Engaging Digital Natives

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I used this PowerPoint during my "Engaging Digital Natives with Web 2.0" presentation at PETE&C 2007.

I used this PowerPoint during my "Engaging Digital Natives with Web 2.0" presentation at PETE&C 2007.

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  • http://tinytube.net/my/setup_search

    this site is a prime example of Digital Natives-- they offer watching videos on phones well before any of the sites they let you take from even have woken up to mobile video

    youtube only went properly mobile on March 2008 (non iphone) --
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  • The next few slides are really good summary of what podcast is and how to make them. Useful very useful.
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  • I love this slide. But can you give me the citation for this? I want to research further.

    Share one concern through a short story.

    A friend of mine shared an article once about Indian IT workers and their family life. It seems that Indian IT professionals are emotionally less literate and has lesser patience. Why? It's because they deal with machines most of the time and get a more predictable feedback than when dealing with people. That is why they have problem dealing with their wives or with their kids. They are said to have problems being a parent.

    I don't know from where he read this, I am surely intrigued by this. If this story is true, can it mean that our kids will become less emotionally literate due to being Digital Natives?

    Will they become less human?
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  • I like this slide.

    Nomadic Grazing Patterns: I think of a cow eating grass owned by a nomadic tribe in India.

    Question:
    They prefer graphics before text? Is there a study or research supporting this claim? I the Digital Immigrant also prefer this. Especially during conferences when most people dump their text onto their powerpoints and hurt my head watching it.

    I think this preference is not unique to Digital Natives.
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  • In what ways are my language (I am a Digital Immigrant) outdated? Are you talking about computer language?

    What is this new language of the Digital Natives?

    In what sense are you using the word 'language' here?

