aa30470cCover                  A Short CourSe                                                in               CAnon eoS 5D...
short courses publishing companyShort CourSeS BookS             and   WeB Site                         S                  ...
shortcourses books and web site                           • Digital Photography Workflow covers everything from getting re...
preFacePrefaCe                            A                                   great photograph begins when you recognize a...
contentsContentS  Cover...i                                            When to Override Automatic Exposure...50  Short Cou...
contentsChapter 5                                                 Chapter 7understanding lenses...96                      ...
ChaPter 1. Camera ControlS     and   CreativityChapter 1Camera Controls and Creativity                         S          ...
ChaPter 1. Camera ControlS     and   Creativity the 5d mark ii Camera                           Canon’s EOS 5D Mark II dig...
JumP Start—uSing full auto modeJumP Start—uSing full auto mode                          The 5D Mark II’s Full Auto mode se...
ChaPter 1. Camera ControlS       and   Creativitygood thingS          to     knoW                            When you firs...
good thingS   to   knoW                            • When you don’t use controls for a specified period, the camera shuts ...
ChaPter 1. Camera ControlS     and   CreativityuSing     the   vieWfinder                          When taking photos with...
anatomy   of the   Cameraanatomy       of the       Camera                            The 5D Mark II has a number of butto...
ChaPter 1. Camera ControlS     and   Creativity                          rear vieW TIPS • Throughout this book when we tel...
Changing SettingS    With   ButtonS   and   dialSChanging SettingS             With   ButtonS       and   dialS           ...
ChaPter 1. Camera ControlS      and   CreativityChanging SettingS            on the      QuiCk Control SCreen             ...
Changing SettingS   With   menuSChanging SettingS             With   menuS                           To change many settin...
ChaPter 1. Camera ControlS       and   CreativityIn the tables on this       Shooting 1 (red)page shaded commandsare not a...
Changing SettingS     With   menuSIn the tables on this       Set   uP   1 (yelloW)page shaded commandsare not available i...
ChaPter 1. Camera ControlS      and   CreativityPlaying BaCk  managing your imageS                           When taking p...
Playing BaCk  managing your imageS TIP                                       MANAGING IMAGES—USING BUTTONS, CON’T. • One w...
ChaPter 1. Camera ControlS    and   CreativityuSing     the   PlayBaCk menu                         The Playback menu tabs...
giving Slide ShoWSgiving Slide ShoWS                           You can display your images as a slide show on the camera’s...
ChaPter 1. Camera ControlS      and   Creativity SeleCting image Quality                and   Sizehttp://www.photocourse.c...
SeleCting image Quality   and   SizeWhen a digital imageis displayed or printedat the correct size forthe number of pixels...
ChaPter 1. Camera ControlS     and   Creativity                          hoW an image iS CaPtured                         ...
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  1. 1. aa30470cCover A Short CourSe in CAnon eoS 5D MArk ii PhotogrAPhy DenniS P. Curtin ShortCourSeS.CoM h t t P :// w w w . S h o r t C o u r S e S . C o MFor more on digital photography, visit http://www.shortcourses.com
  2. 2. short courses publishing companyShort CourSeS BookS and WeB Site S hort Courses is the leading publisher of digital photography books, textbooks, and guides to specific cameras from Canon, Sony, Nikon, Olympus and others. All of these books are available on-line from the Short Courses bookstore at: http://www.shortcourses.com/store/ All recent books are available in both black & white printed, and full-color eBook (PDF) versions available on CDs or as instant downloads. The list of books we’ve published is always expanding so be sure to visit the store to see if there is a book on your camera, or on another topic that interests you.http://www.photocourse.com/itext/pdf/PDFguide.pdf book, would like to make suggestions for im- If you find any errors in thisClick to view a PDF provements, or just want to let me know what you think I welcome yourdocument describing feedback.how to use this eBook. ShortCourses.com 16 Preston Beach Road Marblehead, Massachusetts 01945 E-mail: denny@shortcourses.com Web site: http://www.shortcourses.com To learn more about digital photography, visit our two Web sites: • http://www.shortcourses.com is our consumer site. • http://www.photocourse.com is our instructor/student site. © Copyright 2009 by Dennis P. Curtin. All rights reserved. Printed in the United States of America. Except as permitted under the United States Copy- right Act of 1976, no part of this publication may be reproduced or distrib- uted in any form or by any means, or stored in a database or retrieval system, without the prior written permission of the publisher. Note oN the ShortCourSeS.Com Web Site This book is designed to work with the many free on-line books available at the author’s Web site at www.shortcourses.com. Of special interest may behttp://www.photocourse.com/itext/copyright/circ01.pdf your digital photos, digital photography the books on displaying & sharingClick to view a PDF workflow, image sensors and digital desktop lighting.document on howcopyright law protects • Bookstore is the home of printed copies, ebooks on CDs, and instant down-photographers and loads of the digital photography books published by Short Courses. Click toother artists. visit • Curtin’s Guide to Digital Cameras and Other Photographic Equipment is a guide to choosing a digital camera and understanding its features. Includes coverage of camera bags, tripods, lighting equipment and much more. Click to visit • Using Your Digital Camera clearly explains everything you need to know about using your camera’s controls to capture great photos. Click to visit • Displaying & Sharing Your Digital Photos discusses what digital photogra- phy is all about including printing your images as prints or books, displaying them on-screen, and moving beyond the still image into exciting new areas. Click to visitISBN 1-928873-91-Xii For more on digital photography, visit http://www.shortcourses.com
  3. 3. shortcourses books and web site • Digital Photography Workflow covers everything from getting ready to take photos to storing, organizing, managing and editing your images. Click to visit • Image Sensors, Pixels and Image Sizes describes key concepts such as resolutions, aspect ratios and color depths that have a huge impact on your photographs. Click to visit • Digital Desktop Lighting is a guide to low-cost tabletop photography equipment and the techniques used to photograph products and other small objects for eBay, Web sites, catalogs, ads and the like. Click to visit • Hot Topics/About Us points you to some of the newer or more interesting parts of the site, explains how to navigate the site, recommends other sites, and tells you a little about who we are and how to contact us. Click to visitThis is the home pageof the ShortCoursesWeb site at www.shortcourses.com Tip • When you visit our site be sure to sign up for our newsletter. It’s only used by us, and only occasional- ly. It’s also very easy to unsubscribe. EDUCATORS Short Courses books have always been popular as textbooks in digital photogra- phy courses. If you are an instructor, you should know that special pricing is available for class- room use. For details on using this and other texts in the classroom, please call us at 781- 631-8520, Boston, Massachusetts USA time.For more on digital photography, visit http://www.shortcourses.com iii
