “Mixture” (CLP) and “preparation” (REACH) are synonymous). However, UN GHS Chapter 1.2 includes the phrase, “in which they do not react” at the end of an otherwise identical definition. This term means the same as “preparation” under DPD. A mixture or solution composed of two or more substances”. A physical combination of two or more components whereby the individual components do not chemically react with each other. Note The HCS defines a “mixture” as any combination of two or more chemicals if the combination is not, in whole or in part, the result of a chemical reaction. GHS-CLASSIFICATION OF MIXTURES Skin Irrit. 2; H315: C>= 5 % Eye Dam. 1; H318: C>= 5 % Eye Irrit. 2; H319: 0,5 % <= C < 5 % STOT SE 3; H335: C>= 5 % DPD CLASSIFICATION OF MIXTURES Specific Concentration Limits: Xn; R20: C >= 5 % Xi; R37/38-41: C >= 5 % Xi; R36: 0,5 % <= C < 5 %molecular weight Weight (mass) of a molecule based on the sum of the atomic weights of the atoms that make up the molecule.Monomer A substance which is capable of forming covalent bonds with a sequence of additional like or unlike molecules under the conditions of the relevant polymer-forming reaction used for the particular process.MSDS Material Safety Data Sheet (see SDS).Mutagen A substance or agent capable of altering the genetic material in a living cell. In fact, most chemicals classified as non-carcinogens by agencies such as the National Toxicology Program (NTP) and International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) produced positive responses in one or more of a battery on in vitro genetic assays, suggesting that the specificity of in vitro tests is too poor to rely upon individual tests or test batteries to predict carcinogenic profiles for new molecules. Subsequent addition of in vivo test results (e.g., mouse micronucleus) to the battery database failed to improveDate Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 133 of 186
  • 134. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _Term Description its predictive performance. With the concordance between rodent carcinogens and mutagens averaging about 60 to 70 percent, the appropriate integration of genetic toxicology results into toxicological assessments is not a straight-forward process.Mutation A permanent change in the amount or structure of the genetic material in a cell A mutation is a permanent change in the amount or structure of the genetic material in an organism, resulting in a change of the phenotypic characteristics of the organism. The alterations may involve a single gene, a block of genes, or a whole chromosome. Effects involving single genes may be a consequence of effects on single DNA bases (point mutations) or of large changes, including deletions, within the gene. Effects on whole chromosomes may involve structural or numerical changes. A mutation in the germ cells in sexually reproducing organisms may be transmitted to the offspring. A mutagen is an agent that gives rise to an enhanced occurrence of mutations.NAERG (North American A safety reference book, commonly referred to as the ERG, that is intendedEmergency Response for use by firefighters, police, and other emergency responders who may beGuide) the first to arrive at the scene of a transportation incident involving dangerous goods. The guide is intended to aid first responders in quickly identifying the specific or generic hazards involved in the incident and protecting themselves and the general public. (NAERG 2008 ed, p2).neurotoxin The chemical is toxic to nerve cells in the occupational setting — includes peripheral neuropathy (predominantly motor or sensorimotor), Parkinsonism, solvent syndrome (acute or chronic), and other CNS neurotoxins.NFPA National Fire Protection Agency see "flammability" The National Fire Protection Association; a voluntary membership organization whose aims are to promote and improve fire protection and prevention. NFPA has published 16 volumes of codes known as the National Fire Codes. Within these codes is Standard No. 705, "Identification of the Fire Hazards of Materials". This is a system that rates the hazard of a material during a fire. These hazards are divided into health, flammability, and reactivity hazards and appear in a well-known diamond system using from zero through four to indicate severity of the hazard. Zero indicates no special hazard and four indicates severe hazard. The fourth space of the diamond is used for special hazards. The NFPA specifies these special hazards as follows: - Materials which demonstrate unusual reactivity with water shall be identified with the letter W with a horizontal line through the centre; - Materials which possess oxidizing properties shall be identified by the letters OX; or - Materials possessing radioactivity hazards shall be identified by the standard radioactivity symbol.NIOSH National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health.No-Observed-Adverse- "The dose of a chemical at which there were no statistically or biologicallyEffect Level (NOAEL) significant increases in frequency or severity of adverse effects seen between the exposed population and its appropriate control."NRC National Research CouncilNRC (Nuclear Regulatory U.S. government agency regulating by-product material (radioactive materialCommission) arising from controlled fission).NTP National Toxicology ProgramDate Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 134 of 186
  • 135. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _Term DescriptionNTP Carcinogen 1 = Human carcinogen 2 = Anticipated human carcinogennarcosis A state of stupor, unconsciousness, or arrested activity produced by the influence of narcotics or other chemicals.narcotic A material that produces stupor, insensibility and sometimes unconsciousness.nausea Tendency to vomit, feeling of sickness at the stomach.NCI (National Cancer A branch of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), one of eight agencies thatInstitute) compose the Public Health Service (PHS) in the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS). Established under the National Cancer Institute Act of 1937, it is the Federal Governments principal agency for cancer research and training.NDSL (Non-Domestic An inventory of substances that are not on the DSL but are accepted as beingSubstances List) in commercial use in the United States. Substances for which the US EPA has implemented risk management measures, and those on the confidential portion of the TSCA Inventory, are not automatically included in the updates of the NDSL. NDSL substances are subject to chemical inventory notification but with reduced information requirements.necrosis Death of tissue. Corrosive chemicals may cause localized tissue damage at site of contact, which may lead to permanent damage and scarring. (Example lay language tissue destruction)neoplasia The uncoordinated growth of abnormal cells which is more rapid than of other tissues, forming benign or malignant tumors. (Hodgson, 1988)nephrotoxin A material that may cause adverse effects and potential injury to the kidneys.neural Describing a nerve or the nervous system.neuritis Inflammation of a nerve, pain, and tenderness, anesthesia and paresthesia, paralysis, wasting and disappearance of the reflexes.neurotoxin A material that affects the nerve cells and may produce emotional or behavioral abnormalities.neutralize To eliminate potential hazards by inactivating strong acids, caustics and oxidizers. For example, acids can be neutralized by adding an appropriate amount of caustic substance to the spill.NFPA (National Fire An international membership organization focused on promoting andProtection Association) improving fire protection/prevention and establishing safeguards against loss of life and property by fire. The NFPA establishes more than 300 scientifically based consensus codes and standards. The “Flammable and Combustible Liquids Code” (NFPA 30) and the “Standard System for the Identification of the Hazards of Materials for Emergency Response” (NFPA 704) may be helpful to authors of hazardous workplace chemical labeling.NIOSH (National Institute Part of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in the United Statesfor Occupational Safety Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) a Federal agency which,and Health) in addition to other activities, tests and certifies respiratory protective devices and air sampling detector tubes, recommends occupational exposure limits for various substances, and assists OSHA in occupational safety and health investigations and research.NOAEL (No observed The highest dose level of a substance that causes no observed adverseadverse effect level) effects in a given experimental study.NOEC (No observed The highest concentration of a substance that causes no observed effects inDate Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 135 of 186
  • 136. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _Term Descriptioneffect concentration a given experimental study.NOEL (No observed The highest dose level of a substance that causes no observed effects in aeffect level) given experimental study.Notifier The manufacturer or the importer, or group of manufacturers or importers notifying to the AgencyNRC (National Response The sole federal point of contact for reporting oil and chemical spills releasedCenter) to all types of media. Spills are reported using NRC’s toll-free number 1-800- 424-8802 or nontoll-free 202-267-2675. The NRC operates 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year.NTP (National Toxicology A United States federal interagency program whose mission is to evaluateProgram) agents of public health concern. NTP oversees the external scientific evaluation of substances nominated for listing in or de-listing from the “Report on Carcinogens”.OECD-WPMNM OECD Working Party on Manufactured NanomaterialsOEL Occupational Exposure Limits (OELs, TLVs values, etc.) can in general be described as limits for airborne concentrations of substances, which it is believed do not cause health effects to nearly all workers exposed day after day to those substances during their working lives. Some countries have OELs which originate from the list of Threshold Limit Values (TLVs) published each year by the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH).OH Occupational HealthOSHA European Agency for Safety and Health at workOC Operational ConditionsOECD Organization for Economic Co-operation and Developmentoctanol/water partition A measure of environmental fate, specifically bioaccumulation andcoefficient bioconcentration (expressed as log KOW or log POW) that measures the ability of a chemical to be absorbed in fatty tissues.OECD (Organization for An international organization that, among other things, develops andEconomic Cooperation publishes Guidelines for Testing of Chemicals.and Development)olfactory fatigue A persons ability to detect the odor of a chemical declines as exposure time increases.odor threshold The lowest concentration at which a substance can be detected or recognized using the sense of smell.organochlorines The organochlorine insecticides, including DDT and chlordane, persist in the environment and in animal tissues.organophosphates Organophosphate insecticides interrupt nerve conduction. They cause the accumulation of acetylcholine at nerve endings by irreversibly binding with the acetylcholinesterase enzyme.other CNS neurotoxin In addition to chemicals that cause neuropathy, Parkinsons syndrome, and CNS solvent syndrome, other chemicals that cause acute encephalopathy include organic metal compounds (lead, mercury, tin, nickel, and manganese), hydrazines, boron hydrides, etc.odor threshold The lowest concentration of a substance in air that can be detected by the sense of smell.organic peroxide A liquid or solid organic substance which contains the bivalent -O-O-structure and may be considered a derivative of hydrogen peroxide, where one or bothDate Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 136 of 186
  • 137. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _Term Description of the hydrogen atoms have been replaced by organic radicals. The term also includes organic peroxide formulations (mixtures). (OSHA) An organic compound that contains the bivalent -O-O- structure and which may be considered to be a structural derivative of hydrogen peroxide where one or both of the hydrogen atoms has been replaced by an organic radical.Other Potentially (1) The following human body fluids: semen, vaginal secretions,Infectious Materials cerebrospinal fluid, synovial fluid, pleural fluid, pericardial fluid, peritoneal fluid, amniotic fluid, saliva in dental procedures, any body fluid that is visibly contaminated with blood, and all body fluids in situations where it is difficult or impossible to differentiate between body fluids; (2) Any unfixed tissue or organ (other than intact skin) from a human (living or dead); and (3) HIV- containing cell or tissue cultures, organ cultures, and HIV- or HBV-containing culture medium or other solutions; and blood, organs, or other tissues from experimental animals infected with HIV or HBV (http://www.osha.gov/pls/oshaweb/owadisp.show_document? p_table=STANDARDS&p_id=10051 )Oxidising gas Any gas which may, generally by providing oxygen, cause or contribute to the combustion of other material more than air does.Oxidising liquid A liquid which, while in itself not necessarily combustible, may, generally by yielding oxygen, cause, or contribute to, the combustion of other material.Oxidizing properties Substances and preparations which can generate and maintain heat(Section 9 of SDS) producing chemical reaction with other materials, especially burning flammable material. Oxygen is necessary for a fire to occur. Some chemicals can cause other materials to burn by supplying oxygen. Oxidizers do not usually burn themselves but they will either help the fire by providing more oxygen or they may cause materials that normally do not burn to suddenly catch on fire (spontaneous combustion). In some cases, a spark or flame (source of ignition) is not necessary for the material to catch on fire but only the presence of an oxidizer. Oxidizers can also be in the form of gases (oxygen, ozone), liquids (nitric acid, perchloric acid solutions) and solids (potassium permanganate, sodium chlorite). Some oxidizers such as the organic peroxide family are extremely hazardous because they will burn (they are combustible) as well as they have the ability to provide oxygen for the fire. They can have strong reactions which can result in an explosion.Oxidising solid A solid which, while in itself not necessarily combustible, may, generally by yielding oxygen, cause, or contribute to, the combustion of other material.oxidizer (OSHA) “Oxidizer” means a chemical other than a blasting agent or explosive as defined in 29 CFR 1910.109 (a), that initiates or promotes combustion in other materials, thereby causing fire either of itself or through the release of oxygen or other gases. (DOT) A material that may, generally, by yielding oxygen, cause or enhance the combustion of other materials.OSHA (Occupational The US Federal agency that regulates workplace safety and health for mostSafety and Health US industries and businesses.Administration of the USDepartment of Labor)Ozone-Depleting Any substance designated as a Class I or Class II substance by the EPA inSubstance (ODS) 40 CFR Part 82.P list (EPA Hazardous The P list and the U list: These two lists include pure or commercial gradeWaste Listing) formulations of specific unused chemicals. Chemicals are included on the P list if they are acutely toxic. A chemical is acutely toxic if it is fatal to humans in low doses, if scientific studies have shown that it has lethal effects onDate Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 137 of 186