    Please make me understand.
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  • Tim O'Reilly is the founder and CEO of O'Reilly Media, Inc., thought by many to be the best computer book publisher in the world, and an activist for open standards. O'Reilly Media also publishes online through the O'Reilly Network and hosts conferences on technology topics, including the O'Reilly Open Source Convention, the O'Reilly Emerging Technology Conference, and the Web 2.0 Conference.
  • We can no longer claim that the US educational results are unparalleled. Students around the world outperform American students on assessments that measure 21st century skills. Today’s teachers need better tools to address this growing concern.
    Innovation and creativity no longer sets US education apart. Innovators around the world rival Americans in breakthroughs that fuel economic competitiveness.
    Today,every student, whether he/she plans to go on to a 4-year college, trade school, or entry-level job, requires 21st century skills to succeed. We need to ensure that all students are qualified to succeed in work and life skills in this global economy. Teachers need the training to empower them to transmit these skills through their instruction.
  • Don Tapscott (author of Growing Up Digital and Wikinomics: How Mass Collaboration Changes Everything)
  • Don Tapscott – (author of Growing Up Digital and Wikinomics: How Mass Collaboration Changes Everything)
    Will Richardson – (author of Blogs, Wikis, Podcasts, and Other Powerful Web Tools for Classrooms, weblogg-ed blog, numerous articles, etc.)
  • Today’s students have not just changed incrementally from those of the past, nor simply changed their slang, clothes, body adornments, or styles, as has happened between generations previously. A really big discontinuity has taken place. One might even call it a “singularity” – an event which changes things so fundamentally that there is absolutely no going back. This so-called “singularity” is the arrival and rapid dissemination of digital technology in the last decades of the 20th century.
  • But whether or not this is literally true, we can say with certainty that their thinking patterns have changed.
  • Some refer to them as the N-[for Net]-gen or D-[for digital]-gen.
    The importance of the distinction is this: As Digital Immigrants learn – like all immigrants, some better than others – to adapt to their environment, they always retain, to some degree, their "accent," that is, their foot in the past.
    The “digital immigrant accent” can be seen in such things as turning to the Internet for information second rather than first, or in reading the manual for a program rather than assuming that the program itself will teach us to use it. Today’s older folk were "socialized" differently from their kids, and are now in the process of learning a new language. And a language learned later in life, scientists tell us, goes into a different part of the brain.
  • There are hundreds of examples of the digital immigrant accent. They include printing out your email (or having your secretary print it out for you – an even “thicker” accent); needing to print out a document written on the computer in order to edit it (rather than just editing on the screen); and bringing people physically into your office to see an interesting web site (rather than just sending them the URL). I’m sure you can think of one or two examples of your own without much effort. My own favorite example is the “Did you get my email?” phone call. Those of us who are Digital Immigrants can, and should, laugh at ourselves and our “accent.”
  • Tim O'Reilly is the founder and CEO of O'Reilly Media, Inc., thought by many to be the best computer book publisher in the world, and an activist for open standards. O'Reilly Media also publishes online through the O'Reilly Network and hosts conferences on technology topics, including the O'Reilly Open Source Convention, the O'Reilly Emerging Technology Conference, and the Web 2.0 Conference.
  • To counteract the New WWW's potentially harmful impact on youth, educators must use technology to create learning experiences that are real, rich, and relevant
  • Confronting the Challenges of a Participatory Culture: Media Education for the 21st Century
    -Henry Jenkins, Director of the Comparative Media Studies Program at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology
    -The MacArthur Foundation
  • Not every member must contribute, but all must believe they are free to contribute when ready and that what they contribute will be appropriately valued.
    -In such a world, many will only dabble, some will dig deeper, and still others will master the skills that are most valued within
    the community.
    -The community itself, however, provides strong incentives for creative expression and active participation.
    -Historically, we have valued creative writing or art classes because they help to identify and train future writers and artists, but also because the creative process is valuable on its own; every child deserves the chance to express him- or herself through words, sounds, and images, even if most will never write, perform, or draw professionally.
    -Having these experiences, we believe, changes the way youth think about themselves and alters the way they look at work created by others.
  • According to a 2005 study conducted by the Pew Internet and American Life project (Lenhardt & Madden, 2005), more than one-half of all American teens—and 57 percent of teens who use the Internet—could be considered media creators. For the purpose of the study, a media creator is someone who created a blog or webpage, posted original artwork, photography, stories or videos online or remixed online content into their own new creations. Most have done two or more of these activities. One-third of teens share what they create online with others, 22 percent have their own websites, 19 percent blog, and 19 percent remix online content.
    Contrary to popular stereotypes, these activities are not restricted to white suburban males. In fact, urban youth (40 percent) are somewhat more likely than their suburban (28 percent) or rural (38 percent) counterparts to be media creators. Girls aged 15-17 (27 percent) are more likely than boys their age (17 percent) to be involved with blogging or other social activities online.The Pew researchers found no significant differences in participation by race-ethnicity.
  • Access to this participatory culture functions as a new form of the hidden curriculum, shaping which youth will succeed and which will be left behind as they enter school and the workplace
  • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blog on 12/17/2005
  • RSS Explained
    Think of subscribing via RSS as subscribing to a newspaper. Before you subscribed you had to walk/drive/roller-skate to your local news stand and buy a paper. You could do this every day, but if you forgot then that day was lost.Once you subscribed it just showed up at your door everyday. You didn't have to remember to go get it, and when a paper showed up on your doorstep you could keep it until you were done with it.In a nutshell, RSS took a media where you had to PULL the content from websites and changed it so that your favorite sites could PUSH their content to you whenever they updated. It sounds subtle, but in practice it's a big difference in convenience.
    It is the syndication that allows for blogs to reach the wider audiences than static web sites. Blogs and RSS have transformed information gathering – finding information is no longer a problem . . . Evaluating and extending the learning is the new drive.
  • Homework
    For years there have been web-savvy teachers who posted their homework on a website for their students and parents. This can still be done with blogs, and with many services teachers can post assignments daily with no knowledge of html, css, rss, and other random combinations of letters
    Keep Parents in the Loop
    Of course parents often like to know more about what's going on in your class than just "Do #s 2-106 on page 42." A teacher's blog could become an online newsletter that discusses all kinds of notable events such as units, scans of student work, field trip information and permission slips, and more.
    Virtual Inservice
    Many teachers have decided to use their blogs as a forum for sharing their views on educational psychology, technology, and so on. Other teachers have the power to post comments in each others' blogs or even write larger responses in their own blogs. The result is a series of conversations where teachers share their knowledge and experiences with each other where everyone comes out better informed at the end.
    This week in class, we...
    Some teachers encourage students to work as a group on a single blog, resulting in a sort of online newspaper where different students work on different articles. Knowing that their audience is now not just the teacher but the entire world, students often end up going above and beyond what they would ever do if they just had to submit a report, two pages, double spaced, MLA format.Student Work
    Along the same lines, each student could have their own blog where they can post their assignments. The teacher and classmates could then comment on each student's work, providing concrete evidence of class participation.
  • http://blogging101.wikispaces.com/whywhynot
  • http://blogging101.wikispaces.com/whywhynot
  • http://blogging101.wikispaces.com/bloggersbeware
  • Blogger - http://www.blogger.com/This is a great service (owned by Google) that allows anyone to create and customize a blog. While it's designed so anyone can get started it also has enough versatility for the truly geeky to get almost everything out of it that they want. (audioblogger)
    Blogmeister - http://classblogmeister.com/Many blogging services are turned down by schools or teachers because adults loose a certain level of control over the students. After all, bogging students have a global forum where they can say whatever they want. With Blogmeister (from the brilliant mind of David Warlick), all student postings and comments do not go "live" to the internet unless a teacher approves them.
    NovemberLearning - http://nlcommunities.com/Alan November's blogging service. Used to be free for educators, but will begin charging soon. Has support for photo albums built in to it. Designed for educators, but doesn't really have any significant features tailored to using it in an educational setting (like Blogmeister)
    Edublogs - http://edublogs.org/James Farmer's Wordpress Multiuser offering to educators. Any teacher can get a free blog there. There are several themes to choose from. It is essentially a standard Wordpress installation, which is the blog engine of choice for many edubloggers because of it's powerful features and open source code. While the name is Edublogs, there are no features tailored specifically to using it in the educational environement. James also offers learnerblogs.org for students and uniblogs.org for university students and faculty.
  • Podcasts can also be used as formative or summative assessments.
  • Podcasting is a great tool in differentiating instruction.
  • http://jdorman.wikispaces.com/+Podcasting
  • "Wiki-wiki" means "hurry quick" in Hawaiian.
  • Import changes into an rss aggregator (bloglines)
  • Introducing wikis into the classroom provides a perfect vehicle for reinforcing or teaching students the importance of wide and reliable research, checking authors and sources, etc. Just as podcasting and blogging provides a vehicle for instructing students in copyright and fair use guidelines.
  • The Digital Divide Network is an online community of educators and policy makers who are seeking ways to narrow the gap between the Internet haves and have-nots.
  • Use wikis as formats for subject guides. “The great thing about that,” she says, “is that librarians would be creating the wiki themselves in concert with teachers.”
    Invite students and teachers to annotate your catalog on a wiki. “To students, the best advice comes from other students,” she says. “You could have kids write book reviews you could add to the catalog.”
    Make wikis meeting places for communities inside the school. For example, create a wiki as a kind of bulletin board, a repository for information that comes from the cafeteria, the principal’s office, students, teachers, and even parents.
    Link librarians in your district in a collaborative enterprise. When teaching in North Carolina, Rob Lucas set up a model for such a site. His Teachers Lounge is a wiki where first-year teachers can share lesson plans. Farkas’s libsuccess.org is another fine model.
  • http://ssad.bowdoin.edu:8668/space/snipsnap-index
  • http://www.wikispaces.com/site/for/teachers100K
  • http://jdorman.wikispaces.com/Social+Learning
  • http://jdorman.wikispaces.com/Social+Learning
  • http://del.icio.us/
  • http://stu.dicio.us/
  • http://stu.dicio.us/
  • http://www.furl.net/
  • http://www.blinklist.com/
  • http://www.blinklist.com/
  • http://www.stumbleupon.com/
  • http://www.digg.com/
  • http://www.diigo.com/
  • http://groups.diigo.com/groups/edn
  • http://www.gradefix.com/
  • http://www.mynoteit.com/
  • http://www.backpackit.com/
  • http://www.schoopy.com/
  • http://wizlite.com/
  • http://notemesh.com
  • http://www.pageflakes.com
  • http://www.43things.com/
  • http://www.flickr.com
  • http://www.flickr.com

