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ECTC access to careers, Machine Tool Technology
 

ECTC access to careers, Machine Tool Technology

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Those who say manufacturing is moving out of the US haven't opened their eyes...We teach Machine Tool Technology and manufacturing, and the job-shops, are making great come-backs. We have 8 jobs on ...

Those who say manufacturing is moving out of the US haven't opened their eyes...We teach Machine Tool Technology and manufacturing, and the job-shops, are making great come-backs. We have 8 jobs on our job board and the students we have are quickly getting pulled away to industry before they can complete the 2 year program.

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    ECTC access to careers, Machine Tool Technology ECTC access to careers, Machine Tool Technology Presentation Transcript

    • Elizabethtown Community and Technical College Careers in Technical Areas Machine Tool Technology
    • Introduction
      • Key Questions:
        • Are you the type of person that would rather take something apart to see how it works as opposed to reading about how it works?
        • Are you the type of person that likes to work with your hands in a shop as opposed to working in an office environment?
      • If you answered yes to either one of these questions you may be a good candidate for a career in machine tool technology as a machinist or machine operator
      • What is a machinist you may ask?
    • Definitions
        • A machinist is a person young or old, man or woman, who is able to set up and operate all of the common conventional machine shop equipment as well as CNC machines to shape and form raw materials like steel, into useful products.
        • A machine operator is one who merely operates a particular machine, basically putting parts in and taking parts out while occasionally changing tooling and fixtures.
    • Machines used by the Machinist
    • CNC – Computer Numerical Control
    • A Machinist Has Something to do with nearly Everything
      • Nearly everything you come into contact with has been created, made, or modified by a machinist, machine operator, tool & die worker or mold maker
        • The watch you are wearing was produced by machines made by machine operators or machinists
        • The glasses you are wearing were made in a plastic mold made by a tool and die worker or mold maker
        • The clothes you are wearing were made on a sewing machine that was made by a machine operator in a manufacturing firm
        • The building you are in right now was made by heavy machinery equipment that was manufactured by machine operators and machinists
        • The car you drive contains parts produced by machinists
    • What a Machinist Makes
      • Gears
      • Sprockets
      • Tools
      • Machines/Machine parts
      • Shafts
      • Molds
      • Punch dies
      • Engines/Engine parts
      • Basically anything made of steel, plastic, nylon, copper, brass…
    • Pro Stock Truck Chassis
    • Pro Stock Truck
    • Pro Stock Truck Machined Parts
    • Skills USA
    • Who Makes a Good Machinist?
      • Those who select the machine tool field as a career are usually people who think more concretely, they like things black or white, they like facts and numbers more than theory
      • They like to work with their hands
        • Statistics show that 50-60% of secondary and post-secondary students are Kinesthetic learners (they learn primarily by their hands)
    • FACTS
      • Working conditions
        • Most shops are relatively clean, well lit, and ventilated. This is due primarily to the fact that the newer CNC (computer numerical controlled) machines must be in a clean shop…remember that they are computer controlled and highly precise machines
      • Hours worked
        • Normally, the machinist/machine operator will work 40 -50 hours per week but it is due primarily to how much work the company has and when they promised to have it done
      • Education
        • Many companies prefer that their employees have at least a 2-year diploma or degree at a community and technical college like ECTC. The training that they receive prepares them to read prints , measure their parts to precise dimensions, calculate trigonometric functions, operate a computer using CAD, CAM, CNC software to design and draw the part to be created in the shop, operate any manually operated machine in the typical shop, and operate any CNC machine available.
    • Machinist/Tool and Die Apprentice
      • Occasionally, our students may gain a position at a company as an apprentice
      • A machinist or tool and die apprentice works at a company while attending school weekly:
        • 4 years on the job performing a variety of machining operations
          • 8000 total work hours
        • Attend class, KMA or NTMA, once a week
          • 576 hours (Our classes at ECTC satisfy this criteria)