  4. 4. preFacePrefaCe A great photograph begins when you recognize a great scene or subject. But recognizing a great opportunity isn’t enough to capture it; you also have to be prepared. A large part of being prepared in- volves understanding your camera well enough to capture what you see. Get- ting you prepared to see and capture great photographs is what this book is all about. It doesn’t matter if you are taking pictures for business or pleasure, there’s a lot here to help you get better results and more satisfaction from your photography.The Canon EOS 5D MarkII is a very high-quality To get better, and possibly even great photographs, you need to understand21.1 megapixel camera. both concepts and procedures; the “whys” and “hows” of photography. • Concepts of photography are the underlying principles that apply regardless of the camera you are using. They include such things as how sharpness and exposure affect your images and the way they are perceived by viewers. Un- derstanding concepts answers the “why” kinds of questions you might have about photography. • Procedures are those things specific to one kind of camera, and explain step-by-step how you set your camera’s controls to capture an image just the way you want to. Understanding procedures gives you the answers to the “how” kinds of questions you might have. This book is organized around the concepts of digital photography because that’s how photographers think. You think about scenes and subjects, high-The 5D Mark II accepts lights and shadows, softness and sharpness, color and tone. The proceduresthe full line of Canon EF you use with the Canon EOS 5D Mark II are integrated throughout the con-and EF-S lenses. cepts, appearing in those places where they apply. This integrated approach lets you first understand the concepts of photography and then see step by step how to use the 5D Mark II in all kinds of photographic situations. To get more effective, interesting, and creative photographs, you only need to understand how and when to use a few simple features on your camera such as focus, exposure controls, and flash. If you’ve previously avoided understanding these features and the profound impact they can have on your images, you’ll be pleased to know that you can learn them on a weekend. You can then spend the rest of your life marveling at how the infinite variety of combinations make it possible to convey your own personal view of the world. You’ll be ready to keep everything in a scene sharp for maximum de- tail or to blur it all for an impressionistic portrayal. You’ll be able to get dra-The 5D Mark II can print matic close-ups, freeze fast action, create wonderful panoramas, and capturedirectly to a printerwithout a computer. the beauty and wonder of rainbows, sunsets, fireworks, and nighttime scenes. As you explore your camera, be sure to have fun. There are no “rules” or “best” way to make a picture. Great photographs come from using what you know to experiment and try new approaches. Digital cameras make this espe- phOTOgRAphy cially easy because there are no film costs or delays. Every experiment is free On-linE and you see the results immediately so you can learn step by step. • To learn more about digital pho- This book assumes you’ve mastered the mechanics of your camera. It’s about tography, visit our getting great pictures, not about connecting your camera to computers and ShortCourses Web using your software. That information is well presented in the user guide that site at www. shortcourses.com. came with your camera. Be sure to visit our Web site at www.shortcourses. com for even more digital photography information.iv For more on digital photography, visit http://www.shortcourses.com
  5. 5. contentsContentS Cover...i When to Override Automatic Exposure...50 Short Courses Books and Web Site...ii Scenes Lighter than Middle Gray...50 Preface...iv Scenes Darker than Middle Gray...51 Contents...v Subject Against a Very Light Background...51 Subject Against a Very Dark Background...52 Scenes with High Contrast...52Chapter 1 How Overriding Autoexposure Works...54Camera Controls and Creativity...7 How to Override Automatic Exposure...55 Exposure Compensation...55 The 5D Mark II Camera...8 Autoexposure (AE) Lock...55 Jump Start—Using Full Auto Mode...9 Autoexposure Bracketing (AEB)...57 Good Things to Know...10 Using Histograms...59 Using the Viewfinder...12 Displaying Histograms...59 Focus Screens...12 Evaluating Histograms ...59 Diopter Adjustment...12 Clipped Pixels...61 AF Points ...12 Sample Histograms...62 Information Display...12 Anatomy of the Camera...13 Top View ...13 Chapter 3 Rear View...14 Controlling sharpness...63 Changing Settings with Buttons and Dials...15 The Main Dial...15 Getting Sharper Pictures...64 The Quick Control Dial...15 Using the Self-timer/Remote Switch...64 The INFO Button...15 Supporting the Camera...64 Changing Settings on the Quick Control Adjusting the ISO...65 Screen...16 Sharpness Isn’t Everything...67 The Quick Control Screen...16 How to Photograph Motion Sharply...68 Dual Function Button Screens...16 Speed of Subject...68 Changing Settings with Menus...17 Direction of Movement...68 Playing Back & Managing Your Images...20 Distance to Subject and Focal Length of Image Review...20 Lens...69 Image Playback...20 Focus and Depth of Field...70 INFO Display...20 Focus...70 Jumping in Playback...21 Depth of Field...70 Using the Playback Menu...22 Checking Depth of Field...71 Giving Slide Shows...23 Focusing Techniques...72 Selecting Image Quality and Size...24 Autofocus Modes...72 Number of Pixels...24 Selectable Focusing Points...73 How An Image is Captured...26 Displaying AF Points in Playback...74 The Exposure...26 Using Focus Lock...74 It’s All Black and White After All...26 Manual Focus...75 Choosing Image Size and Quality...27 Controlling Depth of Field...76 Using Deep Depth of Field...77 Using Shallow Depth of Field...78Chapter 2 Conveying the Feeling of Motion...79Controlling exposure...30 Understanding Exposure...31 Chapter 4 The Shutter Controls Light and Motion...32 Capturing light & Color...80 The Aperture Controls Light and Depth of Field...34 Where Does Color Come From?...81 Using Shutter Speed and Aperture Together...36 White Balance and Color...82 Exposure—Faucets & Buckets Analogy...37 Using Preset White Balance Settings...82 Exposure—Seesaw Analogy...38 Creating and Using a Custom White Balance Retaining Highlight and Shadow Details ...39 Setting...83 Choosing Shooting Modes...40 Using a Specific Color Temperature...84 Using Creative Auto (CA) Mode...41 Selecting a Color Space...84 Using Program AE (P) & Program Shift...42 Using White Balance Correction & Bracketing...85 Using Shutter-Priority (Tv) Mode...43 Color and Time of Day...86 Using Aperture-Priority (Av) Mode...44 Sunsets and Sunrises...87 Using Manual (M) Mode...45 Weather...89 How Your Exposure System Works...46 Photographing at Night...91 Meter Averaging and Middle Gray...46 The Direction of Light...93 Types of Metering...48 The Quality of Light...95 When Automatic Exposure Works Well...49For more on digital photography, visit http://www.shortcourses.com v