Transcript

  • 1. Engaging DigitalEngaging Digital NativesNatives Examining 21Examining 21stst century literacies and theircentury literacies and their implications for teaching in the digital age.implications for teaching in the digital age. Jennifer Carrier DormanJennifer Carrier Dorman http://jdorman.wikispaces.com/Conferenceshttp://jdorman.wikispaces.com/Conferences
  • 2. http://jdorman.wikispaces.com/Conferenceshttp://jdorman.wikispaces.com/Conferences
  • 3. We are at a turning point inWe are at a turning point in the tech industry andthe tech industry and perhaps even in the historyperhaps even in the history of the worldof the world Tim O’Reilly – Feb. 14 2006Tim O’Reilly – Feb. 14 2006
  • 4. The Case for 21The Case for 21stst Century EducationCentury Education  Education is changing.Education is changing.  Competition is changing internationally.Competition is changing internationally.  The workplace, jobs, and skill demands areThe workplace, jobs, and skill demands are changing.changing.
  • 5. ImplicationsImplications  These changes, among others, are ushering us toward a worldThese changes, among others, are ushering us toward a world where knowledge, power, and productive capability will bewhere knowledge, power, and productive capability will be more dispersed than at any time in our history—a world wheremore dispersed than at any time in our history—a world where value creation will be fast, fluid, and persistently disruptive.value creation will be fast, fluid, and persistently disruptive.  A world where only the connected will survive.A world where only the connected will survive.  A power shift is underway, and a tough new business rule isA power shift is underway, and a tough new business rule is emerging: Harness the new collaboration or perish.emerging: Harness the new collaboration or perish.  Those who fail to grasp this will find themselves ever moreThose who fail to grasp this will find themselves ever more isolated—cut off from the networks that are sharing, adapting,isolated—cut off from the networks that are sharing, adapting, and updating knowledge to create value.and updating knowledge to create value.
  • 6. Implications for SchoolsImplications for Schools  For smart schools [companies], the rising tide of massFor smart schools [companies], the rising tide of mass collaboration offers vast opportunity…Schools [Companies]collaboration offers vast opportunity…Schools [Companies] can reach beyond their walls to sow the seeds of innovationcan reach beyond their walls to sow the seeds of innovation and harvest a bountiful crop.and harvest a bountiful crop.  Indeed, educators [firms] that cultivate nimble, trust-basedIndeed, educators [firms] that cultivate nimble, trust-based relationships with external collaborators are positioned to formrelationships with external collaborators are positioned to form vibrant classroom [business] ecosystems that enhance learningvibrant classroom [business] ecosystems that enhance learning [create value] more effectively than hierarchically organized[create value] more effectively than hierarchically organized schools [businesses].schools [businesses].  (edits by Will Richardson, original words in brackets)(edits by Will Richardson, original words in brackets)
  • 7. Digital NativesDigital Natives
  • 8. Digital NativesDigital Natives  It is now clear that as a result of thisIt is now clear that as a result of this ubiquitous information environment and theubiquitous information environment and the sheer volume of their interaction with it,sheer volume of their interaction with it, today’s studentstoday’s students think and process informationthink and process information fundamentally differentlyfundamentally differently from theirfrom their predecessors.predecessors.  Marc Prensky – “Digital Natives, DigitalMarc Prensky – “Digital Natives, Digital Immigrants” 2001Immigrants” 2001
  • 9. Digital NativesDigital Natives  ““Different kinds of experiences lead toDifferent kinds of experiences lead to different brain structures” - Dr. Bruce D. Berrydifferent brain structures” - Dr. Bruce D. Berry of Baylor College of Medicine.of Baylor College of Medicine.  it is very likely thatit is very likely that our students’ brains haveour students’ brains have physically changedphysically changed – and are different from ours –– and are different from ours – as a result of how they grew upas a result of how they grew up
  • 10. Who are the digital natives?Who are the digital natives?  Our students today are all “native speakers”Our students today are all “native speakers” of the digital language of computers, videoof the digital language of computers, video games, instantaneous communication, andgames, instantaneous communication, and the Internet.the Internet.  Those of us who were not born into theThose of us who were not born into the digital world but have, at some later point indigital world but have, at some later point in our lives, become fascinated by and adoptedour lives, become fascinated by and adopted many or most aspects of the new technologymany or most aspects of the new technology areare Digital ImmigrantsDigital Immigrants..
  • 11. The ChallengeThe Challenge  Our Digital Immigrant instructors, who speakOur Digital Immigrant instructors, who speak an outdated language (that of the pre-digitalan outdated language (that of the pre-digital age), are struggling to teach a population thatage), are struggling to teach a population that speaks an entirely new languagespeaks an entirely new language
  • 12. The Nomadic Grazing Patterns ofThe Nomadic Grazing Patterns of Digital NativesDigital Natives  Digital Natives are used to receivingDigital Natives are used to receiving information really fast.information really fast.  They like to parallel process and multi-task.They like to parallel process and multi-task.  They prefer their graphicsThey prefer their graphics beforebefore their texttheir text rather than the opposite.rather than the opposite.
  • 13. The Nomadic Grazing Patterns ofThe Nomadic Grazing Patterns of Digital NativesDigital Natives  They prefer random access (like hypertext).They prefer random access (like hypertext).  They function best when networked.They function best when networked.  They thrive on instant gratification andThey thrive on instant gratification and frequent rewards.frequent rewards.  They prefer games to “serious” work.They prefer games to “serious” work.
