Chapter 12 suffixes
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Chapter 12 suffixes

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    Chapter 12 suffixes Chapter 12 suffixes Presentation Transcript

    • Chapter 12COURTNEY LIGNOSKI
    • -taxia• The suffix “-taxia” in it’s simplest meaning is “order or arrangement”. “-taxia”’s meaning is also synonymous with the suffixes “–taxis” and “–taxy”, depending on the root word.• In medical terminology, “-taxia” is most often used in regards to muscle coordination.
    • -taxia• What comes to mind when thinking seeing the word “-taxia” is “ataxia.• Ataxia is described as a lack of control over voluntary muscular movements.
    • -taxia• Ataxia occurs as a result of damage to the cerebellum, the part of the brain that controls muscle movements. Ataxia can result from a stroke or tumor and is expressed in patients suffering from cerebral palsy and multiple sclerosis.
    • -phasia• The suffix “-phasia” means “speech.”• The part of the brain that controls speech is Broca’s area. Some examples of “-phasia” being used in a word are “aphasia” (meaning lack of speech), or “dysphasia” (meaning difficult speech).
    • -phasia• Aphasia effects a person’s ability to communicate both verbally and in written form. Aphasia tends to follow a sudden brain injury, whether that be a tumor or a stroke. However, the onset of aphasia can be slow if a tumor is pressing on Broca’s area.
    • -phasia• Aphasia effects a person’s ability to communicate both verbally and in written form. Aphasia tends to follow a sudden brain injury, whether that be a tumor or a stroke. However, the onset of aphasia can be slow if a tumor is pressing on Broca’s area.