Flipped class freedman_20121026

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Roger Freedman's slides for Clickers 2012: "Flipping the Classroom: Clickers are Primary, Lectures are Secondary"

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Flipped class freedman_20121026

  1. 1. Flipping the Classroom: Clickers are Primary, Lectures are Secondary Roger FreedmanUniversity of California, Santa Barbara airboy@physics.ucsb.edu
  2. 2. Traditional course structure1. Instructor interacts with studentsprimarily by giving a lecture. Source: Futurama
  3. 3. Traditional course structure1. Instructor interacts with studentsprimarily by giving a lecture. Source: Futurama
  4. 4. Traditional course structure1. Instructor interacts with studentsprimarily by giving a lecture. Source: Futurama 2. There is limited time Source: Flickr user Earls37a during the lecture for interactive exercises.
  5. 5. Student learning gains ποσ τεσ − πρ τεσ τ− τ% ε− τ%Class learning gain: g = 100 − πρ τεσ ε− τ%
  6. 6. Student learning gains ποσ τεσ − πρ τεσ τ− τ% ε− τ%Class learning gain: g = 100 − πρ τεσ ε− τ% Richard Hake, Indiana U., American Journal of Physics 1998 66, 64
  7. 7. Student learning gains ποσ τεσ − πρ τεσ τ− τ% ε− τ%Class learning gain: g = 100 − πρ τεσ ε− τ% Richard Hake, Indiana U., American Journal of Physics 1998 66, 64 i>clickers* i>clickers + exercises* * U. of Colorado (Stephanie Chasteen et al.)
  8. 8. Traditional course structure1. Instructor interacts with studentsprimarily by giving a lecture. Source: Futurama 2. There is limited time Source: Flickr user Earls37a during the lecture for interactive exercises. 3. Students can’t go back in time to replay the lecture or review portions that they missed. Source: Grand Comics Database
  9. 9. Traditional course structure 1. During the lecture, students think they understand the material.Source: UCSB Photographic Services
  10. 10. Traditional course structure 1. During the lecture, students think they understand the material.Source: UCSB Photographic Services 2. They then go home to try to do the homework… Source: Microsoft/iStockphoto
  11. 11. Traditional course structure 1. During the lecture, students think they understand the material.Source: UCSB Photographic Services 2. They then go home to try to do the homework… Source: Microsoft/iStockphoto 3. …where they discover that they don’t really understand the material after all.Source: Microsoft/iStockphoto
  12. 12. “Flipped” course structureSolution: Use the power of video! Source: Grand Comics Database
  13. 13. “Flipped” course structureSolution: Use the power of video! Have students view the lecture before coming to class — a video podcast Source: Grand Comics Database
  14. 14. “Flipped” course structureSolution: Use the power of video! Have students view the lecture before coming to class — a video podcast Jonathan Bergmann and Aaron Sams, Source: Grand Comics Database Woodland Park H.S., CO
  15. 15. “Flipped” course structure Solution: Use the power of video! Have students view the lecture before coming to class — a video podcast Jonathan Bergmann and Aaron Sams, Source: Grand Comics Database Woodland Park H.S., COInstructor can then devote class time to:• interactive exercises• student work• demonstrations (for science classes)• providing guidance to students Source: Microsoft/iStockphoto
  16. 16. Note: This is not a “telecourse”NBC’s Continental Classroom(1958-1963)6:00-7:00 a.m.Peabody Award, 1958 Prof. Harvey White, UC Berkeley
  17. 17. “Flipped” course structure1. Instructor records a lecture using awebcam, then publishes it on the Web. Source: Microsoft/iStockphoto
  18. 18. “Flipped” course structure1. Instructor records a lecture using awebcam, then publishes it on the Web. Source: Microsoft/iStockphoto
  19. 19. A Panopto lecture
  20. 20. “Flipped” course structure 1. Instructor records a lecture using a webcam, then publishes it on the Web. 2. Before coming to class, Source: Microsoft/iStockphoto students view the onlineSource: Microsoft/iStockphoto lecture and pose questions to the instructor.
  21. 21. Actual student questions