  • 14. MethodologyMethodology  Today’s teachers have to learn to communicateToday’s teachers have to learn to communicate in the language and style of their students.in the language and style of their students.  ThisThis doesn’tdoesn’t mean changing the meaning of whatmean changing the meaning of what is important, or of good thinking skills.is important, or of good thinking skills.
  • 15. Web 2.0Web 2.0
  • 16. What is Web 2.0?What is Web 2.0?  Web 2.0 is a term often applied to a perceivedWeb 2.0 is a term often applied to a perceived ongoing transition of the World Wide Webongoing transition of the World Wide Web from a collection of static websites to a full-from a collection of static websites to a full- fledged computing platform serving webfledged computing platform serving web applications to end users.applications to end users.  Tim O’ReillyTim O’Reilly
  • 17. Web 2.0Web 2.0  Static content transformed by dynamicStatic content transformed by dynamic participationparticipation  CommunitiesCommunities  NetworksNetworks  Read/writeRead/write
  • 18. The New WWWThe New WWW  WhateverWhatever  WheneverWhenever  WhereverWherever  Tom March, Web-based educator, author, andTom March, Web-based educator, author, and instructional designerinstructional designer
  • 19. The New WWWThe New WWW  The New WWW—offering usThe New WWW—offering us whateverwhatever wewe want,want, wheneverwhenever andand whereverwherever we want it—we want it— may seem like just an extension of ourmay seem like just an extension of our already-technology-enhanced contemporaryalready-technology-enhanced contemporary lifelife
  • 20. Confronting theConfronting the Challenges of aChallenges of a Participatory CultureParticipatory Culture Media Education for the 21Media Education for the 21stst CenturyCentury
  • 21.  “If it were possible to define generally the mission of education, it could be said that its fundamental purpose is to ensure that all students benefit from learning in ways that allow them to participate fully in public, community, [Creative] and economic life.” — New London Group (2000, p. 9)
  • 22. Participatory CultureParticipatory Culture  According to a recent study from the Pew Internet & American Life project (Lenhardt & Madden, 2005), more than one-half of all teens have created media content, and roughly one- third of teens who use the Internet have shared content they produced.
  • 23. A Participatory Culture . . .A Participatory Culture . . .  With relatively low barriers to artistic expression and civic engagement  With strong support for creating and sharing one’s creations with others  With some type of informal mentorship whereby what is known by the most experienced is passed along to novices  Where members believe that their contributions matter  Where members feel some degree of social connection with one another (at the least they care what other people think about what they have created)
  • 24. Forms of Participatory CultureForms of Participatory Culture  Affiliations — memberships, formal and informal, in online communities centered around various forms of media, such as Friendster, Facebook, message boards, metagaming, game clans, or MySpace  Expressions — producing new creative forms, such as digital sampling, skinning and modding, fan videomaking, fan fiction writing, zines, mash-ups
  • 25. Forms of Participatory CultureForms of Participatory Culture  Collaborative Problem-solving — working together in teams, formal and informal, to complete tasks and develop new knowledge (such as through Wikipedia, alternative reality gaming, spoiling).  Circulations — Shaping the flow of media (such as podcasting, blogging).
  • 26. ImplicationsImplications  A growing body of scholarship suggests potential benefits of these forms of participatory culture, including:  opportunities for peer-to-peer learning,  a changed attitude toward intellectual property,  the diversification of cultural expression,  the development of skills valued in the modern workplace, and a more empowered conception of citizenship.
  • 27. ImplicationsImplications  Participatory culture shifts the focus of literacy from one of individual expression to community involvement.  The new literacies almost all involve social skills developed through collaboration and networking.  These skills build on the foundation of traditional literacy, research skills, technical skills, and critical analysis skills taught in the classroom.
  • 28. The New LiteraciesThe New Literacies  Play — the capacity to experiment with one’s surroundings as a form of problem-solving  Performance — the ability to adopt alternative identities for the purpose of improvisation and discovery  Simulation — the ability to interpret and construct dynamic models of real-world processes  Appropriation — the ability to meaningfully sample and remix media content
  • 29. The New LiteraciesThe New Literacies  Multitasking — the ability to scan one’s environment and shift focus as needed to salient details.  Distributed Cognition — the ability to interact meaningfully with tools that expand mental capacities  Collective Intelligence — the ability to pool knowledge and compare notes with others toward a common goal  Judgment — the ability to evaluate the reliability and credibility of different information sources
  • 30. The New LiteraciesThe New Literacies  Transmedia Navigation — the ability to follow the flow of stories and information across multiple modalities  Networking — the ability to search for, synthesize, and disseminate information  Negotiation — the ability to travel across diverse communities, discerning and respecting multiple perspectives, and grasping and following alternative norms.
  • 31. BlogsBlogs
  • 32. BlogsBlogs  A blog is a website for which an individual or a groupA blog is a website for which an individual or a group frequently generates text, photographs, video or audiofrequently generates text, photographs, video or audio files, and/or links, typically (but not always) on a dailyfiles, and/or links, typically (but not always) on a daily basis.basis.  The term is a shortened form of weblog.The term is a shortened form of weblog.  Authoring a blog, maintaining a blog or adding an article to anAuthoring a blog, maintaining a blog or adding an article to an existing blog is called "blogging".existing blog is called "blogging".  Individual articles on a blog are called "blog posts," "posts," orIndividual articles on a blog are called "blog posts," "posts," or "entries"."entries".  The person who posts these entries is called a "blogger".The person who posts these entries is called a "blogger".
