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Open Education: From cMOOCs to UBC
 

Open Education: From cMOOCs to UBC

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A presentation given at Open UBC week at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Oct. 23, 2013. Much of the second half of the presentation was spent browsing the linked websites, so there ...

A presentation given at Open UBC week at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Oct. 23, 2013. Much of the second half of the presentation was spent browsing the linked websites, so there isn't much on the slides for the second half!

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  • Effets durables: first French cMOOc on sustainable development
  • Go to siteEachweek had the following (Distributed!) -- synch presentations -- a twitter chat -- suggested activities/things to blog about -- lists of resources -- Google+ discussions -- Diigo group that people added links to -- ppl tweeting about things relevant to course with #etmoochashtag -- blogs: write, read others’ and comment; respond to comments on yours—blog hubEach could have own path-- It was emphasized that you could drop in and out however you wanted. New topic every two weeks so new ppl could join anytime; didn’t matter if missed earlier parts.-- could watch what you wanted, do whichever activities you wanted (or none), blog about whatever you wanted-- way too much info: presentations, tweets, blogs, links—so had to pick and choose what wanted to focus onWhat I got out of ETMOOCChanged my life! Became much more connected.Blogging: --many more comments -- comment on ppl’s blogs, including those I don’t know -- engage in many more meaningful conversations online this way, with more ppl2. Twitter-- used to just use it to get resources, links from others-- occasionally I’d sent out links myself-- now I actually connect w/other people, talk with them, engage in conversations, get to know them-- have some ppl I now consider friends that I only talk to on twitter and other online places like Google+ or email3. Value of connections: PLN-- ask q on twitter or G+ and gets answered right away-- get lots of helpful resources on things I’m interested in, b/c I know ppl who are interested in those things too, and I follow many of the same ppl they do; also follow hashtags to get that info, and more ppl to follow-- read many more blogs that have good ideas and info-- work with ppl I’ve met on various projects—setting up an etmooc like course for others for next year, collaborating on a couple of other sites with someone I met-- working with some of them on research projects
  • Summer 2013: May and JuneOn-campus course on digital storytelling at the University of Mary Washington in VirginiaBut open to anyone who wants to participate as well-- last summer was all online, even the students taking it for creditRegister your blog, do the assignments, get and give feedbackAssignment bank—created by students and instructors and open online participants, starts = difficulty, stars can be changed-- typically need to do certain # of stars per week -- look at types of assignmentsDaily createRadio station:Best part about this course is the community, people creating together, helping each other when they run into difficulties, coming up with their own fun activities and asking others to join in.
  • Based on earlier versions of the course; weekly announcements/resources/assignments already done, though need a bit of updating with new dates, new links/ideas for things for people to read/watchVolunteers signed up to “run” various weeks-- anything from doing the assignments oneself to commenting on the work of others-- to offering tutorials-- making podcasts with suggestions/tips-- I did a podcast with someone else during audio week where we played creations from participants and talked about why/how they were effective, gave some tips-- this week did a live show on ds106 radio playing all the radio shows from small groupsOne person makes sure the weekly announcements go out to the volunteers for the week and they can update them as needed, but otherwise, there’s really no central authority-- we all think about what might be useful to do and do it-- Google Plus group and Twitter
  • People from etmooc planned this from March to SeptemberFor educators, k-higher edSame basic topics as etmooc; same idea of focusing on connectionsBlog hubPresentations archivesBadges
  • P2PU is a platform on which anyone can run a course—peers teaching peers. In some parts of P2Pu, such as the School of Open, courses go through a peer review process, people are part of a community first, and often work with others to develop a course.Blog posts, google hangouts, twitter chats, group work on open practices
  • Mention stuff at top, look a bit deeper into the MOOCs sectionMy students blog every other week about the texts and/or lectures, and they use this as a jumping off point for in-class presentations during which they are in charge of coming up with questions for the group to discuss.
  • Students post first and last ideas on philosophy, presentation summaries-- can have pseudonym if like-- can post with password protection if likeDidn’t require comments b/c can’t keep track of that many each week.Everything that can be public is, so anyone could follow along if they wish.Had hoped that students would pay more attention to writing if posted publicly, but not sure that’s happening b/c no indication anyone else is reading. Accountability for me, too—what I’m doing is out in the open, and anyone can come along and give comments if they wish (which would be great!). Still an experiment, so not publicizing it widely!Next term thinking of making some open webinar presentations, inviting others to submit blog posts to a hub, maybe even twitter chats if get enough interest.
