City of Charlotte Transportation Bond Program<br />Liz Babson, P.E.<br />CDOT Deputy Director<br />Presentation to<br />20...
Items to Discuss<br />Who maintains which streets?<br />Transportation bond history<br />Typical project schedule<br />Fut...
Who is responsible for which streets?<br />Green= CDOT<br />Red = NCDOT<br />
Charlotte Transportation Bond History<br />Almost 50 years of voter approved bonds<br />City Growth Strategy and Transport...
Charlotte Transportation Bond History<br />
2010 Transportation Bond Projects<br />Beatties Ford Road widening<br />Idlewild Road widening<br />Oakdale Road FTM<br />...
What is a typical project schedule?<br />Planning<br />1 Year<br />Design<br />1 year<br />Real Estate<br />1 year<br />Bi...
Planning + Funding = Projects<br />$390M in projects and programs (2006, 2008 and 2010 bonds)<br />Dozens of projects “on ...
Transportation Projects Recently Completed or In Progress <br />Completed<br />In Progress<br />
Future Transportation Funding – Some Uncertainty<br />???<br />?<br />?<br />?<br />
Unfunded Transportation Needs<br />    Unfunded Road                     Improvement Needs<br />
Conclusion<br />Charlotte remains in a growth mode (additional 300,000 people by 2030)<br />With consistent funding, City ...
Thank You<br />Liz Babson, P.E. <br />CDOT Deputy Director<br />ebabson@charlottenc.gov<br />
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State and Local Road Project Updates: Part 1

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Liz Babson, deputy director of the Charlotte Division of Transportation, reports at the Charlotte Chamber 2011 Transportation Summit.

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  • Share with you where we are currently with our transportation bond program…but before I go there, I want to give you some context that really demonstrates why the bond program is so important. who maintains which streets…transportation bond history…typical project schedule and how the bond program relates to that And then what do we see today when we look toward future transportation bond funding and those future transportation needs
  • We are often asked which roads does CDOT maintain and which roads does NCDOT maintain. The green lines on the map are city maintained roads and the red lines are NCDOT maintained streets. The City is responsible for more than 2300 miles of streets, over 700 traffic signals and 175,000 street signs. There’s a lot we’re responsible for and likewise, there’s a lot of need.
  • Long history of transportation bonds – almost 50 years! Needs are identified through the City Growth Strategy and TAP, which is the policy document that identifies transportation needs and aligns that with costs necessary to complete those projects. CIP which is a 5-year funding document adopted by Council and sets priorities for projects. Bonds fund many different types of transportation improvements. Even in difficult economic times, Charlotte voters approved the 2010 transportation bonds with 64% of voters voting for the bonds!
  • Starting as far back as 1962, we began funding road improvements with transportation bonds and has been the primary source of funds for transportation capital projects. Our 2 largest bonds were the last 2 bond programs (2008, 2010).
  • This a list of the road projects that were approved for funding in the 2010 bond. Represents various types of projects…widening, FTM projects which takes a 2-lane ditch section and builds a complete street with improvements for motor vehicles, as well as and pedestrians and bicyclists, intersection improvements, and moving 1 project into planning and design.
  • We are often asked why does it take so long for a project to go from concept to construction. This diagram lays out that process and shows how bond funding is used to complete a project. For a project to happen we need funding committed twice from transportation bonds during the life of a project. The first commitment bond funds is used to advance Planning &amp; Design for the project and the 2nd commitment of bond funds advances the project through Real Estate, Bid &amp; Construction. Assuming funding is available at those two points, a project can be completed in as little as 4-5 years. This also supports a city commitment made many years ago for a 3-year vote to drive bond program. It’s important to note that the time to deliver a project is extended beyond 4-5 years when the pace of funding is inconsistent.
  • When we have consistent transportation funding we are able to program and advance a significant number of projects. With the past three bonds, the City has programmed and advanced approximately $390M worth of transportation projects and programs and have dozens of projects on the ground. We are building quality projects for all users, not only as we complete road improvements for motor vehicles, but also sidewalks for pedestrians and bicycle accommodations for cyclists. And let’s not forget maintenance, while new projects are great, it is equally important to place emphasis on maintaining what we have. We do this through our street resurfacing effort, bridge maintenance and repairs, and traffic signal system improvements
  • Just to show you what that progress looks like, this is a snapshot of projects that were either recently completed or in progress during design or construction. The orange projects are the road and intersection improvements that have been recently completed. The green projects are the projects that are already funded and in the process moving toward completion.
  • The transportation bonds are really the only way the city is able to fund transportation capital projects. There is now some uncertainty as to whether the City can afford to have a 2012 transportation bond. – without bonds, there are no projects.
  • But, we certainly have needs, this map shows the City’s thoroughfare and farm to market road improvements that have been identified as needing to be improved in the future. These projects are not currently funded. The inability to have consistent transportation bond funding will result in these projects being delayed until funding becomes available. The projects on this map are about $2.5B worth of thoroughfare and FTM improvements
  • Charlotte remains in a growth mode. The recent census data indicates that we may even be growing at a slightly faster rate than previously estimated. With your support and voter approval, we’ve been able to complete some great things. When funding is consistent we have a great track record of getting projects on the ground There is some uncertainty when/if the City will have transportation bonds in the near-term which will impact our ability to advance projects. We have many identified transportation needs
  • So, I hope I’ve left you with something to think about as you consider the future transportation needs and funding necessary to support those.
  • State and Local Road Project Updates: Part 1