  • 33. Why the sudden popularity of blogs?Why the sudden popularity of blogs?  RSS - Really Simple SyndicationRSS - Really Simple Syndication
  • 34. RSS Aggregator – BloglinesRSS Aggregator – Bloglines
  • 35. Blogs in School?Blogs in School?  Blogs are tools, and like any tools they can beBlogs are tools, and like any tools they can be used or misused.used or misused.  Misuse occurs more often when there's a lack ofMisuse occurs more often when there's a lack of instruction. (MySpace, Xanga, Facebook)instruction. (MySpace, Xanga, Facebook)  Interactivity, publishing, collectiveInteractivity, publishing, collective intelligenceintelligence
  • 36. Blogs in SchoolBlogs in School Teacher BlogsTeacher Blogs  HomeworkHomework  Keep Parents in theKeep Parents in the LoopLoop  Virtual InserviceVirtual Inservice  ProfessionalProfessional collaborationcollaboration Student BlogsStudent Blogs  This week in class, we...This week in class, we...  Student WorkStudent Work  Online portfolioOnline portfolio  Peer/teacher feedbackPeer/teacher feedback
  • 37. Why Students Shouldn’t BlogWhy Students Shouldn’t Blog  People will read it.People will read it.  People might not like it.People might not like it.  They might share test answers with others.They might share test answers with others.  They might be found by a child predator onlineThey might be found by a child predator online  They might write something inappropriate.They might write something inappropriate.  They might find something inappropriate.They might find something inappropriate.  They might get other students to start blogging.They might get other students to start blogging. http://blogging101.wikispaces.com/whywhynot
  • 38. Why Students Should BlogWhy Students Should Blog  People will read it.People will read it.  They might like it.They might like it.  They might share what they've learned with others.They might share what they've learned with others.  They might participate in a collaborative learning project.They might participate in a collaborative learning project.  They might become inspired to learn.They might become inspired to learn.  They might inspire others to learn.They might inspire others to learn.  They might get other students to start blogging.They might get other students to start blogging.  If they don't talk in class, they might on a blog.If they don't talk in class, they might on a blog. http://blogging101.wikispaces.com/whywhynot
  • 39. Daily ScribeDaily Scribe
  • 40. Classroom ExtensionsClassroom Extensions
  • 41. Tips for BloggingTips for Blogging http://blogging101.wikispaces.com/bloggersbeware
  • 42. Blog Hosting for SchoolsBlog Hosting for Schools  Blogmeister -Blogmeister - http://http://classblogmeister.comclassblogmeister.com//  Edublogs -Edublogs - http://http://edublogs.orgedublogs.org//
  • 43. PodcastsPodcasts
  • 44. PodcastsPodcasts  iPod + Broadcast = PodcastiPod + Broadcast = Podcast  Amateur radioAmateur radio  Podcasting is the method of distributingPodcasting is the method of distributing multimedia files, such as audio programs ormultimedia files, such as audio programs or music videos, over the Internet using either themusic videos, over the Internet using either the RSS or Atom syndication formats, for playbackRSS or Atom syndication formats, for playback on mobile devices and personal computers.on mobile devices and personal computers.
  • 45. Why use podcasts?Why use podcasts?  Podcasts enable students to share theirPodcasts enable students to share their knowledge and expertise with others through aknowledge and expertise with others through a creative outlet.creative outlet.  Podcasts tap into a mode of media input that isPodcasts tap into a mode of media input that is commonplace for digital natives.commonplace for digital natives.  Podcasts empower students to formPodcasts empower students to form relationships with the content and each otherrelationships with the content and each other in relevant ways.in relevant ways.
  • 46. Why use podcasts?Why use podcasts?  Podcasting is yet another way for themPodcasting is yet another way for them [students] to be creating and contributing ideas[students] to be creating and contributing ideas to a larger conversation, and it’s a way ofto a larger conversation, and it’s a way of archiving that contribution for futurearchiving that contribution for future audiences to use.audiences to use.  Will Richardson,Will Richardson, Blogs, Wikis, Podcasts and OtherBlogs, Wikis, Podcasts and Other Powerful Web Tools for ClassroomsPowerful Web Tools for Classrooms
  • 47. How can podcasts be used?How can podcasts be used?  In the classroom, educators and students canIn the classroom, educators and students can use podcastsuse podcasts toto informinform others about classothers about class news, current events, and areas of interest.news, current events, and areas of interest.  Students can use a podcastStudents can use a podcast forum toforum to persuadepersuade their peers to help others, make atheir peers to help others, make a difference, or try something new.difference, or try something new.  Podcasts can also be used to edutain othersPodcasts can also be used to edutain others through creativethrough creative narrativesnarratives..
  • 48. How can podcasts be used?How can podcasts be used?  Podcasts engage students in thinking criticallyPodcasts engage students in thinking critically about their speaking fluency andabout their speaking fluency and communication skills.communication skills.  The opportunity to create a podcast about whatThe opportunity to create a podcast about what students would like to discuss and share withstudents would like to discuss and share with others is extremely motivating.others is extremely motivating.
  • 49. Other Enduring BenefitsOther Enduring Benefits  Along with the use of technology there are certainAlong with the use of technology there are certain responsibilities that educators and students need toresponsibilities that educators and students need to follow.follow.  Educators need to instruct students on safe and acceptableEducators need to instruct students on safe and acceptable use of technology in and outside of the classroom.use of technology in and outside of the classroom.  Not only do students need to learn how to appropriatelyNot only do students need to learn how to appropriately research, but also how to safely and properly shareresearch, but also how to safely and properly share information online.information online.  Podcasts allow students to learn first hand about copyrightPodcasts allow students to learn first hand about copyright laws and fair use issues.laws and fair use issues.