        • Receive a journeyman's card at the completion
      • Employment locations
        • Small job shops – E-Town Machine and Tool, Central KY Machine and Tool, Synergy…
        • Large manufacturing firms – Dana Corp, Akebono, Toyotomi…
        • Automotive machine shops – AMS, B & R…
        • Airline or automotive manufacturing – Boeing, Ford, GM…
        • Start your own shop – CT Technology, Clinton Industries, Avis Machine, Efficiency Machine
    • Job Outlook
      • Job outlook – despite relatively slow employment growth, job opportunities for machinists continue to be good. The number of students obtaining the skills and knowledge necessary to fill machinist jobs is expected to be less than the number of job openings arising each year from those retiring (during the next 3-5 years, approximately 40% of your skilled labor force will retire).
    • The Numbers!
      • Companies, machines, workers – Approximately 126,000 U.S. companies that use machine tools have about 2 million machine tools and 750,000 to 1,000,000 directly related employees.
    • Earnings
      • Earnings – According to the U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, the median hourly earnings for machinists was $17.22 ($35,815 annually) per hour in May 2009 with the top 10% making over $25.31 ($52,641 annually) per hour.
    • Fall 2009 Statistics:
      • Elizabethtown
        • Average salary for Machinist 1 - $31,661 annually ($15.22 per hour)
          • $48,479 with benefits
        • Average salary for Machinist 2 - $37,882 annually ($18.21 per hour)
          • $56,981 with benefits
        • Average salary for Senior Machinist - $43,520 annually ($20.92 per hour)
          • $64,612 with benefits
    • Fall 2009 Statistics:
      • Bowling Green
        • Average salary for Machinist 1 - $30,930 annually ($14.87 per hour)
          • $47,483 with benefits
        • Average salary for Machinist 2 - $37,007 annually ($17.79 per hour)
          • $55,788 with benefits
        • Average salary for Senior Machinist - $42,516 annually ($22.44 per hour)
          • $63,244 with benefits
    • Fall 2009 Statistics:
      • Louisville
        • Average salary for Machinist 1 - $34,407 annually ($16.54 per hour)
          • $52,220 with benefits
        • Average salary for Machinist 2 - $41,166 annually ($19.79 per hour)
          • $61,460 with benefits
        • Average salary for Senior Machinist - $47,294 annually ($22.74 per hour)
          • $69,793 with benefits
    • Fall 2009 Statistics:
      • Bardstown
        • Average salary for Machinist 1 - $32,461 annually ($15.61 per hour)
          • $49,570 with benefits
        • Average salary for Machinist 2 - $38,839 annually ($18.67 per hour)
          • $58,286 with benefits
        • Average salary for Senior Machinist – $44,620 annually ($21.45 per hour)
          • $66,110 with benefits
    • CHARMILLES STATISTICS:
      • ANNUAL INCOME FOR THE FOLLOWING:
        • Precision machinists or toolmaker - $54,000
        • All workers with Master’s Degree - $47,000
        • All workers with Bachelor’s Degree - $37,000
        • All workers with Associate’s Degree - $27,000
        • All workers with some college, no degree - $22,000
        • All workers with 4 years high school - $21,000
        • All workers with less that a high school degree - $12,000
    • ECTC Machine Tool Technology
      • Diploma Requirements
      • Semester #1
        • MTT114 - ‘Fundamentals of Machine Tools’
        • MAT116 (or MAT1126) Technical Math
        • BRX110 - ‘Blueprint Reading for the Machinist’
        • CIS100 - ‘Introduction to Computers’
        • MTT118 - ‘Metrology and Control Charts’
      • Semester #2
        • MTT124 - ‘Applied Machining’
        • MTT134 - ‘Manual Programming’
        • Gen. Education / Applied Academics Elective
      • Semester #3
        • MTT230 - ‘Conversational Programming’
        • MTT214 - ‘Industrial Machining’
        • BRX210 - ‘Mechanical Blueprint Reading’
      • Semester #4
        • MTT240 - ‘3-D Programming’
        • MTT224 - ‘Advanced Industrial Machining’
        • MTT299 - ‘Cooperative Education’ (or) IE Core or Mathematics Elective
      • AAS Degree Requirements
        • All previously listed machine tool classes plus:
          • Eng 101 – Writing I 3 hours
          • Heritage/Humanities 3 hours
          • Science 3 hours
          • Social Interaction 3 hours
        • Total Hours for AAS Degree 64-69 hours
    • Fox 41 News Report 1 October 10, 2011
    • Fox 41 News Report 2 October 10, 2011
    • Questions?
      • Questions or comments concerning machining or manufacturing?
    • Conclusion
      • If you are looking for a good, respectable trade where you can make things, create things, modify things that effect everyone in our society, then you want to be a machinist, machine operator, tool and die worker, mold maker, or someone in manufacturing
      • Please contact – Grant Logsdon
        • Office – 270-706-8687
        • Cell – 502-836-7576