  • 138. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _Term Description experimental organisms, or if it causes serious irreversible or incapacitating illness. The U list is generally comprised of chemicals that are toxic, but also includes chemicals that display other characteristics, such as ignitability or reactivity. Both the P list and U list are codified in 40 CFR §261.33.pneumonitis Inflammation of the lungs induced by inhalation of metal fumes or toxic gases and vapors.ppm Parts per million.PBT Persistent, Bioaccumulative and Toxic substance Substances that are Persistent, Bioaccumulative and Toxic are substances that do not easily break down, instead they build up in nature and in eg. the fatty tissue of mammals, with a potential to cause serious and long-term irreversible effects. Part of the REACH Substances of Very High Concern.PEC Predicted Effect ConcentrationPersistent A persistent substance will not break down or degrade in humans, animals or nature. This means that they will stay for a very long time once produced.PNECs Predicted No Effect Concentration(s)PPE Personal Protection Equipmentpackaging means one or more receptacles and any other components or materials necessary for the receptacles to perform their containment and other safety functionsPEL (Permissible An occupational exposure limit established under Federal OSHA’s regulatoryExposure Limit) authority (State-plan States may establish more stringent PELs). It is an air concentration that is - an 8 hour time-weighted average (TWA) or -a maximum never-to-be exceeded (CEILING) or - a maximum never-to-be exceeded during any 15-minute period (STEL) or - a maximum never-to-be exceeded during any other OSHA specified time period (PEAK).partitioning The separation of a material into environmental media, based on its physical properties. See Glossary term “environmental medium (media)”.peripheral neuropathy Functional disturbances and/or pathological changes in the nerves of the extremities (hands, feet, arms and legs).Pensky-Martens Closed A method for determining flash point.Cup (PMCC)personal protection The act of protecting the body against contact with known or anticipated chemical or physical hazards. See Glossary term “PPE”.persistence The length of time a compound may remain in the environment.pH A dimensionless number that represents the hydrogen ion (H+) concentration of an aqueous solution. A pH of 7 is neutral. Numbers increasing from 7 to 14 indicate greater alkalinity. Numbers decreasing from 7 to 0 indicate greater acidity.Phase-in substance A substance which meets at least one of the following criteria (a) it is listed in the European Inventory of Existing Commercial Chemical Substances (EINECS) (b) it was manufactured in the Community, or in the countries acceding to the European Union on 1 January 1995, on 1 May 2004 or on 1 January 2007, but not placed on the market by the manufacturer or importer, at least once in the 15 years before the entry into force of the REACH Regulation, provided the manufacturer or importer has documentary evidence of this and (c) it was placed on the market in the Community, or in the countries acceding to the European Union on 1 January 1995, on 1Date Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 138 of 186
  • 139. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _Term Description May 2004 or on January 2007, by the manufacturer or importer at any time between, 18 September 1981 and 31 October 1993 inclusive, and before entry into force of the REACH Regulation it was considered as having been notified in accordance with the first indent of Article 8(1) of Directive 67/548/EEC in the version of Article 8(1) resulting from the amendment effected by Directive 79/831/EEC, but it does not meet the definition of a polymer as set out in the REACH Regulation, provided the manufacturer or importer has documentary evidence of thisphotolysis Decomposition of a chemical via sunlight.photophobia Intolerance/aversion to light.Placing on the market Supplying or making available, whether in return for payment or free of charge, to a third party. Import shall be deemed to be placing on the market.PYROPHORIC A chemical that will spontaneously ignite in the air at a temperature of 130°F (54.4°C) or below.physical hazard A chemical for which there is scientifically valid evidence that it is a combustible liquid, compressed gas, explosive, flammable, organic peroxide, oxidizer, pyrophoric, unstable (reactive), or water-reactive. Other properties that may contribute to the physical hazard should be considered.physical state Physical form and shape (liquid, crystal, powder, gas, etc.) of a chemical.poison Substance that, taken into or formed within the organism, impairs the health of the organism and may kill it. A highly toxic chemical. See Glossary term “poisonous material”.poisonous material (DOT) A material, other than a gas, which is known to be so toxic to humans as to afford a hazard to health during transportation, or which, in the absence of adequate data on human toxicity (1) Is presumed to be toxic to humans because it falls into one of the following categories when tested on laboratory animals (whenever possible, animal test data that has been reported in the chemical literature should be used) a) Oral toxicity. A liquid with an LD50 for acute oral toxicity of not more than 500 mg/kg or a solid with an LD50 for acute oral toxicity of not more than 200 mg/kg. b) Dermal toxicity. A material with an LD50 for acute dermal toxicity of not more than 1,000 mg/kg c) Inhalation toxicity. 1) A dust or mist with an LC50 for acute toxicity on inhalation of not more than10 mg/L or 2) A material with a saturated vapor concentration in air at 20°C (68°F) of more than one-fifth of the LC50 for acute toxicity on inhalation of vapors and with an LC50 for acute toxicity on inhalation of vapors of not more than 5,000 ml/m3 or (2) Is an irritating material, with properties similar to tear gas, which causes extreme irritation, especially in confined spaces.polymer A substance consisting of molecules characterised by the sequence of one or more types of monomer units. Such molecules should be distributed over a range of molecular weights wherein differences in the molecular weight are primarily attributable to differences in the number of monomer units. A polymer comprises the following (a) a simple weight majority of molecules containing at least three monomer units which are covalently bound to at least one other monomer unit or other reactant and (b) less than a simple weight majority of molecules of the same molecular weight. In the context of this definition a ‘monomer unit’ means the reacted form of aDate Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 139 of 186
  • 140. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _Term Description monomer substance in a polymer. Chemical material composed of repeating molecular structural units.polymerization A chemical reaction in which two or more small molecules combine to form larger molecules (polymers) that contain repeating structural units of the original molecules. See Glossary term “hazardous polymerization”.positron decay "A positron is a particle that has the same mass as an electron but has a positive charge. Positron decay may occur when there are too many protons in the nucleus. In this case, a proton is converted into a neutron, and nucleus emits a positron. This increases the number of neutrons by one, decreases the number of protons by one, and leaves the atomic mass unchanged. By changing the numbers of protons, however, positron decay transforms the nuclide into a different element." EPA website Understanding RadiationPOTW (Publicly Owned A treatment works as defined by section 212 of the Federal Water PollutionTreatment Works) Control Act, also known as the Clean Water Act, which is owned by a State or municipality. This definition includes any devices and systems used in the storage, treatment, recycling and reclamation of municipal sewage or industrial wastes of a liquid nature. It also includes sewers, pipes and other conveyances only if they convey wastewater to a POTW Treatment Plant. 40 CFR 403(q).PPE (Personal Protection Clothing or devices worn by a worker to prevent exposure to hazards in theEquipment) workplace. Examples include respirators, gloves, safety glasses, chemical- resistant clothing, etc.precautionary labeling Hazard warning statements and other precautionary statements used in hazard communication.precautionary statements A phrase that describes recommended measure(s) to minimise or prevent adverse effects resulting from exposure to a hazardous substance or mixture due to its use or disposal. Statements used in SDS or on a label that advise the reader about what steps to take in order to avoid a hazard.pressure-generating A chemical that falls within any of the following categories (a) a chemical thatchemical may present a pressure hazard typically over time by decomposition and/or spontaneous polymerization (b) a chemical that is used to pressurize the contents of a self-pressurized container.product name The name under which a product is sold. See Glossary term “identity”.Proposition 65 (California) The specified list of chemicals known to the State of California to cause cancer, birth defects, or other reproductive harm. These listed chemicals may be naturally occurring or synthetic, used as ingredients in materials and products, and/or generated as byproducts, emissions, and waste. Exemptions: Chemicals in closed containers. Although operations in which employees handle hazardous substances only in sealed containers (e.g., warehouse, transportation, or retail sales) are exempt from the full standard, employers are still required to: • Ensure that labels on incoming containers are not removed or defaced. • Obtain and maintain Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDSs) and make them readily accessible to employees in their work area(s) during each work shift. Note: California employers must determine whether any of the hazardous chemicals from their chemical inventory are subject to Proposition 65 requirements. To obtain this updated list of chemicals, please call OEHHA at (916) 445-6900; access the OEHHA Web site <http://www.oehha.ca.gov>; or subscribe toDate Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 140 of 186
  • 141. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _Term Description Division 2 of Title 22, California Code of Regulations, beginning with Section 12000, from Barclays Law Publishers.psi (pounds per square Unit of pressure representing the pressure a substance exerts on the walls ofinch) a vessel or container.psia (pounds per square Unit of measure used for “absolute pressure” where the psi measured is theinch atmosphere) gauge pressure plus atmospheric (barometric) pressure. Absolute pressure is zero only in a perfect vacuum.psig (pounds per square Unit of measure used for “gauge pressure” where the psi measured is theinch gauge) pressure in excess of that exerted by the atmosphere. The pressure gauge reading after the gauge is adjusted to read zero at the surrounding atmospheric pressure.pS/m A unit of electrical conductance a measure of how easily electricity flows(picosiemans/meter) through an electrical element. A picosiemans is one trillionth (10-12) of a siemans. A siemans is the reciprocal of resistance one siemans is equal to the reciprocal of one ohm and is sometimes referred to as the mho.pyrolysis Transformation of a compound into one or more other substances by heat alone, i.e., without oxidation. It is thus similar to destructive distillation. Though the term implies decomposition into smaller fragments, pyrolytic change may also involve isomerization and formation of higher molecular weight compounds.pyrophoric A chemical that will ignite spontaneously in air at a temperature of 130°F (54.4°C) or below. See Glossary term “spontaneously combustible material”.pyrophoric material A liquid or solid that, even in small quantities and without an external ignition source, can ignite within five (5) minutes after coming in contact with air when tested in accordance with UN Manual of Tests and Criteria. See Glossary term “spontaneously combustible material”.Product identifier Details permitting the identification of the substance or mixturePyrophoric liquid A liquid which, even in small quantities, is liable of igniting within five minutes after coming into contact with air.Pyrophoric solid a solid which, even in small quantities, is liable of igniting within five minutes after coming into contact with air.Pyrotechnic article An article containing one or more pyrotechnic substancesPyrotechnic substance A substance or mixture of substances designed to produce an effect by heat, light, sound, gas or smoke or a combination of these as the result of non- detonative self-sustaining exothermic chemical reactionsparesthesia Tingling or numbness.Parkinsons syndrome A degenerative central nervous system disorder with 4 characteristic features slowness and poverty of movement, muscular rigidity, resting tremor, and postural instability.PEL Permissible exposure limit. (OSHA)personal protective Respirators, gloves, eye protection, and other equipment used to protectequipment (PPE) workers from hazards when engineering controls fail to completely eliminate the potential for exposure.pesticide Substance used to kill pests including algae (algicide), aphids (aphicide), fungi (fungicide), plants (herbicide), insects (insecticide), larvae (larvacide), molluscs (molluscicide), eggs (ovicide), rodents (rodenticide), and slime- producing organisms (slimicide).photoallergic contact A type of allergic contact dermatitis caused by skin contact with an allergendermatitis (PACD) that becomes active only after it absorbs UV lightDate Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 141 of 186
