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State-Level Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, 2000-2010

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Energy-related carbon dioxide emissions vary significantly across states. An analysis of state-level emissions data from 2000 through 2010 released by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) …

Energy-related carbon dioxide emissions vary significantly across states. An analysis of state-level emissions data from 2000 through 2010 released by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) shows that the overall size of a state, as well as the available fuels, types of businesses, climate, and population density, play a role in both total and per capita emissions.

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  • 1.        State-Level Energy-RelatedCarbon Dioxide Emissions,2000-2010 May 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysiswww.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 
  • 2.  U.S. Energy Information Administration   |   State‐Level Energy‐Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, 2000‐2010  ii                       This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA’s data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other Federal agencies.
  • 3. May 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration   |   State‐Level Energy‐Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, 2000‐2010  iii Table of ContentsOverview .................................................................................................................................................. 1 Total state emission levels ....................................................................................................................... 1 Emissions by fuel ..................................................................................................................................... 2 Emissions by sector .................................................................................................................................. 2 Per capita carbon dioxide emissions ....................................................................................................... 2 Energy intensity ....................................................................................................................................... 3 Carbon intensity of the energy supply..................................................................................................... 4 Carbon intensity of the economy ............................................................................................................ 4 Electricity trade ........................................................................................................................................ 4 Appendix A. Comparison of fuel detail for the State Energy Data System and the Annual and Monthly Energy Review data systems ................................................................................................................. 15  
  • 4. May 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration   |   State‐Level Energy‐Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, 2000‐2010  iv TablesTable 1. State energy‐related carbon dioxide emissions by year (2000 ‐ 2010) ........................................... 6 Table 2. 2010 state energy‐related carbon dioxide emissions by fuel ......................................................... 7 Table 3. 2010 state energy‐related carbon dioxide emissions by sector ..................................................... 8 Table 4. 2010 state energy‐related carbon dioxide emission shares by sector ............................................ 9 Table 5. Per capita energy‐related carbon dioxide emissions by state (2000 ‐ 2010) ................................ 10 Table 6. Energy‐intensity by state (2000 – 2010) ....................................................................................... 11 Table 7. Carbon intensity of the energy supply by state (2000 – 2010) ..................................................... 12 Table 8. Carbon intensity of the economy by state (2000 – 2010) ............................................................. 13 Table 9. Net electricity trade index and primary electricity source for selected states (2000 – 2010) ...... 14   
  • 5. May 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration   |   State‐Level Energy‐Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, 2000‐2010  v FiguresFigure 1. Energy‐related carbon dioxide emissions by state, 2010 .............................................................. 1 Figure 2. Per‐capita energy‐related carbon dioxide emissions by state, 2010 ............................................. 3 
  • 6. May 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration   |   State‐Level Energy‐Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, 2000‐2010  1 Overview Energy‐related carbon dioxide emissions vary significantly across states (Figure 1), whether considered on an absolute or per capita basis.  The overall size of a state, as well as the  available fuels, types of businesses, climate, and population density, play a role in both total and per capita emissions.   Additionally, each state’s energy system reflects circumstances specific to that state.   For example, some states are located near abundant hydroelectric supplies, while others contain abundant coal resources.  This paper presents a basic analysis of the factors that contribute to a state’s carbon dioxide profile.  This analysis neither attempts to assess the effect of state policies on absolute emissions levels or on changes over time, nor does it intend to imply that certain policies would be appropriate for a particular state. The term “energy‐related carbon dioxide emissions” as used in this paper, includes emissions released at the location where fossil fuels are used.  For feedstock application, carbon stored in products such as plastics are not included in reported emissions for the states where they are produced. It is also important to recognize that the state‐level carbon dioxide emissions data presented in this paper count emissions based on the location where the energy is consumed as a fuel.  To the extent that fuels are used in one state to generate electricity that is consumed in another state, emissions are attributed to the former rather than the latter.  An analysis that attributed “responsibility” for emissions with consumption rather than production of electricity, which is beyond the scope of the present paper, would yield different results.   Total state emission levels Over the time period from 2000 to 2010, carbon dioxide emissions fell in 32 states and rose in 18 states (Table 1).    The greatest percentage decrease in carbon dioxide emissions occurred in Delaware at 27.9 percent, (4.5 million metric tons).  The greatest absolute decline was 58.8 million metric tons in Texas (8.3 percent).  New York experienced a decline of 38.6 million metric tons (18.3 percent).  The greatest percentage increase was in Nebraska at 16.0 percent (6.6 million metric tons), while Colorado experienced the greatest absolute increase (11.8 million metric tons or 13.9 percent).   Figure 1. Energy‐related carbon dioxide emissions by state, 2010 million metric tons carbon dioxide  
  • 7. May 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration   |   State‐Level Energy‐Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, 2000‐2010  2 From 2009 to 2010, only 14 states saw a decrease in emissions.  The United States was rebounding from the recession and emissions from consumption of energy was up in most states.  Because of differences in data aggregations it is difficult to compare the total for all states with the total for the United States.  See the Appendix for  a comparison of levels of data detail between the state and national data systems. Emissions by fuel States exhibit very different emissions profiles by fuel type (Table 2).  For example, in 2010, coal consumption accounted for 80.8 percent of carbon dioxide emissions in West Virginia.  In California, 65.2 percent of carbon dioxide emissions came from petroleum, while only 1.4 percent came from coal.  Rhode Island had no emissions from coal consumption, but 46.1 percent of its emissions were from natural gas.  Vermont’s share of carbon dioxide emissions from petroleum was 92.5 percent and Hawaii’s share was 91.4 percent in 2010.  No other states exceeded 80 percent in terms of the share of emissions from petroleum;  Maine’s petroleum share was 75.6 percent. Emissions by sector There can also be significant variations in terms of carbon dioxide emissions by sector (Tables 3 and 4) – even for states that have similar fuel emissions’ profiles.   These variations are due to factors such as the use of different fuels for electricity generation, climate, and sources of economic outputs (e.g., commercial versus industrial activity).  For example, in Vermont the largest share of emissions in 2010 came from the transportation sector (58.7 percent), predominantly from petroleum, but the electric power sector share is small (0.1 percent) because of Vermont’s reliance on nuclear power.  Vermont’s residential sector share was 22.1 percent – indicative of a relatively cold climate where petroleum is the main heating fuel.  