• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
What's Next for CMS?
 

What's Next for CMS?

on

  • 2,867 views

Dr. Heath Morrison, superintendent for Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools, visit the Charlotte Chamber Ballantyne & Southpark joint luncheon on August 2 to discuss what's next for our public schools.

Dr. Heath Morrison, superintendent for Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools, visit the Charlotte Chamber Ballantyne & Southpark joint luncheon on August 2 to discuss what's next for our public schools.

Statistics

Views

Total Views
2,867
Views on SlideShare
507
Embed Views
2,360

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0

4 Embeds 2,360

http://charlottechamber.com 2352
http://asoft8167.accrisoft.com 6
http://www.charlottechamber.com 1
http://www.linkedin.com 1

Accessibility

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment
  • Federal, state and local pressure for reform. Change is coming.
  • Some of the national changes under way.
  • Some of the education changes in the budget bill: Kindergarten Entry Assessments – must be completed w/in 60 days of enrollment; requires PEPs (personal education plans) for at-risk students Early Grade Reading Assessments – designed to increase reading proficiency for K-3 graders Emphasizing Third Grade Literacy – retaining 3 rd graders if they do not pass their State-approved standardized reading comprehension tests; requires that schools provide summer reading camp to those 3 rd graders who are not reading proficient prior to retaining them (these students would have another shot at passing an alternative reading assessment at the end of the reading camp and, thus, be promoted to fourth grade if they prove to be reading proficient on the alternative reading test) Pay for Excellence Plans – Allows but does not require districts to develop pay for performance plans and to submit such plans to the State Board of Education by March 2013; includes 5 suggested criteria to be included in each pay for performance plan SCHOOL PERFORMANCE GRADES SECTION 7A.3.(a) G.S. 115C-12(9)c1. reads as rewritten: "c1. To issue an annual "report card" for the State and for each local school administrative unit, assessing each unit's efforts to improve student performance based on the growth in performance of the students in each school and taking into account progress over the previous years' level of performance and the State's performance in comparison with other states. This assessment shall take into account factors that have been shown to affect student performance and that the State Board considers relevant to assess the State's efforts to improve student performance. As a part of the annual "report card" for each local school administrative unit, the State Board shall award an overall numerical school performance score on a scale of zero to 100 and a corresponding letter grade of A, B, C, D, or F earned by each school within the local school administrative unit. The school performance score and grade shall reflect student performance on annual subject-specific assessments, college and workplace readiness measures, and graduation rates. For schools serving students in any grade from kindergarten to eighth grade, separate performance scores and grades shall also be awarded based on the school performance in reading and mathematics respectively. The annual "report card" for schools serving students in third grade also shall include the number and percentage of third grade students who (i) take and pass the alternative assessment of reading comprehension; (ii) were retained in third grade for not demonstrating reading proficiency as indicated in G.S. 115C-83.1G(a); and (iii) were exempt from mandatory third grade retention by category of exemption as listed in G.S. 115C-83.1G(b)." SECTION 7A.3.(b) G.S. 115C-47(58) reads as rewritten: "(58) To Inform the Public About the North Carolina School Report Cards Issued by the State Board of Education. – Each local board of education shall ensure that the report card issued for it by the State Board of Education receives wide distribution to the local press or is otherwise provided to the public. Each local board of education shall ensure that the overall school performance score and grade earned by each school in the local school administrative unit for the current and previous four school years is prominently displayed on the Web site of the local school administrative unit. If any school in the local school administrative unit is awarded a grade of D or F, the local board of education shall provide notice of the grade in writing to the parent or guardian of all students enrolled in that school."
  • Reform might have a bad name in Charlotte. But whatever you call it – change, reform, continuous improvement – it’s coming. Can’t stop it. Shouldn’t try. Instead, we need to use the push for reform to help us get to where we want to go, where we need to be: making sure that every student graduates from high school with a meaningful diploma. That every student is prepared for what comes next, whether it’s college, a career or the military. We’re not there yet. CMS has done more work than many other districts and is considered a national leader. But we still have a lot of work to do.
  • It is also important for us, and the community, to know there is urgency around this work. We’re not doing this work in a vacuum. We’re doing it in real time -- as students move through school. The clock is ticking for us – and for them.