  6. 6. contentsChapter 5 Chapter 7understanding lenses...96 other Features and Commands...136 Canon Lenses...97 Continuous Photography...137 Electronic Lens Mount...97 Remote Control Photography...138 Focusing Technology...97 Shooting Still Images in Live View...139 Ultrasonic Motors...98 Manual Focusing...140 Image Stabilization...98 Live View/Movie Function Settings...140 Information on a Canon Lens...99 Live View Function Settings...140 Lens Peripheral Illumination Correction...100 Screen Settings Type...141 Focal Length...101 Grid Display...141 Zoom Lenses...102 Silent Shooting...141 Normal Lenses...103 Metering Timer...142 Wide-Angle Lenses...104 AF Mode...142 Telephoto Lenses...106 General Tips in Live View...143 Macro Lenses and Accessories...108 Live View Focusing Tips...143 Tilt-Shift Lenses...110 Magnified View for Focusing...144 Lens Accessories...111 Live View Exposure Tips...144 Perspective in a Photograph...112 Shooting Movies in Live View...145 Basic Movie Tips...145 Camera settings...146Chapter 6 Exposure Tips...147using Flash and studio lighting...113 Things to Avoid...147 Using a TV As the Monitor...147 How Flash Works...114 Playing Movies...148 Using a Canon Speedlite...115 Using Picture Styles...149 Controlling Flash Exposures...116 Selecting Picture Styles...149 What’s E-TTL II?...116 Adjusting Picture Styles...149 Flash Exposure Compensation...116 Registering a Picture Style...150 Flash Exposure (FE) Lock...117 Registering Your Own Settings...151 External Speedlite Control...118 Using Custom Functions...152 Flash Function Settings...118 C.Fn I: Exposure...153 Custom Functions...118 C. Fn II: Image...154 Flash Exposure Bracketing (FEB)...119 C.Fn III: Auto focus/Drive...155 High-speed Sync (FP)...119 C.Fn IV: Operation Others...156 Wireless Remote Flash...120 Using My Menu...158 Stroboscopic Flash...120 Changing Other Settings...159 Portraits with Flash...121 Shooting Without a CF Card...159 Positioning the Flash and Subjects...121 Setting the Date and Time...159 Red-eye...122 Changing the Review Time...159 Using Fill Flash...123 Reset File Numbers...160 Using Slow Sync Flash...124 Turning the Beep On and Off...160 Using Available Light...126 Adjusting Monitor Brightness...161 Using Flash in Close-ups...127 Traveling Options—Language and Video Set- Studio Lighting...128 tings...161 Candidates for Studio Lighting...128 Setting the Auto Power Off Time...161 Lighting...128 Formatting CF Cards...161 Backgrounds...130 Turning Auto Rotate On and Off...162 Risers...130 Creating and Selecting Folders...162 Special Bulbs...130 Firmware Version...163 Portrait and Product Photography— Battery Info...163 Introduction...131 Resetting Camera Settings...164 The Main Light...132 Caring for Your Camera...165 The Fill Light...133 Cleaning the Image Sensor...165 The Background Light...134 Cleaning the Camera and Lens...167 The Rim Light...135 Protecting your Camera from the Ele- ments...167 Protecting when Traveling...168 Storing a Camera...168 Caring for Yourself...168vi For more on digital photography, visit http://www.shortcourses.com
  7. 7. ChaPter 1. Camera ControlS and CreativityChapter 1Camera Controls and Creativity S erious digital cameras give you creative control over your images. They COnTEnTS do so by allowing you to control the light and motion in photographs • The 5D Mark II as well as what’s sharp and what isn’t. Although most consumer digital Camera • Jump cameras are fully automatic, some allow you to make minor adjustments that Start: Using Full affect your images. The best ones such as the Canon 5D Mark II offer inter- Auto Mode • Good Things to Know • changeable lenses, external flash connections, and a wide range of controls— Using the Viewfinder more than you’d find on a 35mm SLR. However, regardless of what controls • Anatomy of the your camera has, the same basic principles are at work “under the hood.” Camera • Changing Settings with Buttons Your automatic exposure and focusing systems are having a profound affect and Dials • Chang- on your images. Even with your camera set to Full Auto, you can indirectly ing Settings with the control, or at least take advantage of the effects these systems have on your Quick Control Screen • Changing Settings images. with Menus • Playing Back & Managing In this chapter, we’ll first explore your camera and how you use it in Full Auto Your Images • Using mode. We’ll also see how you use menus and buttons to operate the camera, the Playback Menu • manage your images and control image quality. In the chapters that follow, Giving Slide Shows • Selecting Image we’ll explore in greater depth how you take control of these settings, and oth- Quality and Size ers, to get the effects you want.for more on digital PhotograPhy, viSit httP://WWW.ShortCourSeS.Com
  8. 8. ChaPter 1. Camera ControlS and Creativity the 5d mark ii Camera Canon’s EOS 5D Mark II digital SLR camera features a full-frame (24 x 36mm) image sensor with 21.1 megapixels that can capture still images up to 5616 x 3744 in size–large enough for 28 x 18 inch prints. Its high-speed continuous mode captures up to 78 Large/Fine JPEGs or 13 RAW images at 3.9 frames-per-second (on a UDMA Compact Flash card) making it ideal for photographing wildlife, sports and other action subjects. The camera has a large three-inch 920,000-pixel LCD monitor on which you can review your images. Using Live View, you can also use this monitor to The Canon 5D Mark compose them, magnifying parts of the scene up to 10x for the precise man- II is a single-lens reflex (SLR) camera ual focus required in macro photography. Live View also has silent modes so when you look in that avoid startling people and wildlife. Using Live View, along with software the viewfinder you and a cable supplied with the camera, you can use a computer screen as the are seeing the scene through the lens. viewfinder to compose and focus images, using menu commands displayed on the screen to change camera settings. Using an optional wireless transmit- ter you can even eliminate the cable and work wirelessly over short distances. Live View also makes it possible for the camera to capture full 16:9 HD videohttp://www.photocourse.com/itext/SLR/ clips at 1920 x 1080 resolution and 30 frames per second. Camera settings Click this button to play you make to adjust image sharpness, contrast, color saturation and white an animation that shows balance, also apply to movies so you have extensive creative control. You also how an SLR works when you compose an image have access to more than 60 Canon EF lenses from ultra-wide-angle and fish- and press the shutter eye to macro and supertelephoto. button. The camera has a top shutter speed of 1/8000 sec and a 1/200 maximum flash sync shutter speed setting. ISO settings range from 100–6400 but you can expand the ISO up to 25,600. The camera’s 14-bit Analog-to-Digital (A/D) conversion process captures images with finer and more accurate gradations of tones and colors. High- light Tone Priority is perfect for wedding and nature photographers trying to capture details in wedding dresses, clouds, snow or other white subjects. When you don’t plan on editing