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Feedback for self-regulation
 

Feedback for self-regulation

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    Feedback for self-regulation Feedback for self-regulation Presentation Transcript

    • Feedback on writing: concerns, suggestions Christina Hendricks Philosophy, UBC November 21, 2013
    • Helping students become selfregulated writers Nicol & Macfarlane-Dick (2006) • Self-regulation: students set goals to be reached, have effective strategies for achieving them, and the ability to put those strategies into effect. • Students must know: 1. what good performance is (i.e. the student must possess a concept of the goal or standard being aimed for); 2. how current performance relates to good performance (for this, the student must be able to compare current and good performance); 3. how to act to close the gap between current and good performance. (these three points quoted from Nicol & Macfarlane-Dick 2006, p. 204; referring to Sadler (1989))
    • Problems in feedback for self-regulation self-regulation Goals set by students for their work differ from those needed to complete the task well • Suggestions: written descriptions of criteria & standards, examples of work that does/does not live up to them, peer review to evaluate others’ work on criteria (Nicol & Macfarlane-Dick 2006, p. 206)
    • Problems in feedback for self-regulation self-regulation Students don’t understand how their work hasn’t lived up to goals ‣ Feedback too vague, not enough detail (Weaver, 2006; Walker, 2009; Carless, 2006) ‣ Students don’t see how feedback applies to their work ‣ Students don’t understand feedback (Walker, 2009) • Example: “too much description, not enough analysis” (Chanock, 2000)
    • Problems in feedback for self-regulation self-regulation Students don’t know how to bridge gap between current work and successful performance ‣ Need feedback that gives specific suggestions for improvement on future work (Weaver, 2006; Carless, 2006) ‣ Feedback should be related to goals/standards/criteria, and show how students’ work reaches or falls short of those (Nicol and Macfarlane-Dick, 2006) • Marking rubrics may be helpful for this
    • Problems in feedback for self-regulation self-regulation Students are unable to use feedback to improve future assignments ‣ Not enough feedback that can be transferred to later work; most or all is focused on particular assignment (Lizzio & Wilson, 2008) ‣ Too many comments; students overwhelmed (Nicol & Macfarlane-Dick, 2006; Lunsford, 1997) ‣ Too much negative feedback demoralizing; positive feedback vague while negative specific (Weaver, 2006) ‣ Feedback comes too late to be used on later work
    • Discussion • What do you do when providing feedback on student work that you think is effective (or not)? • What one or two things will you take away from all this to use in giving feedback in the future?
    • Works cited Carless, D. (2006). Differing perceptions in the feedback process. Studies in Higher Education, 31(2), 219-233. Chanock, K. (2000). Comments on essays: Do students understand what tutors write? Teaching in Higher Education, 5(1), 95-105. Lizzio, A. and Wilson, K. (2008). Feedback on assessment: Students’ perceptions of quality and effectiveness. Assessment and Evaluation in Higher Education, 33(3), 263-275. Lunsford, R.F. (1997). When less is more: Principles for responding in the disciplines. New Directions For Teaching and Learning, 69, 91-104. Nicol, D.J. and Macfarlane-Dick, D. (2006). Formative assessment and self-regulated learning: a model and seven principles of good feedback practice. Studies in Higher Education, 31(2), 199-218. Sadler, D.R. (1989). Formative assessment and the design of instructional systems. Instructional Science, 18, 119144. Walker, M. (2009). An investigation into written comments on assignments: do students find them usable? Assessment and Evaluation in Higher Education, 34(1), 67-78. Weaver, M.R. (2006). Do students value feedback? Student perceptions of tutors’ written responses. Assessment and Evaluation in Higher Education, 31(3), 379-394.