  • 142. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _Term Descriptionphotoirritant contact A type of irritant contact dermatitis caused by skin contact with an irritant thatdermatitis (PICD) becomes active only after it absorbs UV light.pleura A thin membrane that covers the lungs (visceral pleura) and thorax adjacent to the lungs (parietal pleura).pneumoconiosis Chronic scarring lung disease caused by the accumulation of asbestos, coal, silica, and other fibrogenic dusts.RID Regulations concerning the International Carriage of Dangerous Goods by RailRIP REACH Implementation ProjectRMM Risk Management MeasureRadiological Incidents Characterized by the onset of symptoms, if any, in days to weeks or longer. Typically, there will be no characteristic signatures because radioactive materials are usually odorless and colorless. Specialized equipment is required to determine the size of the affected area, and whether the level of radioactivity presents an immediate or long-term health hazard. Because radioactivity is not detectable without special equipment, the affected area may be greater due to the migration of contaminated individuals.QSAR (Quantitative Quantitative structure-activity relationship is an analytical method used toStructure-Activity predict the toxic effects based on the quantitative analysis/comparison ofRelationship) molecular structure and pharmacological activity of a substance with known toxicological properties to a similar substance with unknown properties. Also see Glossary term “SAR”.Radiation Accident Large-scale accidents from atomic bomb testing fallout released iodine-131 and strontium-90. The nuclear accident at Chernobyl released large amounts of radioactive iodine and cesium. Small-scale accidents usually occur as the result of exposures to industrial radiography sources used in nondestructive testing, in industrial sterilization facilities, in radiotherapy machines, as well as from criticality accidents occurring with experimental assemblies or chemical processing.Radiation Energy The usual energy ranges for the common forms of radiation are 4 to 8 MeV for alpha particles, 0 to 2 MeV for beta particles, and 0.05 to 2 MeV for gamma rays. ORAU Radiation Basicsradioactive Having the property of emitting radiation (such as alpha, beta, or gamma rays) from an atomic nucleus" NTP Glossaryradionuclide A radioisotope, which is defined as "an unstable isotope of an element that decays or disintegrates spontaneously, emitting radiation. Approximately 5,000 natural and artificial radioisotopes have been identified." NRC GlossaryRadionuclide Internal Based on the annual limit on intake (ALI) >5 mCi is Low 0.500-4.999 mCi isToxicity Class Moderate 0.005-0.499 mCi is High <0.005 mCi is Very High Vanderbilt University Online Radiation SafetyRD50 Concentration producing a 50% decrease in respiratory rate in experimental animals following a 10-minute exposure.RD50 "The RfD is a numerical estimate of a daily oral exposure to the human population, including sensitive subgroups such as children, that is not likely to cause harmful effects during a lifetime."Regulated Waste Liquid or semi-liquid blood or other potentially infectious materials; contaminated items that would release blood or other potentially infectious materials in a liquid or semi-liquid state if compressed; items that are caked with dried blood or other potentially infectious materials and are capable of releasing these materials during handling; contaminated sharps; and pathological and microbiological wastes containing blood or other potentiallyDate Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 142 of 186
  • 143. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _Term Description infectious materials.REL Recommended exposure limit. (NIOSH)reproductive toxin A chemical that is toxic to the reproductive system, including defects in the progeny and injury to male and female reproductive function.Restricted Use Regulations that have banned or restricted the use of the agent.route of exposure Route of entry For occupational exposures, poisons are usually absorbed through inhalation or skin contact. Significant occupational lead absorption can occur through ingestion.R (Hazard Statements) Also known as R/S numbers, R/S phrases and R/S statements. R/S phrasesand S (Precautionary are an EU system of hazard codes and phrases for labeling dangerousStatements) phrases chemicals and compounds. The R/S phrases are letter-number combinations(Risk and Safety) assigned to a substance or preparation (mixture) and consists of a risk part (R) and a safety part (S). An R/S phrase letter/number combination has the same meaning in different languages.Risk phrase (R phrase) or A phrase assigned to a hazard class and category that describes the natureHazard statement of the hazards of a hazardous substance or mixture, including, where appropriate, the degree of hazard.RCRA (Resource A statute enacted in 1976 that is administered by US EPA, RCRA wasConservation and created to regulate the treatment, storage and disposal of hazardousRecovery Act) chemical waste. While medical waste is not regulated under the current federal RCRA regulations, there are federal requirements for medical waste under the Clean Air Act (CAA) and the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA).REACH and REACH Regulation (EC) No 1907/2006 concerning the Registration, Evaluation,Regulation Authorisation and Restriction of Chemicalsreactive Chemicals are unstable, explosive, capable of detonation, or react violently with water.reactivity Chemical reaction with the release of energy. The tendency of a substance to undergo a chemical change with the release of energy. Undesirable effects (pressure buildup, temperature increase, formation of noxious, toxic, or corrosive by-products) may occur because of a reaction to heating, burning, direct contact with other materials, or other conditions when in use or in storage.reducing agent In a reduction reaction (which always occurs simultaneously with an oxidation reaction), the chemical or substance that (1) combines with oxygen or (2) loses electrons to the reaction.Registrant The manufacturer or the importer of a substance or the producer or importer of an article submitting a registration for a substance under the REACH Regulationreproductive toxicant Chemical that adversely affects male or female fertility and may include damage to reproductive organs. Also note HCS Appendix A defines “reproductive toxins” as chemicals that affect the reproductive capabilities, including chromosomal damage (mutagens) and effects on fetuses (teratogenesis).RESPIRATOR A device which is designed to protect the wearer from inhaling harmful contaminants.Respiratory sensitiser A substance that induces hypersensitivity of the airways following inhalation of the substanceRisk Risk is the combination of "Hazard", probability and exposure. See also "HazardRisk phrase Indication of intrinsic hazards (per DSD). Known as hazard statement perDate Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 143 of 186
  • 144. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _Term Description CLP.RID The Regulations concerning the International Carriage of Dangerous Goods by Rail under framework Directive 96/49/EC [Annex 1 to Appendix B (Uniform Rules concerning the Contract for International Carriage of Goods by Rail) (CIM) of COTIF (Convention concerning international carriage by rail)], as amended.refrigerant gas or (DOT) All nonpoisonous refrigerant gases, dispersant gases (fluorocarbons)dispersant gas and mixtures thereof, or any other compressed gas having a vapor pressure greater than or equal to 1792 kPa (260 psi) at 130°F (54°C) and restricted for use as a refrigerant, dispersant, or blowing agent.registry number See Glossary term “CAS registry number”.residue (DOT) Means the hazardous material remaining in packaging, including a tank car, after its contents have been unloaded to the maximum extent practicable and before the packaging is either refilled or cleaned of hazardous material and purged to remove any hazardous vapors.responsible party Someone who can provide additional information on the hazardous chemical and appropriate emergency procedures, if necessary.respiratory sensitizer (GHS) A substance that will induce hypersensitivity of the airways following inhalation of the substance.responsible party Someone who can provide additional information on the hazardous chemical and appropriate emergency procedures, if necessary.risk assessment The process for evaluating hazard and exposure information in order to estimate the probability that a chemical will cause an adverse effect under specific exposure conditions.RoC (Report on An informational scientific and public health document that identifies agents,Carcinogens) substances, mixtures, or exposure circumstances that may pose a hazard to human health by virtue of their carcinogenicity. The RoC is published by NTP and compiles data on carcinogenicity, genotoxicity (ability to damage genes), and biologic mechanisms of the listed substance in humans and/or animals. See Glossary term “NTP”.routes of exposure The means by which a chemical may gain access to the body, for example, through the gastrointestinal tract (ingestion), lungs (inhalation), skin (topical) or eyes.RQ (CERCLA reportable The quantity of a substance designated under CERCLA as hazardous, thequantity) release of which requires notification to the National Response Center, (800) 424-8802. (DOT) Reportable quantity means the quantity specified for a substance in the Appendix to the Hazardous Materials Table. (SARA) Reportable quantity means the quantity specified in Title III, section 304, which requires specific reporting. Reportable Quantity (RQ) = 1000 lbDate Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 144 of 186
  • 145. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _Term DescriptionRTECS (Registry of Toxic Published by NIOSH, RTECS is a compendium of the known toxic andEffects of Chemical biological effects of chemical substances. See Glossary term “NIOSH”.Substances) It is a compendium of data extracted from the open scientific literature. The data are recorded in the format developed by the RTECS staff and arranged in alphabetical order by prime chemical name. Six types of toxicity data are included in the file (1) primary irritation (2) mutagenic effects (3) reproductive effects (4) tumorigenic effects (5) acute toxicity and (6) other multiple dose toxicity. Specific numeric toxicity values such as LD50, LC50, TDLo, and TCLo are noted as well as species studied and route of administration used. For each citation, the bibliographic source is listed thereby enabling the user to access the actual studies cited. No attempt has been made to evaluate the studies cited in RTECS. The user has the responsibility of making such assessments. RTEC # is the number of the substance as given in the Registry of Toxic Effects of Chemical Substances published by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) in USA. Important for looking up toxicological data of the substance, many of the synonyms can also be found in this Registry.SADT (self-accelerating The SADT is the lowest temperature at which self-accelerating decompositiondecomposition of an organic peroxide may occur in the packaging as used in transport.temperature) Organic peroxides with SADT values below 50ºC are temperature controlled for transport and storage.Safety phrase (S phrase), Phrases related to the safe use of the substance (per DSD). A phrase that describes recommended measure(s) to minimise or prevent adverse effects resulting from exposure to a hazardous substance or mixture due to its use or disposal. It is also called Precautionary statements (per CLP).SAR (structure-activity A subjective method used to predict the toxic effects of an untestedrelationship) substance based on the similarity of its molecular structure and composition to that of another substance with known toxicological properties. See Glossary term “QSAR”.SARA Title III Title III of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 also known as the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA). It requires extensive submission of information about hazardous chemicals to EPA, states and local communities and establishes a national program of emergency planning. Administered by EPA.SC Supply ChainSCBA Self-Contained Breathing ApparatusSDS Safety Data SheetSIEF Substance Information Exchange ForumSME Small and Medium sized EnterprisesSVHC Substances of Very High ConcernSDWA (Safe Drinking A US federal statute enacted in 1974 to regulate the nation’s public drinkingWater Act) water supply.sensitizer An agent that can induce an allergic reaction in the skin or lungs.serum Watery proteinaceous portion of the blood that remains after clotting.sign Objective evidence of disease from a laboratory test, x-ray, or physical examination.SIN List The "Substitute It Now" List with 378 substances identified by ChemSec as fulfilling the criteria for Substances of Very High Concern as defined in the REACH regulation. A ChemSec project aiming to speed up the REACH implementation process and provide a substitution tool for companies.simple asphyxiant A gas or vapor that can cause asphyxiation by displacing oxygen, but has noDate Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 145 of 186