your images on a computer, Picture Styles let you adjust them for printing right from the camera as you capture them, or later in playback mode. The camera captures images in the JPEG format but also offers the higher- quality RAW format. You can select either a full-sized RAW image format, or one of two smaller and more manageable sRAW formats that are identical to full-size RAW images except for their pixel dimensions and file sizes. The focusing system uses nine AF points from which you or the camera can select the one used to focus. Its 35-zone metering sensor and evaluative me- tering are linked to all AF points. Also available are centerweighted average metering, partial metering and spot metering—the last two covering approxi- mately 8 percent or 3.5 percent of the viewfinder at center, respectively. The camera has E-TTL II autoflash and 7 shooting modes, plus three custom The 5D Mark II camera modes you can use to store your own settings. As an added convenience, par- body comes with an eyecup and body cap, ticularly for wireless flash operations, you can adjust the flash settings of the battery pack (LP-E6), Canon Speedlite 580EX II and 430EX II directly from the camera. battery charger (LC-E6 or LC-E6E, strap (EW- The camera’s integrated sensor cleaning offers a number of ways to prevent EOS5DMKII) interface dust from affecting your images, or remove it if it does. cable (IFC-200U), stereo video cable Finally, the camera has customization features including 25 Custom Func- (STV-250N), EOS Digital Solutions Disk, and tions, picture styles you can edit or define from scratch, and the ability to manuals. create your own menu listing only those settings you use most frequently. for more on digital PhotograPhy, viSit httP://WWW.ShortCourSeS.Com
  9. 9. JumP Start—uSing full auto modeJumP Start—uSing full auto mode The 5D Mark II’s Full Auto mode sets everything for you. All you have to do is frame the image and push the shutter button. This is a good mode to use in most situations because it lets you focus on the subject rather than on the camera. • Selecting the mode. Turn the Power Switch on the back of the camera to ON and set the Mode Dial to Full Auto (the green rectangle icon). • Framing the image. The viewfinder shows about 98% of the scene you are going to capture. If the image in the viewfinder is fuzzy, turn the diopterThe Mode Dial with thegreen Full Auto icon. adjustment knob at the upper right corner of the viewfinder to adjust it (page 12). • Autofocus. The nine small rectangles displayed in the viewfinder are AF points used for focusing. When the focus switch on the lens is set to AF, the camera focuses on the closest part of the scene covered by one or more of these points (page 72). When you press the shutter button halfway down, theThe Power Switch set AF point(s) being used to set focus momentarily flashes red, the round focusto the white line aboveON. confirmation light in the lowerright corner of the viewfinder glows green, and the camera beeps. How close you can get to a subject depends on the mini- mum focus distance of the lens you are using. • Autoexposure. Evaluative metering divides the scene in the viewfinder into 35 zones and separately meters each of them to determine the best exposure for the scene (page 46). The shutter speed and aperture that will be used to take the picture are displayed in the viewfinder when the display isThis icon is displayed activated by pressing the shutter button halfway down (page 12).when you turn the • Automatic white balance. The color cast in a photograph is affected bycamera on and off toindicate the sensor is the color of the light illuminating the scene. The camera adjusts white bal-being cleaned. ance so white objects in the scene look white in the photo (page 82). TAKING A PICTURE IN AUTO MODE TIPS • If the camera 1. With the Power Switch on the back of the camera set to ON or the doesn’t work as white line above it, set the Mode Dial to Full Auto (the green rect- described here, you angle icon). Set the focus mode switch on the lens to AF (page 72). may need to clear previous settings as 2. Compose the image in the viewfinder, making sure the area that you described on page 164. want sharpest is covered by one of the nine AF points. • If you don’t use 3. Press the shutter button halfway down and pause so the camera can any controls for 60 automatically set focus and exposure. When it’s done so, it beeps, the seconds, the camera enters auto power round green focus confirmation light in the viewfinder glows, and the off mode (page 161). AF point(s) being used to set focus briefly flashes red. To wake it up, press the shutter button 4. Press the shutter button all the way down to take the picture. halfway down and release it. ● The shutter sounds, buSY may be briefly displayed in the viewfind- • If you have at- er, and the red access lamp on the back of the camera glows while the tached a dedicated image is being saved. You can take another photo at any time. Speedlite flash, its AF-assist beam may ● The image is displayed on the monitor for 2 seconds so you can re- light to assist focus view it, press Erase to delete it, or press INFO to change the display. in dim light (page 118). 5. When finished, turn the Power Switch to OFF.for more on digital PhotograPhy, viSit httP://WWW.ShortCourSeS.Com
  10. 10. ChaPter 1. Camera ControlS and Creativitygood thingS to knoW When you first start taking photos with a new camera, it sometimes seems that there is too much to learn all at once. To simplify your getting started, here are some of the things you may want to know right off. • The power switch has two positions, ON and the white line above it. The only difference is that when set to the white line the Quick Control Dial works (page 15).The battery compart- • If your camera is right out of the box, you need to mount a lens (page 97)ment cover is on thebottom of the camera and set it to AF (autofocus), insert a charged battery pack, and insert a Com-and accepts LP-E6 pactFlash (CF) card on which to store your images. No CF card is includedlithium battery packs. with the camera, and there may be no lens as part of the package. • To insert a CF card, turn off the camera, slide the CF card slot cover on the right side of the camera toward the back, and swing it open. Insert the CF card with its front label facing the rear of the camera and the small holes facing inward. Press the card down until the gray eject button pops out, then close the cover. To remove a card, open the CF card slot cover and press the gray eject button to pop up the card so you can grasp it and pull it out. • The first time you use the camera, select a language (if necessary) and enterSections in the batteryicon on the LCD panel the current date and time (page 159) so your images are accurately dated.and in the viewfinderare deleted as the • One of the camera’s default settings lets you shoot pictures without a CFbattery charge falls. The card in the camera. Images are even displayed on the monitor so you thinklast two blink to draw you are capturing them, but they are not saved. To ensure you don’t takeyour attention when thebattery is almost dead. unsaved pictures, turn off the Shoot w/o card setting on the Shooting 1 menu tab (page 159). • If you turn off the camera while an image is being saved, the message Re- cording is displayed and the power