  • So where is CMS right now? As a district, CMS and the community it serves have much reason for pride. There are a lot of good things going on in CMS. We won the Broad Prize last year. National recognition – and scholarships for our students. Our graduation rate has gone up. Preliminary state testing numbers suggest that more of our schools achieved high growth last year than the year before. That’s all good news. So we’re a good district right now.
  • CMS has accomplished a lot in recent years. We’re viewed as a national leader in many ways. But are we a great district? Are we everything we want to be? Are we everything that our students need us to be, and that the community expects us to be? .
  • Assessing where CMS is now, and how to get the district to great -- where we want it to be -- is the purpose of my entry plan. It has five goals.
  • In any district, anywhere, student achievement comes first. So that’s my top priority. I know that CMS is viewed nationally as a leader in raising student achievement. Here are some of the things CMS is doing now that are important to student achievement.
  • CMS has put a focus of effective teaching and leadership. The conversation about teacher performance started here earlier than it did in many places, and that’s good. My job is to support great teaching in every way I can. And I will. New Teacher Project – the irreplaceables. We want to attract great teachers and we want to keep them. That means we must create schools where there is a culture of respect, where teachers feel valued and trust their principals.
  • And then there’s the question of keeping the great teachers once we figure out who they are.
  • How do we keep them in the classroom? Here are some of the reasons they leave.
  • We need to focus our teaching on getting students through high school with a meaningful diploma. A high school diploma isn’t a guarantee of a job any more. But not having one is pretty much a guarantee of failure.
  • Having that piece of paper isn’t enough. It has to mean something. It has to reflect a level of literacy and numeracy that will enable the graduate to begin learning something else, whether it’s in college, in a career or in the military. It should also reflect that each student has been lifted to the maximum level possible. That’s not the same level for every student – it’s not realistic to expect all students to get A-pluses. But the diploma has to mean more than just pushing the low achievers barely over the finish line while very bright students graduate from high school academically unchallenged and unprepared for college. Public education has to span a wide range of abilities so that every student not only learns, but is challenged and stretched. We want all students to graduate with a diploma that represents a significant achievement for them.
  • Montgomery County uses these seven keys.
  • 70% of the 30 fastest-growing jobs will require an education beyond high school. 40% of all new jobs will require at least an associate’s degree. Getting kids a meaningful diploma isn’t optional for us. We have to do it. The costs of failure – and we are failing a lot of kids, as the graduation rates make clear – is astronomical.
  • A high school diploma isn’t a guarantee of a job any more. But not having one is pretty much a guarantee of failure. . Getting kids a meaningful diploma isn’t optional for us. We have to do it. The cost of failure – and we are failing a lot of kids, as the graduation rates make clear – is astronomical.
  • Consider these facts from the Alliance For Excellent Education: An estimated 53,800 students in the class of 2010 were dropouts. If North Carolina had been able to cut that number in half – to get 26,900 of those students to graduate, we’d have millions more dollars in many areas today. We need to all be clear about this: We ALL lose here, not just the dropouts. Consider these facts from the Alliance For Excellent Education: An estimated 53,800 students in the class of 2010 were dropouts. If North Carolina had been able to cut that number in half – to get 26,900 of those students to graduate -- we’d have millions more dollars in many areas today. We’d have $292 million more in increased earnings We’d have $71 million in increased investments We’d have $655 million more in increased home sales We’d have $30 milliion more in increased auto sales We’d have 2,600 new jobs
  • My second entry plan goal is to build a strong working relationship with the Board of Education.
  • We need to make sure that our systems and processes are as efficient and effective as they can be.
  • We have systems and processes in place. By documenting these, we can show the public that we are efficient and effective. It also shows that we allocate resources wisely. It’s an opportunity for schools to show leadership in allocation of resources.
  • We have to get schools ready for a nearly paperless world. It’s not just a matter of buying kids computers. It’s a sea change in training, in mindset and in the way we operate.
  • It’s a lot of changes. If we hang back, we’ll get lost. But we also need to look at how this changes the teaching and learning process.
  • The fact is, we can do this work and we will do this work. It’s a matter of focusing on every child, every day, for a better tomorrow.
  • CMS has also made performance management a priority.
  • The district measures a lot of things. Some are things the state requires. Others are federally mandated. Still others are things we think are important. We need to ask ourselves: Are we measuring the things that parents care about? That the community cares about?
  • That culture starts at the top. I’ve begun to assemble my full leadership team – I inherited some vacancies.
  • Central office support for schools New team – Ann, Earnest, Frank, Millard, Valerie, three principal vacancies filled Looking during entry at structure to see if it best serves needs, talking to school staff as I visit schools
