Digital Storytelling - Windows and Apple
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Digital Storytelling - Windows and Apple

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This presentation accompanied a full-day training workshop I conducted in the Central York School District in July 2006.

This presentation accompanied a full-day training workshop I conducted in the Central York School District in July 2006.

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Digital Storytelling - Windows and Apple Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Students as Directors of Their Own Learning using digital storytelling to create truly authentic learning experiences
  • 2. Jennifer Dorman http://jdorman.wikispaces.com [email_address] http://cliotech.blogspot.com/
  • 3. Essential Questions
    • How can we teach essential knowledge, skills, and understandings to all students in a diverse academic setting?
    • How can differentiated instruction be enhanced through the integration of educational technologies in the classroom?
  • 4. Many educators believe in the ‘exceptionality’ of computers, viewing them as instructional talismans that can do for student learning what other reforms cannot. “ Tools for the Mind” – Mary Burns
  • 5. Technology & Student Learning
    • This has resulted in the narrow focus on technology at the expense of the more important pillars of learning . . .
      • cognition,
      • instruction,
      • assessment,
      • and curriculum.
  • 6. We are no longer teaching if what we teach is more important than who we teach or how we teach. (Carol Ann Tomlinson 2003)
  • 7. What is digital storytelling?
  • 8.  
  • 9. What is digital storytelling?
    • Digital storytelling is the process of writing about a story, and adding the multimedia elements of voice, imagery, and music to create a visual story.
  • 10. What do students learn?
    • The process of digital storytelling provides a high-quality learning experience because the learning experience honors the writing process first.
    • The inclusion of the technology into the process represents a “value-added” approach where the inclusion of the technology extends the learning experience beyond what could be accomplished without technology.
  • 11. Digital Storytelling . . .
    • develops visual and multimedia literacy in students.
    • addresses the development of the interpretation of digital media and the application of that interpretation to a personal message or story.
  • 12. Digital Storytelling . . .
    • provides students with a competitive and compelling voice by enlarging the boundaries of who students can communicate with and by increasing the depth and power of that communication.
  • 13. Digital Storytelling . . .
    • permits students to recapture creativity, develop it and intensify it, apply it, extend it…
    • helps students write more effectively by permitting the visualization of the writing, resulting in an additional level of perception that extends the writing process to a place seldom reached.
  • 14. Digital Storytelling . . .
    • provides an authentic personal learning experience- as such; student investment is greatly increased resulting in greatly improved motivation and end product.
  • 15. Digital Storytelling . . .
    • teaches elements of technology and information literacy-students use many different computer applications and must be conversant about locating and managing visuals and video, as well as being able to do so in the context of copyright and fair use.
  • 16. Why implement a digital storytelling program?
  • 17. Differentiating Instruction
    • Digital documentaries and digital storytelling tap into student interests and specific learning profile and allow teachers to customize content, process, & product according to students' readiness with background information and technological proficiencies.
  • 18. I hear and I forget. I see and I remember. I do and I understand. - Confucius
  • 19. Tell me and I forget. Teach me and remember. Involve me and I learn. - Benjamin Franklin
  • 20. Enduring Understanding
    • We learn. . .
      • 10% of what we READ
      • 20% of what we HEAR
      • 30% of what we SEE
      • 40% of what we both SEE and HEAR
      • 70% of what is DISCUSSED with others
      • 80% of what we EXPERIENCE personally
      • 95% of what we TEACH someone else
    • --William Glasser
  • 21. Why Digi Docs?