    1. 1. City of Charlotte Transportation Bond Program<br />Liz Babson, P.E.<br />CDOT Deputy Director<br />Presentation to<br />2011 Charlotte Regional Transportation Summit<br />April 8, 2011<br />
    2. 2. Items to Discuss<br />Who maintains which streets?<br />Transportation bond history<br />Typical project schedule<br />Future transportation bond funding and needs<br />
    3. 3. Who is responsible for which streets?<br />Green= CDOT<br />Red = NCDOT<br />
    4. 4. Charlotte Transportation Bond History<br />Almost 50 years of voter approved bonds<br />City Growth Strategy and Transportation Action Plan (TAP) identify needs<br />Capital Improvement Plan (CIP) sets priorities<br />Bonds fund street improvements, intersection improvements, sidewalks, street lights, bikeways, signal system, and other transportation needs<br />2010 election results from Mecklenburg County Board of Elections website<br />
    5. 5. Charlotte Transportation Bond History<br />
    6. 6. 2010 Transportation Bond Projects<br />Beatties Ford Road widening<br />Idlewild Road widening<br />Oakdale Road FTM<br />Scaleybark/South intersection<br />Ballantyne Commons/Elm intersection<br />Providence/McKee intersection<br />Johnston-Oehler Road FTM Planning & Design<br />
    7. 7. What is a typical project schedule?<br />Planning<br />1 Year<br />Design<br />1 year<br />Real Estate<br />1 year<br />Bid & Construction<br />1 – 2 years<br />$<br />3-Year Vote to Drive<br />$<br />Typically 4 – 5 Years<br />
    8. 8. Planning + Funding = Projects<br />$390M in projects and programs (2006, 2008 and 2010 bonds)<br />Dozens of projects “on the ground”<br />Quality projects for all users – provide transportation choices<br />Maintenance of existing infrastructure<br />
    9. 9. Transportation Projects Recently Completed or In Progress <br />Completed<br />In Progress<br />
    10. 10. Future Transportation Funding – Some Uncertainty<br />???<br />?<br />?<br />?<br />
    11. 11. Unfunded Transportation Needs<br /> Unfunded Road Improvement Needs<br />
    12. 12. Conclusion<br />Charlotte remains in a growth mode (additional 300,000 people by 2030)<br />With consistent funding, City has positive track record of getting projects on the ground – 3 year vote to drive<br />Some uncertainty about future funding<br />City has many identified transportation needs<br />
    13. 13. Thank You<br />Liz Babson, P.E. <br />CDOT Deputy Director<br />ebabson@charlottenc.gov<br />

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