  • 146. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _Term Description other significant adverse effects.skin designation Danger of cutaneous absorption. (ACGIH)smelter An establishment used to separate or refine a metal from its ore, often with accompanying chemical change." [NTP]Specific Activity Disintegrations per gram of a radioisotope. Equals 1 Ci/gm for radium-226. "Note that the activity, alone, is not a direct measure of the hazard of a radioactive sample. The relative hazard also depends on the types of radiation emitted in the decays and on the number of such emissions per decay. As an example, working 1 meter away from a 4 terabecquerel (108 Ci) source of cobalt-60 for 8 hours would deliver a whole body dose of about 11.3 Sv a person--a lethal dose. Work performed under the same conditions with a 4 TBq (108 Ci) source of hydrogen-3 would produce no effect at all. The low 0.018 MeV maximum beta would be totally absorbed by the air between the worker and the source."spent materials Materials that have been used and can no longer serve the purpose for which they were produced without processing.SPEGL Short-term public emergency guidance level. (NRC)STEL Short-term exposure limits. (ACGIH)STOT Specific Target Organ Toxicity(STOT)RE Repeated Exposure(STOT)SE Single Exposuresubacute syndrome The onset of symptoms is gradual over a period of less than 2 months. The syndrome may be a cumulative exposure with short latency, e.g., lead poisoning.surfactant "A detergent compound that promotes lathering." [EPA]Self-heating substance A solid or liquid substance, other than a pyrophoric substance, which, by reaction with air and without energy supply, is liable to self-heat this substance differs from a pyrophoric substance in that it will ignite only when in large amounts (kilograms) and after long periods of time (hours or days)Self-reactive substance A thermally unstable liquid or solid substance liable to undergo a strongly exothermic decomposition even without participation of oxygen (air). This definition excludes substances or mixtures classified under GHS as explosive, organic peroxides or as oxidizing.self-heating material A material that, when in contact with air and without an energy supply, is liable to self-heat. A material of this type which exhibits spontaneous ignition or if the temperature of the sample exceeds 200°C during the 24-hour test period when tested in accordance with paragraph 3.b(1) of Appendix E to 49 CFR 173.124.sensitization Immune process whereby individuals become hypersensitive to substances such as pollen, animal dander or other agents that make them develop a potentially harmful allergy when they are subsequently exposed to the sensitizing material (allergen).sensitizer A chemical that, following an initial exposure, causes a substantial proportion of exposed humans or animals to develop an allergic reaction in normal tissue upon subsequent exposure to that chemical.Serious eye damage The production of tissue damage in the eye, or serious physical decay of vision, following application of a test substance to the anterior surface of the eye, which is not fully reversible within 21 days of applicationDate Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 146 of 186
  • 147. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _Term DescriptionSIEF A Substance Information Exchange Forumsignal word Word used in labeling to indicate the relative degree of severity of an immediate hazard. They are used in diminishing order of severity DANGER, WARNING, and CAUTION (a) Danger means a signal word indicating the more severe hazard categories and (b) Warning means a signal word indicating the less severe hazard categoriessilicosis A disease of the lungs (fibrosis) caused by the inhalation of silica dust. See Glossary term “pneumoconiosis”.Skin corrosion The production of irreversible damage to the skin, namely visible necrosis through the epidermis and into the dermis, following the application of a test substance up to 4 hoursSkin irritation The production of reversible damage to the skin following the application of a test substance for up to 4 hours .Skin sensitiser A substance that will induce an allergic response following skin contact. The definition for “skin sensitiser” is equivalent to “contact sensitiser” Solid means a substance or mixture which does not meet the definitions of liquid or gasslurry A liquid containing insoluble material in suspension.Sludge The accumulated semiliquid suspension of settled solids deposited from wastewaters or other fluids in tanks or basins. It does not include solids or dissolved material in domestic sewage or other significant pollutants in water resources, such as silt, dissolved materials in irrigation return flows or other common water pollutants.Solid waste Garbage, refuse, sludges, and other discarded solid materials and includes mining, agricultural, and industrial solid wastes; hazardous wastes; sludges; construction and demolition wastes; and infectious wastes.solubility The ability of a substance to be dissolved in another substance. Can be expressed as a number describing the degree to which one material will dissolve in another. For example, a chemicals solubility in water can be expressed as the number of grams of the chemical that will dissolve in 100 ml of water, or as grams per Liter, or as weight percent at ambient temperature. A simple rule is that a substance is soluble in water when >1 g/100 ml (>10 g/L) dissolves and insoluble when <0.1 g/100ml (<1 g/L) dissolves. For very toxic substances pay attention to the quantity (the dose) that dissolves. Soluble metal compounds include nitrates, acetates, chlorides, bromides, and iodides (except those of Ag, Hg, and Pb) Also soluble are sulfates (except Ba, Sr, and Pb) and all salts of Na, K, and NH4 (except Na.1/3O4Sb, Cl6-Pt.2K, and potassium cobaltnitrite).solution Any homogeneous liquid mixture of two or more chemical compounds or elements that will not undergo any segregation under conditions normal to transportation.specific chemical identity The chemical name, CAS #, or any other information that reveals the identity of the chemicalspecific gravity The ratio of the density of a material to the density of water at a given temperature. Also the ratio of the density of a vapor or gas as compared to the density of air at a specified temperature.splash filling The process of filling a tank (or container) where a liquid enters the top of the tank by way of piping and falls freely to the liquid surface in the tank.spontaneously DOT term used for “pyrophoric material” and “self-heating material.” Seecombustible material Glossary term “pyrophoric material”.Stability The ability of a substance to remain unchanged (i.e., not decomposed or chemically modified) under specific conditions of use or storage.Date Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 147 of 186
  • 148. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _Term DescriptionStandard This standard, known as ANSI Z400.1/Z129.1-2010, also known as the “American National Standard for Hazardous Workplace Chemicals – Hazard Evaluation and Safety Data Sheet and Precautionary Labeling Preparation.static discharge A rapid discharge of accumulated electrical charge on an insulated body or(electrostatic discharge) object that comes in contact with another object. The discharge can also occur when a high electrostatic field develops between two objects in close proximity.STEL (Short Term See Glossary terms “PEL” and “TLV”.Exposure Limit)subchronic (health effect) An adverse health effect that occurs after repeated daily exposure (usually for several weeks or months) of experimental animals to a chemical for part (approximately 10 percent) of the animals’ life span.Subcutaneous Under the skin.Substance A chemical element and its compounds in the natural state or obtained by any manufacturing process, including any additive necessary to preserve its stability and any identified impurity deriving from the process used, but excluding any solvent which may be separated without affecting the stability of the substance or changing its composition.Substances which, in Solids or liquid substances which, by interaction with water, are liable tocontact with water, emit become spontaneously flammable or to give off flammable gases inflammable gases dangerous quantities.Supplier Any manufacturer, importer, downstream user or distributor placing on the market a substance, on its own or in a mixture, or a mixtureSUS (Saybolt universal A unit of measure for viscosity. It is the time in seconds required for 60seconds) milliliters of a fluid to flow through the orifice of a Saybolt Universal viscometer at a given temperature. See Glossary term “aspiration”.Symbol A graphical element intended to succinctly convey informationSynergism The simultaneous action of separate materials that together, have an effect greater than the sum of the individual effects.systemic health effects The adverse health effects that occur, following absorption and circulation of a chemical, in a part or parts of the body distant from the site of exposure or administration (e.g., lead ingestion and neurological effects).systemic toxicity The toxicity observed when a substance has an adverse effect in a part of the body distant from the site of exposure/administration.T8 CCR, Section 5191 “Occupational Exposure to Hazardous Chemicals in Laboratories.”TCLP Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure Regulatory Levels Toxicity Characteristic Leaching (not Leachate) Procedure is designed to determine the mobility of both organic and inorganic analytes present in liquid, solid, and multiphasic wastes. This is usually used to determine if a waste may meet the definition of EP Toxicity, that is, carrying a hazardous waste code under RCRA (40 CFR Part 261) of D004 through D052.Target organ effect The effect of a material on an organ or system that can be a result of direct contact with the organ or through systemic toxicity.TCC (Tagliabue or Tag A standard method of determining flash point. See Glossary term “flashClosed Cup) point”.Teratogen A chemical that causes malformations or permanent structural change in the embryo or fetus that may adversely affect survival, development or function. Also see Glossary term “developmental toxicity”.Date Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 148 of 186
  • 149. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _Term DescriptionTest data Data from a formal or informal test or experiment, including information concerning the objectives, experimental methods and materials, protocols, results, data analyses, recorded observations, monitoring data, measurements, and conclusions from a test or experiment.Teratology The study of embryonic developmental defects.THoD (Theoretical A measure of the total amount of oxygen required to oxidize a chemicalOxygen Demand) completely calculated from the molecular formula.threshold limit value (ACGIH) Concentration in air of a substance to which it is believed that most(TLV) workers can be exposed daily without adverse effect (the threshold between safe and dangerous concentrations). These values are established (and revised annually) by the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists and are time-weighted concentrations for a 7 or 8-hour workday and a 40-hour workweek. For most substances the value may be exceeded, to a certain extent, provided there are compensatory periods of exposure below the value during the workday (or in some cases the week). For a few substances (mainly those that produce a rapid response) the limit is given as a ceiling concentration (maximum permissible concentration - designated by "C") that should never be exceeded." [Glossary for Chemists of Terms Used in Toxicology," http//sis.nlm.nih.gov/main.htm] Developed by ACGIH (American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists). The recommended air concentration for a material at or below which nearly all workers should have no health problems. TLVs are expressed as - a time-weighted average (TWA) for an 8-hour day - a short-term exposure limit (STEL) maximum 15-minute exposures (no more than 60 minutes/day) or, - a ceiling value (C) that is not to be exceeded under any condition. For TLV-TWAs that do not have TLV-STELs, the following applies Excursions in worker exposure levels may exceed 3 times the TLV–TWA for no more than a total of 30 minutes during a workday, and under no circumstances should they exceed 5 times the TLV–TWA, provided that the TLV–TWA is not exceeded. TLVs with a “skin” notation indicate that the material may represent exposure by this route, including mucous membranes and the eyes. The TLVs are presented in the ACGIH annual publication, Threshold Limit Values and Biological Exposure Indices.tolerance "The amount of pesticide that may safely remain in or on raw farm products at time of sale." [EPA]TWA Time-Weighted Average, the concentration of a chemical averaged or weighted over an 8-hour workday.Toxicokinetics The passage through the body of a toxic agent or its metabolites, usually in an action similar to that of pharmacokinetics (absorption, metabolism, distribution and elimination).Tenth-Value Layer (TVL) "The thickness of a specified substance which, when introduced into the path of a given beam of radiation, reduces the radiation field quantity to one-tenthDate Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 149 of 186