  • 50. Jumping in with both feet . . .Jumping in with both feet . . .  Listen to a few podcasts onlineListen to a few podcasts online  iTunes > Source List > Podcasts > EducationiTunes > Source List > Podcasts > Education  http://www.podcastalley.com/http://www.podcastalley.com/  http://www.ipodder.org/http://www.ipodder.org/  http://epnweb.org/http://epnweb.org/  http://www.jakeludington.com/archives/000405.htmlhttp://www.jakeludington.com/archives/000405.html (“Podcasting with Windows Media Player)(“Podcasting with Windows Media Player)  Get a feel for the genreGet a feel for the genre  Podcasts are not “polished” – production value isPodcasts are not “polished” – production value is secondary to the contentsecondary to the content
  • 51. Searching for Podcasts -Searching for Podcasts - iTunesiTunes
  • 52. Subscribing to PodcastsSubscribing to Podcasts
  • 53. Creating a PodcastCreating a Podcast 1.1. Write your script.Write your script. 2.2. Practice.Practice. 3.3. Record your audio file. (Record your audio file. (AudacityAudacity)) 4.4. Edit your audio (Effect > Normalize)Edit your audio (Effect > Normalize) 5.5. Add and credit legally useable music (Add and credit legally useable music (optionaloptional)) 6.6. File > Save Project.File > Save Project. 7.7. File > Export as MP3 > Edit ID3 TagsFile > Export as MP3 > Edit ID3 Tags 8.8. Upload the MP3 file to a web server. (Upload the MP3 file to a web server. (GCastGCast andand AudiobloggerAudioblogger))
  • 54. Audacity – Audio Editing SoftwareAudacity – Audio Editing Software  http://audacity.sourceforge.net/http://audacity.sourceforge.net/
  • 55. Publishing Your Podcasts - GCastPublishing Your Podcasts - GCast
  • 56. Pedagogy for PodcastingPedagogy for Podcasting  Education Podcast NetworkEducation Podcast Network  University of Wisconsin-Madison PodcastingUniversity of Wisconsin-Madison Podcasting  Pod PedagogyPod Pedagogy
  • 57. Online Podcasting ResourcesOnline Podcasting Resources http://jdorman.wikispaces.com/+Podcasting
  • 58. WikisWikis
  • 59. What is a Wiki?What is a Wiki?  AA wikiwiki is a type of website that allows usersis a type of website that allows users easily to add, remove, or otherwise edit andeasily to add, remove, or otherwise edit and change most available content.change most available content.
  • 60. How is a Wiki Constructed?How is a Wiki Constructed?  A single page in aA single page in a wikiwiki is referred to as a "wikiis referred to as a "wiki page", while the entire body of pages, whichpage", while the entire body of pages, which are usually highly interconnected viaare usually highly interconnected via hyperlinks, is "the wiki“hyperlinks, is "the wiki“  in effect, a wiki is actually a very simple, easy-to-in effect, a wiki is actually a very simple, easy-to- use user-maintained database for searching anduse user-maintained database for searching and creating information.creating information.
  • 61. Are Wikis Safe?Are Wikis Safe?  Wikis are generally designed with theWikis are generally designed with the philosophy of making it easy to correctphilosophy of making it easy to correct mistakes, rather than making it difficult tomistakes, rather than making it difficult to make them.make them.
  • 62. Are Wikis Safe?Are Wikis Safe?  Thus while wikis are very open, they provideThus while wikis are very open, they provide a means to verify the validity of recenta means to verify the validity of recent additions to the body of pages.additions to the body of pages.  The most prominent, on almost every wiki, is theThe most prominent, on almost every wiki, is the "Recent Changes" page—a specific list"Recent Changes" page—a specific list numbering recent edits, or a list of all the editsnumbering recent edits, or a list of all the edits made within a given timeframe.made within a given timeframe.
  • 63. Tracking ChangesTracking Changes
  • 64. Tracking ChangesTracking Changes
  • 65. Using Wikis as a SourceUsing Wikis as a Source  Wikipedia is as reliable as other external sourcesWikipedia is as reliable as other external sources we rely on.we rely on.  Properly written articles cite the sources, and aProperly written articles cite the sources, and a reader should rely on the Wikipedia article asreader should rely on the Wikipedia article as much, but no more, than the sources the articlemuch, but no more, than the sources the article relies on.relies on.  If an article doesn't cite a source, it may or may notIf an article doesn't cite a source, it may or may not be reliable.be reliable.  Students should never use information in a wikiStudents should never use information in a wiki until they have checked those external sources.until they have checked those external sources.
  • 66. What the Experts are SayingWhat the Experts are Saying  Wikis are helping young people developWikis are helping young people develop “writing skills and social skills by learning“writing skills and social skills by learning about group consensus and compromise—allabout group consensus and compromise—all the virtues you need to be a reasonable andthe virtues you need to be a reasonable and productive member of society.”productive member of society.”  Jimmy Wales, founder of WikipediaJimmy Wales, founder of Wikipedia
  • 67. What the Experts are SayingWhat the Experts are Saying  ““The media is controlled by people who haveThe media is controlled by people who have the resources to control it,” he says. “Wikisthe resources to control it,” he says. “Wikis show that all of us have an equal opportunityshow that all of us have an equal opportunity to contribute to knowledge.”to contribute to knowledge.”  Andy Garvin, head of the Digital Divide NetworkAndy Garvin, head of the Digital Divide Network
  • 68. Ways to Use WikisWays to Use Wikis  Use wikis as formats for subject guides.Use wikis as formats for subject guides.  Invite students and teachers to annotate yourInvite students and teachers to annotate your catalog on a wiki.catalog on a wiki.  Make wikis meeting places for communitiesMake wikis meeting places for communities inside the school.inside the school.  Link librarians and teachers in your district inLink librarians and teachers in your district in a collaborative enterprise.a collaborative enterprise.