  • http://opendefinition.org/“A piece of data or content is open if anyone is free to use, reuse, and redistribute it — subject only, at most, to the requirement to attribute and/or share-alike.”Open Content definition http://www.opencontent.org/definition/Reuse - the right to reuse the content in its unaltered / verbatim form (e.g., make a backup copy of the content)Revise - the right to adapt, adjust, modify, or alter the content itself (e.g., translate the content into another language)Remix - the right to combine the original or revised content with other content to create something new (e.g., incorporate the content into a mashup)Redistribute - the right to share copies of the original content, your revisions, or your remixes with others (e.g., give a copy of the content to a friend)Free software definitionhttp://www.gnu.org/philosophy/free-sw.htmlThe freedom to run the program, for any purpose (freedom 0).The freedom to study how the program works, and change it so it does your computing as you wish (freedom 1). Access to the source code is a precondition for this. The freedom to redistribute copies so you can help your neighbor (freedom 2). The freedom to distribute copies of your modified versions to others (freedom 3). By doing this you can give the whole community a chance to benefit from your changes. Access to the source code is a precondition for this.
  • WileyReuse - the right to reuse the content in its unaltered / verbatim form (e.g., make a backup copy of the content)Revise - the right to adapt, adjust, modify, or alter the content itself (e.g., translate the content into another language)Remix - the right to combine the original or revised content with other content to create something new (e.g., incorporate the content into a mashup)Redistribute - the right to share copies of the original content, your revisions, or your remixes with others (e.g., give a copy of the content to a friend)Content is open to the extent that its license allows users to engage in the 4R activities. Content is less open to the extent that its license places restrictions (e.g., forbidding derivatives or prohibiting commercial use) or requirements (e.g., mandating that derivatives adopt a certain license or demanding attribution to the original author) on a user's ability to engage in the 4R activities.The freedom to run the program, for any purpose (freedom 0).The freedom to study how the program works, and change it so it does your computing as you wish (freedom 1). Access to the source code is a precondition for this. The freedom to redistribute copies so you can help your neighbor (freedom 2). The freedom to distribute copies of your modified versions to others (freedom 3). By doing this you can give the whole community a chance to benefit from your changes. Access to the source code is a precondition for this.
  • Wiley’s 4 Rshttp://is.gd/uEC3hjRevise—adapt and improve the OER so it better meets your needs.Remix—combine or "mash up" the OER with other OER to produce new materials.Reuse—use the original or your new version of the OER in a wide range of contexts.Redistribute—make copies and share the original OER or your new version with others.Wiki educator on defining OER http://wikieducator.org/Educators_care/Defining_OEROption 1Open Educational Resources (OER) are teaching, learning, and research resources that reside in the public domain or have been released under an intellectual property license that permits their free use or re-purposing by others. Open educational resources include full courses, course materials, modules, textbooks, streaming videos, tests, software, and any other tools, materials, or techniques used to support access to knowledge (Atkins, Brown, & Hammond 2007[1]).Option 2Open Educational Resources (OER) are materials used to support education that may be freely accessed, reused, modified and shared by anyone (Downes 2011[2]). Option 3Open Educational Resources (OER) are teaching, learning, and research materials in any medium that reside in the public domain or have been released under an open license that permits their free use and re-purposing by others (Creative Commons[3]). UNESCO on OER http://www.unesco.org/new/en/communication-and-information/access-to-knowledge/open-educational-resources/“Open Educational Resources are teaching, learning or research materials that are in the public domain or released with an intellectual property license that allows for free use, adaptation, and distribution. “OER link is toJISC guide to OER: http://www.jisc.ac.uk/publications/programmerelated/2013/Openeducationalresources“Open educational resources (OER) are learning and teaching materials, freely available online for anyone to use. Examples include full courses, course modules, lectures, games, teaching materials and assignments. They can take the form of text, images, audio, video and may even be interactive.”“Once released, the resources can be used by a learner, reused by a teacher, remixed with other resources or repurposed to create new educational materials. While it is not essential to embrace all aspects – release, use, reuse and repurposing – involvement with one aspect tends to lead naturally to another.”“Releasing open educational resources is not simply about putting learning and teaching material online; it involves making the material available in a genuinely open way. Creative Commons or similar licenses are used so that the creator of the resources can retain copyright, while others can copy, distribute, and make some uses of their work.”
  • Second bullet piont: http://is.gd/IoSQj9 is http://www.hackeducation.com/2013/05/08/coursera-chegg/“For certain courses, students will be able to access all or parts of textbooks for free. The materials are restricted by DRM: students will not be able to copy-paste or print, and access to the textbooks will be revoked when the course ends. As the press release reads, of course, “students will also be able to purchase full versions of e-textbooks provided by publishers for continued personal learning.”“Unlike its popular textbook rental service, the Chegge-reader that Coursera will utilize has almost all of the features that students continually report that they dislike: namely, locked-down content that expires and an inability to share notes, highlights or the books themselves.”“Because the free versions of the books will be read through an e-reader, we’ll also get information about usage. How students use the electronic text, how they use the material, will be tracked through software.””