Hawaii, where a dominant share of emissions is also from petroleum, has a residential share of 0.3 percent – the lowest in the United States because of minimal heating  and cooling requirements.  The largest sector emissions share in Hawaii, like Vermont, was from the transportation sector (49.3 percent).  However, unlike Vermont, Hawaii’s electric power sector share nearly as high (40.1 percent).  The dominant fossil fuel for the generation of electricity in Hawaii is petroleum.   Per capita carbon dioxide emissions Another useful way to compare total carbon dioxide emissions across states is to divide them by state population and examine them on a per capita basis (Table 5 and Figure 2).  Many factors contribute to the amount of emissions per capita, including: climate, the structure of the state economy, population density, energy sources, building standards and explicit state policies to reduce emissions.   The 2010 carbon dioxide emissions in Wyoming were 118.5 metric tons per capita, the highest in the United States.  In 2010, Wyoming was the second largest energy producer in the United States.  Unlike the largest energy producer, Texas, that has a population of 25 million, Wyoming has less than 600 thousand people giving Wyoming the lowest population density in the lower‐48 states.1 Its winters are cold (the average low temperatures in January are in the 5 to 10 degree Fahrenheit range2 ).  These factors act to raise Wyoming’s per capita emissions compared to other states.  The second highest state per capita carbon dioxide emissions level was North Dakota at 80.4 metric tons per capita.  Alaska (54.6 metric tons per capita),  West Virginia (54.2 metric tons per capita) and Louisiana (49.3 metric tons per capita)                                                             1 U.S. Energy Information Administration, State Profiles and Energy Estimates: http://www.eia.gov/state/ 2 http://www.wrcc.dri.edu/narratives/WYOMING.htm 
  • 8. May 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration   |   State‐Level Energy‐Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, 2000‐2010  3 round out the top five states in terms of per capita carbon dioxide emissions.  All of these are fossil‐energy‐producing states.  The activity of producing energy is itself energy intensive. Figure 2. Per‐capita energy‐related carbon dioxide emissions by state, 2010 metric tons carbon dioxide per person  The State of New York, with a population of 19.6 million people, had the lowest per capita carbon dioxide emissions – 8.8 metric tons per capita.  A large portion of the population is located in the New York City metropolitan area where mass transit is readily available and most residences are multi‐family units that provide efficiencies of scale in terms of energy for heating and cooling.   The New York economy is oriented towards high‐value, low‐energy‐consuming activities such as financial markets.  For example, in 2010 New York contained 6.3 percent of the U.S. population, but consumed only 1.1 percent of the country’s industrial energy.3   New York’s energy prices are relatively high (the average retail electricity price of 16.41 cents per kWh was third highest in the country in 2010), which in turn encourages energy savings.4   The second lowest per capita carbon emitting state (9.7 metric tons per capita) was Vermont.  As mentioned above, Vermont had almost no emissions from its electric power sector.    Other states with relatively low per capita emissions rates include: California (9.9 metric tons per capita), Idaho and Oregon (both 10.4 metric tons per capita). Energy intensity The energy intensity of a state, as measured by the amount of energy consumed per unit of economic output or, specifically, British thermal units per dollar of a state’s gross domestic product  (Btu/GDP), plays an important role in its overall emissions profile (Table 6). The states with the highest rates of emissions per capita in 2010 also had the higher energy intensity values:  Wyoming (24.6 thousand Btu per dollar), North Dakota (22.8 thousand Btu per dollar) and West Virginia (21.6 thousand Btu per dollar).  Delaware had the lowest energy intensity (3.3 thousand Btu per dollar), followed by New York (3.5 thousand Btu per dollar), Massachusetts, and Connecticut (both 3.7 thousand Btu per dollar).  With                                                             3 U.S. Energy Information Administration, State Energy Data 2010, state population and energy consumption by sector. 4 U.S. Energy Information Administration, State Electricity Profiles, Table 1, 2010 Summary Statistics http://www.eia.gov/electricity/state/newyork/pdf/New_York.pdf 
  • 9. May 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration   |   State‐Level Energy‐Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, 2000‐2010  4 the exceptions of California and Hawaii, the states with the lowest energy intensity are clustered in the relatively densely populated New England and Central‐Atlantic.  The 2010 national average is 7.5 thousand Btu per dollar of GDP.   Carbon intensity of the energy supply The carbon intensity of energy supply (CO2/Btu) is reflective of the energy fuel mix within a state.  As with energy intensity, the states with high carbon intensity of energy supply tend to be the states with high per capita emissions.  The top five states in 2010 for the energy carbon intensity as measured in kilograms of carbon dioxide per million Btu (kg CO2/MMBtu) —West Virginia (81.7 kg CO2/MMBtu), Kentucky (77.2 kg CO2/MMBtu), Wyoming (76.8 kg CO2/MMBtu), Indiana (75.1 kg CO2/MMBtu), and North Dakota (73.6 kg CO2/MMBtu)— are all states with coal as the dominant fuel (Table 7).  The national average carbon intensity of the energy supply in 2010 was 57.6 kg CO2/MMBtu.  The states with lower carbon intensity tend to be those states with relatively substantial non‐carbon electricity generation such as hydropower or nuclear.  These states include, for example, Vermont (34.5 kg CO2/MMBtu), Washington (37.4 kg CO2/MMBtu), Oregon (39.1 kg CO2/MMBtu), Idaho (41.2 kg CO2/MMBtu) and New Hampshire (41.5 kg CO2/MMBtu). Carbon intensity of the economy Another measure, the overall carbon intensity of the economy (CO2/dollar of state GDP), combines energy intensity with the carbon intensity of that energy supply.   As one would expect, the states with the highest carbon intensity of their economies (Table 8) as measured in metric tons of carbon dioxide per million dollars of state GDP (mt CO2/million dollars of GDP) are also the states with the highest values of energy intensity and carbon intensity of that energy supply.  In 2010 these states included:  Wyoming (1,886 mt CO2/ million dollars of GDP), West Virginia (1,767 mt CO2/ million dollars of GDP) North Dakota (1,681 mt CO2/ million dollars of GDP), Louisiana (1,145 mt CO2/ million dollars of GDP), and Montana (1,098 mt CO2/ million dollars of GDP).  The 2010 U.S. average is 430 mt CO2/ million dollars of GDP.  The states with the lowest carbon intensity of economic activity are also states that appear on the lower end of both energy intensity and the carbon intensity of that energy supply.  These states include:   New York (167 mt CO2/ million dollars of GDP), Connecticut (175 mt CO2/ million dollars of GDP), Delaware (209 mt CO2/ million dollars of GDP), Massachusetts (213 mt CO2/ million dollars of GDP), and California (214 mt CO2/ million dollars of GDP). Electricity trade Because this analysis does not account for electricity trade, it is important to understand how much this can influence a state’s carbon dioxide emissions profile.  The Net Electricity Trade Index (Table 9) indicates whether a state is self sufficient in the generation of electricity in a given year (a value of 1.0); is a net importer of electricity in a given year (a value of less than 1.0); or is a net exporter of electricity in a given year (a value greater than 1.0).  As indicated in Table 9, over half of the 10 states with the highest per capita emissions the states are net exporters of electricity in at least some years.  In particular, Wyoming, North Dakota, West Virginia and Montana are large electricity exporters of power produced predominantly with coal.  New Mexico is also a net exporter of electricity.   Oklahoma is a net exporter, but its dominant fuel is natural gas.  Indiana is a small exporter in some years, but was export‐neutral in 2009 and 2010.  Kentucky, like Indiana is a coal‐fueled generation state, but has been export‐