remains on until all images are saved. • Should you inadvertently open the compact flash card door while the cam- era is writing to the card, a warning is displayed on the monitor and an open door “alarm” sounds, but the image is saved without interruption as long as you don’t remove the card. • To take pictures, hold the camera in your right hand while supporting the lens with your left. Brace the camera against your face as you look throughThe CF card slot cover is the viewfinder and brace your elbows against your body. Press the shutteron the right side of the button slowly and smoothly as you hold your breath after breathing in deeplycamera as seen fromthe shooting position. and exhaling. • The shutter button has two stages. When you press it halfway down and briefly pause, the camera sets focus and exposure. When the green confirma- tion light comes on in the viewfinder and the camera beeps, you press it the rest of the way to take the picture. If you press the shutter button all of thePressing the shutter way down without pausing halfway, the camera pauses to focus before takingbutton halfway downlocks focus and the picture.exposure and pressing itall the way down takes • If the camera can’t focus, it doesn’t beep when you press the shutter but-the picture. ton halfway down, the round green focus confirmation light in the viewfinder blinks, and you can’t take a picture. For help on focusing see page 72.http://www.photocourse.com/itext/cases/cases.pdf • In P, Tv, Av, M and B modes pressing the AF-ON button does the sameClick to view a PDFdocument on camera thing as pressing the shutter button halfway down.straps and cases.10 for more on digital PhotograPhy, viSit httP://WWW.ShortCourSeS.Com
  11. 11. good thingS to knoW • When you don’t use controls for a specified period, the camera shuts down in two stages. After 4 seconds metering turns off, as do the viewfinder dis- play and the aperture and/or shutter speed readouts on the LCD panel. After one minute auto power off takes effect and the LCD panel and monitor turn off. At this point dials, and many buttons including the three above the LCD panel, won’t work. To turn on metering, and reactivate the displays and but- tons, press the shutter button halfway down. • You can illuminate the LCD panel by pressing the button marked with theThe Mode Dial with light bulb icon on top of the camera.seven shooting modesand 3 custom modes. • You can use the camera’s monitor to review images you’ve taken (page 20), and in Live View (page 139) use it to compose, focus and capture them. You can adjust the monitor’s brightness to match the light you’re viewing it in (page 160). • When you take a picture, it is displayed on the monitor for two seconds but you can adjust this review time (page 159). While it’s displayed, you can press the Erase button (page 20) to delete it, or INFO to change the display mode.If the focus confirmation • While watching the monitor, press the INFO button to cycle through thelight in the viewfinder list-like Camera Settings screen, the grid-like Shooting Functions screenblinks when you press (page 15), and turning off the monitor. Like the LCD panel, the Shootingthe shutter buttonhalfway down, the Functions screen reflects setting changes as you or the camera make them.camera is havingtrouble focusing (page • You can reset all camera settings to their factory defaults (page 164). This is72). useful if you make changes and can’t remember how to undo them. • When photographing in a studio-like setting, or using the camera to give a slide show, you can use the optional AC Adapter Kit ACK-E6 to power the camera instead of the battery pack. Instructions on how to attach the adapter are included with it. • Routinely check the shots remaining displayed on the LCD panel and Shoot-Pressing the LCD Panel ing Functions screen. When the number in brackets gets to zero you can’tIllumination buttonlights the LCD panel take any more photos unless you delete some or change memory cards.so it’s readable in thedark. It turns off after • When you charge batteries with the LC-E6 or LC-E6E charger the orange6 seconds of inactivity. charge lamp blinks more rapidly the more charged the battery is. It blinksTurning the Mode once per second up to 50%, twice per second up to 75%, three times per sec-Dial or pressing anyshooting related button ond after 75% and glows green when fully charged. Fully charging a depletedextends it. battery takes about 2.5 hours. • A fully charged battery should capture around 800 pictures depending on the temperature and how often you use flash, the monitor, and Live View. TIPS • Recharge batteries immediately before using them because they gradually • If you press the INFO button once loose their charge over time. or twice to display the Shooting Func- • The battery pack cover can be attached in two directions. Align it so the blue tions screen on the seal shows through the battery shaped opening to indicate a battery is fully monitor (it’s grid- charged. Align it in the other direction on a battery that needs charging. like) and then turn the Mode Dial, you’ll • If you encounter an error message you can’t resolve, or if the camera con- see the settings for each shooting trols “freeze,” you might “reboot” it by turning it off, removing the battery mode. Those that are for a few seconds, reinserting the battery and turning it back on. Sometimes grayed out can’t be ensuring that the lens is locked into place also helps. changed in the cur- rent shooting mode. • See the Battery info command on page 163.for more on digital PhotograPhy, viSit httP://WWW.ShortCourSeS.Com 11
  12. 12. ChaPter 1. Camera ControlS and CreativityuSing the vieWfinder When taking photos with the 5D Mark II, you normally compose them in the viewfinder. Since this is your center of interest, the camera also displays focus and exposure information to guide you. foCuS SCreenS The camera accepts three interchangeable focus screens. Should you switch them, you have to set Custom Function IV-5 Focusing screen (page 152) to tell the camera which one you have installed. • The Eg-A focus screen comes with your camera. It displays a bright view of the scene and makes it easy to manually focus.The Eg-D optional focusscreen. • The Eg-D is the same as Eg-A but displays grid lines that are great for studio and architectural photography where accurately aligning vertical and horizontal lines is important. • The Eg-S is a super-precision matte screen designed for lenses with a maxi- mum aperture of f/2.8 or larger. This screen makes manual focusing easier and more precise than the Eg-A, but when used with a lens slower than f/2.8, the viewfinder image is darker. dioPter adJuStmentThe diopter adjustment You can adjust the viewfinder display so you can read it without glasses.knob. To do so, remove the lens cap and look through the viewfinder at an evenly lit surface or fairly bright light source (not the sun!). If the viewfinder dis- play isn’t sharp, try to bring the AF points into focus by turning the dioptric adjustment knob at the upperright corner of the viewfinder. If this doesn’t work, the camera also accepts the accessory E-series Dioptric Adjustment Lenses in 10 types ranging from -4 to +3 diopters. These lenses slip into the viewfinder’s eyepiece holder. af PointSWhen focus is achievedthe AF point or points The viewfinder displays nine small