Open Education: From cMOOCs to UBC Open Education: From cMOOCs to UBC Presentation Transcript

  • Overview • On sabbatical 2012-2013, I took a couple of open online courses… • Which led to me helping to facilitate a couple of open online courses… • And the benefits of online discussions and collaborations made me wonder— why don’t I open up my on-campus courses too?
  • Connectivist (M)OOCs (term introduced by Stephen Downes) • Major focus is on developing connections between participants to promote learning from each other, including after the course is finished • Instructors facilitate connections rather than acting as the main, centralized sources of knowledge • Participants create their learning goals and decide their own paths through course • Course is distributed in various places on the web (though often with a central hub of info) See, e.g. http://is.gd/K5JfXKhttp://is.gd/hZfG4dhttp://is.gd/DEqD1U
  • From Dave Cormier’s video on MOOCs: http://is.gd/cQwOSP
  • Connectivist (M)OOCs Often involve: • Aggregating: Collecting/reading/watching material provided in course & what you & others find outside • Remixing & repurposing: Blogging, discussing online, creating new ideas &artifacts, applying what you’re learning to new contexts • Sharing: giving all of the above back to community & opening it to the public (if you want) Adapted from: http://change.mooc.ca/how.htm
  • https://sites.google.com/site/themoocguide/ http://eci831.ca/ http://cck11.mooc.ca/ http://mobimooc.wikispaces.com http://connect.downes.ca/
  • http://www.connectivistmoo cs.org/ https://mslocopen.wordpress.com/ http://www.effetsdurables.org/ Online instruction for open educators http://wideworlded.org/ online-instruction-for-openeducators/ http://blogs.leeward.hawaii.edu/teachonline/
  • ETMOOC (Jan-March 2013) http://etmooc.org
  • ds106 http://ds106.us
  • Current ds106: “headless” http://ds106.us/2013/07/21/fall-2013-the-headless-ds106-syllabus/
  • Open Online Experience 2013-2014 (OOE13) http://www.ooe13.org/
  • Why open? (P2PU) August-Sept. 2013 https://p2pu.org/en/courses/588/ why-open/
  • Arts One Digital http://artsone-digital.arts.ubc.ca/
  • PHIL 102 http://blogs.ubc.ca/phil102/
  • Thank you! And contact info Christina Hendricks Sr. Instructor, Philosophy & Arts One, UBC Website: http://blogs.ubc.ca/christinahendricks Blog: http://blogs.ubc.ca/chendricks Twitter: @clhendricksbc Slides available at: h Slides licensed under Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 Canada license (CC-BY)
  • What does “open” mean? Different things in different contexts: • • • • • • Open source (software) Open access (publishing) Open data Open science Open government Open education, open educational resources See, e.g., http://p2pfoundation.net/Category:Open
  • Some common views of “open” relevant to edu • Davild Wiley’s “4R’s of open content”: available to reuse, revise, remix, redistribute (http://opencontent.org/definition/) • The “open definition” from the Open Knowledge Foundation (for open content & data): access, redistribution, reuse, no technological restriction, no discrimination (http://opendefinition.org/okd/) • Openness as inviting and encouraging wide participation and collaboration, working together to create something, to decide something, etc.
  • Open Education (some suggested characteristics) Open Content • “Open Educational Resources” (OER): Free & open educational materials & courses: no cost access, licensed to allow reuse &modification A guide to OER:http://is.gd/t9ErV6 • Assigned readings free and open: e.g., textbooks that students can not only read for free but copy/paste, print, take notes on, etc. David Wiley’s open course on Open Education: http://is.gd/uEC3hj
  • Open Education (some suggested characteristics) Open content, cont’d • Free and open instruction, such as lectures, demonstrations, even class discussionsbeing available to watch, participate in, and revise/remix Stephen Downes’ blog (2010)http://is.gd/lz5dKo Student work • Asking students to post some work on publicly available blogs, wikis, video sites, etc.