• Save
Culture of Transparency
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Like this? Share it with your network

Share

Culture of Transparency

on

  • 211 views

Organizational Culture of Transparency - elements, costs, and benefits.

Organizational Culture of Transparency - elements, costs, and benefits.

Statistics

Views

Total Views
211
Views on SlideShare
208
Embed Views
3

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0

2 Embeds 3

https://www.linkedin.com 2
http://www.linkedin.com 1

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Culture of Transparency Presentation Transcript

  • 1. A Compliance and Ethics Program: Framework for Implementing a“Culture of Transparency” Charles L. Pourciau, Jr. JD 
  • 2. Why listen today?• What are the Costs . . . . . . . . .  without a                     Culture of Transparency?• What is a Culture of Transparency?• What are the Organizational Benefits? • Questions 
  • 3. Do these situations exist in your company? Types of misconduct observed: • Sexual Harassment • Substance Abuse • Insider trading • Illegal Political Contributions • Stealing  • Environmental violations • Improper contracts • Contract Violations  • Improper use of competitor’s information • Health or safety violations • Anti‐competitive practices The 2011 National Business Ethics Survey asked  employees about these situations in their companies.
  • 4. 2011 National Business Ethics SurveyUS Workforce = 138M people• 62M (45%) – observed misconduct,• 41M (65%) – reported misconduct,• 9M (22%) – experienced retaliationAre the details of these responses an indication of an  Opaque Culture?
  • 5. How does an ‘Opaque’ Culture Look? AS ECONOMIC STRESS ON COMPANIES EASES, MISCONDUCT BECOMES MORE PREVALENT Hiring new  80 Percentage of Employees Who Observed  employees 79% Misconduct in previous 12 Months Rehiring of  60 63% former staff 56% Business  40 42% expansion Restoration of  20 compensation  and/or benefits 0 1 or 2 3 or 4 5 Reinstatement of  Number of Recovery Measures  hours or overtimeWhat are other indications of an Opaque Culture (vs. A Culture of Transparency)?
  • 6. ‘Uncle Sam’ visits!The Justice Department’ s Criminal Division ‐ FCPA: • 2004 collected around $11,000,000; • 2005 collected around $16,500,000, • In 2009 and 2010 combined collected nearly $2B.   Assistant Attorney General Lanny A. Breuer’s  speech before World Bank on May 25, 2011  Healthcare fraud  2001 to 2009 $2.5B False Claims Act (FCA) whistleblower lawsuits – 2001 to 2009 $9.2B Pfizer ‐ $  2.30B    2011 GSK    ‐ $ 0.60B    2010 NYS/ NY City              $ 0.54B    2009 Lilly    ‐ $  0.43B    2009 Merck‐ $  0.65B    2008 Total                    $ 4.52B“The Justice Department’s Consumer Protection Branch recovered more than  $913M in criminal and civil fines, penalties, and restitution in 2011. . .”   DOJ Press Release Monday, March 5, 2012 Is this the US Government’s Deficit Reduction Program?
  • 7. Motivation of healthcare fraud  whistleblowers• New England Journal of Medicine (May 2010) – Identified 42 whistleblowers – Interviewed 26 – 4 outsiders; 22 insiders – 6 intended to file suit; 20 saw lawyer for other  reasons before filing suit – Motivation themes – integrity (11), public safety  (7),  justice (7) and self preservation (5) It is about integrity not about the money!!!
  • 8. 2011 National Business Ethics Survey  Supplement• MONETARY REWARDS LEAST LIKELY TO MOTIVATE REPORTING• Reason for Reporting Outside Company:  – If it was a big enough crime                                                               82% – If keeping quiet would cause possible harm to people                 76% – If the problem was ongoing  70% – If keeping quiet would cause further harm to the environment  65% – If my company didn’t do anything about my [internal] report     65% – If keeping quiet would get my company in big trouble  56% – If I had the potential to receive a substantial monetary reward  43% Bounties are not the main motivator!!!
  • 9. Opaque Company Examples • FCPA violation‐self reported, cooperated, responsible • Revenue $467M 2011  • MN government contractor  • USAF suspended from future contracts for 6 months Total Cost: $15,000,000  • Revenue $3.96B • UK‐based: US and German subsidiaries paid Greek doctors to use their products. • Under the FCPA: Doctors at overseas government‐ owned or operated hospitals are foreign officials. • Paid DOJ $16.8M penalty; paid SEC $5.8M penalty;  legal fees: $9.4M in 2.2012 Total Cost: $30,700,000  Other Examples?
  • 10. Opaque Company Examples • 2011 Revenue $11M out Lufthansa’s $125M • Tulsa, OK; Maintenance, Repair, Overhaul (MRO) • Bribed Latin America foreign officials • FCPA violation‐self reported, cooperated, responsible • Paid DOJ $11.8M penalty; $7.&M legal fees in 3.2012 Total Cost $19,500,000  • Exton, PA; Global specialty metals distributor  • Titanium alloy & aluminum bars no export licenses • Paid DOC $575,000 penalty 3.2011 • Price fixing guilty plea 12.2011 • Export privileges revoked  from 2.2012 till 2.2014These examples include issues both self reported and investigation identified.