rectangles called AF points (AF standsbeing used to set focus for autofocus). When the focus switch on the lens is set to AF (page 72), theflash red and the greenconfirmation light camera focuses on the closest part of the scene covered by one or more ofglows steady in the these AF points. The one being used to set focus can be selected manually orviewfinder. automatically (page 73). When you press the shutter button halfway down, the focusing point or points being used to set focus flash red. The circle in the center of the viewfinder indicates the spot metering area (page 48). TIP • To turn on meter- ing and display expo- information diSPlay sure information on When you press the shutter button halfway down, the viewfinder displays the the LCD panel and in the viewfinder, press current shutter speed and aperture, the ISO, the shots remaining in continu- the shutter button ous mode, and the focus confirmation indicator. In P, Tv, Av, M and B modes halfway down. it also displays an exposure level indicator that’s used for setting exposure compensation (page 55) and Manual (M) exposure (page 45). A number of other indicators are also displayed during various procedures.The viewfinder displaystays on for 4 secondsafter you press theshutter button halfwaydown.12 for more on digital PhotograPhy, viSit httP://WWW.ShortCourSeS.Com
  13. 13. anatomy of the Cameraanatomy of the Camera The 5D Mark II has a number of buttons and dials that quickly change im- TIPS portant settings without the time-consuming need to work your way through • You can quickly menus. reset all camera set- tings to their original factory defaults (page 164). • You can connect the camera to a computer and use Live View (page 139) so you and others can immediately see photos as you take them. This is a great way to take portraits and close-ups.The shutter button (top)and Main Dial (bottom). TIP • Blue icons indi- cate the function of buttons in Playback mode. toP vieW 1. Mode Dial selects any of the camera’s shooting modes (page 40). 2. Shutter button sets exposure and focus and turns on metering, the view- finder, and LCD panel displays when pressed halfway down, and takes the photo when pressed all the way. 3. Main Dial is used by itself and with buttons to change camera settings in shooting modes (page 15). In playback mode, turning the dial jumps youAfter pressing a buttonthat has two functions, through pictures you’ve taken (page 20).turning the Main Dialchanges the first setting 4. LCD Panel Illumination button lights the LCD panel.and turning the QuickControl Dial changes the 5. Metering/WB button selects the metering mode (page 48) in conjunc-second. tion with the Main Dial and sets white balance (page 82) in conjunction with the Quick Control Dial. 6. AF-DRIVE button specifies autofocus modes (page 72) in conjunction with the Main Dial and cycles the camera among the drive modes single-shot, continuous (page 137), and self-timer (page 64) in conjunction with the Quick Control Dial. 7. ISO/Flash Exposure Compensation button, in conjunction with the Main Dial changes the ISO (page 65), and sets flash exposure compensation (page 116) in conjunction with the Quick Control Dial.for more on digital PhotograPhy, viSit httP://WWW.ShortCourSeS.Com 13
  14. 14. ChaPter 1. Camera ControlS and Creativity rear vieW TIPS • Throughout this book when we tell you to turn the Quick Control Dial, in many cases you can also turn the Main Dial. • You can quickly reset camera settings to their original fac- tory defaults (page 164). • In P, Tv, Av, M and B modes (page 40), pressing the AF-ON button performs the same function as pressing the shutter button halfway down. 1. Live View/Print/Share button, when pressed in shooting mode, turns on Live View when it’s enabled. In playback mode, it lets you print or transfer images when connected to a printer or computer. 2. MENU button displays and hides the menu on the monitor (page 17). 3. Picture Style selection button changes picture styles (page 149). 4. INFO button cycles you through information about camera settings in shooting mode (page 15), or images in playback mode (page 20). 5. Playback button displays the last image you captured (page 20). 6. Erase button deletes the image displayed on the monitor (page 20). 7. AF-ON button autofocuses in P, Tv, Av, M and B modes (page 72). 8. AE/FE lock/Index/Reduce button (*) locks exposure (page 55) and flash exposure (page 117). In playback mode, it unzooms a zoomed image and Tip switches to index view (page 20). • You can press 9. AF point selection/Magnify button, in conjunction with the Main or the Multi-controller Quick Control Dial, manually selects which AF point is used to set focus (page straight down and in eight sideways direc- 73). In Playback and Live View modes it zooms images up to 10x (page 20). tions. You use it to select the AF point, 10. Multi-controller, a small joy stick, moves in 8 directions plus straight correct the white down. It selects AF points (page 73), makes white balance corrections (page balance, scroll the 85) and scrolls around an enlarged image in playback mode (page 20). playback image dur- ing magnified view, 11. SET button in the middle of the Quick Control Dial confirms settings operate the Quick Control screen, and and starts and stops movie recording (page 145). highlight and select menu options except 12. Quick Control Dial adjusts exposure by itself, and works in conjunc- Erase images on the tion with buttons to change settings in shooting mode (page 15). In playback Playback 1 menu and mode it scrolls through images, and in menu mode it highlights menu com- Format on the Set up 1 menu where you mands. have to press SET instead. 13. Power switch turns the camera on and off, and when set to the white line, activates the Quick Control Dial in shooting modes.14 for more on digital PhotograPhy, viSit httP://WWW.ShortCourSeS.Com
  15. 15. Changing SettingS With ButtonS and dialSChanging SettingS With ButtonS and dialS Buttons and dials are often used together. Pressing a button initiates a proce- dure by activating metering and the exposure displays, in the viewfinder and on the LCD panel and monitor, and then turning a dial highlights one of the available options. Each time you press a button to initiate a procedure, you only have about 6 seconds to turn the dial or the displays become inactive. • Many buttons, including the three above the LCD panel, won’t work when auto power off is in effect (page 161). To wake up the camera, press the shut- ter button halfway down and release it.When you press many • After pressing buttons that have two functions, such as AF-DRIVE, turn-buttons, their function ing the Main Dial changes the setting listed first (AF) and turning the Quickremains active for only6 seconds. If you are Control Dial changes the one listed second (DRIVE).slow, just press thebutton again for another6 seconds. the main dial The Main Dial is used to change settings in shooting modes, highlight menu tabs in menu mode (page 17), and jump through pictures in playback mode (page 21). • When changing metering, AF mode, ISO or selecting an AF point, you firstThe Quick Control Dial press and release a button to select a setting before you turn the dial.only adjusts exposuresettings when the • When changing shutter speeds and apertures in P, Tv, Av, M and B modesPower Switch is set to you turn the dial