  • 150. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _Term Description of its original value." NCRP Radiological Termsteratogen "A substance capable of causing birth defects." [EPA]TIH (Toxic inhalation "It is a gas or volatile liquid which is known to be so toxic to humans as tohazard) pose a hazard to health during transportation, or in the absence of adequate data on human toxicity, is presumed to be toxic to humans because when tested on laboratory animals it has a Lethal Concentration 50 (LC50) value of not more than 5000 ppm."TPQ (Threshold Planning The designated quantity of a SARA Extremely Hazardous Substance asQuantity) listed in 40 CFR 355 Appendix A and B that, if equaled or exceeded at a facility, triggers emergency planning provisions under SARA Title III. The minimum amount of a substance at which notification is required under 40 CFR 355. TPQs are listed in Appendices A and B of that regulation.Transformation Also biotransformation. The oxidation or alteration of the chemical structure of a substance, resulting in the loss of physical and chemical properties, or primary biodegradation.transport (ecological) Moving from one ecological medium or compartment to another.TSCA Toxic Substances Control Act. Searchable database sold by National Technical Information Service (NTIS) at www.ntis.gov Enacted in 1976, TSCA gives US EPA the authority to require testing and to restrict or prohibit the manufacture, use, distribution, export and disposal of chemical substances and mixtures.TSCA Inventory A dynamic list of chemical substances, commonly identified by CAS Registry Numbers or by EPA Accession Numbers, that are manufactured, imported, or processed for commercial purposes in the United States since January 1, 1975.UEL or UFL (upper The highest concentration (highest percentage of the substance in air) thatexplosive limit or upper will produce a flash of fire when an ignition source (heat, arc, or flame) isflammable limit of a vapor present. Compare to Glossary term “LEL”.or gas)UN number An identification number assigned by the United Nations to hazardous materials in transportation. They are used to readily identify hazardous materials in transportation emergencies. Those preceded by “NA” are associated with descriptions not recognized for international shipments. The United Nations has numbered a great many substances to facilitate identification, especially during transport. The UN Hazard Class, the UN Subsidiary Risks, and the UN Pack Group are entered in the field reserved for them in the section Identification. The use of UN number for classes or groups of chemicals (n.o.s: not otherwise specified) must be discussed by the Peer Review group.unstable (reactive) A chemical which, in the pure state, or as produced or transported, will vigorously polymerize, decompose, condense, or will become self-reactive under conditions of shocks, pressure, or temperature.uncoupler A chemical like pentachlorophenol that can cause a hypermetabolic state by poisoning cellular respiration (uncoupling oxidative phosphorylation).USDA (United States US Federal agency whose responsibilities include enhancing the protectionDepartment of and safety of the nation’s agriculture supply.Date Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 150 of 186
  • 151. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _Term DescriptionAgriculture)Vapor The gaseous form of substances that are normally in the solid or liquid state (at room temperature and pressure). The vapor can be changed back to the solid or liquid state either by increasing the pressure or decreasing the temperature alone. Vapors also diffuse.vapor pressure (VP) A measure of a chemicals volatility at room temperature (20-25 degree C or 68-77 degree F). Multiply vapor pressure times 1300 to estimate in ppm the saturated concentration of the chemical after a spill in a confined space.ventilation The engineering method of controlling the workplace environment with air flow. The workplace ventilation used to maintain air quality can be important in the prevention of fire and explosions, and in controlling certain concentrations of substances such as dusts, fumes, mists, vapors or gases that might exist or are produced in the workplace. Workplace air quality can be controlled by local exhaust, by dilution ventilation, or a combination of the two methods. See Glossary term “adequate ventilation”.VOC (volatile organic A precursor substance to the creation of ozone, a class of pollutantscompound) regulated under the Clean Air Act. When a VOC evaporates and undergoes a photochemical reaction, it will cause oxygen in the air to be converted into smog-promoting ozone under certain climatic conditions.volatility from water A measure of how much of a gas will remain in water, versus how much will be in air, using Henry’s Law Constant (amount of gas absorbed by a liquid at a given temperature).volatile Quality of a solid or liquid allowing it to pass into a vapor state at a given temperature.vPvB Very Persistent and Very BioaccumulativeUN GHS The international criteria agreed by the United Nation Economic and Social Council (UN ECOSOC) for the classification and labelling of hazardous substances and mixtures, called the “Globally Harmonised System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals”.Universal Precautions It is an approach to infection control. According to the concept of Universal Precautions, all human blood and certain human body fluids are treated as if known to be infectious for HIV, HBV, and other bloodborne pathogens.UN RTDG Tthe United Nations Recommendations on the Transport of Dangerous Goods and Flowchart Basic Types for Classifying Substances.USDA (United States US Federal agency whose responsibilities include enhancing the protectionDepartment of and safety of the nation’s agriculture supply.Agriculture)USP<231> A colorimetric procedure based on the precipitation of insoluble metal sulfides. The test is qualitative rather than quantitative. It is not an element specific method, nor is it equally sensitive to each metal. The limits specified by the test are based on the ability to observe the precipitate, rather than on the analysis of toxicological data. The procedure does not necessarily detect all potential forms and/or valences of elements of concern when they are present as the oxo ions or in the organometallic form. Chromium and nickel are potential contaminants from modern stainless steel processing equipment and are not detected by USP<231>.Vapor The gaseous form of substances that are normally in the solid or liquid state (at room temperature and pressure). The vapor can be changed back to the solid or liquid state either by increasing the pressure or decreasing the temperature alone. Vapors also diffuse.vapor density The weight of a vapor or gas as compared to a standard, usually air.Vapor intrusion A fate and transport process characterized by the upward movement ofDate Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 151 of 186
  • 152. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _Term Description volatile chemicals from subsurface contamination (e.g., buried waste, contaminated groundwater) into overlying buildings. The potential for adverse human health effects from exposure to indoor air vapors has motivated private, state, and federal entities to develop guidance documents and protocols specific to the collection and analysis of soil vapor data.vapor pressure The pressure exerted by a saturated vapor above its own liquid in a closed container, usually reported on SDS in millimeters of mercury (mmHg) at 68°F (20°C).ventilation The engineering method of controlling the workplace environment with air flow. The workplace ventilation used to maintain air quality can be important in the prevention of fire and explosions, and in controlling certain concentrations of substances such as dusts, fumes, mists, vapors or gases that might exist or are produced in the workplace. Workplace air quality can be controlled by local exhaust, by dilution ventilation, or a combination of the two methods.VOC (volatile organic A precursor substance to the creation of ozone, a class of pollutantscompound) regulated under the Clean Air Act. When a VOC evaporates and undergoes a photochemical reaction, it will cause oxygen in the air to be converted into smog-promoting ozone under certain climatic conditions.volatility from water A measure of how much of a gas will remain in water, versus how much will be in air, using Henry’s Law Constant (amount of gas absorbed by a liquid at a given temperature).WARNING Signal word used in labeling that indicates a potentially hazardous situation which, if not avoided, could result in death or serious injury. See Glossary terms “CAUTION” and “DANGER.”Waste Disposal and Specially Controlled Industrial WastePublic Cleaning Law - Waste oil (Flash point below 70°C, Waste acid (pH <2),(Japan, Specially Waste Alkali (pH >12.5),Controlled Industrial - Special Harmful Industrial Wastes containing hazardous chemicals (e.g.,Waste) Alkyl mercury, Mercury, Cadmium, Lead, Organic Phosphate, Chromium (VI)) - Industrial waste from business activities that are not applicable to the Specially Controlled Industrial WasteWEEL Workplace Environmental Exposure Levels.water reactive chemical (OSHA) A chemical that reacts with water to release a gas that is either flammable or presents a health hazard.water reactive material DOT term. See Glossary term “water reactivity.”water reactivity Generally, the inherent ability of a chemical to react with water. OSHA “Water reactive” means a chemical that reacts with water to release a gas that is either flammable or presents a health hazard. DOT “Water reactive material” is synonymous with “Dangerous when wet material”, which means a material that, by contact with water, is liable to become spontaneously flammable or give off flammable or toxic gas at a rate greater than 1 liter per kilogram of material per hour when tested in accordance with UN Manual of Tests and Criteria.WEEL (Workplace Developed and maintained by the AIHA WEEL Committee, the WEEL GuidesEnvironmental Exposure are a compilation of airborne exposure limits. The WEEL CommitteeLevel Guides) concentrates on chemicals, environmental agents and stresses for which there are no legal or authoritative limits in existence. See Glossary term “AIHA”.WHMIS (Workplace A Canadian nationwide system to provide information to workers onDate Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 152 of 186
  • 153. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _Term DescriptionHazardous Materials hazardous materials used in the workplace through the use of labels, SDSsInformation System) and worker education. It is the Canadian counterpart of the HCS, but has different provisions and interpretations.WFD Waste Framework Directive: Directive 2006/12/EC on WasteRevised WFD Directive 2008/98/EC of European Parliament and of the Council of 19 November 2008 on waste and repealing certain Directives (the revised Directive 2006/12/EC)work area A room or a defined space in a workplace where hazardous chemicals are produced or used, and where employees are present.workplace An establishment, job site, or project, at one geographical location containing one or more work areas.Date Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 153 of 186
  • 154. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ 19. Table 2 – Incompatible ChemicalsThe list is representative of chemical incompatibilities and is not complete, nor are allincompatibilities shown.Chemical Chemical Keep Out of Contact with:Alkaline metals, such as Carbon tetrachloride or other chlorinated hydrocarbons, carbonpowdered aluminum, dioxide and watermagnesium, sodium,potassium, etc.Acetic Acid Chromic acid, nitric acid, hydroxyl compounds, ethylene glycol, perchloric acid, peroxides and permanganatesAcetylene Chlorine, bromine, copper, fluorine, silver and mercuryAmmonia Mercury, chlorine, calcium hypochlorite, iodine, bromine and hydrofluoric acidAmmonium nitrate Acids, metal powders, flammable liquids, chlorates, nitrites, sulfur, finely divided organic or combustible materialsCarbon, activated Calcium hypochloriteCopper Acetylene and hydrogen peroxideChromic acid Acetic acid, naphthalene, camphor, glycerin, turpentine, alcohol and flammable liquidsChlorine Ammonia, acetylene, butadiene, butane, methane, propane, hydrogen, sodium carbide, turpentine, benzene and finely divided metalsCyanides Acids - organic or inorganicHydrogen peroxide Copper, chromium, iron, most metals, alcohols, acetone, organic materials, aniline, nitromethane, flammable liquids and combustible materialsHydrogen sulfide Fuming nitric acid and oxidizing gasesHydrocarbons (butane, Fluorine, chlorine, bromine, chromic acid and sodium peroxidepropane, benzene, gasoline,turpentine etc.)Iodine Acetylene, ammonia and hydrogenNitric acid Acetic acid, aniline, chromic acid, hydrocyanic acid, hydrogen sulfide, flammable liquids, flammable gases, copper, brass and any heavy metalsPerchloric acid Acetic anhydride, bismuth and its alloys, alcohol, paper, wood, ether, oils and greasePhosphorous Oxidizing agents, oxygen, strong basesPotassium chlorate Sulfuric and other acidsPotassium permanganate Glycerin, ethylene glycol, benzaldehyde and sulfuric acidSodium Carbon tetrachloride, carbon dioxide and waterSodium nitrite Ammonium nitrate and other ammonium saltsSodium peroxide Ethyl or methyl alcohol, glacial acetic acid, acetic anhydride, benzaldehyde, carbon disulfide, glycerin, ethylene glycol, ethyl acetate, methyl acetate and furfuralSulfides, inorganic Acids Sulfuric acid Potassium chlorate, potassiumDate Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 154 of 186
  • 155. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ 20. Hazardous Waste Identification (RCRA Subtitle C) In order to determine if a facility is subject to RCRA Subtitle C, the owner and operator must determine if they have a hazardous waste. This determination must be made by using the following methodology: • Is the material a solid waste? • Is the waste excluded? • Is the waste a listed hazardous waste? • Is the waste a characteristic waste? A waste must first be a solid waste before it can be a hazardous waste. A solid waste is a waste that is abandoned, inherently waste-like, a military munition, or recycled. On the other hand, if a material is directly reused without prior reclamation by being either used as an ingredient, used as a product substitute, or returned to the production process, then the material is not regulated as a waste at all. If such reused materials, however, are used in a manner constituting disposal; burned for energy recovery, used to produce a fuel, or contained in fuels; accumulated speculatively; or are dioxin- containing wastes considered inherently waste like; then they are regulated as solid wastes. If a recycled material needs reclamation prior to direct use or reuse, its regulatory status is determined by the type of material that it is: • Spent materials are regulated as solid wastes when reclaimed; used in a manner constituting disposal; burned for energy recovery, used to produce a fuel, or contained in fuels; or accumulated speculatively. • Listed sludges are solid wastes when reclaimed; used in a manner constituting disposal; burned for energy recovery, used to produce a fuel, or contained in fuels; or accumulated speculatively. • Characteristic sludges are not solid wastes when reclaimed, unless they are used in a manner constituting disposal; burned for energy recovery, used to produce a fuel, or contained in fuels; or accumulated speculatively. • Listed by-products are solid wastes when reclaimed; used in a manner constituting disposal; burned for energy recovery, used to produce a fuel, or contained in fuels; or accumulated speculatively. • Characteristic by-products are not solid wastes when reclaimed, unless they are used in a manner constituting disposal; burned for energy recovery, used to produce a fuel, or contained in fuels; or accumulated speculatively. • CCPs are not solid wastes when reclaimed, unless they are used in a manner constituting disposal; or burned for energy recovery, used to produce a fuel, or contained in fuels. • Scrap metal is a solid waste when reclaimed; used in a manner constituting disposal; burned for energy recovery, used to produce a fuel, or contained in fuels; or accumulated speculatively. Some kinds of materials are excluded from the Subtitle C hazardous waste regulations. There are five categories of exclusions: • Exclusions from the definition of solid waste • Exclusions from the definition of hazardous waste • Exclusions for waste generated in raw material, product storage, or manufacturing units • Exclusions for laboratory samples and waste treatability studiesDate Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 155 of 186
