Social networking and web 2 guidelines

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Talk given on 21 May 2010 for UCL 'Digital Humanities' event

Talk given on 21 May 2010 for UCL 'Digital Humanities' event

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  • As a web application you can integrate and use social networking software and use some of the ’plug in’ code snippets and widgets (utilities) designed for blog and web pages. Many of these

Transcript

  • 1. Social Networking + Web 2.0 guidelines
  • 2. Web 2.0 - ‘social web’?
    • Tools for communication and collaboration
    • User-generated content + feedback and interaction
    • Group formation
  • 3. Common examples
    • social networking
    • blogs
    • wikis
    • social bookmarking
    • media sharing
    • ‘ micro-blogging’
  • 4. Why in education?
    • a route to better collaborative working and participation even in ‘traditional’ settings
    already in our students’ social lives part of students’ post-university professional practice in all subjects
  • 5.
    • ‘ Web 2.0’ services :
      • wiki (Confluence)
      • blogging (Wordpress)
      • podcasting
      • video applications
    • Moodle – some web 2.0 features - basic blogging, wiki, RSS, student-generated material – will get better
    • MyPortfolio – student owned, multimedia, Facebook-style ‘groups’
    Web 2.0 UCL services MyPortfolio
  • 6. Web 2.0 + Moodle + MyPortfolio
  • 7. Web 2.0 + Moodle Contact LTSS if you want to know how to do this
  • 8. But UCL applications may be thought to lack
    • Flexibility
    • Functionality
    • Attractiveness
    • Dynamic interfaces
    • Novelty
    • Coolness - a big part of appeal to both educators and staff.
  • 9. And external services usually
  • 10. Going ‘off piste’
    • risk
    • service provision
    • legal liability (data protection, © )
    • UCL regulations
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/op_timus/471658053/
  • 11. Service provision A pink cross means that the company is dead now while green circles mark companies that got acquired. http://www.labnol.org/internet/chart-of-internet-companies-that-vanished/8619/
  • 12. Copyright and content
    • Confidentiality / ownership of data
    • Copyright
    • UCL licensed content
    • UCL Computing Regs (2007)
    • Easy ‘take down’ for unacceptable content
  • 13. Data Protection
    • ‘ Personal data held by UCL’ or an organisation providing services on behalf of UCL e.g. email address, name, address, personal interests etc
    UCL Data Protection Policy http://www.flickr.com/photos/bixentro/346558163/
  • 14. Accessibility
    • UCL services should be ‘reasonably’ available to disabled individuals (dyslexic, visually/ hearing impaired etc)
    • How accessible are Web 2.0 services?
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/henryfaber/28058869/
  • 15. UCL Assessment regulations
    • Retention of students’ assessed work
    • Security
      • how to ensure that no changes can be made
      • visibility of assessed work to other students,
      • impact of possible loss of externally stored materials.
  • 16. Quick tips
    • Reduce your risk
      • Consider UCL alternatives
      • Read the small print
      • Warn students its not a UCL service
      • Make it optional
  • 17. Moving on to Web 2.0?
    • email [email_address]
    • phone 34431
    • twitter @CliveYoung
    • these slides on
    • www.ucl.ac.uk/ltss-blog
    • and