without first pressing a button (pages 41–45).the white line aboveON. Setting it to ON • After pressing MENU, turn the dial to select menu tabs listing commandsprevents inadvertent (page 17).shifts in exposure byturning the dial. the QuiCk Control dial The Quick Control Dial works in shooting modes to change settings, in menu mode to highlight menu commands, and in playback mode to scroll through images. • When changing the white balance, drive mode, flash exposure compensa- tion or AF point selection, you first press and release a button to select a set- TipS ting before you turn the dial. • Many buttons won’t • When changing exposure compensation (page 55) or selecting an aperture work when auto power off is in effect in Manual (M) mode (page 45), you turn the dial by itself. This only works so press the shutter when the Power Switch is set past ON to the white line pointing to the Quick button halfway down Control Dial and release it to ac- tivate metering and • After pressing MENU turn the dial to move the highlight up and down the the camera’s LCD panel displays. menu. • If you turn the camera off while the the info Button Shooting Functions screen is displayed, When the camera is ready to shoot, you can press the INFO button to cycle the screen will be through the list-like Camera Settings, the grid-like Shooting Functions displayed again the next time you turn screens, and turning off the monitor. You can use the Set up 3 menu’s INFO on the camera. To button setting to specify which screens are displayed. avoid this, press the INFO button to When the Shooting Functions screen is displayed, you can use it instead of display a different the LCD panel as a guide when changing settings. It has the advantage of screen before turning off the camera. larger type and better illumination. You can also press the Multi-controller straight down to activate it and change it into the Quick Control screen.for more on digital PhotograPhy, viSit httP://WWW.ShortCourSeS.Com 15
  16. 16. ChaPter 1. Camera ControlS and CreativityChanging SettingS on the QuiCk Control SCreen In addition to using menus to change or confirm settings, you can also use the Quick Control screen and the three dual function buttons above the LCD panel. the QuiCk Control SCreen You can use the Quick Control screen and Multi-controller to change set- tings on the monitor. This is very convenient when you’re shooting from a tripod or monopod, with the camera at eye level, where it’s hard to read the LCD panel on top of the camera. This screen is almost identical to the Shoot- ing Functions screen (page 15). In fact if you display the Shooting Functions screen and then press the Multi-controller straight down, it changes into the Quick Control screen.The Quick Controlscreen (top) anda settings screen USING THE QUICK CONTROL SCREEN(bottom). 1. Press the joystick-like Multi-controller straight down to activate the Quick Control screen displaying the current camera settings on the monitor. The currently selected setting is highlighted in green and TipS remains highlighted for only 10 seconds if you don’t use any camera • You can’t display controls. the Quick Control screen when the 2. Press the Multi-controller in any direction to highlight the setting camera is in auto you want to change and its function is indicated at the bottom of the power off mode. screen. Press the shutter button halfway down 3. Press SET to display a settings screen (this is optional), then turn the and release it to wake up the camera. Main or Quick Control Dial to scroll through choices for the selected setting. If you displayed a setting screen, press SET after selecting • When Custom Function III-3: your choice to return to the Quick Control screen. AF point selection method is set to 1: Multi-control- dual funCtion Button SCreenS ler direct, you can’t display the Quick The three buttons above the LCD panel each have two functions. When the Control screen. Shooting Functions or Quick Control screen is displayed, you can press one of • Settings remain these buttons to display a two-part setting screen on the monitor. selected for 10 sec- onds if you don’t use • Turning the Main Dial changes the upper setting. any controls. Press the Multi-control- • Turning the Quick Control Dial changes the lower setting. ler straight down to reselect it.The three buttons abovethe LCD panel eachhave two settings youchange with the Mainand Quick Control Dials.16 for more on digital PhotograPhy, viSit httP://WWW.ShortCourSeS.Com
  17. 17. Changing SettingS With menuSChanging SettingS With menuS To change many settings, you press the MENU button to display a series of menu tabs coded with colors, icons and dots. To charge settings from these menus you use the Main Dial, the Quick Control Dial and the SET button. • All of the camera’s menu commands and the pages on which they are discussed in this book are listed in tables on pages 18–19. On those tables, shaded menu items are not available in Full or Creative Auto modes (pages 9 and 41). • Some menus are spread across two or three tabs. In these cases the tab numbers (1, 2, 3) are indicated on the tabs with dots. • You can use the Multi-controller as well as the Main and Quick ControlIcons, colors and Dials to change menu settings. To do so, you press it sideways to highlightdots indicate (from menu items and press it straight down to select them. (To reduce the pos-top down) Shooting, sibility of mistakes, you can’t use the Multi-controller to select Erase imagesPlayback, Set up,Custom Functions and on the Playback 1 menu or Format on the Set up 1 menu.)My Menu tabs. • When menus are displayed on the monitor, you can press the shutter button halfway down at any time to instantly return to shooting mode. • You can place up to six frequently used menu commands on your own “My Menu” and even have that menu displayed first when you press the MENU button (page 158). • The last menu you viewed is displayed the next time you press MENU. USING MENUS • To display the menu, press the MENU button.Once you press MENU,the Main Dial, the Quick • To select a tab, turn the Main Dial. Colors, dots, and icons help youControl Dial (above) and identify which menu tab is displayed.the SET button in itscenter are all you need • To move the colored selection frame up and down the menu to high-to change settings. light settings, turn the Quick Control Dial. • To display the options or settings screen for a highlighted command, press the SET button in the center of the Quick Control Dial. • To select a listed option (not all commands list options), turn the Quick Control Dial to highlight it, then press SET to confirm the change. • To backup without changing a setting, press MENU or the shutter button before pressing SET.The Shooting 1 menu. • To hide the menu, press the MENU or shutter button.for more on digital PhotograPhy, viSit httP://WWW.ShortCourSeS.Com 1