  • 69. Class WikisClass Wikis
  • 70. Class Wikis – Online ContentClass Wikis – Online Content
  • 71. Class Wikis - WebquestsClass Wikis - Webquests
  • 72. Class Wikis - WebquestsClass Wikis - Webquests
  • 73. Class Wikis – Student CollaborationClass Wikis – Student Collaboration
  • 74. Class Wikis – Student CollaborationClass Wikis – Student Collaboration
  • 75. Class Wikis – Student CollaborationClass Wikis – Student Collaboration
  • 76. Class Wikis – Student CollaborationClass Wikis – Student Collaboration
  • 77. Professional Learning CommunitiesProfessional Learning Communities
  • 78. PLC – Professional ResearchPLC – Professional Research
  • 79. PLC – Virtual TrainingPLC – Virtual Training
  • 80. PLC – Curricular CollaborationPLC – Curricular Collaboration
  • 81. PLC – Supporting TeachersPLC – Supporting Teachers
  • 82. Links to Getting StartedLinks to Getting Started  Wiki Walk-ThroughWiki Walk-Through http://www.teachersfirst.com/content/wiki/http://www.teachersfirst.com/content/wiki/  What’s a wiki?What’s a wiki?  Who uses wikis?Who uses wikis?  Wikis or blogs?Wikis or blogs?  How to use wikis with students.How to use wikis with students.  Ideas for activities, projects, collaborations, etc.Ideas for activities, projects, collaborations, etc.  Using wikis in Education (blog) http://ikiw.org/Using wikis in Education (blog) http://ikiw.org/  Classroom use of wikisClassroom use of wikis http://www.teachinghacks.com/wiki/index.php?http://www.teachinghacks.com/wiki/index.php? title=Wikistitle=Wikis
  • 83. WikispacesWikispaces  Wikispaces is offering K-12 organizations theirWikispaces is offering K-12 organizations their premium membership for freepremium membership for free  No advertisementsNo advertisements  Greater storage capacityGreater storage capacity  Enhanced privacy settingsEnhanced privacy settings http://www.wikispaces.com/site/for/teachers100K
  • 84. NYT Magazine – December 3, 2006NYT Magazine – December 3, 2006  ““Open Source Spying” Clive ThompsonOpen Source Spying” Clive Thompson  The U.S.A. and other Western countries haveThe U.S.A. and other Western countries have embraced 21embraced 21stst century technologies such as blogscentury technologies such as blogs and wikis.and wikis.  ““Once the intelligence community has a robust andOnce the intelligence community has a robust and mature wiki and blog knowledge-sharing Webmature wiki and blog knowledge-sharing Web space . . . the nature of intelligence will changespace . . . the nature of intelligence will change forever.”forever.”
  • 85. SocialSocial LearningLearning http://jdorman.wikispaces.com/Social+Learning
  • 86. Social Learning – Web 2.0Social Learning – Web 2.0 http://jdorman.wikispaces.com/Social+Learning
  • 87. Del.icio.usDel.icio.us http://del.icio.us/
  • 88. Stu.dicio.usStu.dicio.us http://stu.dicio.us/
  • 89. Stu.dicio.us FeaturesStu.dicio.us Features  Note-takingNote-taking  Note commentingNote commenting  Note sharingNote sharing  Keyword link to Google and WikipediaKeyword link to Google and Wikipedia  To-Do ListsTo-Do Lists  ScheduleSchedule  Document storage/trackingDocument storage/tracking  Grade organizerGrade organizer  Privacy FeaturesPrivacy Features  RSS FeedsRSS Feeds  Integration with FacebookIntegration with Facebook  Social NetworkingSocial Networking http://stu.dicio.us/
  • 90. FurlFurl http://www.furl.net/
  • 91. BlinkListBlinkList http://www.blinklist.com/
  • 92. BlinkListBlinkList http://www.blinklist.com/static/classroom.php
  • 93. StumbleUponStumbleUpon http://www.stumbleupon.com/
  • 94. DiggDigg  Find an article, video, or podcast online and submit itFind an article, video, or podcast online and submit it to Digg.com. Your submission will immediatelyto Digg.com. Your submission will immediately appear in “Upcoming Stories,” where other membersappear in “Upcoming Stories,” where other members can find it and, if they like it, Digg it.can find it and, if they like it, Digg it.  Subscribe to RSS feeds of particular topics,Subscribe to RSS feeds of particular topics, popular/upcoming sections, individual users, and thepopular/upcoming sections, individual users, and the search terms of your choicesearch terms of your choice  Digg. Participate in the collaborative editorial processDigg. Participate in the collaborative editorial process by Digging the stuff that you like best.by Digging the stuff that you like best.  Build a friend list; then your friends can track whatBuild a friend list; then your friends can track what you’re Digging. They can also subscribe to an RSSyou’re Digging. They can also subscribe to an RSS feed of your submissions and/or your Diggs.feed of your submissions and/or your Diggs. http://www.digg.com/
  • 95. DiigoDiigo http://www.diigo.com/
  • 96. DiigoDiigo http://groups.diigo.com/groups/edn
  • 97. GradefixGradefix http://www.gradefix.com/
  • 98. GradefixGradefix
  • 99. mynoteITmynoteIT http://www.mynoteit.com/
  • 100. BackpackBackpack http://www.backpackit.com/
  • 101. SchoopySchoopy http://www.schoopy.com/
  • 102. WizliteWizlite  Wizlite is a tool allowing users toWizlite is a tool allowing users to collaboratively highlight important passagescollaboratively highlight important passages on pages on the Internet.on pages on the Internet.  Users can organize in groups and attach notesUsers can organize in groups and attach notes to their selections.to their selections.  Wizlite is activated by a bookmarklet orWizlite is activated by a bookmarklet or Firefox toolbar extension.Firefox toolbar extension.  Wizlite is great for many applications, such asWizlite is great for many applications, such as topic discovery (e.g. for talks) or reviewing.topic discovery (e.g. for talks) or reviewing. http://wizlite.com/
  • 103. NoteMeshNoteMesh  NoteMesh is a free service that allows collegeNoteMesh is a free service that allows college students in the same classes to share notes with eachstudents in the same classes to share notes with each other.other.  It works by creating a wiki for individual classes thatIt works by creating a wiki for individual classes that users can edit.users can edit.  Users are free to post their own lecture notes orUsers are free to post their own lecture notes or contribute to existing lecture notes.contribute to existing lecture notes.  The idea is that users in the same class canThe idea is that users in the same class can collaboratively create a definitive source for lecturecollaboratively create a definitive source for lecture notes.notes. http://notemesh.com