  • 11. War Story #1 ‐ Opaque Company ScenarioImagine you are the CEO of a company under investigation by the US Attorney’s office for fraud.Two Board members accompany you to a meeting with a US Attorney to discuss a Deferred Prosecution Agreement.On the next slides see how this conversation unfolds for this opaque company. Opaque Company
  • 12. War Story #1 Opaque CompanyAssistant US Attorney:  “Please describe your ethics and compliance program.” CEO: “We don’t have a formal document but I have an open door policy and our people are honest and good.” Opaque Company
  • 13. War Story #1 Opaque CompanyAssistant US Attorney:  “How much does your company spend annually on office supplies?”CEO: “I believe that we spend between $50k and $100K annually.” Opaque Company
  • 14. War Story #1 Opaque CompanyAssistant US Attorney: “How much does your company spend on ethics & compliance?”CEO:  “I do not have that number at hand but will get back to you with it.” Opaque Company
  • 15. War Story #1 Opaque CompanyAssistant US Attorney: “How does your company train its employees?”CEO:“We do not have a training program for ethics and compliance.”Five days later your company is indicted.   Transparent Company
  • 16. War Story #2 ‐ Transparent Company ScenarioImagine you are the CEO of a company under investigation by the US Attorney’s office for fraud.Two Board members accompany you to a meeting with a US Attorney to discuss a Deferred Prosecution Agreement.On the next slides see how this conversation unfolds for this transparent company. Transparent Company
  • 17. War Story #2 Transparent CompanyAssistant US Attorney “Please describe your ethics and compliance program.” CEO: “We have a formal program and annually every employee certifies they read, understood and agree to follow it.” Transparent Company
  • 18. War Story #2 Transparent CompanyAssistant US Attorney “How much does your company spend annually on office supplies?”CEO: “We spend $100K annually.” Transparent Company
  • 19. War Story #2 Transparent CompanyAssistant US Attorney” “How much does your company spend on ethics & compliance?”CEO: “Over the last five years we have spent $200,000. Would you like detail?” Transparent Company
  • 20. War Story #2 Transparent CompanyAssistant US Attorney: “How does your company train its employees?”CEO: “Training based an employees job; initial training completed within 30 days of hire; mandatory annual ethics training.”Your outside counsel receives a Non‐Prosecution Agreement for review.   Transparent Companies
  • 21. Transparent CompaniesEthisphere 2011 Worlds Most Ethical Companies – Partial   Culture of Transparency: Elements
  • 22. The Culture of Transparency includes:• A written Policy for Ethics and Compliance• Accountability for the Ethics and Compliance assigned• Initial and annual education all employees• All reports investigated and discipline as required• Practices & Operating procedures aligned with the law Culture of Transparency: Elements
  • 23. The Culture of Transparency includes:• Openness … not whack‐a‐mole … With good listening  skills• No Retaliation ……   No Retribution• Accountability …… No Passing the Buck• ‘Walk the Talk’ of Ethics and Compliance  Organizational Benefits
  • 24. Organization Benefits Higher gross margin and profits With COT         7.9% increase SH value Without COT   2.1% increase SH valueTotal SH return (10 yr period) Top Quartile          +8.8% Bottom Quartile    ‐7.4% Top outperformed Bottom by >16% Morgan Stanley
  • 25. HOW IT’S SUPPOSED TO WORKFCPA violation – China Managing Director pleads guilty • Evaded internal controls • Web of deceit to thwart adequate controls to prevent corruption • Self‐dealing and deception DOJ Press Release April 25, 2012 Morgan Stanley had • Self‐reported, cooperated with DOJ investigation • Effective internal controls; employees not bribing government officials • Frequent training  on internal policies 2002 ‐ 2008 • Managing Director – trained 7 times; reminded 35 times • Monitoring; Random audits  •DOJ Press Release April 25, 2012        Uncle Sam Declined To Prosecute!
  • 26. National Business Ethics Survey http://www.ethics.org/nbes/“Whistleblower Experiences in Fraud Litigation against  Pharmaceutical  Companies” New England Journal of Medicinehttp://www.whistleblowers.org/storage/whistleblowers/documents/DoddFrank/newenglandjournalmedicine.pdf Charles L. Pourciau, Jr. JD 
  • 27. My Requests?• I seek introductions to Board members & CEOs • Speaking engagements Contact Info: 727. 410. 4786 Email: cpourciau79@gmail.com Charles L. Pourciau, Jr. JD