    • One of the ways to move from data to understanding is to tell the story and make the relevant connections
    • Students sew the information together in an organized way that forces students to think about the entire body of information
  • 22. Higher-Order Applications
    • Digital video editing programs are higher-order applications
    • The nature of digital videos overcomes the limitations of more static demonstration software that can be episodic and disjointed
  • 23. According to Bernajean Porter
    • Author of DigiTales: The Art of Telling Digital Stories
      • A documentary uses an abundant amount of primary sources
      • Multiple points of view are presented
      • The students make a personal connection and draw from a wider, global view
  • 24. The Steps
  • 25. The Steps in Creating a DigiDoc
    • Select and research a topic
      • identify topic and resources for research
      • gather research and maintain a working/annotated bibliography
      • analyze and select information for inclusion
  • 26. The Steps in Creating a DigiDoc
    • Prepare for interviews
      • conduct background research
      • prepare interview questions
      • conduct, record, and analyze the interview
  • 27. The Steps in Creating a DigiDoc
    • Gather media resources
      • still-frame imagery
      • video
      • audio
  • 28. The Steps in Creating a DigiDoc
    • Tell the story
      • create storyboard (narrative/script, visual, audio, etc.)
      • develop “point of view”
      • identify and cite supporting documentation
  • 29. The Steps in Creating a DigiDoc
    • Production
      • create film rough draft
      • add special media effects, transitions, audiovisual extras, etc.
      • edit final film
  • 30. The Steps in Creating a DigiDoc
    • Share the final products
      • premier films and enjoy the hard work of all filmmakers
  • 31.  
  • 32. Assessing a Digital Story http://www.digitales.us/evaluating/scoring_guide.php
  • 33. Scaffolding Steps
    • Stories from one image
    • Stories from a sequence of images
    • Stories from a sequence of images with specified persona
    • Stories from a muted video clip
    • Stories from a muted video clip or sequence of images with background sound
    • Stories with student-found images and set narrative
    • Stories with student-found images and student-created narrative
  • 34. Finding Resources Gathering media content
  • 35.  
  • 36.  
  • 37.  
  • 38. unitedstreaming
    • Professional Development > Best Practices > “Creating Movies with unitedstreaming content” or “Using Images to Make Movies”
  • 39.  
  • 40. unitedstreaming
    • Search for editable clips
      • Video .asf files
      • Audio .mp3 files
      • Images .jpeg files
    • Import media into Windows Movie Maker
  • 41. Library of Congress
    • The Library of Congress has Image Libraries, Video Libraries, and Exhibitions online
      • http://www.loc.gov/index.html
      • American Memory Collection contains historic media
  • 42.  
  • 43.  
  • 44. Internet Archive
    • Moving Images
    • Texts
    • Audio
    • Educational Resources
  • 45.  
  • 46. Creative Commons
    • Audio
    • Images
    • Video
    • Text
    • Educational Resources
  • 47. Sound Resources
    • http://www.freeplaymusic.com/ *
    • http://findsounds.com/
    • http://www.partnersinrhyme.com/pir/PIRsfx.html
    • http://www.garageband.com/charts
    • http://music.podshow.com/
    • http://www.podsafeaudio.com/
    • http://www.archive.org/details/audio
    • http://naturesongs.com/
    • http://www.americanrhetoric.com/
    • http://www.hpol.org/
  • 48. Getting Started
    • Hardware
      • Digital cameras for still and video images
      • Scanners
      • Microphones
      • Computers with internal or external video/audio conversion interface devices
    • Software
      • Video editing software
      • Word processing software
      • Image editing software
      • Internet access
  • 49. Video Editing Software Packages
    • iMovie (MAC)
    • Pinnacle Systems Studio DV
    • Pinnacle Systems Avid Liquid
    • Pinnacle Systems Dazzle
    • Windows Movie Maker
    • Adobe Premiere
    • Avid FreeDV
    • Cyberlink’s PowerDirector
    • Unlead VideoStudio
    • Roxio VideoWave
    • Unlead DVDMovie
    • FactoryCyberlink’s
    • Power Producer
    • Sonic MyDVD
    • WinDVD Creator
  • 50. Video Editing Software Windows Movie Maker
  • 51. Basic Vocabulary
    • Collection
    • Project
    • Movie
  • 52. Moving Between Media Collections
  • 53. Project
    • A project contains the arrangement and timing information of audio and video clips, video transitions, video effects, and titles you have added to the storyboard/timeline.
    • A saved project file in Windows Movie Maker has an . mswmm file name extension.
    • By saving your projects, you can open the project file later and begin editing it in Windows Movie Maker from where you last saved.