  • 10. May 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration   |   State‐Level Energy‐Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, 2000‐2010  5 neutral in recent years.  Louisiana, the only state of high per capita emitters that is consistently a net importer of electricity, and Alaska  a state that is an importer in some years, but export‐neutral in most, are both fossil‐fuel producing states with a large energy‐intensive component of their economies.     Four of the ten states with the lowest per capita carbon dioxide emissions are consistent importers of electricity:  Idaho, California, Massachusetts, and Florida.  Rhode Island was an electricity exporter in 2001 and was self sufficient in 2000, 2008, 2009, and 2010. In the other years Rhode Island was an importer of electricity (about 40 percent in 2004).  Idaho generates its electricity principally with hydroelectric power and has historically imported 50 percent or more of its electricity from other states.  California consistently imports about 30 percent of its electricity and natural gas is the dominant fuel for the electricity that it generates internally.  Both Massachusetts and Florida also use natural gas as the dominant fuel for electricity generation. New York, which is self sufficient many years and a slight importer in other years, generates a dominant share of its electricity with nuclear power.   Vermont, which is a consistent exporter of electricity, is also a state dominated by nuclear power generation.  Connecticut, also a nuclear power producer, is a slight exporter in some years, an importer in others and self sufficient in yet others.  Both Oregon and Washington are usually either self sufficient or net exporters.  However, in 2001, which was a particularly bad year for hydroelectric generation in the Pacific Northwest, both states were net importers of electricity. If the emissions associated with the generation of electricity were allocated to the states where that electricity is consumed, in many cases, the emissions profiles of both the producing and consuming states would change. 
  • 11. May 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration   |   State‐Level Energy‐Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, 2000‐2010  6 Table 1. State energy‐related carbon dioxide emissions by year (2000 ‐ 2010) million metric tons carbon dioxide State 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 Percent AbsoluteAlabama 140.4 132.0 136.7 137.2 139.7 141.5 144.0 146.1 139.2 119.8 132.7 ‐5.5% ‐7.7Alaska 44.3 43.4 43.6 43.5 46.8 48.1 45.8 44.1 39.5 37.9 38.7 ‐12.6% ‐5.6Arizona 86.0 88.3 87.7 89.3 96.6 96.7 100.0 102.2 103.1 94.6 95.9 11.6% 9.9Arkansas 63.2 62.4 60.9 61.3 61.9 59.7 61.6 63.1 63.7 61.6 66.1 4.6% 2.9California 381.3 385.8 384.9 389.5 391.5 389.0 397.5 403.7 389.8 375.9 369.8 ‐3.0% ‐11.4Colorado 84.7 92.8 90.9 90.0 93.1 95.4 96.4 99.2 97.6 93.7 96.5 13.9% 11.8Connecticut 42.8 41.5 39.9 42.3 44.4 43.9 40.9 40.3 38.2 36.5 36.9 ‐13.7% ‐5.8Delaware 16.3 15.7 15.5 16.1 16.1 17.0 15.8 16.7 15.9 11.8 11.7 ‐27.9% ‐4.5District of Columbia 4.3 4.1 4.2 3.9 4.0 3.9 3.2 3.4 3.1 3.2 3.3 ‐23.6% ‐1.0Florida 239.2 238.1 241.3 244.9 257.3 260.9 259.5 257.8 240.2 226.3 246.0 2.8% 6.7Georgia 167.9 160.3 165.1 167.5 173.3 183.9 181.5 184.6 173.5 163.4 173.7 3.4% 5.8Hawaii 18.8 19.2 20.5 21.5 22.6 23.2 23.5 24.4 19.7 18.9 18.9 0.7% 0.1Idaho 15.6 15.5 14.9 14.2 15.5 15.7 15.8 16.3 15.8 15.4 16.2 4.0% 0.6Illinois 232.1 223.1 225.1 227.7 235.2 242.0 233.9 242.1 240.7 226.1 230.4 ‐0.7% ‐1.7Indiana 238.2 228.6 231.7 236.9 237.8 236.7 235.0 234.7 231.5 208.5 219.1 ‐8.0% ‐19.1Iowa 77.7 76.6 77.2 76.4 78.9 78.9 80.2 85.7 88.3 83.8 88.7 14.1% 11.0Kansas 76.1 71.8 76.6 78.4 75.8 72.0 72.1 80.1 76.9 75.0 75.0 ‐1.3% ‐1.0Kentucky 144.7 148.1 148.3 143.9 150.9 153.2 156.1 156.4 153.7 143.7 150.7 4.2% 6.1Louisiana 239.9 211.9 219.8 214.6 226.2 221.7 236.0 234.5 221.7 203.9 223.5 ‐6.8% ‐16.4Maine 22.3 22.4 24.0 23.4 24.0 23.1 21.3 21.0 19.4 18.6 18.5 ‐17.1% ‐3.8Maryland 77.5 78.0 77.9 80.4 82.0 83.9 77.5 78.1 74.7 71.4 70.5 ‐9.0% ‐7.0Massachusetts 82.2 82.1 82.9 83.8 82.6 84.3 76.4 80.0 77.2 71.0 73.0 ‐11.2% ‐9.2Michigan 192.6 188.5 187.9 184.7 187.4 189.3 178.2 181.2 175.2 164.4 165.9 ‐13.9% ‐26.7Minnesota 97.7 94.7 97.3 101.0 100.6 101.7 99.1 100.9 100.6 93.1 93.4 ‐4.4% ‐4.3Mississippi 60.6 69.4 61.9 63.2 64.8 63.2 65.4 67.7 64.1 60.4 65.5 8.0% 4.9Missouri 125.4 131.1 131.8 138.3 140.0 143.0 141.6 140.8 137.9 131.6 135.7 8.2% 10.3Montana 31.3 31.9 30.7 32.7 34.5 35.5 35.8 37.8 36.1 32.5 34.9 11.4% 3.6Nebraska 41.4 42.7 42.2 43.0 43.1 43.5 44.1 44.5 46.5 46.8 48.0 16.0% 6.6Nevada 45.3 44.6 41.4 43.4 47.7 49.8 41.5 41.8 41.2 39.7 38.1 ‐15.9% ‐7.2New Hampshire 17.5 16.9 17.6 20.8 21.9 21.3 19.4 19.3 19.1 17.3 17.0 ‐2.8% ‐0.5New Jersey 121.1 118.5 118.9 119.8 122.6 127.6 120.2 128.6 124.3 110.4 115.4 ‐4.7% ‐5.7New Mexico 58.0 58.2 55.2 57.3 58.5 59.1 59.9 59.1 57.6 58.5 54.8 ‐5.5% ‐3.2New York 211.4 206.7 200.8 210.1 213.9 210.7 192.5 199.4 190.5 175.5 172.8 ‐18.3% ‐38.6North Carolina 147.7 143.1 144.3 144.7 148.2 152.7 147.4 153.6 149.0 132.9 142.9 ‐3.3% ‐4.8North Dakota 50.8 51.7 51.4 50.9 49.5 52.4 50.8 52.6 53.1 51.4 52.5 3.3% 1.7Ohio 264.0 254.5 260.3 267.4 262.5 269.7 263.0 268.9 261.9 237.6 249.1 ‐5.6% ‐14.9Oklahoma 100.1 101.4 101.6 103.5 99.8 106.9 110.2 109.6 113.1 104.9 103.4 3.4% 3.4Oregon 41.2 40.6 39.1 39.3 40.6 41.0 40.3 43.8 43.2 41.2 40.3 ‐2.4% ‐1.0Pennsylvania 276.3 263.4 270.1 273.0 276.6 280.0 274.1 277.6 264.9 246.0 256.6 ‐7.1% ‐19.7Rhode Island 11.6 12.1 11.6 11.3 10.8 11.0 10.4 11.0 10.6 11.3 11.0 ‐4.8% ‐0.6South Carolina 79.3 78.0 79.2 79.5 87.1 85.7 86.4 87.0 85.5 80.7 84.0 5.9% 4.7South Dakota 14.1 13.4 13.7 13.6 13.7 13.2 13.3 13.9 15.1 14.9 15.1 7.3% 1.0Tennessee 125.2 124.2 123.2 120.9 123.0 124.6 127.0 126.7 120.3 100.3 107.1 ‐14.5% ‐18.1Texas 711.3 704.1 715.8 706.4 709.7 677.8 675.2 676.7 653.3 624.9 652.6 ‐8.3% ‐58.8Utah 65.1 62.9 62.1 62.7 65.3 67.0 68.3 70.4 69.9 65.0 64.2 ‐1.3% ‐0.9Vermont 6.8 6.6 6.4 6.5 7.0 6.8 6.7 6.6 6.1 6.3 6.0 ‐10.8% ‐0.7Virginia 122.3 120.0 118.5 122.2 126.5 128.5 122.0 127.7 117.4 106.3 109.8 ‐10.2% ‐12.5Washington 82.8 79.4 72.8 74.5 76.7 78.3 76.3 81.8 79.6 77.5 76.1 ‐8.1% ‐6.7West Virginia 113.4 103.5 116.2 112.5 109.8 111.9 112.2 114.6 110.6 89.1 98.9 ‐12.7% ‐14.4Wisconsin 107.5 105.5 106.7 104.3 107.1 110.5 102.7 104.7 105.7 96.7 99.2 ‐7.7% ‐8.3Wyoming 62.7 63.0 61.7 63.4 63.4 62.8 63.7 66.1 66.8 63.7 64.9 3.5% 2.2Total15,879.9 5,772.4 5,810.0 5,857.5 5,968.8 6,000.4 5,921.6 6,029.0 5,842.9 5,441.8 5,631.3 ‐4.2% ‐248.6Note:  The District of Columbia is included in the data tables, but not in the analysis as it is not a state.Source:  U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), State Energy Data System and EIA calculations made for this analysis.the data series differences.1For the United States as a country see, EIA, Monthly Energy Review, Section 12: Environment.  Differing methodologies between the two data series causesthe total for all states to be slightly different from the national‐level estimate.  The amount varies no more than 0.5 percent.  See Appendix A for details on Change 2000 to 2010  
  • 12. May 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration   |   State‐Level Energy‐Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, 2000‐2010  7 Table 2. 2010 state energy‐related carbon dioxide emissions by fuel million metric tons carbon dioxide                       Shares State Coal Petroleum Natural Gas  Total Coal Petroleum Natural GasAlabama 67.8 36.0 29.0 132.7 51.1% 27.1% 21.8%Alaska 1.4 19.6 17.8 38.7 3.5% 50.6% 45.9%Arizona 43.2 34.8 17.9 95.9 45.1% 36.3% 18.6%Arkansas 27.7 23.8 14.6 66.1 41.9% 36.0% 22.0%California 5.2 241.3 123.4 369.8 1.4% 65.2% 33.4%Colorado 36.1 33.5 26.8 96.5 37.4% 34.7% 27.8%Connecticut 2.7 23.4 10.8 36.9 7.3% 63.4% 29.3%Delaware 2.9 5.9 3.0 11.7 24.3% 50.4% 25.3%District of Columbia 0.0 1.5 1.8 3.3 0.2% 45.2% 54.6%Florida 60.2 123.2 62.6 246.0 24.5% 50.1% 25.5%Georgia 72.5 72.5 28.7 173.7 41.7% 41.8% 16.5%Hawaii 1.6 17.3 0.0 18.9 8.5% 91.4% 0.0%Idaho 0.8 10.9 4.5 16.2 4.9% 67.2% 27.8%Illinois 100.9 79.9 49.6 230.4 43.8% 34.7% 21.5%Indiana 136.8 52.3 30.0 219.1 62.4% 23.9% 13.7%Iowa 46.6 27.4 14.8 88.7 52.5% 30.9% 16.7%Kansas 34.0 25.8 15.3 75.0 45.3% 34.3% 20.4%Kentucky 95.3 42.8 12.6 150.7 63.2% 28.4% 8.4%Louisiana 24.4 121.4 77.7 223.5 10.9% 54.3% 34.8%Maine 0.2 14.0 4.3 18.5 1.2% 75.6% 23.2%Maryland 25.1 34.1 11.3 70.5 35.6% 48.3% 16.1%Massachusetts 7.9 41.4 23.6 73.0 10.8% 56.8% 32.4%Michigan 70.7 54.9 40.2 165.9 42.6% 33.1% 24.2%Minnesota 29.8 41.0 22.7 93.4 31.9% 43.9% 24.2%Mississippi 14.0 28.2 23.2 65.5 21.4% 43.1% 35.5%Missouri 75.7 45.1 15.0 135.7 55.8% 33.2% 11.0%Montana 19.2 11.8 3.9 34.9 55.0% 33.9% 11.1%Nebraska 24.0 15.0 9.0 48.0 50.1% 31.2% 18.7%Nevada 7.6 16.3 14.2 38.1 19.9% 42.8% 37.3%New Hampshire 3.2 10.5 3.3 17.0 18.8% 61.6% 19.6%New Jersey 6.8 73.2 35.5 115.4 5.8% 63.4% 30.7%New Mexico 25.3 16.5 13.1 54.8 46.1% 30.1% 23.8%New York 15.8 92.2 64.9 172.8 9.1% 53.3% 37.6%North Carolina 70.7 55.8 16.3 142.9 49.5% 39.1% 11.4%North Dakota 38.6 10.5 3.4 52.5 73.5% 20.0% 6.5%Ohio 127.9 78.3 42.9 249.1 51.4% 31.4% 17.2%Oklahoma 32.7 33.8 37.0 103.4 31.6% 32.7% 35.8%Oregon 4.0 23.4 12.9 40.3 10.0% 58.0% 32.0%Pennsylvania 123.7 85.7 47.1 256.6 48.2% 33.4% 18.4%Rhode Island 0.0 5.9 5.1 11.0 0.0% 53.9% 46.1%South Carolina 38.2 33.9 11.9 84.0 45.5% 40.4% 14.2%South Dakota 3.7 7.6 3.8 15.1 24.4% 50.5% 25.2%Tennessee 48.6 44.8 13.7 107.1 45.4% 41.8% 12.8%Texas 151.6 318.0 183.0 652.6 23.2% 48.7% 28.0%Utah 33.6 18.5 12.1 64.2 52.3% 28.7% 18.9%Vermont 0.0 5.6 0.5 6.0 0.0% 92.5% 7.5%Virginia 32.6 56.7 20.4 109.8 29.7% 51.7% 18.6%Washington 9.0 51.5 15.6 76.1 11.8% 67.7% 20.5%West Virginia 80.0 12.5 6.4 98.9 80.8% 12.7% 6.5%Wisconsin 43.3 36.0 20.0 99.2 43.6% 36.3% 20.1%Wyoming 45.7 11.3 7.9 64.9 70.4% 17.4% 12.1%Total11,969.0 2,377.2 1,285.0 5,631.3 35.0% 42.2% 22.8%Note:  The District of Columbia is included in the data tables, but not in the analysis as it is not a state.Source:  U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), State Energy Data System and EIA calculations made for this analysis.1For the United States as a country see, EIA, Monthly Energy Review, Section 12: Environment.  Differing methodologies between the two data series causes the total for all states to be slightly different from the national‐level estimate.  The amount  varies no more than 0.5 percent.  See Appendix A for details on the data series differences. 