  • 156. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ • Exclusion for dredged material If the waste fits one of these categories, it is not regulated as a RCRA hazardous waste, and the hazardous waste requirements do not apply. If the waste is a solid waste and is not excluded, a facility must determine if it is a listed hazardous waste. The F, K, P, and U lists provide narrative descriptions of wastes from specific industrial processes and sources. Wastes meeting any of these descriptions are listed hazardous wastes. However, through the delisting process, facilities can demonstrate that their wastes does not pose sufficient hazard to warrant Subtitle C regulation as a listed hazardous waste. Wastes may also be hazardous if they exhibit a characteristic. Even if a facility’s waste is listed, the owner and operator must still determine if it exhibits a characteristic. The four characteristics are: • Ignitability • Corrosivity • Reactivity • Toxicity There are special regulatory conventions or provisions that apply to hazardous waste mixtures; treatment, storage, and disposal residues; and contaminated media and debris. These provisions are known as the mixture rule, the derived-from rule, and the contained-in policy. RCRA and AEA jointly regulate mixed waste, or waste that is radioactive, and listed or characteristic. EPA provided a conditional exemption for LLMW storage, treatment, transportation, and disposal of mixed wastes.Date Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 156 of 186
  • 157. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ More GHS Labeling SampleDate Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 157 of 186
  • 158. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ 21. Notes from SDS Compiler’s Guide Updated August 2010.pdf (183 pages) First Aid Notes Rinse continuously with water, preferably for at least 15 minutes. As a harmful substance could stay under contact lenses, they should be removed but only if they are not sticking to the eyes. Otherwise, extra damage could be done. After rinsing, contact a physician immediately. Chemical Dangers The substance can form explosive peroxides. During storage, peroxides can be formed. During distillation and evaporation (by heating) the substance concentrates to peroxides and the residue is explosive. Peroxides should be neutralized before concentration with ferrous thiocyanate or by passing the liquid over a column of activated alumina. These substances should not be stored over 12 months. The substance may polymerize due to heating above 100°C. Polymerization is a chemical reaction in which molecules of a substance combine to form larger molecules. This reaction generally involves liberation of heat, which may result in the building up of pressure or may give rise to fire and/or explosion. On combustion, forms carbon monoxide. On contact with hot surfaces or flames this substance decomposes forming [acetic acid fumes]. The substance decomposes [rapidly, slowly, on warming, on heating, on contact with] above 70°C. The solution in water is a strong acid, it reacts violently with bases and is corrosive to [aluminum, copper, iron]. TLV: [ ] ppm ; [ ] mg/m3 [] (skin) (ACGIH) TLVs preceded by C are ceiling values, meaning that they should not be exceeded during any part of the working exposure. Other values are time-weighted averages (TWA), defined as the TWA concentration for a normal 8-hour workday and a 40-hou workweek, to which nearly all workers may repeatedly be exposed, day after day, without adverse effect. The addition of (skin) refers to the potential contribution to the overall intake by the cutaneous route because of the possibility of absorption of the substance through the skin, mucous membranes, or the eyes. TLVs are given in ppm (parts by volume of gas or vapour per million parts by volume of contaminated air) or in mg/m3 (milligrams per cubic meter). If only a value in mg/m3 is given this applies to the aerosol of the substance. (Aerosol: a suspension of liquid or solid particles in air). TLV: [yy] ppm as STEL (Ceiling value) [(ACGIH] Threshold Limit Value-Short Term Exposure Limit is the concentration to which it is believed that worker can be exposed continuously for a short period of time without suffering from: 1) irritation, 2) chronic or irreversible damage, or 3) narcosis of sufficient degree to increase the likelihood of accidental injury, impair self-rescue or materially reduce work efficiency, and provided that the daily TLV-TWA is not exceeded. It is not a separate independent exposure limit; rather, it supplements the time-weighted average (TWA) limit where there are recognized acute effects from a substance whose toxic effects are primarily of chronic nature. STELs are recommended only where toxic effects have been reported from high short-term exposures in either humans or animals.Date Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 158 of 186
  • 159. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ A STEL is defined as a 15-minute TWA exposure which should not be exceeded at any time during the a workday even if 8-hour TWA is within the TLV-TWA. Exposure above TLV-TWA up to STEL should not be longer than 15 minutes and should not occur more than four times per day. There should be at least 60 minutes between successive exposures in this range. An averaging period other than 15 minutes may be recommended when this is warranted by observed biological effects. Carcinogen category: [] The following criteria have been followed to assign carcinogenic substances to 5 different categories: 1. Substances that cause cancer in man and can be assumed to make a significant contribution to cancer risk. 2. Substances that are considered to be carcinogenic for man because sufficient data from long-term animal studies or limited evidence from animal studies substantiated by evidence from epidemiological studies indicate that they can make a significant contribution to cancer risk. 3. Substances that cause concern that they could be carcinogenic for man but cannot be assessed conclusively because of lack of data. The classification in category 3 is provisional. 4. Substances for which the criteria for classification in category 4 or 5 are fulfilled but the database is insufficient for the establishment of a maximum concentration (MAK) value. 5. Substances for which in vitro or animal studies have yielded evidence of carcinogenic effects that is not sufficient for classification of the substance in one of the other categories. A MAK or BAT value can be established provided no genotoxic effects have been detected. 6. Substances with carcinogenic potential for which a non-genotoxic mode of action is of prime importance and genotoxicity plays no or at most a minor part. No significant contribution to human cancer risk is expected provided the MAK value is observed. 7. Substances with carcinogenic and genotoxic effects, the potency of which is considered to be so low that, provided the MAK and BAT values are observed, no significant contribution to human cancer risk is to be expected. BAT value (biological tolerance value for occupational exposures) is established on the basis of sufficient occupational-medical and toxicological data indicating that these concentrations based on an exposure of 8 hours daily and 40 hours weekly do not cause adverse effects on the health of the employee. BAT values can be defined as concentrations or rates of formation or excretion in blood and/or urine, being conceived as ceiling values for healthy individuals. They provide a basis for deciding whether the amount of a chemical substance taken up by the organism may be harmful or not. Serious local effects by all routes of exposure The substance is corrosive to the skin, the respiratory tract and the digestive tract. Use for corrosive substances that cause local tissue damage by any route of exposure but that are not necessarily absorbed.Date Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 159 of 186
  • 160. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ Spillage Disposal Guide Some means of limiting the effects of leakage are: • facilities for collecting spilled liquid • sand or a suitable absorbing material for containment or absorption • provision to seal leaking drums • provision to rinse away spilled substance (as far as allowed) • ventilation In connection with this the following aids should be available at all times: • personal protective equipment (goggles, face shields, special clothing, aprons, boots, gloves, respiratory protective equipment, etc.) • collecting vessels (e.g., enclosing vessels) • neutralizing agents • sand or a suitable absorbing material Detailed disposal procedures are given in various handbooks on chemical safety detailed disposal. When chemicals are used in the cleaning-up procedure, attention should be given to eventual disposal of the waste materials. The general measures for spillage disposal on the ICSC are intended to protect those who have to deal with a spill and to avoid environmental pollution (e.g., possible incineration or other disposal of collected residues). Disposal phrases are presented twice, first as phrase combinations and then as single phrases. Most liquids and solids conform to the specification of one or another of the groups A, B, and C that are listed below. Having determined in which group a substance belongs one can use the fixed combination of disposal phrases appropriate to that group. If there is no fixed combination that applies to a particular substance the compiler should select the appropriate phrase(s). The classification into the groups A, B, and C is based on generally accepted ideas on the prevention of water pollution. Group A contains salts whose ions are fairly common in natural surface waters; group B contains those substances which in general cause little pollution and therefore could be drained in small amounts; group C contains substances which cause undesired pollution. Specification of the groups A, B, and C: A: Inorganic salts, acids, and bases only containing one or more of the following: aluminium, ammonium, calcium, iron, magnesium, manganese, potassium or sodium; carbonate, chloride, nitrate, phosphate (ortho), silicate, or sulfate. A1: Solid: neutral or weak or medium strong acid or base. A2: Solid: strong acid or base. A3: Liquid: neutral or weak acid or base. A4: Liquid: medium or strong acid or base. B: Liquids (B1) and solids (B2) with a solubility in water > 10 g/100 ml and with flash point > 0°C, and not reacting spontaneously with water to produce toxic or flammable vapours or gases, and not belonging to group A or C. C: Liquids (C1) and solids (C2) which do not meet the specification of group A or B, or are mentioned in the following lists:Date Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 160 of 186
  • 161. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ Substances containing any of the following elements: antimony, arsenic, barium, beryllium, boron, cadmium, chromium, cobalt, copper, lead, mercury, molybdenum, nickel, selenium, tellurium, thallium, tin, titanium, uranium, vanadium, zinc. Evacuate Danger area [when a situation could occur when only one of them is selected]: • a flammable gas with relative density to air >= 0.9 • a toxic gas with a rat LC50 (4 hr) <= 2 mg/l (T-label according to EC rules) • a liquid with a RIR >= 4000 • liquid with the ratio p20/LEL >= 10 (where p20 = saturated vapour pressure at 20°C in kPa and LEL = lower explosive limit in vol. %) Isolate and ventilate the area until gas has dispersed Use for all gases presenting a hazard, including simple asphyxiants. Clean-up Procedures Cover the spilled material with [absorbent, non-combustible, inert, Ventilation]. Apply for liquids meeting the criteria for F or F+ chemicals. Complete the phrase with foamblanket. Apply also for liquids meeting the criteria for T+, T or C if the vapour pressure at room temperature exceeds 20 kPa. Complete this phrase with the names of the inert absorbent such as sand, earth, vermiculite, etc. A spill often causes a harmful or even dangerous concentration of gases/vapours. Ventilation is a means of clearing the atmosphere. Moreover, for leaking gases it is the only method to remove them. In some situations however ventilation might increase the danger: • substances in the form of powder may be dispersed by ventilation • local ventilation could cause faster evaporation of a liquid spill, thus increasing the vapour • concentration if not enough fresh air is supplied • concentrations above the upper explosion limit will decrease, thus bringing the atmosphere within the explosive limits Collect leaking liquid in sealable [metal, plastic, non-metallic]containers. As a rule a leaking liquid should be collected in a sealable container. However if the liquid could polymerize or decompose violently due to casual circumstances (e.g., contamination), the container should only be covered rather than sealed in order to allow any pressure which might tear the container to be released. Cautiously neutralize spilled liquid[]. While neutralizing (medium) strong acids or bases, a great deal of heat can be developed. The neutralizing process should therefore be done by adding small portions of neutralizer at a time and with protection against spattering. Absorb remaining liquid in [] sand or inert absorbent and remove to safe place. This applies to liquids which must not be allowed to enter the sewer because they are highly flammable (i.e., flash point < 21°C) or are dangerous to health or may cause serious environmental pollution. Safe place means a place that is free from explosion hazards and where no persons can be exposed to the substance or where no environmental pollution is possible. Substances spilled in the laboratory can be cleared away by special equipment obtainable from the suppliers of the chemicals.Date Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 161 of 186