  • 54. Movie
    • A movie is the final project you save by using the Save Movie Wizard.
    • You can save a movie to your computer or to a recordable CD, send it as an attachment in an e-mail message, or save and send it to the Web.
    • The saved movie can be watched in a media player, such as Microsoft Windows Media® Player, or in a Web browser.
  • 55. Rules of Thumb
    • Be sure to keep all your source files in one folder.
    • If you need to open your project on another computer, you need both your source files folder and Windows Movie Maker project file .
  • 56. Capturing Video
  • 57. Importing Video Files
  • 58. Importing Still Images
  • 59. Capturing Images from Video Use this tool to take a screen shot from a video file.
  • 60. Importing Audio
  • 61. Editing Projects Using tools to edit your project
  • 62. Editing a Project
    • You can use the storyboard/timeline to create and edit projects. The storyboard and timeline both display your work in progress, but each provides a different view of your work:
      • The storyboard displays the sequence of clips.
      • The timeline displays the timing of clips.
  • 63. Editing a Project
    • After you add clips to the storyboard/timeline to create a project, you can do the following:
      • Rearrange the clips in the sequence you want.
      • Create transitions between clips.
      • Add video effects to video clips and pictures.
      • Trim the clips to hide unwanted segments (on the timeline view only).
      • Split and combine clips.
      • Add narration that synchronizes with the clips (on the timeline view only).
  • 64. Storyboard View
  • 65. Timeline View
  • 66. Video Clips
  • 67. Zooming In and Out
    • To fit the timeline on the screen
      • On the View menu, click Zoom to Fit.
  • 68. Splitting a Clip Use this tool to split the clip.
  • 69. Combining Clips
  • 70. Trimming Clips Drag the sides of the video clip to trim the length.
  • 71. Trimming Clips
  • 72. Transitions
  • 73. Video Transitions
  • 74. Working with Transitions
  • 75. Video Effects
  • 76. Video Effects
  • 77. Working with Video Effects
  • 78. Transitions and Video Effects Transition Video Effect Two Video Effects
  • 79. Titles and Credits
  • 80. Adding Titles and Credits
  • 81. Title Before a Clip
  • 82. Title Overlay Over a Video Clip
  • 83. Credit at the End of the Project
  • 84. Enter Text
  • 85. Choose Animation
  • 86. Select Font and Color
  • 87. Working with Audio
  • 88. Audio Options
    • Some of the different audio-related tasks you can perform in Windows Movie Maker include the following.
      • Narrate the timeline.
      • Adjust audio levels.
      • Add audio effects.
      • Adjust the volume of audio clips.
  • 89. Narrate the Timeline Narrate the timeline
  • 90. Narrate the Timeline
  • 91. Alternative Narration
    • Instead of recording narration directly into Windows Movie Maker, you can record your narration with another audio editing program and import audio tracks as you would with music files.
      • Audacity Tutorial
  • 92. Adjusting Audio Levels
    • You can adjust the audio levels between the Audio and Audio/Music tracks (the audio that was captured as part of a video clip on the Audio track, and the audio that was captured or imported and added to the Audio/Music track). Adjusting the audio levels determines which audio will play louder than the other in your movie.
  • 93. Audio Effects
  • 94. Adjusting Audio
  • 95. Making the Movie Saving the final project as a movie file that can be shared
  • 96. Save Movie Wizard
  • 97. Finish Movie
  • 98. Save to My Computer
    • Enter a file name for your saved movie
    • Choose a place to save your movie
  • 99. Save Movie Wizard
  • 100. Save Movie Wizard
  • 101. Save to CD
    • Enter a file name for your saved movie
    • Choose a place to save your movie
  • 102. Send in E-Mail
    • Enter a file name for your saved movie
    • Choose a place to save your movie
  • 103. Send to the Web
    • Enter a file name for your saved movie
    • Choose a place to save your movie
  • 104. Send to DV Camera
    • Enter a file name for your saved movie
    • Choose a place to save your movie
  • 105.  