  • 104. PageFlakesPageFlakes http://www.pageflakes.com
  • 105. Social Networking – 43 ThingsSocial Networking – 43 Things http://www.43things.com/
  • 106. FlickrFlickr  What you can do with your photos:What you can do with your photos:  UploadUpload  TagTag  Geotag (mapping)Geotag (mapping)  BlogBlog  CommentComment  OrganizeOrganize  Organize into online photo albums with annotationOrganize into online photo albums with annotation  Form/join groupsForm/join groups http://www.flickr.com
  • 107. Applications for FlickrApplications for Flickr  Virtual field tripVirtual field trip  Categorize, analyze, evaluate imagesCategorize, analyze, evaluate images  Geography practiceGeography practice  Picture books-documentariesPicture books-documentaries  Display original artworkDisplay original artwork  Online scavenger huntsOnline scavenger hunts  Process live field tripsProcess live field trips  Upload exported (jpeg) Inspiration graphic organizersUpload exported (jpeg) Inspiration graphic organizers
  • 108. Photo Editing ToolsPhoto Editing Tools PhixrPhixr http://www.phixr.com/http://www.phixr.com/ Pxn8Pxn8 http://pxn8.com/http://pxn8.com/ PicasaPicasa http://picasa.google.com/http://picasa.google.com/ GIMPGIMP http://www.gimp.org/windows/http://www.gimp.org/windows/ Free Serif PhotoPlusFree Serif PhotoPlus http://www.freeserifsoftware.com/http://www.freeserifsoftware.com/ Paint.NetPaint.Net http://www.eecs.wsu.edu/paint.net/http://www.eecs.wsu.edu/paint.net/ PixiaPixia http://park18.wakwak.com/~pixia/http://park18.wakwak.com/~pixia/ PhotoFiltrePhotoFiltre http://photofiltre.free.fr/frames_en.htmhttp://photofiltre.free.fr/frames_en.htm Ultimate PaintUltimate Paint http://www.ultimatepaint.com/http://www.ultimatepaint.com/ VCW VicMan’s Photo EditorVCW VicMan’s Photo Editor http://www.vicman.net/vcwphoto/index.htmhttp://www.vicman.net/vcwphoto/index.htm ImageForgeImageForge http://www.cursorarts.com/ca_imffw.htmlhttp://www.cursorarts.com/ca_imffw.html PicnikPicnik http://www.picnik.com/http://www.picnik.com/
  • 109. Online Bibliography HelpersOnline Bibliography Helpers  Easybib - http://www.easybib.com/Easybib - http://www.easybib.com/  KnightCiteKnightCite http://webapps.calvin.edu/knightcite/http://webapps.calvin.edu/knightcite/  Landmarks Citation MachineLandmarks Citation Machine http://citationmachine.net/http://citationmachine.net/  NoodleTools http://www.noodletools.com/NoodleTools http://www.noodletools.com/  Ottobib http://ottobib.com/Ottobib http://ottobib.com/
  • 110. Video Editing ToolsVideo Editing Tools Eye Spot Online Video MixingEye Spot Online Video Mixing http://eyespot.com/http://eyespot.com/ Jump Cut Online Video EditorJump Cut Online Video Editor http://jumpcut.com/http://jumpcut.com/ Windows Movie MakerWindows Movie Maker http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/usinghttp://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/using /moviemaker/default.mspx/moviemaker/default.mspx Avid Free DVAvid Free DV http://www.avid.com/freedv/http://www.avid.com/freedv/ Storyboard ProStoryboard Pro http://www.atomiclearning.com/storyboardhttp://www.atomiclearning.com/storyboard propro Microsoft PhotoStoryMicrosoft PhotoStory http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/usinghttp://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/using // digitalphotography/photostory/default.mspxdigitalphotography/photostory/default.mspx
  • 111. Classroom ResourcesClassroom Resources  NoteStar enhanced research tools http://notestar.4teachers.org/NoteStar enhanced research tools http://notestar.4teachers.org/  RubiStar rubric creation tools http://rubistar.4teachers.org/index.phpRubiStar rubric creation tools http://rubistar.4teachers.org/index.php  QuizStar online quiz creation tools http://quizstar.4teachers.org/QuizStar online quiz creation tools http://quizstar.4teachers.org/  TrackStar online hotlist and Internet activity creation toolsTrackStar online hotlist and Internet activity creation tools http://trackstar.4teachers.org/http://trackstar.4teachers.org/  Web Worksheet Wizard http://wizard.4teachers.org/Web Worksheet Wizard http://wizard.4teachers.org/  Project Poster online project-based activity creation toolsProject Poster online project-based activity creation tools http://poster.4teachers.org/http://poster.4teachers.org/  Discovery School Puzzle Maker http://www.puzzlemaker.com/Discovery School Puzzle Maker http://www.puzzlemaker.com/  National Library of Virtual ManipulativesNational Library of Virtual Manipulatives http://nlvm.usu.edu/en/nav/vlibrary.htmlhttp://nlvm.usu.edu/en/nav/vlibrary.html
  • 112. WebQuestsWebQuests  A WebQuest for K-12 Teachers utilizing the WebGuide Template -A WebQuest for K-12 Teachers utilizing the WebGuide Template - Internet4Classrooms version -Internet4Classrooms version - http://www.internet4classrooms.com/lesson_plan_quest.htmhttp://www.internet4classrooms.com/lesson_plan_quest.htm  WebQuest Template - http://www.internet4classrooms.com/lesson-WebQuest Template - http://www.internet4classrooms.com/lesson- template.htmtemplate.htm  San Diego State University Educational Technology DepartmentSan Diego State University Educational Technology Department WebQuests Page - http://webquest.sdsu.edu/WebQuests Page - http://webquest.sdsu.edu/  Best WebQuests - http://bestwebquests.com/Best WebQuests - http://bestwebquests.com/  WebQuest Templates SDSU -WebQuest Templates SDSU - http://webquest.sdsu.edu/LessonTemplate.htmlhttp://webquest.sdsu.edu/LessonTemplate.html  Teachnology WebQuest Generator - http://teachers.teach-Teachnology WebQuest Generator - http://teachers.teach- nology.com/web_tools/web_quest/nology.com/web_tools/web_quest/  Differentiated Instruction WebQuests -Differentiated Instruction WebQuests - http://www.lakelandschools.org/EDTECH/Differentiation/nine.htmhttp://www.lakelandschools.org/EDTECH/Differentiation/nine.htm  Using theUsing the Understanding By DesignUnderstanding By Design Model to create WebQuests -Model to create WebQuests - http://www.bclacts.org/Using%20Ubd%20to%20design%20ahttp://www.bclacts.org/Using%20Ubd%20to%20design%20a %20webquest.pdf%20webquest.pdf