  • 13. May 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration   |   State‐Level Energy‐Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, 2000‐2010  8 Table 3. 2010 state energy‐related carbon dioxide emissions by sector million metric tons carbon dioxideState Commercial Electric Power Residential Industrial Transportation TotalAlabama 2.1 76.7 2.8 17.7 33.4 132.7Alaska 2.5 3.0 1.8 16.6 14.8 38.7Arizona 2.4 54.4 2.3 4.8 32.1 95.9Arkansas 2.6 32.3 2.3 8.6 20.3 66.1California 15.9 43.5 28.9 67.5 214.0 369.8Colorado 4.2 39.9 7.8 14.9 29.7 96.5Connecticut 3.4 7.7 7.7 1.9 16.2 36.9Delaware 0.8 4.2 1.1 1.1 4.5 11.7District of Columbia 1.2 0.2 0.8 0.0 1.1 3.3Florida 5.4 119.6 1.6 12.4 107.0 246.0Georgia 4.0 79.1 8.3 14.5 67.8 173.7Hawaii 0.3 7.6 0.1 1.7 9.3 18.9Idaho 1.1 0.7 1.6 3.4 9.4 16.2Illinois 11.5 94.0 23.7 33.9 67.2 230.4Indiana 5.4 114.3 8.7 48.5 42.2 219.1Iowa 4.1 40.6 4.5 18.0 21.6 88.7Kansas 2.0 35.4 4.5 15.1 18.0 75.0Kentucky 2.4 94.2 3.7 18.0 32.4 150.7Louisiana 1.9 42.6 2.6 128.1 48.2 223.5Maine 1.8 2.6 2.7 2.9 8.6 18.5Maryland 5.0 24.9 6.6 4.2 29.8 70.5Massachusetts 6.8 18.2 13.7 3.4 30.8 73.0Michigan 9.4 70.4 19.0 17.4 49.7 165.9Minnesota 5.7 29.3 8.3 17.3 32.7 93.4Mississippi 1.5 26.4 2.0 10.4 25.2 65.5Missouri 4.1 76.0 7.0 9.3 39.4 135.7Montana 1.2 19.8 1.6 4.5 7.7 34.9Nebraska 1.9 23.1 2.7 7.8 12.6 48.0Nevada 1.8 16.8 2.4 2.7 14.3 38.1New Hampshire 1.3 5.4 2.3 0.8 7.3 17.0New Jersey 10.9 17.7 14.7 6.5 65.6 115.4New Mexico 1.6 29.0 2.3 8.2 13.7 54.8New York 25.2 38.1 31.7 9.1 68.7 172.8North Carolina 5.2 72.2 6.5 10.1 48.9 142.9North Dakota 0.9 29.5 1.0 14.2 6.9 52.5Ohio 10.5 120.8 17.7 34.8 65.3 249.1Oklahoma 2.7 47.4 4.1 20.7 28.5 103.4Oregon 1.9 9.8 2.5 4.4 21.6 40.3Pennsylvania 10.5 119.6 20.4 39.5 66.5 256.6Rhode Island 0.9 3.1 2.3 0.5 4.2 11.0South Carolina 1.8 40.9 2.3 7.6 31.6 84.0South Dakota 0.8 3.5 1.1 3.3 6.5 15.1Tennessee 3.9 43.3 4.9 13.7 41.4 107.1Texas 12.2 220.4 13.7 211.4 194.9 652.6Utah 2.4 34.8 3.8 7.0 16.2 64.2Vermont 0.6 0.0 1.3 0.5 3.5 6.0Virginia 5.0 34.3 7.2 12.6 50.7 109.8Washington 3.8 13.1 5.1 12.0 42.1 76.1West Virginia 1.6 74.3 1.9 9.6 11.6 98.9Wisconsin 5.2 42.6 8.6 12.6 30.2 99.2Wyoming 1.0 42.8 0.9 11.8 8.4 64.9Total1222.3 2,240.0 337.1 957.8 1,874.1 5,631.3Note:  The District of Columbia is included in the data tables, but not in the analysis as it is not a state.1For the United States as a country see, EIA, Monthly Energy Review, Section 12: Environment.  Differing methodologies between the two data series causes the total for all states to be slightly different from the national‐level estimate.  The amount varies no more  than 0.5 percent.  See Appendix A for details on the data series differences.Source:  U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), State Energy Data System and EIA calculations made for this analysis.  
  • 14. May 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration   |   State‐Level Energy‐Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, 2000‐2010  9 Table 4. 2010 state energy‐related carbon dioxide emission shares by sector percent of total SharesState Commercial Electric Power  Residential Industrial TransportationAlabama 1.6% 57.8% 2.1% 13.3% 25.1%Alaska 6.4% 7.9% 4.6% 42.9% 38.2%Arizona 2.5% 56.7% 2.4% 5.0% 33.4%Arkansas 3.9% 48.9% 3.5% 13.1% 30.7%California 4.3% 11.8% 7.8% 18.2% 57.9%Colorado 4.3% 41.3% 8.1% 15.5% 30.8%Connecticut 9.2% 20.8% 20.9% 5.2% 43.9%Delaware 7.1% 36.0% 9.0% 9.1% 38.8%District of Columbia 35.5% 5.6% 25.2% 1.0% 32.7%Florida 2.2% 48.6% 0.7% 5.0% 43.5%Georgia 2.3% 45.5% 4.8% 8.3% 39.0%Hawaii 1.3% 40.1% 0.3% 9.0% 49.3%Idaho 6.6% 4.1% 10.0% 21.0% 58.3%Illinois 5.0% 40.8% 10.3% 14.7% 29.2%Indiana 2.4% 52.2% 4.0% 22.1% 19.3%Iowa 4.7% 45.7% 5.1% 20.2% 24.3%Kansas 2.7% 47.2% 6.0% 20.1% 24.0%Kentucky 1.6% 62.5% 2.5% 11.9% 21.5%Louisiana 0.9% 19.1% 1.2% 57.3% 21.6%Maine 9.6% 14.0% 14.6% 15.6% 46.3%Maryland 7.0% 35.3% 9.4% 5.9% 42.3%Massachusetts 9.3% 24.9% 18.8% 4.7% 42.3%Michigan 5.6% 42.4% 11.4% 10.5% 30.0%Minnesota 6.2% 31.4% 8.9% 18.6% 35.0%Mississippi 2.4% 40.3% 3.0% 15.9% 38.4%Missouri 3.0% 56.0% 5.1% 6.9% 29.0%Montana 3.6% 56.8% 4.7% 13.0% 22.0%Nebraska 3.9% 48.1% 5.6% 16.2% 26.2%Nevada 4.8% 44.2% 6.2% 7.2% 37.6%New Hampshire 7.5% 31.8% 13.5% 4.5% 42.7%New Jersey 9.5% 15.4% 12.7% 5.6% 56.8%New Mexico 2.9% 52.9% 4.2% 15.0% 25.0%New York 14.6% 22.0% 18.3% 5.3% 39.8%North Carolina 3.6% 50.6% 4.5% 7.1% 34.2%North Dakota 1.7% 56.2% 1.9% 27.0% 13.1%Ohio 4.2% 48.5% 7.1% 14.0% 26.2%Oklahoma 2.7% 45.8% 4.0% 20.0% 27.6%Oregon 4.7% 24.2% 6.3% 11.0% 53.8%Pennsylvania 4.1% 46.6% 8.0% 15.4% 25.9%Rhode Island 8.5% 28.0% 20.5% 4.7% 38.4%South Carolina 2.1% 48.6% 2.7% 9.0% 37.6%South Dakota 5.2% 23.2% 7.0% 22.0% 42.7%Tennessee 3.6% 40.4% 4.5% 12.7% 38.7%Texas 1.9% 33.8% 2.1% 32.4% 29.9%Utah 3.8% 54.1% 5.9% 10.9% 25.3%Note: The District of Columbia is included in the data tables, but not in the analysis as it is not a state.Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, State Energy Data System and EIA calculations made for this analysis.  