  • 106. Video Editing Software iMove
  • 107. Basic Vocabulary Get to know the basics
  • 108. Video Clips
    • Video clips are segments of footage that you select and manipulate in iMovie HD as you build and edit your movie.
    • If you copy a section of video, or separate the audio from one piece of your footage and paste it elsewhere, those pieces are also called clips.


    • Information about a clip is shown at the top of each clip in the clip viewer and the Clips pane. The number in the top-left corner of the clip indicates its length in minutes: seconds:frames.
  • 109. Frames
    • A single still image in a video clip is called a "frame."
      • Movies are made up of a series of frames.
    • When you move the playhead to a frame, the frame's location in the movie is displayed above the playhead.
      • The location 01:08:15 shows that the frame occurs 1 minute, 8 seconds, and 15 frames into the movie.


    • The number of movie frames (or images) that flash across the screen each second as you watch a movie is called the frames per second (fps), or "frame rate."
  • 110. Clip Viewer
    • The clip viewer below the iMovie monitor displays clips in the order that they will appear in your movie.
    • It gives you a simple, straightforward view of the clip sequences and transitions used in your movie.
    • You can easily drag clips to rearrange them or add clips to the clip viewer by dragging them from the Clips pane.
    • You can also drag video files from the Finder desktop into the Clip viewer.
  • 111. Clip Viewer
  • 112. Timeline Viewer
    • The timeline viewer below the iMovie monitor displays the movie's video track and two audio tracks.
    • Use the timeline viewer to position and edit audio and video.
    • The three tracks allow you to add and manipulate multiple layers of sound, including the sound contained in the video clips.
  • 113. Timeline Viewer
  • 114. Scrubber Bar
    • The scrubber bar below the iMovie monitor represents the total length of a selected clip.
    • A playhead appears at the top of the scrubber bar.
    • You can drag the playhead along the scrubber bar to browse the frames, or "scrub," in your movie. 

  • 115. Scrubber Bar
    • When you hold the pointer under the scrubber bar, crop markers appear.
    • You use the crop markers to select frames in a clip.
    • The selected frames are represented by a yellow shaded area in the scrubber bar.

  • 116. Playhead
    • The triangular control that appears in the scrubber bar and at the top of the timeline viewer is called the "playhead." Its position corresponds to the frame in the clip that is displayed in the iMovie monitor.
    • As you play a movie, the playhead moves along the scrubber bar and timeline indicating the frames being displayed.

  • 117. Crop Markers
    • Crop markers appear under the scrubber bar whenever you select a clip and hold the pointer just under the scrubber bar.
    • You use crop markers to select part of a video clip.
    • Drag them left or right to mark the beginning and end of the part that you want to crop, copy, or trim.
    • You can also select and apply video effects to a portion of a clip.
    • You can use the crop markers to select video in a single clip or across several clips. 

  • 118.  
  • 119. Clip Information
    • The Clip Info window appears when you choose Show Info from the File menu. You can use the Clip Info window to:
      • Change the name of the clip
      • Find out how much disk space the clip takes up
      • Find out the date and time the clip was captured
      • See the duration of a clip
  • 120. Clip Information
  • 121. Clips Pane
    • When you first import video, your footage appears in the Clips pane.
    • You can select and play clips in the Clips pane to initially review the footage you have.
    • You can easily delete unwanted clips by dragging clips to the iMovie Trash or selecting them and pressing Delete.
    • You can also split clips and do initial trimming and cropping of footage in the Clips pane to prepare the footage for finer editing later in the clip viewer or timeline viewer.
    • You can rename clips and rearrange them to organize them as you plan your project.
  • 122. Clips Pane
    • Drag clips from the Clips pane to the clip viewer to add them to your movie.
    • You can also Option-drag a clip from the Clips pane to copy the clip into your movie, leaving the original still available in the Clips pane.
    • You can remove clips from your movie by dragging them from the clip viewer back to the Clips pane or into the iMovie Trash.
    • You can also drag clips to your desktop for use in other applications or to copy them into another iMovie HD project.
  • 123. Clips Pane
  • 124. Direct Trimming
    • You can use direct trimming in the timeline viewer to trim audio and video clips quickly and with fewer steps.