  • The culture of respect that every school should have.
  • We want public trust in our schools. We also want public involvement at every school – partnerships that benefit our students and our schools.
  • Public education has never fully engaged parents. That has to change. We need parents in our schools doing important things, not just picking up trash and trimming landscape plants. We need their expertise, their input and their engagement. But every school does not benefit equally from partnerships. Some schools are very good at them. Others are not. We want to have equally high levels of parent engagement at every school.
  • Strong partnerships are an important part of great schools. The schools in the Ballantyne area have some great partners doing great things. South Meck is a good example. The school gets financial support, volunteer support and booster-club support from a wide range of businesses, faith partners and corporate and community citizens. And students at that school have a new, state-of-the-art EcoLab that’s helping them learn about science and the environment. That lab was built with the help of many corporate sponsors, including the names you see up there – Lowe’s, Tecta America, REI and many others. Hawk Ridge Elementary also has strong partnerships. Here are some examples from Troy Moore, the principal at Hawk Ridge: Home Depot – Grant to establish extensive gardens.  They have acted as consultants in each planting season and offered deeply discounted rates on all supplies, seeds and plants needed since the initial planting.  In turn, our produce and herbs are donated to the Harvest Food Bank.  Great learning experiences for our students! ICA Inc. (Insurance Claims Adjusters INC)  - They have provided new Laptops and other technology equipment for technology initiatives.  They also provide sponsorship funding for student events such as movie nights, etc.  In addition, sponsored a meal at a local restaurant for all Dads to get information on our Hawk Dads group that aims to boost male volunteerism at Hawk Ridge. Point of Contact- Steven Bucey Unit Paving http://unitpaving.com/ - They have provided amazing pavement options for our courtyard at no cost.  It provides a nice eating area for families and classes and frames out our gardens. Point of Contact-Scott Michaud The Ballantyne Rotary Club  http://www.rotary7680.org/club-details/ballantyne-rotary-club - They have supported us in many ways over the last two years.  They supply book bags and school supplies for any students who we feel could utilize this benefit.  They put on the Ballantyne Teachers Cup Volleyball Tournament in March.  Hawk Ridge has been the top ticket sale school for the last two years.  One hundred percent of that money comes right back to the school which has been very beneficial for our technology initiatives.  Not to mention this is a fun community event that promotes school spirit!! BiLo  Elm Lane Store – BiLo has selected us to be a recipient of their Golf Tournament Proceeds in years past.  They also offer food items for special events we are hosting.  They have been gracious to allow us to keep a bin at the store for box top collection. Autism Speaks http://www.autismspeaks.org/ - The Autism Speaks Organization partnered with Hawk Ridge Elementary to promote Light It Up Blue Day on April 24, 2012.  They offered support and materials to go along with the vision our EC Department had for the day.  Randy Peterson from Autism Speaks (East Coast) spoke at a parent information night and was on hand to document the day.  Clips from our celebration were featured on the Worldwide Light It Up Blue Day video.   Morrison YMCA- Hawk Ridge and the Morrison YMCA are true family partners.  We share facilities and create programs and partnerships to benefit the Hawk Ridge Community in many ways.    At Hawk Ridge, we have amazing parent involvement and log over 8,000 hours a year. 
  • Strong partnerships are an important part of great schools. The schools in the Ballantyne area have some great partners doing great things. South Meck is a good example. The school gets financial support, volunteer support and booster-club support from a wide range of businesses, faith partners and corporate and community citizens. And students at that school have a new, state-of-the-art EcoLab that’s helping them learn about science and the environment. That lab was built with the help of many corporate sponsors, including the names you see up there – Lowe’s, Tecta America, REI and many others. Hawk Ridge Elementary also has strong partnerships. Here are some examples from Troy Moore, the principal at Hawk Ridge: Home Depot – Grant to establish extensive gardens.  They have acted as consultants in each planting season and offered deeply discounted rates on all supplies, seeds and plants needed since the initial planting.  In turn, our produce and herbs are donated to the Harvest Food Bank.  Great learning experiences for our students! ICA Inc. (Insurance Claims Adjusters INC)  - They have provided new Laptops and other technology equipment for technology initiatives.  They also provide sponsorship funding for student events such as movie nights, etc.  In addition, sponsored a meal at a local restaurant for all Dads to get information on our Hawk Dads group that aims to boost male volunteerism at Hawk Ridge. Point of Contact- Steven Bucey Unit Paving http://unitpaving.com/ - They have provided amazing pavement options for our courtyard at no cost.  It provides a nice eating area for families and classes and frames out our gardens. Point of Contact-Scott Michaud The Ballantyne Rotary Club  http://www.rotary7680.org/club-details/ballantyne-rotary-club - They have supported us in many ways over the last two years.  