  22. 22. “Flipped” course structure 1. Instructor records a lecture using a webcam, then publishes it on the Web. 2. Before coming to class, Source: Microsoft/iStockphoto students view the onlineSource: Microsoft/iStockphoto lecture and pose questions to the instructor. 3. In class, instructor clarifies points raised by the students… Source: Flickr user sarahjanenyc1
  23. 23. PhysicsMailbag
  24. 24. Q1. I don’t understand how in adiabatic processes if there is noheat flow in or out, the temperature can still change?Q2. I know that W = –(U2 – U1) for adiabatic process, and thismakes W = nCV(T1 – T2), but if the gas is cooling and decreasing intemperature, wouldnt it also decrease in volume, making worknegative because W = p(V2 – V1)?Q3. In a mechanical engine, such as a car engine, would theengine be 100% efficient if friction didnt exist?
  25. 25. 2. Why do we only use an integral to calculate the moments of inertia for spheres or cylinders and not other shapes?
  26. 26. “Flipped” course structure 1. Instructor records a lecture using a webcam, then publishes it on the Web. 2. Before coming to class, Source: Microsoft/iStockphoto students view the onlineSource: Microsoft/iStockphoto lecture and pose questions to the instructor. 3. In class, instructor clarifies points raised by the students… 4. …and has students spend class time on Source: Flickr user sarahjanenyc1 exercises and clicker questions. Source: Flickr user sarahjanenyc1
  27. 27. Q12.x1 A question for you: You put your spacecraft into a circular orbit around the forest moon of Endor, which has 1/2 QuickTime™ and a decompressor are needed to see this picture. the radius of Earth and has 1/4 the Earth’s mass. Compared to being in an orbit of the same size around Earth, when in orbit around the forest moon of Endor your spacecraft will have A. the same acceleration and the same orbital period. B. 1/2 the acceleration and 1/2 the orbital period. C. 1/4 the acceleration and 1/4 the orbital period. D. 1/4 the acceleration and the same orbital period. E. none of the above.
  28. 28. RT3.x1A ranking task y (m) 2 D Five identical objects, A A1.5 through E, are launched A simultaneously from the B C ground. Air resistance can 1 D be ignored. Rank them in E order of when they hit the B E ground, from first to last.0.5 Enter your answer using C your i>clicker2, with no 0 spaces. (Example: x (m) 0 2 4 6 8 ABCDE)
  29. 29. A problem for youAn object moves on a curved path as shown. It speeds up as it movesfrom point 1 to point 2. ρ r r• Draw the vector ∆v = v2 − v1(the change in velocity from point 1 topoint 2) r• Draw the average ρ r acceleration vector v2 a = ∆ϖ ∆τ 2 Afor the time interval from 1 to 2. This is ran estimate of the direction of the v1instantaneous acceleration vector at 1point A, midway between points 1 and 2.
  30. 30. A problem for youA particle of mass m is free to move along the x–axis. The onlyforce on the particle is a conservative force given by the potentialenergy function 1 4 1 2 U ( x) = α ξ − βξ 4 2In this expression α and β are positive constants.• Find the points at which the particle is in equilibrium.• Determine which of the points of equilibrium are stable and whichare unstable.
  31. 31. PhysicsExercise TimeTolasana
  32. 32. Student responses Premed physics class, Winter 2011 Panopto lectures vs. traditional lectures:Much prefer Panopto Prefer Panopto slightly Panopto = traditional Prefer traditional slightly Much prefer traditional
  33. 33. Student responses Premed physics class, Winter 2011 Panopto lectures vs. traditional lectures:Much prefer Panopto Prefer Panopto slightly Panopto = traditional Views per lecture: Prefer traditional slightly Much prefer traditional All more than once Some more than once None more than once
  34. 34. Student learning gains ποσ τεσ − πρ τεσ τ− τ% ε− τ%Class learning gain: g = 100 − πρ τεσ ε− τ% Richard Hake, Indiana U., American Journal of Physics 1998 66, 64 i>clickers* Calculus-based Algebra- W12 #1 Calculus-based based W11 W12 #2 * U. of Colorado (Stephanie Chasteen et al.)
  35. 35. Try flipping YOUR class! Source: Grand Comics Database

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