    • When you place the pointer near one end of the clip and drag toward the center, you trim the clip with one move.
    • The trimmed video is still present, but hidden, so you can drag the end of the clip in and out until you have it exactly as you want.
    • The trimmed part of the clip is preserved.

  • 125. Direct Trimming
    • You can also trim adjacent clips in a similar way.
    • If you place the pointer near the center of the clip, you can drag the clip without trimming any of it.
      • As you drag toward an adjacent clip, all the adjoining clips move (or "ripple") along with it.
      • But, if you hold down the Command key as you drag, you overwrite the adjacent clip with the clip you're moving.
      • In this way, you can extend or move a clip and remove adjoining footage in the same move.

  • 126.  
  • 127. Getting Started
  • 128. iMovie
    • When you open iMovie HD, three options appear:
      • Create a new project
      • Open an existing project
      • Create a Magic iMovie
  • 129. Starting a New Project
    • In most cases, when you start a new project, you don't need to choose a video format.
    • iMovie HD can automatically detect whether you're importing footage from a standard definition (DV), high definition (HDV), or Apple iSight camera.
    • However, if you need to, you can choose the appropriate format for your video. 

  • 130. Importing Media Importing video, audio, and still images
  • 131. Importing Video, Audio, & Images
    • You can import audio, video, and still images to use in your movie.
    • Importing an image or clip can be as easy as dragging it into your movie from the desktop.
    • Or you can use the Import command to select and import clips and images.
    • You can also copy and paste clips between movies.

  • 132. Using the Import Command
    • Choose File > Import
    • Select the file you want to import
    • Click “Open”
  • 133. Supported Formats
    • iMovie HD supports importing video in common formats, such as standard definition and wide screen formats (NTSC and PAL), high definition formats (HDV 720p and 1080i), MPEG-4, and clips from Apple's iSight camera.
    • Audio files must be in AIFF format or another format that works with QuickTime.
  • 134. Importing a Clip from Another iMovie Project
    • Open the project you want to copy clips from
    • Select the clips and choose Edit > Copy
    • Open the iMovie presentation you want to copy the clips into
    • Choose Edit > Paste
  • 135. Supported Video Formats
    • DV NTSC
    • DV PAL
    • DV NTSC Widescreen
    • DV PAL Widescreen
    • MPEG 4
    • iSight
    • HDV 720p
    • HDV 1080i
  • 136. To Specify a Video Format
    • Choose File > New Project or click the Create New Project button in the Project window
    • In the Create Project dialog, click the “Video format” triangle to display format options
    • Choose the video format options you want
    • Click Create
  • 137. Setting a Default Frame Rate
    • Different video formats may use different frame rates.
      • For example, standard definition video in NTSC format uses a frame rate of 29.97 frames per second, whereas PAL format uses a frame rate of 25 frames per second.
      • High definition video may use 29.97 or 25 frames per second depending on the specific format of the video camera.
  • 138. Setting a Default Frame Rate
    • Choose iMovie HD > Preferences
    • Click on the General icon
    • Select a frame rate from the “New Project frame rate” pop-up menu
  • 139. Setting a Default Frame Rate
  • 140. Adding Photos from iPhoto Library
    • Click the Photos button
    • Choose and album from the pop-up menu
    • Select a photo from the photos displayed in the Photos pane and drag it
  • 141.  
  • 142. Working with Clips Editing video clips
  • 143. Selecting Part of a Video Clip
    • Select the clip (or clips).
    • Drag the crop markers below the scrubber bar to mark the beginning and end of the section you want to select.
    • To move the crop marker one frame at a time, select a crop marker by Shift-clicking or dragging it and then press the Left or Right Arrow key.
    • To move the marker ten frames at a time, hold down Shift as you click the arrow keys.
  • 144. Cropping Video Clips
    • You can crop a clip by selecting it in the Clips pane, clip viewer, or timeline viewer and dragging the crop markers below the scrubber bar to indicate where you want your clip to begin and end.