  • 15. May 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration   |   State‐Level Energy‐Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, 2000‐2010  10 Table 5. Per capita energy‐related carbon dioxide emissions by state (2000 ‐ 2010) metric tons carbon dioxide per person Change2000 to 2010State 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 Percent AbsoluteAlabama 31.5 29.6 30.6 30.6 31.0 31.1 31.3 31.5 29.8 25.4 28.1 ‐11.0% ‐3.5Alaska 70.6 68.5 67.9 67.2 70.9 72.0 67.8 64.9 57.6 54.6 54.6 ‐22.6% ‐16.0Arizona 16.6 16.7 16.1 16.0 16.8 16.2 16.2 16.1 15.9 14.4 14.4 ‐13.7% ‐2.3Arkansas 23.6 23.2 22.5 22.5 22.6 21.5 21.9 22.2 22.2 21.3 22.7 ‐3.7% ‐0.9California 11.2 11.2 11.0 11.1 11.0 10.9 11.1 11.2 10.7 10.2 9.9 ‐11.5% ‐1.3Colorado 19.6 20.9 20.2 19.8 20.3 20.5 20.3 20.5 19.8 18.7 18.9 ‐3.2% ‐0.6Connecticut 12.5 12.1 11.6 12.2 12.8 12.6 11.7 11.6 10.9 10.4 10.5 ‐16.5% ‐2.1Delaware 20.7 19.8 19.3 19.7 19.5 20.2 18.5 19.3 18.2 13.4 13.1 ‐36.4% ‐7.5District of Columbia 7.5 7.1 7.2 6.8 6.9 6.7 5.5 5.8 5.3 5.3 5.4 ‐28.5% ‐2.1Florida 14.9 14.6 14.5 14.4 14.8 14.7 14.4 14.1 13.0 12.2 13.2 ‐11.7% ‐1.7Georgia 20.4 19.0 19.2 19.2 19.5 20.2 19.5 19.4 17.9 16.6 17.5 ‐14.1% ‐2.9Hawaii 15.5 15.8 16.7 17.5 18.1 18.4 18.5 19.2 15.4 14.7 14.5 ‐6.1% ‐0.9Idaho 12.0 11.7 11.1 10.4 11.2 11.0 10.8 10.9 10.3 9.9 10.4 ‐13.3% ‐1.6Illinois 18.7 17.8 17.9 18.1 18.6 19.1 18.4 19.0 18.8 17.5 17.8 ‐4.6% ‐0.9Indiana 39.1 37.3 37.7 38.3 38.3 37.9 37.3 37.0 36.2 32.5 34.0 ‐13.1% ‐5.1Iowa 26.6 26.1 26.3 26.0 26.8 26.7 27.1 28.7 29.5 27.8 29.4 10.6% 2.8Kansas 28.2 26.6 28.2 28.8 27.8 26.3 26.2 28.9 27.5 26.6 26.4 ‐6.5% ‐1.8Kentucky 35.7 36.4 36.3 34.9 36.4 36.6 37.0 36.8 35.8 33.3 34.7 ‐2.8% ‐1.0Louisiana 53.7 47.5 49.2 48.0 50.4 49.3 55.7 53.6 49.8 45.4 49.3 ‐8.1% ‐4.3Maine 17.5 17.5 18.5 18.0 18.4 17.6 16.2 16.0 14.8 14.1 14.1 ‐19.3% ‐3.4Maryland 14.6 14.5 14.3 14.6 14.8 15.0 13.8 13.9 13.2 12.6 12.3 ‐15.8% ‐2.3Massachusetts 12.9 12.8 12.9 13.0 12.8 13.1 11.8 12.3 11.8 10.8 11.0 ‐14.8% ‐1.9Michigan 19.3 18.8 18.7 18.3 18.6 18.8 17.7 18.0 17.5 16.5 16.7 ‐13.7% ‐2.6Minnesota 19.8 19.0 19.4 20.0 19.8 19.9 19.3 19.4 19.2 17.7 17.7 ‐10.8% ‐2.1Mississippi 21.3 24.3 21.7 22.0 22.5 21.8 22.6 23.2 21.8 20.5 22.1 3.9% 0.8Missouri 22.4 23.2 23.2 24.2 24.3 24.6 24.2 23.8 23.2 22.0 22.6 0.9% 0.2Montana 34.7 35.2 33.7 35.6 37.2 38.0 37.8 39.5 37.3 33.4 35.6 2.6% 0.9Nebraska 24.1 24.8 24.5 24.8 24.7 24.8 25.1 25.2 26.1 26.1 26.5 9.8% 2.4Nevada 22.4 21.3 19.1 19.4 20.5 20.7 16.6 16.3 15.8 15.1 14.3 ‐36.1% ‐8.1New Hampshire 14.1 13.5 13.9 16.2 17.0 16.4 14.8 14.6 14.4 13.1 12.8 ‐8.9% ‐1.3New Jersey 14.4 14.0 13.9 13.9 14.2 14.8 13.9 14.9 14.4 12.7 13.2 ‐8.0% ‐1.2New Mexico 31.9 31.8 29.9 30.6 31.0 30.9 30.8 30.1 29.0 29.2 27.0 ‐15.4% ‐4.9New York 11.1 10.8 10.5 10.9 11.1 10.9 9.9 10.3 9.8 9.0 8.8 ‐20.7% ‐2.3North Carolina 18.3 17.4 17.4 17.2 17.4 17.6 16.6 17.0 16.1 14.2 15.1 ‐17.4% ‐3.2North Dakota 79.3 81.3 81.1 80.5 77.9 82.6 79.8 82.5 82.8 79.6 80.4 1.3% 1.1Ohio 23.2 22.3 22.8 23.4 22.9 23.5 22.9 23.3 22.7 20.6 21.6 ‐7.0% ‐1.6Oklahoma 29.0 29.3 29.2 29.6 28.4 30.3 30.9 30.4 31.1 28.5 27.8 ‐4.1% ‐1.2Oregon 12.0 11.7 11.1 11.1 11.4 11.3 11.0 11.8 11.4 10.8 10.4 ‐13.2% ‐1.6Pennsylvania 22.5 21.4 21.9 22.1 22.3 22.6 22.0 22.2 21.1 19.5 20.3 ‐9.7% ‐2.2Rhode Island 11.0 11.5 10.8 10.5 10.0 10.3 9.7 10.3 10.1 10.7 10.4 ‐5.3% ‐0.6South Carolina 19.7 19.2 19.3 19.2 20.8 20.2 19.9 19.7 19.0 17.7 18.3 ‐7.3% ‐1.4South Dakota 18.7 17.7 18.0 17.7 17.7 17.0 16.9 17.5 18.8 18.3 18.5 ‐1.1% ‐0.2Tennessee 22.0 21.6 21.2 20.6 20.8 20.8 20.8 20.5 19.3 15.9 16.9 ‐23.0% ‐5.1Texas 34.0 33.0 33.0 32.0 31.7 29.7 28.9 28.4 26.9 25.2 25.9 ‐23.8% ‐8.1Utah 29.0 27.5 26.6 26.4 26.8 26.8 26.4 26.4 25.7 23.4 22.7 ‐21.8% ‐6.3Vermont 11.1 10.8 10.3 10.6 11.4 11.0 10.8 10.6 9.9 10.2 9.7 ‐12.6% ‐1.4Virginia 17.2 16.7 16.3 16.6 17.0 17.0 16.0 16.6 15.1 13.5 13.8 ‐19.8% ‐3.4Washington 14.0 13.3 12.0 12.2 12.4 12.5 12.0 12.7 12.1 11.6 11.3 ‐19.4% ‐2.7West Virginia 62.8 57.6 64.6 62.4 60.9 62.0 62.1 63.2 60.9 48.9 54.2 ‐13.6% ‐8.6Wisconsin 20.0 19.5 19.6 19.0 19.4 19.9 18.4 18.7 18.8 17.1 17.5 ‐12.5% ‐2.5Wyoming 127.0 127.8 124.2 127.1 126.1 124.1 124.2 126.4 125.5 117.0 118.5 ‐6.7% ‐8.5Average all states 20.8 20.3 20.2 20.2 20.4 20.3 19.8 20.0 19.2 17.7 18.2 ‐12.6% ‐2.6Source:  U.S. Energy Information Administration, State Energy Data System and EIA calculations made for this analysis.Note:  The District of Columbia is included in the data tables, but not in the analysis as it is not a state. 
  • 16. May 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration   |   State‐Level Energy‐Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, 2000‐2010  11 Table 6. Energy‐intensity by state (2000 – 2010) thousand Btu per dollar of GDP Change2000 to 2010State 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 Percent AbsoluteAlabama 18.3 17.1 17.4 17.2 16.9 16.4 16.3 16.2 15.9 15.3 16.0 ‐12.6% ‐2.3Alaska 21.7 20.6 19.8 20.2 20.3 21.1 18.7 17.8 15.9 14.1 14.2 ‐34.5% ‐7.5Arizona 8.7 8.5 8.4 8.0 8.3 7.6 7.2 7.3 7.6 7.5 7.6 ‐12.6% ‐1.1Arkansas 14.4 14.2 14.0 13.6 13.1 12.2 12.3 12.6 12.5 12.4 13.0 ‐9.9% ‐1.4California 4.9 4.9 4.8 4.7 4.5 4.3 4.3 4.2 4.0 4.0 4.0 ‐17.8% ‐0.9Colorado 6.3 6.7 6.4 6.4 6.5 6.4 6.3 6.4 6.3 6.1 6.2 ‐1.8% ‐0.1Connecticut 4.6 4.3 4.3 4.5 4.5 4.3 4.1 3.9 3.8 3.9 3.7 ‐19.9% ‐0.9Delaware 5.0 4.7 4.8 4.6 4.4 4.4 4.1 4.3 4.3 3.3 3.3 ‐34.6% ‐1.7District of Columbia 1.0 0.9 0.9 0.8 0.8 0.8 0.6 0.7 0.6 0.6 0.6 ‐39.4% ‐0.4Florida 6.9 6.6 6.6 6.4 6.3 6.0 5.9 5.8 5.8 5.8 6.1 ‐11.4% ‐0.8Georgia 8.5 8.1 8.3 8.2 8.2 8.3 8.0 7.9 7.6 7.8 8.1 ‐4.6% ‐0.4Hawaii 5.6 5.6 5.8 5.9 5.8 5.7 5.6 5.7 4.7 4.6 4.6 ‐18.3% ‐1.0Idaho 10.1 9.0 8.9 8.0 8.0 7.6 8.1 7.5 7.5 7.8 7.8 ‐23.0% ‐2.3Illinois 8.1 7.9 7.9 7.9 7.8 7.9 7.5 7.6 7.8 7.8 7.6 ‐5.9% ‐0.5Indiana 13.8 13.4 13.4 13.2 12.8 12.8 12.4 12.2 12.3 11.9 11.9 ‐14.1% ‐1.9Iowa 11.1 11.0 11.0 10.5 10.3 10.4 10.5 10.9 11.6 11.9 12.4 10.9% 1.2Kansas 12.0 11.4 11.7 11.7 11.5 10.4 10.2 10.9 10.4 10.6 10.6 ‐11.7% ‐1.4Kentucky 14.5 14.9 14.7 14.1 14.5 14.4 14.2 14.2 13.8 13.5 13.5 ‐7.0% ‐1.0Louisiana 26.0 22.6 23.2 21.3 21.4 20.1 21.6 22.6 21.5 18.9 20.4 ‐21.6% ‐5.6Maine 11.9 11.6 11.8 11.0 11.1 11.2 10.3 10.3 10.3 9.4 9.5 ‐20.0% ‐2.4Maryland 6.1 5.7 5.5 5.6 5.5 5.4 5.0 5.0 4.8 4.7 4.5 ‐26.1% ‐1.6Massachusetts 4.5 4.3 4.3 4.3 4.2 4.2 3.9 3.9 3.8 3.7 3.7 ‐18.3% ‐0.8Michigan 8.3 8.5 8.4 8.1 8.4 8.5 8.0 8.2 8.3 8.3 8.1 ‐1.8% ‐0.2Minnesota 7.9 7.6 7.6 7.4 7.2 7.3 7.1 7.3 7.4 7.2 7.1 ‐9.8% ‐0.8Mississippi 14.5 15.5 14.3 13.8 14.0 13.6 13.8 13.9 12.7 12.7 13.5 ‐6.8% ‐1.0Missouri 8.7 9.0 8.9 9.1 9.1 9.2 9.1 9.0 8.9 8.8 8.8 1.7% 0.1Montana 20.4 18.3 18.9 18.4 18.6 18.9 19.0 18.8 18.4 16.9 17.7 ‐13.1% ‐2.7Nebraska 10.6 10.6 10.7 10.0 10.3 10.0 9.9 10.1 10.5 10.6 11.1 5.1% 0.5Nevada 7.7 7.5 6.8 6.8 6.8 6.5 5.7 5.5 5.6 5.9 5.8 ‐24.7% ‐1.9New Hampshire 7.5 7.3 7.4 8.3 8.6 8.4 7.6 7.8 7.7 7.3 7.5 ‐0.3% 0.0New Jersey 5.8 5.5 5.5 5.3 5.3 5.4 5.1 5.4 5.2 5.0 5.1 ‐12.0% ‐0.7New Mexico 13.8 13.4 12.4 12.4 11.9 12.1 12.1 12.2 11.9 12.1 11.0 ‐20.1% ‐2.8New York 4.6 4.4 4.4 4.4 4.4 4.2 3.8 3.8 3.8 3.8 3.5 ‐24.7% ‐1.1North Carolina 7.8 7.5 7.5 7.7 7.5 7.2 6.7 6.7 6.7 6.5 6.6 ‐16.4% ‐1.3North Dakota 29.5 29.5 27.9 25.9 25.5 26.2 24.9 24.9 23.8 23.0 22.8 ‐22.5% ‐6.6Ohio 9.0 8.8 8.6 8.7 8.6 8.7 8.6 8.7 8.7 8.2 8.5 ‐6.0% ‐0.5Oklahoma 13.5 13.2 13.0 13.2 12.7 13.4 13.2 13.1 13.1 11.1 12.3 ‐9.0% ‐1.2Oregon 9.0 8.2 8.1 7.8 7.4 7.1 6.8 6.7 6.7 6.7 6.2 ‐31.1% ‐2.8Pennsylvania 10.0 9.6 9.6 9.5 9.6 9.6 9.2 9.2 9.0 8.7 8.8 ‐11.9% ‐1.2Rhode Island 5.2 5.2 4.7 4.3 4.0 4.1 3.9 4.2 4.4 4.7 4.5 ‐14.1% ‐0.7South Carolina 12.9 12.4 12.7 12.2 13.0 12.8 12.5 12.3 12.2 12.5 12.5 ‐3.6% ‐0.5South Dakota 10.0 8.4 8.5 8.4 8.4 8.2 8.5 8.3 8.7 9.1 9.8 ‐1.6% ‐0.2Tennessee 10.5 10.5 10.1 9.8 9.7 9.6 9.1 9.2 8.8 8.4 8.4 ‐19.4% ‐2.0Texas 14.2 13.6 13.6 13.4 12.8 12.1 11.6 11.1 10.8 10.5 10.6 ‐25.5% ‐3.6Utah 10.8 10.2 9.9 9.9 9.9 9.7 9.4 9.2 9.1 8.6 8.5 ‐21.3% ‐2.3Vermont 9.1 8.2 7.9 7.9 7.7 7.6 8.1 7.5 7.6 8.1 7.5 ‐16.7% ‐1.5Virginia 6.9 6.4 6.3 6.2 6.3 6.2 5.8 5.9 5.5 5.3 5.2 ‐25.5% ‐1.8Washington 8.6 7.5 8.0 7.7 7.6 7.3 7.4 7.1 6.9 6.7 6.6 ‐23.1% ‐2.0West Virginia 27.4 25.0 27.6 26.6 25.6 25.9 25.7 25.9 24.6 20.2 21.6 ‐21.2% ‐5.8Wisconsin 8.7 8.5 8.4 8.2 8.0 8.2 7.6 7.7 7.8 7.6 7.6 ‐12.3% ‐1.1Wyoming 33.4 31.3 30.2 30.6 29.5 29.7 27.5 28.0 26.9 23.1 24.6 ‐26.5% ‐8.8Average all states 8.8 8.5 8.4 8.3 8.2 8.0 7.7 7.7 7.6 7.4 7.5 ‐15.2% ‐1.3Source:  U.S. Energy Information Administration, State Energy Data System and EIA calculations made for this analysis.Note:  The District of Columbia is included in the data tables, but not in the analysis as it is not a state. 
  • 17. May 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration   |   State‐Level Energy‐Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, 2000‐2010  12 Table 7. Carbon intensity of the energy supply by state (2000 – 2010) kilograms energy‐related carbon dioxide per million Btu Change2000 to 2010State 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 Percent AbsoluteAlabama 57.9 57.6 57.3 57.0 56.3 57.2 57.5 58.1 55.9 51.3 53.9 ‐6.9% ‐4.0Alaska 59.7 59.0 59.4 59.4 60.3 60.2 61.3 60.9 60.6 60.1 60.4 1.1% 0.6Arizona 55.0 56.0 54.8 55.8 56.2 57.0 57.9 56.9 56.0 54.6 55.0 0.1% 0.1Arkansas 56.8 56.3 54.4 54.6 55.1 55.4 55.2 54.8 55.6 54.3 55.5 ‐2.3% ‐1.3California 52.8 54.0 53.9 53.4 53.6 53.0 53.1 54.1 54.2 53.7 52.9 0.2% 0.1Colorado 69.1 68.8 69.4 68.4 68.9 68.5 68.6 67.5 66.5 65.8 66.5 ‐3.7% ‐2.6Connecticut 49.9 51.8 50.9 50.8 50.4 51.4 49.4 49.3 49.6 47.2 47.2 ‐5.5% ‐2.8Delaware 69.6 68.3 67.5 69.1 69.4 69.9 69.5 70.0 69.1 65.2 64.0 ‐8.1% ‐5.6District of Columbia 61.0 62.1 61.3 60.7 61.2 61.6 60.1 59.6 59.2 59.0 59.2 ‐3.0% ‐1.8Florida 63.3 63.8 62.7 63.1 63.3 63.5 62.2 62.3 60.0 58.6 59.9 ‐5.5% ‐3.5Georgia 59.6 59.5 58.6 59.7 59.7 61.3 61.2 61.5 61.3 59.1 58.9 ‐1.2% ‐0.7Hawaii 68.6 71.2 72.0 71.3 71.4 71.0 71.3 71.4 70.0 69.8 69.5 1.2% 0.8Idaho 39.2 43.9 41.8 42.9 43.2 42.2 39.3 42.4 40.6 39.5 41.2 5.1% 2.0Illinois 53.4 52.6 52.4 52.2 53.4 53.7 53.5 53.5 53.0 51.8 52.0 ‐2.5% ‐1.4Indiana 77.6 78.0 77.4 77.1 77.5 77.4 78.1 77.6 76.8 75.5 75.1 ‐3.2% ‐2.5Iowa 66.3 67.3 66.1 66.3 64.6 63.4 62.7 62.0 60.3 56.6 56.2 ‐15.1% ‐10.0Kansas 64.8 63.7 65.1 65.0 63.9 65.7 64.9 64.6 64.0 63.0 62.2 ‐4.0% ‐2.6Kentucky 77.6 77.5 76.6 76.2 76.3 76.3 77.4 77.3 77.6 76.7 77.2 ‐0.5% ‐0.4Louisiana 54.9 54.7 54.6 55.4 55.4 56.0 56.6 56.3 57.0 56.1 56.2 2.3% 1.3Maine 45.2 45.5 46.8 48.2 47.3 45.3 44.9 44.1 40.7 43.3 42.5 ‐6.0% ‐2.7Maryland 60.7 62.6 62.7 61.9 61.8 62.2 61.5 60.9 60.1 59.1 59.2 ‐2.5% ‐1.5Massachusetts 61.1 62.2 61.7 62.0 61.6 62.4 60.3 61.1 59.8 58.9 58.4 ‐4.4% ‐2.7Michigan 62.5 61.4 59.9 60.5 60.0 59.6 60.4 60.2 59.5 60.7 59.0 ‐5.6% ‐3.5Minnesota 58.6 58.8 59.0 60.4 59.4 58.5 58.1 57.4 56.3 54.8 53.9 ‐8.1% ‐4.7Mississippi 54.9 58.8 56.7 57.9 57.7 56.8 56.9 57.1 57.6 55.3 55.6 1.2% 0.7Missouri 70.5 70.9 71.1 71.6 71.8 71.7 71.6 71.1 70.2 69.8 70.6 0.3% 0.2Montana 59.6 65.3 60.4 63.2 63.5 62.4 60.9 62.4 61.4 60.2 62.0 3.9% 2.4Nebraska 59.9 60.9 59.2 61.2 58.7 60.2 59.7 56.9 57.2 57.7 54.1 ‐9.7% ‐5.8Nevada 67.2 67.2 66.4 66.8 66.7 66.5 61.3 61.7 61.2 59.7 59.2 ‐11.9% ‐8.0New Hampshire 47.7 47.6 47.6 49.1 48.1 47.2 46.9 44.8 44.9 43.9 41.5 ‐13.0% ‐6.2New Jersey 53.5 53.2 52.7 53.9 54.9 54.7 53.5 53.8 53.7 51.2 52.0 ‐2.9% ‐1.5New Mexico 71.9 72.5 72.1 72.8 72.5 71.9 71.2 69.7 69.1 69.9 68.4 ‐4.9% ‐3.6New York 52.8 52.5 51.7 52.9 52.7 52.4 50.4 50.8 49.3 47.8 47.8 ‐9.4% ‐5.0North Carolina 59.5 59.6 59.2 57.6 59.0 59.5 59.2 60.5 58.9 56.4 57.2 ‐3.8% ‐2.3North Dakota 81.2 81.3 81.5 82.0 80.8 81.2 80.6 80.3 79.1 77.0 73.6 ‐9.3% ‐7.6Ohio 68.0 69.0 70.3 70.9 69.2 70.0 69.8 69.9 69.0 68.6 68.7 1.1% 0.7Oklahoma 67.3 67.1 67.5 67.5 65.8 65.9 66.0 64.5 64.8 64.3 63.2 ‐6.1% ‐4.1Oregon 37.9 41.3 38.3 39.0 39.1 40.3 37.4 40.2 39.3 38.6 39.1 3.0% 1.1Pennsylvania 61.0 60.4 60.6 60.6 60.1 60.7 60.6 60.1 58.9 57.2 57.5 ‐5.7% ‐3.5Rhode Island 58.1 59.2 59.9 60.3 60.2 60.3 58.9 58.9 55.7 56.4 56.1 ‐3.4% ‐2.0South Carolina 46.9 47.7 46.3 46.9 48.2 47.1 48.0 47.8 47.9 45.8 46.4 ‐1.0% ‐0.5South Dakota 52.6 57.5 54.6 52.9 53.0 50.9 49.6 50.4 49.2 