They supply book bags and school supplies for any students who we feel could utilize this benefit.  They put on the Ballantyne Teachers Cup Volleyball Tournament in March.  Hawk Ridge has been the top ticket sale school for the last two years.  One hundred percent of that money comes right back to the school which has been very beneficial for our technology initiatives.  Not to mention this is a fun community event that promotes school spirit!! BiLo  Elm Lane Store – BiLo has selected us to be a recipient of their Golf Tournament Proceeds in years past.  They also offer food items for special events we are hosting.  They have been gracious to allow us to keep a bin at the store for box top collection. Autism Speaks http://www.autismspeaks.org/ - The Autism Speaks Organization partnered with Hawk Ridge Elementary to promote Light It Up Blue Day on April 24, 2012.  They offered support and materials to go along with the vision our EC Department had for the day.  Randy Peterson from Autism Speaks (East Coast) spoke at a parent information night and was on hand to document the day.  Clips from our celebration were featured on the Worldwide Light It Up Blue Day video.   Morrison YMCA- Hawk Ridge and the Morrison YMCA are true family partners.  We share facilities and create programs and partnerships to benefit the Hawk Ridge Community in many ways.    At Hawk Ridge, we have amazing parent involvement and log over 8,000 hours a year. 
  • Strong partnerships are an important part of great schools. The schools in the Ballantyne area have some great partners doing great things. South Meck is a good example. The school gets financial support, volunteer support and booster-club support from a wide range of businesses, faith partners and corporate and community citizens. And students at that school have a new, state-of-the-art EcoLab that’s helping them learn about science and the environment. That lab was built with the help of many corporate sponsors, including the names you see up there – Lowe’s, Tecta America, REI and many others. Hawk Ridge Elementary also has strong partnerships. Here are some examples from Troy Moore, the principal at Hawk Ridge: Home Depot – Grant to establish extensive gardens.  They have acted as consultants in each planting season and offered deeply discounted rates on all supplies, seeds and plants needed since the initial planting.  In turn, our produce and herbs are donated to the Harvest Food Bank.  Great learning experiences for our students! ICA Inc. (Insurance Claims Adjusters INC)  - They have provided new Laptops and other technology equipment for technology initiatives.  They also provide sponsorship funding for student events such as movie nights, etc.  In addition, sponsored a meal at a local restaurant for all Dads to get information on our Hawk Dads group that aims to boost male volunteerism at Hawk Ridge. Point of Contact- Steven Bucey Unit Paving http://unitpaving.com/ - They have provided amazing pavement options for our courtyard at no cost.  It provides a nice eating area for families and classes and frames out our gardens. Point of Contact-Scott Michaud The Ballantyne Rotary Club  http://www.rotary7680.org/club-details/ballantyne-rotary-club - They have supported us in many ways over the last two years.  They supply book bags and school supplies for any students who we feel could utilize this benefit.  They put on the Ballantyne Teachers Cup Volleyball Tournament in March.  Hawk Ridge has been the top ticket sale school for the last two years.  One hundred percent of that money comes right back to the school which has been very beneficial for our technology initiatives.  Not to mention this is a fun community event that promotes school spirit!! BiLo  Elm Lane Store – BiLo has selected us to be a recipient of their Golf Tournament Proceeds in years past.  They also offer food items for special events we are hosting.  They have been gracious to allow us to keep a bin at the store for box top collection. Autism Speaks http://www.autismspeaks.org/ - The Autism Speaks Organization partnered with Hawk Ridge Elementary to promote Light It Up Blue Day on April 24, 2012.  They offered support and materials to go along with the vision our EC Department had for the day.  Randy Peterson from Autism Speaks (East Coast) spoke at a parent information night and was on hand to document the day.  Clips from our celebration were featured on the Worldwide Light It Up Blue Day video.   Morrison YMCA- Hawk Ridge and the Morrison YMCA are true family partners.  We share facilities and create programs and partnerships to benefit the Hawk Ridge Community in many ways.    At Hawk Ridge, we have amazing parent involvement and log over 8,000 hours a year. 
  • The clocks are ticking for us – 141,000 clocks waiting to be educated. Those clocks don’t run at all the same speed, either. As the picture suggests, they run at many different speeds. Some run fast, some keep good time and some run slow. Some students are learning at higher levels than others. Some need more help than others. But a key measure of success for us will be how effectively we reach all kinds of students – how well we are able to teach and to challenge high fliers and average students and struggling students.
  • Because whether they run fast, medium or slow -- every student in CMS deserves the best education we can give them. Doing this well is in their best interests. It’s also in our community’s best interest.
  • So what do we do now? What’s next for CMS and all of us?
  • We’re going to work on educating every child.
  • We’re going to work on it every day.
  • So our students will have a better tomorrow. There is no work more important, more energizing or more crucial than this.