    • Next, choose Edit > Crop to delete the unselected portions of the clip from the video.


      • Tip: To precisely adjust the crop marker position, click a marker to select it and press the Left or Right Arrow key to move the crop marker one frame at a time.
      • To move the marker in 10-frame increments, hold down the Shift key while pressing the arrow key.
  • 145. Cutting, Copying, & Pasting
    • To copy a clip to a new position in the movie:
      • Select the video clip or frame range you want to cut or copy, then choose Edit > Cut or Copy.
      • Move the playhead where you want the chosen clip to appear.
      • Choose Edit > Paste.
  • 146. Cutting, Copying, & Pasting
    • When you position the playhead within a clip and choose Paste, the clip is split at the playhead and the pasted video, along with its soundtrack, appears as a new clip at that point (pushing the remaining portion of the split clip back in the timeline.)
    • You can also have the the pasted clip replace footage in the timeline.
      • Position the playhead where the pasted clip should start and choose Advanced > "Paste Over at Playhead".
      • The pasted clip replaces an equal duration of clip in the timeline.
  • 147. Deleting Segments
    • To trim a video clip using direct trimming:
      • Select the clip you want to edit in the timeline viewer.
      • Position the pointer over the end of the clip until you see the pointer change.
      • Drag the end of the clip to remove the frames that you want trimmed.
        • If you trim too much from the clip, you can drag the end of the clip again to lengthen it. The trimmed frames are not lost.
      • Repeat the procedure on the other end of the clip, if you want.
  • 148. Splitting a Clip
    • Select a clip and position the playhead where you want to divide the clip.
    • Choose Edit > "Split Video Clip at Playhead" or "Split Selected Audio Clip at Playhead."
  • 149. Adjusting the Length of an Image
    • Double-click the clip in the clip viewer or timeline viewer.
    • Type the duration you want in the Duration field.
    • Click Set.
  • 150. Changing Direction & Speed
    • Select the clip or clips in the clip viewer or timeline viewer.
    • Click Effects.
    • Select the Fast/Slow/Reverse effect and choose the options you want.
    • Click Apply.
  • 151. Creating a Color Clips
    • To change a black clip to color:
      • Select the black clip in the clip viewer.
      • Choose File > Show Info.
      • Click the Color box and choose a color for the clip.
      • Click Set.
  • 152. Adding Motion to an Image
    • To pan or zoom during the display of a photo, you apply the Ken Burns Effect in the Photos pane.
      • You can use the Ken Burns Effect to resize or crop an image without adding motion.
    • The photograph appears as a clip at the end of your movie in the timeline.
      • You can drag the clip to where you want it to appear in your movie.
  • 153. Adding Motion to a Photograph
  • 154. Adding Motion to an Image
    • Click the Photos button and click the Ken Burns Effect checkbox if it's not selected.
    • Select a photograph from your iPhoto library and click Start.
    • Use the Zoom slider to move to the starting point for a zoom.
    • Hold the pointer over the image in the preview monitor until a hand appears, then press the mouse button and drag to the spot in the photograph where you want to begin the pan.
    • Click End.
  • 155. Adding Motion to an Image
    • Use the Zoom slider to move to the ending point for the zoom.
    • Hold the pointer over the image until a hand appears, then press the mouse button and drag to the point at which you want to end the pan.
    • Move the Duration slider to set the length of time you want the pan and zoom action to take.
    • Click Preview to see the overall effect, and repeat the above steps to make adjustments.
    • Click Apply when you have the effect you want.
  • 156. Copying Pan & Zoom Settings
    • To copy the starting settings to the ending settings:
      • Click the Photos button and make sure the Ken Burns Effect checkbox is selected.
      • Select a photograph from your iPhoto library and click Start.
      • Set up the pan and zoom effect you want.
      • Press the Option key and click End.
      • Make the final pan and zoom changes your image needs.
  • 157. Removing Pan & Zoom
    • To remove the pan and zoom effect from a rendered image:
      • Select the image in the clip viewer.
      • Click the Photos button to open the Photos pane.
      • Deselect the Ken Burns Effect checkbox.