45.3 42.4 ‐19.2% ‐10.1Tennessee 60.4 59.1 58.8 58.2 57.7 58.0 60.3 60.0 59.2 54.4 55.5 ‐8.0% ‐4.9Texas 57.3 57.7 57.4 57.6 57.1 57.5 57.1 56.9 56.6 56.0 55.7 ‐2.9% ‐1.6Utah 75.6 76.3 76.5 75.8 76.6 76.3 75.3 75.0 74.5 74.0 73.5 ‐2.8% ‐2.1Vermont 37.3 39.3 38.4 38.1 40.7 39.3 35.9 37.9 34.6 34.0 34.5 ‐7.6% ‐2.8Virginia 59.1 60.4 60.1 60.1 58.9 58.5 58.1 58.6 57.3 55.1 55.8 ‐5.6% ‐3.3Washington 37.0 41.3 35.3 37.1 37.8 38.3 35.6 37.7 36.9 37.7 37.4 1.0% 0.4West Virginia 83.4 82.8 83.4 83.7 83.2 83.1 83.0 83.5 82.9 80.6 81.7 ‐2.0% ‐1.7Wisconsin 62.0 61.7 61.9 61.1 62.1 61.9 60.4 60.3 60.2 58.7 58.7 ‐5.3% ‐3.3Wyoming 81.1 81.3 81.2 81.0 81.4 80.7 80.7 79.7 79.2 77.6 76.8 ‐5.4% ‐4.3Average all states 59.5 60.1 59.5 59.8 59.7 59.9 59.5 59.5 58.9 57.6 57.6 ‐3.2% ‐1.9Source:  U.S. Energy Information Administration, State Energy Data System and EIA calculations made for this analysis.Note:  The District of Columbia is included in the data tables, but not in the analysis as it is not a state. 
  • 18. May 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration   |   State‐Level Energy‐Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, 2000‐2010  13 Table 8. Carbon intensity of the economy by state (2000 – 2010) metric tons energy‐related carbon dioxide per million dollars of GDP Change2000 to 2010State 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 Percent AbsoluteAlabama 1,058.7 986.0 997.7 980.5 950.1 936.4 935.7 938.5 889.0 785.5 861.3 ‐18.6% ‐197.4Alaska 1,298.3 1,216.1 1,175.5 1,199.3 1,223.9 1,270.7 1,148.5 1,084.2 961.1 850.3 859.7 ‐33.8% ‐438.6Arizona 479.6 475.0 460.5 446.2 465.3 433.7 418.4 416.7 426.9 409.9 419.8 ‐12.5% ‐59.8Arkansas 817.9 798.1 758.7 741.3 722.0 676.9 680.3 691.9 694.0 671.4 720.0 ‐12.0% ‐97.9California 259.3 262.0 256.3 251.5 241.3 229.9 227.4 227.4 219.1 216.4 213.5 ‐17.6% ‐45.8Colorado 434.0 459.9 444.6 438.6 444.7 438.7 432.2 432.1 417.0 403.8 410.3 ‐5.5% ‐23.7Connecticut 230.8 222.6 217.2 228.6 228.4 223.0 200.5 192.0 186.1 184.2 174.7 ‐24.3% ‐56.1Delaware 346.8 320.4 324.2 318.3 305.2 309.8 286.3 301.3 295.0 218.3 208.6 ‐39.9% ‐138.2District of Columbia 61.5 55.3 54.9 50.1 49.5 47.4 38.0 39.6 35.6 36.6 36.1 ‐41.2% ‐25.3Florida 436.0 423.0 414.2 401.7 401.5 383.6 367.3 361.7 348.2 342.5 365.3 ‐16.2% ‐70.7Georgia 509.4 479.7 488.7 488.3 491.2 506.4 490.3 488.0 465.5 458.5 479.9 ‐5.8% ‐29.5Hawaii 385.4 398.6 413.8 417.7 416.8 407.9 398.1 407.5 328.0 321.7 318.7 ‐17.3% ‐66.6Idaho 395.2 394.7 370.9 344.4 347.5 322.8 318.7 317.4 304.9 309.7 319.6 ‐19.1% ‐75.6Illinois 432.1 414.0 416.3 412.7 416.0 424.9 401.3 409.4 412.0 403.7 396.3 ‐8.3% ‐35.8Indiana 1,073.3 1,047.8 1,032.8 1,018.1 996.2 988.0 970.1 943.9 945.5 897.4 892.5 ‐16.8% ‐180.7Iowa 738.4 742.4 727.5 693.7 667.1 656.2 661.0 673.4 700.5 675.2 695.1 ‐5.9% ‐43.3Kansas 776.9 723.3 764.8 763.4 736.0 684.7 662.9 703.8 668.7 666.3 658.1 ‐15.3% ‐118.8Kentucky 1,127.4 1,153.1 1,125.0 1,078.0 1,110.8 1,099.3 1,095.7 1,096.9 1,074.1 1,036.2 1,042.2 ‐7.6% ‐85.2Louisiana 1,427.7 1,234.8 1,265.3 1,182.3 1,186.5 1,124.3 1,223.5 1,271.5 1,224.1 1,061.6 1,145.0 ‐19.8% ‐282.6Maine 536.2 527.9 550.2 529.5 524.1 507.2 461.0 452.8 418.0 407.5 403.0 ‐24.8% ‐133.1Maryland 369.6 356.8 345.7 348.6 342.0 338.2 307.0 304.3 289.2 278.9 266.2 ‐28.0% ‐103.4Massachusetts 272.8 266.0 268.4 267.3 258.5 260.7 232.8 239.4 229.0 215.4 213.3 ‐21.8% ‐59.5Michigan 518.8 520.2 503.8 489.2 501.4 504.4 484.4 492.0 496.2 502.0 481.0 ‐7.3% ‐37.8Minnesota 462.7 445.1 446.9 448.7 429.3 426.8 414.8 420.7 415.4 396.2 383.9 ‐17.0% ‐78.8Mississippi 797.5 913.8 807.6 798.4 806.2 775.6 786.9 791.5 733.4 699.9 751.9 ‐5.7% ‐45.6Missouri 612.4 641.2 633.9 652.6 651.6 659.9 652.3 642.3 623.5 617.4 624.6 2.0% 12.2Montana 1,215.8 1,195.7 1,140.6 1,163.8 1,180.6 1,181.1 1,158.3 1,172.0 1,129.8 1,015.9 1,097.6 ‐9.7% ‐118.1Nebraska 634.8 647.5 634.6 614.2 605.8 599.6 592.2 577.5 600.9 610.8 602.2 ‐5.1% ‐32.5Nevada 514.3 501.3 453.8 451.6 454.6 434.1 347.0 340.5 344.0 355.1 341.2 ‐33.7% ‐173.1New Hampshire 358.3 347.5 352.1 404.9 415.2 396.5 356.4 351.0 347.6 322.6 311.0 ‐13.2% ‐47.3New Jersey 308.0 294.9 291.7 288.4 289.4 296.8 272.9 288.2 278.7 254.4 263.1 ‐14.6% ‐44.9New Mexico 991.4 967.4 896.4 904.8 864.4 872.5 864.2 849.5 823.4 847.4 753.1 ‐24.0% ‐238.4New York 244.9 230.7 225.0 235.0 232.3 219.1 192.1 195.5 187.4 179.7 167.1 ‐31.8% ‐77.8North Carolina 466.8 446.2 445.1 441.5 441.1 430.1 397.9 406.8 396.1 368.7 375.3 ‐19.6% ‐91.5North Dakota 2,393.4 2,401.1 2,270.2 2,126.3 2,062.2 2,125.1 2,009.6 2,001.5 1,886.3 1,768.3 1,680.8 ‐29.8% ‐712.6Ohio 615.2 605.3 605.8 616.2 593.5 606.4 596.9 606.2 598.9 565.3 584.5 ‐5.0% ‐30.7Oklahoma 907.2 884.2 881.1 887.6 832.4 886.0 870.5 846.2 849.0 713.2 775.0 ‐14.6% ‐132.2Oregon 340.2 338.6 310.6 304.3 290.9 286.2 255.4 269.1 262.7 259.7 241.5 ‐29.0% ‐98.7Pennsylvania 610.7 580.8 582.6 578.5 577.2 580.6 559.9 555.5 529.3 500.0 507.1 ‐17.0% ‐103.6Rhode Island 301.5 305.1 279.0 261.1 242.5 249.9 230.6 246.7 243.0 262.5 250.2 ‐17.0% ‐51.3South Carolina 606.5 590.2 589.9 574.2 625.7 604.0 600.0 588.1 582.3 573.8 579.0 ‐4.5% ‐27.6South Dakota 525.3 486.0 462.6 446.7 443.0 418.3 419.6 419.4 430.2 413.1 417.4 ‐20.5% ‐107.9Tennessee 632.0 620.1 596.5 572.8 560.3 554.9 550.6 550.5 523.3 457.3 468.3 ‐25.9% ‐163.8Texas 815.2 786.3 781.1 769.4 732.8 698.1 663.6 632.5 612.9 586.0 589.9 ‐27.6% ‐225.3Utah 817.3 776.1 759.4 753.2 761.1 738.0 705.7 689.3 678.9 634.7 624.8 ‐23.6% ‐192.5Vermont 338.1 322.8 303.0 302.5 313.5 299.6 291.2 285.3 263.2 276.0 260.4 ‐23.0% ‐77.7Virginia 410.0 385.8 375.9 374.4 371.9 360.0 335.5 348.0 317.6 289.4 288.4 ‐29.7% ‐121.6Washington 319.5 311.1 282.7 284.7 288.4 280.3 262.4 267.1 255.8 253.4 248.3 ‐22.3% ‐71.3West Virginia 2,288.4 2,072.3 2,297.9 2,223.7 2,130.3 2,154.1 2,128.5 2,158.1 2,035.7 1,624.9 1,767.2 ‐22.8% ‐521.2Wisconsin 539.8 525.6 521.8 498.9 498.0 504.6 461.2 464.5 471.8 448.2 448.4 ‐16.9% ‐91.4Wyoming 2,710.4 2,544.1 2,448.1 2,474.1 2,396.8 2,393.0 2,219.6 2,230.2 2,129.6 1,794.6 1,886.0 ‐30.4% ‐824.4Average all states 524.0 508.0 502.6 496.1 488.7 477.9 459.2 458.7 446.0 425.9 430.0 ‐17.9% ‐94.0Source:  U.S. Energy Information Administration, State Energy Data System and EIA calculations made for this analysis.Note:  The District of Columbia is included in the data tables, but not in the analysis as it is not a state.  