What's Next for CMS? What's Next for CMS? Presentation Transcript

  • What’s next for CMS?Ballantyne/South Park Chamber Chapters Aug. 2, 2012 Dr. Heath E. MorrisonCharlotte-Mecklenburg Schools
  • There is a tsunami of educational reform and change taking place – and it will continue.
  • What’s next?Nationally:ESEA Waiver/ReauthorizationCommon Core StandardsBlended learningNew evaluation systems/Pay for performanceVouchers/charter schools/virtual schools
  • What’s next?In North Carolina: Grades for all schools Kindergarten entry assessments Early-grade reading assessments Emphasis on third-grade literacy Pay for Excellence plans (optional)
  • 5
  • The clock is ticking for us and for each of the 141,000students that we have the honor and privilege of serving.
  • A lot of good things in CMS
  • But is CMSa greatdistrict? Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools ABC Results - All Schools Number of Schools by Growth Status - 2005-06 through 2009-10 120 108 100 2005-06 80 80 73 72 2006-07 67 60 64 60 2007-08 50 52 49 34 2008-09 40 m N 30 S h o b u s c e r f l 17 2009-10 20 16 9 0 High Growth Expected Growth Less Than Expected Growth
  • ‘Good’ is the enemy of ‘great.’ We want great results, not just good ones.
  • My entryplan:Five goalsfor first 100days
  • 1. Focus onstudentachievement.
  • Effectiveteachingand leadershipHow do weknow who’seffective?
  • Once weidentifyteachingstars, are wedoing all theright things tokeep them?
  • Three main reasons greatteachers leave teaching: Poor leadership Poor working conditions Counterproductive policies
  • Increasing thegraduation rateHow do we raisethe rate and makethe diplomameaningful?
  • Our graduationrate has beenrising:2010 – 69.92011 – 73.52012 – 75.1%(preliminary)
  • Is a CMSdiploma thepassport for abettertomorrow?
  • Seven keys to college readiness Read at advanced levels in Grades K–2 Score ‘advanced’ in reading on the Maryland SchoolAssessment in Grades 3–8 Complete advanced math in Grade 5 Complete Algebra 1 by Grade 8 with a ‘C’ or higher Complete Algebra 2 by Grade 11 with a ‘C’ or higher Score 3 on an AP exam or 4 on an IB exam Score 1650 on the SAT or 24 on the ACT
  • But are we preparing students forthe future?New jobs in the workforce requiregreater education and skills: 70% of the 30 fastest-growing jobs willrequire an education beyond high school. 40% of all new jobs will require at least anassociate’s degree.
  • A diploma isjust thebeginning.Without it,there is nobeginning.
  • $292 million inincreased earnings$71 million inincreased investments$655 million more inincreased home sales$30 million more inincreased auto sales2,600 new jobs
  • 2. Build a collaborativerelationship with the Board ofEducation.
  • 3. Increaseorganizationalefficiency toensure strongsupport toschools.
  • Hiring: From 14 steps…
  • … to five
  • Teaching andlearningthroughtechnologyWhat does this mean for theteaching and learning process?
  • PerformancemanagementWhat measuresshould thedistrict use toassessperformance?
  • Are wemeasuring therightthings?
  • 4. Establish arespectful,positive culturecentered onteaching andlearning.
  • What district leadership mustprovide: Clear direction and expectations Support and supervision Shared accountability Outstanding service
  • Get the right people on the bus.
  • Make schools a placewhere employees feelvalued and students feelsafe and ready to learnthrough a culture ofrespect.
  • ‘A culture of discipline is not aprinciple of business; it is aprinciple of greatness.’ - Jim Collins
  • 5. Build publictrust throughopen, honestcommunication.
  • Parent andcommunityconnectionsDo we have acommondefinition ofparentengagement andcommunityinvolvementacross CMS?
  • Hawk Ridge ElementarySouth Mecklenburg High
  • Some successful brands
  • What’s thebrand for CMS?
  • What’s next forCMS?
  • Every child.
  • Every day.
  • For a bettertomorrow.