  • 162. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ Do NOT wash away into sewer. This is mentioned as an extra warning in case of very flammable liquids which are practically insoluble in water, thus causing a serious explosion hazard in the sewer. Also for insoluble strong smelling substances (mercaptanes, amines, etc.). Do NOT let this chemical enter the environment. Release to the environment of a substance should be avoided when the substance is hazardous to the environment (acute or long-term), or when bioaccumulation can occur. Personal protection Self-contained breathing apparatus This is recommended for extra protection when a toxic gas or the vapour from a liquid or solid may reach a harmful concentration during disposal activities. Particulate filter adapted to the airborne concentration of the substance Equipment of this type is recommended as extra personal protection against substances that, when dispersed in air, will be harmful if inhaled. Dust masks or respirators for particles consist of a face piece and a filter, sometimes combined together. Respirators for particle filtration are only effective if the air contains a minimum of 18% oxygen and is free from harmful gases and vapours. They should only be used in situations where a high level of mobility of the wearer is required. Applies for substances with a b.p. >= 350°C, which may come as a fine powder or as mist (i.e., hazard of dispersion in air on handling). The dust respirator phrases should not be used if the substance is physiologically inert (i.e. 13619 is used) or if the spontaneous dispersion of the substance in air is highly unlikely for any reason, including its hygroscopic properties. Applies to substances with a OEL/TWA with a RIR <120. It also applies to solid carcinogens and mutagens Complete protective clothing including self-contained breathing apparatus This is recommended for extra personal protection when the gas, vapour, or mist may cause injury both to the respiratory tract and the undamaged skin. Applies to gases: - if corrosive to the skin, or - if absorbed by the skin Applies to liquids and solids: 1) if the RIR > 120 and the vapour of the substance: a) is corrosive to the skin, or b) will be absorbed by the skin. Or 2) if the substance on contact with (humid) air produces gases, vapours, or mists which a) are corrosive to the skin, or b) will be absorbed by the skin. 3) applies to compounds with RIR above 20 000 and which are absorbed through the skin. Liquids and solids that can be absorbed by the skin should note regarded as also being absorbed in the gas or vapour phase. Absorption of gas/vapour is often much less serious than absorption of liquid/solid. Only when absorption of the substance in the gas or vapour phase is clearly mentioned in toxicological literature. Liquids whose vapours are absorbed by the skin to a high degree include, e.g., carbon disulphide, hydrogen cyanide, and methyl bromide (the latter is more a gas than a liquid).Date Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 162 of 186
  • 163. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ Packaging and Labelling EU Classification 1. The name of the substance must appear on the label. The symbols, R- and S-phrases are required to be used as shown in Annex I to Directive 67/548/EEC. 2. The percentage of the concentration of the solution must be stated on the label. 3. It must be stated in the label whether the substance is a specific isomer or a mixture of isomers. 4. Substances susceptible to spontaneous polymerization are generally placed on the market in a stabilized form. However, they are sometimes placed on the market in non- stabilized form. In this case, the label must contain the name of the substance followed by non-stabilized. 5. Substances that are classified carcinogenic, mutagenic and/or toxic for reproduction (categories 1 and 2), are ascribed Note E if they are also classified as T+, T or Xn , the risk phrases (R20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 39, 68, 48, 65) and all combinations of these phrases shall be preceded by the word also. 6. If the added stabilizer changes the dangerous properties of the substance (Annex I) a label should be provided in accordance with the rules for the labelling of dangerous preparations. 7. If the substance is in an explosive form a label should be provided reflecting its explosive property. • Applies to certain coal and oil-derived substances. • Applies only to certain complex coal and oil-derived substances; the classification of carcinogen need not apply if it can be shown that the substance contains benzene < 0.1% by volume. • Applies only to certain complex oil-derived substances; the classification of carcinogen need not apply if it can be shown that the substance contains 1,3- butadiene < 0.1% by volume. If the substance is not classified as a carcinogen, at least S (2-)9-16 should apply. • Applies only to certain complex oil-derived substances; the classification of carcinogen need not apply if it can be shown that the substance contains less than 3% DMSO extract as measured by IP346. • Applies only to certain complex coal-derived substances; the classification of carcinogen need not apply if it can be shown that the substance contains benzo(a)- pyrene < 0.005% by volume. • Applies only to certain complex coal and oil-derived substances; the classification of carcinogen need not apply if the full refining history is known and it can be shown that the substance from which it is produced is not a carcinogen. 8. The classification of carcinogen need not apply if it can be shown that the substance contains: benzene < 0.1% by volume. When the substance is classified as a carcinogen, Note E shall also apply. When the substance is not classified as a carcinogen at least S (2-)23- 24-62 shall apply. Applies only to certain complex oil-derived substances.Date Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 163 of 186
  • 164. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ 9. The classification of carcinogen need not apply if it can be shown that the substance fulfils one of the following conditions: • -short biopersistence test (inhalation) shows that the fibres longer than 20 micrometer have a • weighted half-life < 10 days • -short biopersistence test (intratrancheal) shows that the fibres longer than 20 micrometer have a weighted half-life < 40 days • -an appropriate intra-peritoneal test has shown no excess carcinogenicity • -absence of relevant pathogenicity or neoplastic changes in a suitable long term inhalation test. 10. The classification of carcinogen need not apply to fibres with a length weighted geometric mean diameter less than two standard errors greater than 6 micrometers. 11. This substance may not require a standard label according to Article 23 (Annex VI, section 8 Commission Directive 98/98/EC). Source: SDS Compiler’s Guide Updated August 2010.pdf (183 pages) 22. Globally Harmonized System of Classification & Labelling of Chemicals (GHS) Hazard statements are listed below in alphabetical order. The actual phrase (not the code GHSNNN or HNNN or PNNN) should appear on the labels and the SDS. The selection of the appropriate hazard statement , signal word and pictogram should be in accordance with the classification criteria in the second revised version of the GHS (http://www.unece.org/trans/danger/publi/ghs/ghs_rev02/02files_e.html). GHS001 Catches fire spontaneously if exposed to air GHS002 Causes damage to [organs] if in contact with skin GHS003 Causes damage to [organs] if inhaled GHS004 Causes damage to [organs] if swallowed GHS005 Causes damage to [organs] through prolonged or repeated exposure if in contact with skin GHS006 Causes damage to [organs] through prolonged or repeated exposure if inhaled GHS007 Causes damage to [organs] through prolonged or repeated exposure if swallowed GHS008 Causes damage to organs GHS009 Causes damage to organs through prolonged or repeated exposure GHS010 Causes eye irritation GHS011 Causes mild skin irritation GHS012 Causes serious eye damage GHS013 Causes serious eye irritation GHS014 Causes severe skin burns and eye damage GHS015 Causes skin irritation GHS0155 Causes skin and eye irritation GHS016 Combustible liquid GHS017 Contains gas under pressure; may explode if heated GHS019 Contains refrigerated gas; may cause cryogenic burns or injury GHS020 Explosive; fire, blast or projection hazard GHS021 Explosive; mass explosion hazard GHS022 Explosive; severe projection hazard GHS023 Extremely flammable aerosol GHS024 Extremely flammable gas GHS025 Extremely flammable liquid and vapour GHS026 Fatal if inhaled dust GHS027 Fatal if inhaled gas GHS028 Fatal if inhaled mistDate Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 164 of 186
  • 165. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ GHS029 Fatal if inhaled vapour GHS030 Fatal if swallowed GHS0305 Fatal if swallowed or in contact with skin GHS0306 Fatal if swallowed or if inhaled GHS0307 Fatal if swallowed, in contact with skin or if inhaled GHS031 Fatal in contact with skin GHS0315 Fatal in contact with skin or if inhaled GHS032 Fire or projection hazard GHS033 Flammable aerosol GHS034 Flammable gas GHS035 Flammable liquid and vapour GHS036 Flammable solid GHS037 Harmful if inhaled dust GHS038 Harmful if inhaled gas GHS039 Harmful if inhaled mist GHS040 Harmful if inhaled vapour GHS041 Harmful if swallowed GHS0415 Harmful if swallowed or if inhaled GHS0416 Harmful if swallowed or in contact with skin GHS0417 Harmful if swallowed, in contact with skin, or if inhaled GHS042 Harmful in contact with skin GHS0425 Harmful in contact with skin or if inhaled GHS043 Harmful to aquatic life GHS044 Harmful to aquatic life with long-lasting effects GHS045 Heating may cause a fire GHS046 Heating may cause a fire or explosion GHS047 Heating may cause an explosion GHS048 Highly flammable liquid and vapour GHS049 In contact with water releases flammable gases GHS050 In contact with water releases flammable gases which may ignite spontaneously GHS051 May be corrosive to metals GHS052 May be fatal if swallowed and enters airways GHS053 May be harmful if inhaled dust GHS054 May be harmful if inhaled gas GHS055 May be harmful if inhaled mist GHS056 May be harmful if inhaled vapour GHS057 May be harmful if swallowed GHS0575 May be harmful if swallowed or if inhaled GHS0576 May be harmful if swallowed or in contact with skin GHS0577 May be harmful if swallowed, in contact with skin, or if inhaled GHS058 May be harmful if swallowed and enters airways GHS059 May be harmful in contact with skin GHS0595 May be harmful in contact with skin or if inhaled GHS060 May cause allergic or asthmatic symptoms or breathing difficulties if inhaled GHS061 May cause allergic skin reaction GHS062 May cause cancer GHS063 May cause damage to [organs] if in contact with skin GHS064 May cause damage to [organs] if inhaled GHS065 May cause damage to [organs] if swallowed GHS066 May cause damage to [organs] through prolonged or repeated exposure if in contact with skin GHS067 May cause damage to [organs] through prolonged or repeated exposure if inhaled GHS068 May cause damage to [organs] through prolonged or repeated exposure if swallowed GHS069 May cause damage to organs GHS070 May cause damage to organs through prolonged or repeated exposure GHS071 May cause fire or explosion; strong oxidizer GHS072 May cause genetic defects GHS073 May cause harm to breast-fed children GHS075 May cause long lasting effects to aquatic life GHS076 May cause long lasting harmful effects to aquatic lifeDate Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 165 of 186
  • 166. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ GHS077 May cause or intensify fire; oxidizer GHS078 May damage fertility or the unborn child GHS079 May explode in the fire GHS080 May intensify fire; oxidizer GHS081 May mass explode in fire GHS082 May cause respiratory irritation GHS083 May cause drowsiness or dizziness GHS085 Self-heating in large quantities; may catch fire GHS086 Self-heating; may catch fire GHS087 Suspected of causing cancer GHS088 Suspected of causing genetic defects GHS089 Suspected of damaging fertility or the unborn child GHS090 Toxic if inhaled dust GHS091 Toxic if inhaled gas GHS092 Toxic if inhaled mist GHS093 Toxic if inhaled vapour GHS094 Toxic if swallowed GHS0945 Toxic if swallowed or if inhaled GHS0946 Toxic if swallowed or in contact with skin GHS0947 Toxic if swallowed, in contact with skin or if inhaled GHS095 Toxic in contact with skin GHS0955 Toxic in contact with skin or if inhaled GHS096 Toxic to aquatic life GHS097 Toxic to aquatic life with long-lasting effects GHS098 Unstable explosive GHS099 Very toxic to aquatic life GHS100 Very toxic to aquatic life with long-lasting effects GHS101 Harms public health and the environment by destroying ozone in the upper atmosphere GHS110 No hazard classification according to GHS criteria GHS111 Insufficient data for GHS classification New GHS Combination Phrases GHS0155 Causes skin and eye irritation GHS0305 Fatal if swallowed or in contact with skin GHS0306 Fatal if swallowed or if inhaled GHS0307 Fatal if swallowed, in contact with skin or if inhaled GHS0315 Fatal in contact with skin or if inhaled GHS0415 Harmful if swallowed or if inhaled GHS0416 Harmful if swallowed or in contact with skin GHS0417 Harmful if swallowed, in contact with skin, or if inhaled GHS0425 Harmful in contact with skin or if inhaled GHS0575 May be harmful if swallowed or if inhaled GHS0576 May be harmful if swallowed or in contact with skin GHS0577 May be harmful if swallowed, in contact with skin, or if inhaled GHS0595 May be harmful in contact with skin or if inhaled GHS0945 Toxic if swallowed or if inhaled GHS0946 Toxic if swallowed or in contact with skin GHS0947 Toxic if swallowed, in contact with skin or if inhaled GHS0955 Toxic in contact with skin or if inhaled GHS101 Harms public health and the environment by destroying ozone in the upper atmosphere GHS110 No hazard classification according to GHS criteria GHS111 Insufficient data for GHS classificationDate Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 166 of 186