  • 19. May 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration   |   State‐Level Energy‐Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, 2000‐2010  14 Table 9. Net electricity trade index and primary electricity source for selected states (2000 – 2010) Primary SourceLeast CO2 per capitaNew York 0.9 1.0 1.0 0.9 0.9 0.9 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 0.9 NuclearIdaho 0.5 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.5 0.5 0.4 0.5 0.5 0.5 HydroelectricVermont 1.6 1.4 1.3 1.4 1.2 1.2 1.5 1.3 1.5 1.7 1.5 NuclearCalifornia 0.8 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.7 Natural GasConnecticut 1.0 0.9 0.9 0.9 1.0 1.0 1.1 0.9 0.9 1.1 1.1 NuclearRhode Island 1.0 1.1 0.9 0.7 0.6 0.8 0.8 0.9 1.0 1.0 1.0 Natural GasOregon 1.0 0.9 1.0 1.0 1.1 1.0 1.0 1.1 1.1 1.1 1.1 HydroelectricMassachusetts 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.8 0.8 0.8 0.8 0.8 0.8 0.8 0.8 Natural GasWashington 1.0 0.9 1.2 1.1 1.1 1.1 1.1 1.1 1.1 1.0 1.0 HydroelectricFlorida 0.9 0.9 0.9 0.9 0.9 0.9 0.9 0.9 0.9 0.9 0.9 Natural GasMost CO2 per capitaOklahoma 1.0 1.1 1.1 1.1 1.1 1.2 1.2 1.2 1.2 1.2 1.1 Natural GasNew Mexico 1.7 1.6 1.5 1.6 1.5 1.6 1.6 1.5 1.5 1.7 1.5 CoalIndiana 1.2 1.1 1.1 1.1 1.1 1.0 1.1 1.1 1.1 1.0 1.0 CoalMontana 1.7 1.9 1.7 1.8 1.7 1.6 1.6 1.5 1.5 1.3 2.0 CoalKentucky 1.1 1.1 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 CoalLouisiana 0.9 0.9 0.9 0.9 0.9 0.9 0.9 0.9 0.9 0.9 0.9 Natural GasWest Virginia 3.0 2.6 2.9 3.0 2.8 2.8 2.6 2.5 2.4 2.1 2.3 CoalAlaska 0.9 1.0 1.0 0.9 0.9 1.0 1.0 1.0 0.9 1.0 1.0 Natural GasNorth Dakota 3.0 2.6 2.4 2.3 2.2 2.6 2.3 2.3 2.3 2.3 2.4 CoalWyoming 3.3 3.1 3.0 3.0 2.9 2.9 2.6 2.5 2.4 2.4 2.5 Coal1990 through 2010 (Million kilowatthours)http://www.eia.gov/electricity/state/Note:  The District of Columbia is included in the data tables, but not in the analysis as it is not a state.Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, State Electricity Profiles, Table 10. Supply and Disposition of Electricity, 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009Less than 1.0 indicates a net importer of electricity.2010Greater than 1.0 indicates a net exporter of electricity.2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 
  • 20. May 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration   |   State‐Level Energy‐Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, 2000‐2010  15 Appendix A. Comparison of fuel detail for the State Energy Data System and the Annual and Monthly Energy Review data systems Energy Source State Energy Data System Annual/Monthly Energy ReviewConsumption Sector Category Fuel Detail Fuel DetailResidential  Coal Coal CoalResidential  Natural Gas Natural Gas Natural GasResidential  Petroleum Distillate Fuel Distillate FuelResidential  Petroleum Kerosene KeroseneResidential  Petroleum LPG LPGCommercial Coal Coal CoalCommercial Natural Gas Natural Gas Natural GasCommercial Petroleum Distillate Fuel Distillate FuelCommercial Petroleum Kerosene KeroseneCommercial Petroleum LPG LPGCommercial Petroleum Motor Gasoline Motor GasolineCommercial Petroleum Residual Fuel Residual FuelCommercial Petroleum Not Available Pet CokeIndustrial Coal Coal Total Coal TotalIndustrial Coal/Coke Not Available Coking coalIndustrial Coal Not Available Other CoalIndustrial Coal/Coke Not Available Net Coke ImportsIndustrial Natural Gas Natural Gas Natural GasIndustrial Petroleum Asphalt and Road Oil Asphalt and Road OilIndustrial Petroleum Distillate Fuel Distillate FuelIndustrial Petroleum Kerosene KeroseneIndustrial Petroleum LPG Total LPG TotalIndustrial Petroleum Not Available Normal Butane/ButyleneIndustrial Petroleum Not Available Ethane/EthyleneIndustrial Petroleum Not Available Isobutane/IsobutyleneIndustrial Petroleum Not Available Propane/PropyleneIndustrial Petroleum Not Available Butane/Propane MixIndustrial Petroleum Not Available Ethane/Propane MixIndustrial Petroleum Lubricants LubricantsIndustrial Petroleum Motor Gasoline Motor GasolineIndustrial Petroleum Residual Fuel Residual FuelIndustrial Petroleum Petroleum Products (Other) Detail as follows:Industrial Petroleum Not Available Petroleum CokeIndustrial Petroleum Not Available Aviation Gas Blending ComponentsIndustrial Petroleum Not AvailableMotor Gasoline Blending ComponentsIndustrial Petroleum Not Available Pentanes PlusIndustrial Petroleum Not Available Petrochemical FeedstocksIndustrial Petroleum Not Available Special NaphthasIndustrial Petroleum Not Available Still GasIndustrial Petroleum Not Available Unfinished OilsIndustrial Petroleum Not Available Waxes  
  • 21. May 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration   |   State‐Level Energy‐Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, 2000‐2010  16 Energy Source State Energy Data System Annual/Monthly Energy ReviewConsumption Sector Category Fuel Detail Fuel DetailTransportation  Coal Coal CoalTransportation  Natural Gas Natural Gas Natural GasTransportation  Petroleum Aviation Gasoline Aviation GasolineTransportation  Petroleum Distillate Fuel Distillate FuelTransportation  Petroleum Jet Fuel (Total) Jet Fuel (Total)Transportation  Petroleum LPG LPGTransportation  Petroleum Lubricants LubricantsTransportation  Petroleum Motor Gasoline Motor GasolineTransportation  Petroleum Residual Fuel Residual FuelElectric Power  Coal Coal CoalElectric Power  Natural Gas Natural Gas Natural GasElectric Power  PetroleumDistillate Fuel (inc. Kerosene Jet Fuel)Distillate Fuel (inc. Kerosene Jet Fuel)Electric Power  Petroleum Petroleum Coke Petroleum CokeElectric Power  Petroleum Residual Fuel Residual FuelElectric Power  Renewables Not Available GeothermalElectric Power  Waste Not Available Non‐biomass waste  

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