      • Click Update.
  • 158. Capturing a Still Image
    • To save the image as a file to export to another application:
      • Display the image you want to export in the iMovie monitor.
      • Choose File > Save Frame and save the file with the format and name you want.
        • JPEG or PICT format
  • 159. Playing Your Whole Movie
    • To see your whole movie play:
      • Choose Edit > Select None.
      • Move the playhead to the beginning of the movie, or click Rewind.
        • To quickly rewind, you can press the Home key on your keyboard.
      • Click Play.
  • 160. Restoring a Clip
    • Select the clip in the timeline viewer or clip viewer.
    • Choose Advanced > Revert Clip to Original
  • 161. Deleting Unwanted Footage
    • To delete footage:
      • Select the audio or video clips you want to delete.
        • To select multiple clips, hold down the Shift key (or the Command key for discontiguous clips) while you click the clips.
      • Choose Edit > Clear or press the Delete key.
  • 162. Transitions, Titles, & Effects
  • 163. Transitions Between Clips
    • Click the Transitions button and select a transition style in the Transitions pane.
    • Set the duration of the transition using the Speed slider.
    • Set the direction you want the transition to start from using the arrow buttons (if applicable).
    • Click Preview to see how the transition looks.
    • Drag the transition from the list to where you want it in the clip viewer.
  • 164.  
  • 165. Titles & Text
    • Click the Titles button to open the Titles pane.
    • Select a title style from the titles list.
    • Click an arrow button to choose the direction the text moves (if applicable).
    • Type the text you want in the text field.
    • Select Over Black if you want the title to appear over a black clip.
  • 166. Titles & Text
    • To change the color of the text, click the Color box to select a color.
    • Choose a font style for the title from the pop-up menu, and drag the text size slider to make the text larger or smaller.
    • Drag the Speed slider and Pause slider to change the duration of the title.
    • Click Preview to see how the title will look.
    • When the title is ready, drag it into the clip or timeline viewer, or, if the cli p already has a title, select a clip and click Update.
  • 167.  
  • 168. Video Effects
    • Select the clip or clips you want to alter.
      • To apply an effect to a section of a clip, drag the crop markers to select the frame range you want.
    • Click the Effects button and select a video effect.
    • Move the Effect In and Effect Out sliders to indicate when you want the effect to begin and end.
  • 169. Video Effects
    • Adjust the effect with any other available sliders (some effects have more options).
    • Click Preview to view the effect in the iMovie monitor.
    • Repeat any of the above steps until you have the effect the way you want it.
    • Click Apply.
  • 170.  
  • 171. Undoing Changes
    • Choose Edit > Undo to remove your last change. Continue choosing Undo to cancel your previous changes one by one.
    • Choose Advanced > Revert Clip to Original to undo all of the changes made to a selected clip.
    • Choose File > Revert to Saved to undo all of the changes made to a project since the last time you saved it.
  • 172. Edit Existing Effects
    • Select the clip or transition icon that you want to change in the clip viewer.
      • If you want to select all your transitions at once, select a transition and choose Edit > Select Similar Clips.
    • Click the Titles, Effects, or Transitions button.
    • Make your modifications in the pane you selected.
    • Click Update.
  • 173. Working with Sound
  • 174. Adding Sound
    • Move the playhead in the timeline viewer to the frame where you want to hear the sound effect.
    • Click the Audio button.
    • Choose iMovie Sound Effects from the pop-up menu.
  • 175. Adding Sound
    • Click the arrow next to the sound effect collections to see more effects, then click a sound effect to listen to it.
    • Click "Place at Playhead.”
    • Choose Advanced > "Lock Audio Clip at Playhead" if you want to lock the sound effect to a specific frame (if you reposition the video clip, the locked audio clip moves with it).
  • 176.  
  • 177. Trimming Audio Tracks
    • Select the audio clip in the timeline viewer.
    • If volume level bars appear in your clips in the timeline viewer, choose View > Show Clip Volume Levels to hide them.
    • Position your pointer at one end of the audio clip until it changes shape, then drag to where you want the audio clip to start or end.