  • 167. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ Abbreviations ACGIH: American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists AFFF: Aqueous Film Forming Foam AFFF/ACT: AFFF + Alcohol Type Concentrate BCF: Bioconcentration Factor BOD: Biological Oxygen Demand C: Ceiling Value (of OEL or TLV) CAS: Chemical Abstract Service CEFIC: Conseil Européen des Fédérations de lIndustrie Chimique CEU: Commission of the European Union COD: Chemical Oxygen Demand CSI: Chemical Substances Inventory CSST: Commission de la Santé et de la Sécurité du Travail EC: European Community EINECS: European Inventory of Existing Commercial Chemical Substances EPA: Environmental Protection Agency (USA) EU: European Union IARC: International Agency for Research on Cancer ICSC: International Chemical Safety Card ILO: International Labor Office IRPTC: International Register of Potentially Toxic Chemicals IUPAC: International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry LC50: Lethal Concentration 50% LD50: Lethal Dose 50% LEL: Lower Explosive Limit Log Kow: Logarithm of the octanol/water partition coefficient NFPA: National Fire Protection Association NIOSH: National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (USA) OEL: Occupational Exposure Limits P: Percutaneous (with PDK-absorption through skin) R Risk: European Union System RIR: Relative Inhalation Risk RTECS: Registry of Toxic Effects of Chemical Substances S Safety: European Union System SADT: Self-Accelerating Decomposition Temperature STEL: Short-Term Exposure Limit TEC: Transport Emergency Card TLV: Threshold Limit Value TSCA: Toxic Substances Control Act TWA: Time Weighted Average UN: United Nations UN CETDG: United Nations Committee of Experts on Transport of Dangerous Goods UNEP: United Nations Environment Programme WHO: World Health OrganizationDate Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 167 of 186
  • 168. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ 23. Labeling and Storing of Chemicals at Allowed Substances • No substance is to be brought into the Materials laboratory without prior approval by the EH&S Specialist, R&D Manager/Supervisor or Regulatory Affairs department. Labeling of Chemicals • Prior to re-packaging or mixing any chemical out of the original supplier labeled container, the container must be labeled with a workplace label and a storage classification sticker. • All mixtures must have their entire contents labeled with the composition in % indicated, i.e., 2% Nitric Acid in 98% Methanol, All Constituents must be indicated along with their concentrations. • Temporary Labels are allowed if a substance/mixture is not going to be stored, and is going to be used in less than one day.?? • Waste containers must be appropriately labeled with either a label or a Waste Disposal Label (color?). Labeling of Non- Substances Storage of Substances Hazardous Storage Groups Hazardous Waste Disposal Procedures Labeling of Liquid Hazardous Waste Labeling of Contaminated Solid Waste Waste Disposal Forms Storage of Hazardous Waste • All hazardous waste must be stored with compatible substances, the MSDS will have a list of incompatible substances. ___ indicates a storage code. _ table lists general guide to chemical storage Substances with different colored stickers must not be stored together.? 24. Labeling and Other Forms of Warning Labeling requirements for all hazardous substances are summarized as follows: • All containers of hazardous materials must be labeled with the identity of the hazardous substance. • The label must contain all applicable hazard warning statements. • The name and address of the chemical manufacturer or other responsible party must be present. • Manufacturer’s product labels must remain on all containers, and must not be defaced in any way. Appropriate hazard warning statements and Proposition 65 warnings must be present, if not that information must be added. • Labels must be legible, in English, and prominently displayed. • Secondary containers (such as spray bottles) must be labeled with the identity of the substance and appropriate hazard warnings.Date Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 168 of 186
  • 169. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ • New synthesized compounds must be labeled with the appropriate hazard warnings based on the knowledge of the chemical and physical properties of that substance.Date Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 169 of 186
  • 170. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ • The RA dept shall verify that all primary and secondary containers are labeled as: Label information Primary Container Secondary Container Identity of the hazardous √ √ substance(s) Applicable hazard warnings √ √ Name and address of the √ manufacturer • The RA dept will provide clear and reasonable warnings to individuals prior to exposure by means of posting signs conspicuously, labeling consumer products and training employees. • The RA dept will arrange for labels, signs and other warnings. • Hazardous Substance Inventory List Sample Hazardous Substance Operation/Work Area MSDS Osgood Complete Incomplete 25. Biological Waste Labeling IMPORTANT LABELLING REQUIREMENT: Lab personnel must apply an adhesive-backed label completed with generator information to each bag or container (such as autoclaved bags or filled sharps containers) placed into the medical waste box. Building Services provides such a label that has space to record Date, Building, Lab #, and Contact Person. Apply this label to all containers placed inside the medical waste box AND to the exterior of the sealed medical waste box before it is made available for pick-up by Building Services. Alternatively, the inner bags and containers can be marked clearly with a permanent marker to indicate "_____________________________." 26. Employee Training Program Sample COMPANY: ______________________________ DATE: _________________ DEPARTMENT: __________________________________________________ We have developed a training program to increase employee awareness of hazardous substances in our workplace and to motivate employees to protect themselves. The training program is based on the types of hazardous substances used at the work site and the associated hazards. Overview of Hazard Communication Regulation The hazard communication regulation is intended to ensure that both employers and employees understand the dangers associated with hazardous substances in the workplace. The following information is a review of the specific requirements of a hazard communication program, including container labeling, MSDSs, and training. Written Hazard Communication Program We have a written program that outlines how we provide information on and control your exposure to hazardous substances. This plan is available to you during our training or during your work shift from (person) at (location). Hazardous Substances Used in Our Workplace In our shop we use a variety of chemical products. Most of these products contain one or more hazardous substances. Let’s review the hazardous substance inventory list in your work area. For specific hazard information on each brand of material, review the MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEETS (MSDSs) and, if applicable, the Proposition 65 list of chemicals.Date Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 170 of 186
  • 171. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ Reading Labels, Warnings, and MSDSs Labels. A product label on both the original and secondary containers should be read before working with the material. Each label has two important pieces of information: 1. Identity of the hazardous substance 2. Hazard warnings The label on the original container also gives the name and address of the manufacturer. The label should act as a visual reminder of the information we have presented in this training session and of the detailed information on the MSDS. Proposition 65 warnings. These are provided to you prior to exposure in the form of labels, placards, employee training, and the like so that you know that certain chemicals in your workplace are known to the state to cause cancer, birth defects, or other reproductive harm. It is essential to your safety that you read the hazard warning and use the hazardous substances only within the prescribed guidelines. Questions concerning any of the warning message(s) should be directed to your supervisor or foreman. Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDSs). Manufacturers and importers are responsible for providing us with adequate information for using the hazardous substances safely. We use MSDSs as the primary source for informing you about the hazards of the substances in our plant. MSDSs are kept at (location) and are readily available to you in every shift. You will be trained on the specific hazards of the substances in your work area. You will also be trained on how to read the information in the MSDSs. The information includes: 1. Chemical and physical properties of hazardous substances, such as vapor pressure or specific gravity 2. Physical hazards of the chemicals, such as flammability or reactivity 3. Health hazards of the hazardous substances, such as signs and symptoms of exposure 4. Routes of entry 5. Protective measures, such as work practices, engineering controls, and use of personal protective equipment 6. Methods to detect the release of a hazardous substance in the work area 7. Emergency and first-aid procedures You can read the California Hazard Communication Regulation for additional information on any specific program element.Date Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 171 of 186
  • 172. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ 27. MSDS Request Letter Sample Date: ___________________________ Chemical Company or Distributor: ______________________________________ RE: MSDS for (product[s]) Please send me an up-to-date copy of your Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) for the above product. The MSDS is needed for compliance with the State of California Hazard Communication Regulation, Title 8, California Code of Regulations, Section 5194. Please send the MSDS to: (Name) (Company name) (Address) If this product does not require an MSDS, please notify us in writing. If you have any questions regarding our request, please contact (name and phone number). Sincerely, Firm RepresentativeDate Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 172 of 186
  • 173. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ 28. Hazardous Waste Tag 29. Container Labeling Another component of Hazard Communication is container labeling. All containers of chemicals at should be labeled as to the contents even if you know what is in the container. Labels on purchased chemicals must contain: • The identity of the chemical • Appropriate hazard warnings • The name of the company that manufactured or distributed the chemical EH&S recommends that chemicals are dated as they are received. Good labeling practices will prevent laboratory accidents and can avoid costly charges for disposal of unknown chemicals.Date Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 173 of 186
  • 174. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft Effective Date: _ 30. NFPA (NATIONAL FIRE PROTECTION ASSOCIATION) 704M SYSTEM The marking system designed by the National Fire Protection Association identifies hazard characteristics of materials at terminal and industrial sites. It uses a diamond divided into four quadrants, with each quadrant representing a different characteristic, as explained below. The risk level ratings, ranging from four (highest risk) to zero (minimum risk), are based upon protective equipment normally used by firefighters. Health (Blue) Health hazards in firefighting generally result from a single exposure, which may vary from a few seconds up to an hour. Only hazards arising out of an inherent property of the material are considered. It should be noted, however, that the physical exertion demanded in firefighting or other emergency conditions tends to intensify the effects of any exposure. Health Hazard -> 4: Deadly 3: Extreme danger 2: Hazardous 1: Slightly hazardous 0: Normal material Risk level 4: Materials too dangerous to human health to expose firefighters. A few whiffs of the vapor could cause death or the vapor or liquid could be fatal on penetrating the firefighter s normal full protective clothing. The normal full protective clothing and breathing apparatus available to the average fire department will not provide adequate protection against inhalation or skin contact with these materials. Risk level 3: Materials extremely hazardous to health, but areas may be entered with extreme care. Full protective clothing including self-contained breathing apparatus, coat, pants, gloves, and boots, with bands around the legs, arms, and waist should be provided. No skin surface should be exposed. Risk level 2: Materials hazardous to health, but areas may be entered freely with full facemask self- contained breathing apparatus that also provides eye protection. Risk level 1: Materials only slightly hazardous to health. It may be desirable to wear self-contained breathing apparatus. Risk level 0: Materials which on exposure under fire conditions would offer no hazard beyond that of ordinary combustible materials. Flammability (Red) Susceptibility to burning is the basis for assigning risk levels within this category. The method of attacking the fire is influenced by the material s susceptibility factor. Risk level 4: Very flammable gases or very volatile flammable liquids. Shut off flow and keep cooling water streams on exposed tanks or containers. Risk level 3: Materials that can be ignited under almost all normal temperature conditions. Water may be ineffective because of the low flash point. A4 Risk level 2: Materials that must be moderately heated before ignition will occur. Water spray may be used to extinguish the fire because the material can be cooled below its flash point. Risk level 1: Materials that must be preheated before ignition will occur. Water may cause frothing if it gets below the surface of the liquid and turns to steam. However, water fog gently applied to the surface will cause a frothing that will extinguish the fire. Risk level 0: Materials that will not burn. Reactivity/Stability (Yellow) The assignment of degrees in the reactivity category is based upon the susceptibility of materials to release energy either by themselves or in combination with water. Fire exposure is one of the factors considered, along with conditions of shock and pressure.Date Printed: 9/28/2012 Page 174 of 186
  • 175. ProcedureSafety Data Sheet (SDS) and Labels SOP Part Number: NNNNNSOP Revision: draft