  • 178. Splitting an Audio Clip
    • Select a clip and position the playhead where you want to divide the clip.
    • Choose Edit > "Split Video Clip at Playhead" or "Split Selected Audio Clip at Playhead."
  • 179.  
  • 180. Recording a Voiceover
    • Click the Audio button.
    • Click the Record button next to the input meter and speak into your microphone.
      • Speak clearly. While you are speaking, the input meter should be yellow. If it turns red, you are speaking too loudly.
    • Click the button again to stop recording.
  • 181. Positioning Audio with Video
    • To position an audio clip with a specific video frame:
      • Select the audio clip in the timeline viewer.
      • Move the audio clip until the frame you want appears in the iMovie monitor.
      • Choose Advanced > "Lock Audio Clip at Playhead" if you want to make sure that the audio clip doesn't get moved (you can unlock it later if you change your mind).
  • 182. Fade In & Fade Out
    • Choose View > Show Clip Volume Levels.
      • A volume level bar appears in each clip in the timeline viewer.
    • Click a point on the volume level bar where you want the volume to change, then drag the marker up or down to adjust the volume.
      • You can click the volume level bar multiple times to adjust volume up and down at multiple points during the length of a clip.
    • Move the markers until you have the amount of fade you want.
  • 183. Adjusting Volume
    • To make fine adjustments to the volume level of a clip:
      • Choose View > Show Clip Volume Levels.
      • Click a point on the volume level bar where you want to adjust the volume, then drag the marker that appears up or down to make the sound louder or softer at that point.
      • Click the beginning point of the marker and drag to adjust how abruptly the volume changes. (You can use this adjustment to make the clip fade in or out.)
  • 184. Adjusting Volume
  • 185. Separating Sound from Video
    • To extract sound from a clip:
      • Select a video clip in the timeline viewer.
      • Choose Advanced > Extract Audio.
  • 186. Inserting with Running Audio
    • Choose iMovie HD > Preferences.
    • Click General.
    • Select the "Extract audio when using 'Paste Over at Playhead'" checkbox.
    • Select the video or image that you want to insert.
    • Choose Edit > Cut or Copy.
    • Position the playhead at the first frame to be replaced, or use the crop markers to select the video frames to replace.
    • Choose Advanced > "Paste Over at Playhead."
  • 187. Removing Audio When Pasting
    • To change the default:
      • Choose iMovie HD > Preferences.
      • Click General.
      • Deselect the "Extract audio when using 'Paste Over At Playhead'" checkbox.
  • 188. Turning Audio On and Off
    • You can play one or both audio tracks at a time to preview your audio effects, or turn off the audio in the video track of your movie. For example, if you notice sound problems coming from your video track, you might mute the video track to eliminate them.
    • To turn the audio in a track on or off, select or deselect the checkbox on the right side of the track.
  • 189. Locking Audio to Video
    • Move the playhead in the timeline viewer to the point at which you want the audio to start.
    • Drag the audio clip so that its starting point is lined up with the playhead.
    • Choose Advanced > "Lock Audio Clip at Playhead.”
    • Pins in the audio and video clips indicate that the audio is locked to the video. To unlock the audio, select the clip and choose Advanced > Unlock Audio Clip.
  • 190. Sharing Your Movie
  • 191. Saving as a QuickTime Movie
    • Choose File > Share.
    • Click QuickTime and choose a movie format from the pop-up menu.
    • Click the "Share selected clips only" checkbox if you only want to share clips you selected.
    • Click Share.
    • Name your movie, select a location for the file, and click Save.
  • 192. Exporting to iDVD
    • Click the iDVD button to open the iDVD pane.
    • Click Create iDVD Project.
    • iDVD opens and your movie appears in a new project in iDVD.
  • 193. Setting Chapter Markers for iDVD
    • Move the playhead to the point at which you want to start a new chapter.
    • Click the iDVD button and click Add Chapter.
      • To quickly add a chapter marker, you can also choose Markers > Add Chapter Marker.
    • Type a chapter title next to the thumbnail that appears in the iDVD pane.