  18. 18. ChaPter 1. Camera ControlS and CreativityIn the tables on this Shooting 1 (red)page shaded commandsare not available in Full Command Settings PageAuto and Creative auto Quality Sets image size, compression and format 27modes. Beep Turns camera beep Off/On 160 Shoot w/o card Specifies if the camera takes pictures without 159 a card inserted Review time Specifies how long an image is displayed im- 159 mediately after capture Peripheral illumin. Turns on and off for the selected lens. 100 correct. Shooting 2 (red) Command Settings Page Expo.comp./AEB Exposure compensation and autoexposure 55, 57 bracketing White balance Prevents color casts 82 Custom WB Sets white balance in unique lighting situa- 83 tions WB SHIFT/BKT Adjusts and brackets white balance 85 Color space Specifies the color space used to capture 84 images Picture Style Lets you select predefined image settings, or 149 create your own Dust Delete Data Locates dust on the sensor so its effects can 166 be removed from images using software. PlayBaCk 1 (Blue) Command Settings Page Protect images Protects images from being erased 22 Rotate Rotates images shot in portrait mode 22 Erase images Erases images from the memory card 22Some settings are only Print order Specifies images to be printed —displayed when youare using an optional Transfer order Selects images to be sent to PC —WFT-E4/E4A wireless External media Used with WFT-E4/E4A wireless transmitter —transmitter. backup to save images PlayBaCk 2 (Blue) Command Settings Page Highlight alert Highlights overexposed areas in images 59 AF point disp. Specifies if AF points used to focus are dis- 74 played in review or playback modes Histogram Selects type of histogram displayed 59 Slide show Plays back images automatically 23 Image jump Specifies how you jump in playback mode. 211 for more on digital PhotograPhy, viSit httP://WWW.ShortCourSeS.Com
  19. 19. Changing SettingS With menuSIn the tables on this Set uP 1 (yelloW)page shaded commandsare not available in Full Command Settings PageAuto and Creative auto Auto power off Specifies when camera turns off 161modes. Auto rotate Rotates images shot in portrait mode 162 Format Prepares card to store images 161 File numbering Specifies image file numbers 160 Select folder Create and select folders for images 162 WFT settings Used with WFT-E4/E4A wireless — transmitter Recording function+media Used with WFT-E4/E4A wireless — select transmitter Set uP 2 (yelloW) Command Settings Page LCD brightness Adjusts monitor brightness 161 Date/Time Sets camera date and time 159 Language Specifies language used for menus 161 and messages Video system Specifies PAL or NTSC video 161 Sensor cleaning Cleans dust from the sensor 165 Live View/Movie func. set. Customizes the Live View display 139 Set uP 3 (yelloW) Command Settings Page Battery info. Manage your battery packs 163 INFO. button Specifies which INFO screens are 15 displayed External Speedlite control Sets an external flash 118 Camera user setting Stores your own settings to C1, C2 151 and C3 on the Mode Dial Clear settings Resets many camera settings to their 164 factory defaults Firmware ver. Updates the camera’s firmware 163 CuStom funCtionS (orange) Command Settings Page C.Fn I: Exposure Exposure, ISO, bracketing, flash sync 153 C.Fn II: Image Noise reduction, highlight tone and 154 auto lighting optimizer C.Fn III: Autofocus/Drive Autofocus and mirror lockup 155 C.Fn IV: Operation/Others Shutter button, AF-ON, SET dials, 156 focusing screen and Live View Clear all Custom Func. (C.Fn) Resets Custom Functions to their 152 defaults my menu (green) Command Settings Page My Menu settings Stores frequently used commands 158for more on digital PhotograPhy, viSit httP://WWW.ShortCourSeS.Com 1
  20. 20. ChaPter 1. Camera ControlS and CreativityPlaying BaCk managing your imageS When taking photos, there are many times when you want to review the im- TIPS ages you’ve taken, ideally before leaving the scene. • After zooming an image or displaying information about image revieW it, you can turn the Main or Quick When you take a photo, it’s displayed for 2 seconds (counting from when Control Dials to scroll you release the shutter button) although you can change this with the Re- through other im- view time command (page 159) on the Shooting 1 menu tab. With an image ages using the same settings. displayed, press the Erase button to delete it, or the INFO button to change the information display. Pressing either button also keeps the image on the • To immediately return to shooting screen until you press the shutter button halfway down to take another photo mode, press the or auto power off takes effect. shutter button half- way down. image PlayBaCk To review some or all of the images you have taken, press the Playback but- ton to display the last photo you took. You can then scroll through images, display small thumbnails so you can quickly locate a specific image, erase the image, or zoom in to examine details. In playback mode, you can press the shutter button halfway down at any time to instantly return to shooting mode. You may not be able to playback photos on the card taken with an- other camera.Pressing INFO inplayback mode displaysinformation about theimage. info diSPlay To display or hide information about images in review or playback modes, repeatedly press the INFO button to cycle through single image display, single image display with recording quality, histogram display, and shoot- ing information display. On two of the screens a small thumbnail and one orThe Playback icon. more histograms are displayed (page 59). Once information is displayed for one image in playback (but not review) mode, you can turn the Quick Control Dial to scroll through other images with the same information displayed. MANAGING IMAGES—USING BUTTONSThe Index/Reduceicons. 1. Press the Playback button and use any of the following procedures: ● To display one image after another, turn the Quick Control Dial. ● To display 4 or 9 small thumbnails in index view, press the Index button once or twice. Turn the Quick Control Dial to scroll the blue frame to select a specific image. To return to single-image view, press the Magnify button.The Magnify icon. ● To jump by the specified method (page 21), turn the Main Dial. ● To magnify an image up to 10x, display it in single-image view and press or hold down the Magnify button. When an image is magnified, a small square on the screen indicates which part of the image you are viewing as you press the Multi-controller to scroll around. To re- duce the image and return to single-image view, press or hold down the Index/Reduce button or press the Playback button.The Erase icon. CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE ...20 for more on digital PhotograPhy, viSit httP://WWW.ShortCourSeS.Com
  21. 21. Playing BaCk managing your imageS TIP MANAGING IMAGES—USING BUTTONS, CON’T. • One way to delete ● To erase the image displayed in single-image view or the one high- all images on a card lighted in index view, press the Erase button (marked with a trash (and all folders but the current one), is can icon). To confirm the erasure, turn the Quick Control Dial to to format the card highlight Erase and press SET. (page 161). ● To change the information displayed, press INFO. 2. To resume shooting, press the Playback button or press the shutter button halfway down. JumPing in PlayBaCkThe Playback icon. In playback mode, it takes time to navigate through images when there are many of them on a card. To speed things up you can turn the Main Dial to jump in single-image, magnified, and index modes. The jump methods from which you can choose include the following: • 1 image displays all of the images and movies in the order they were cap- tured. • 10 images (the default) jumps you forward and back 10 images at a time. • 100 images jumps you forward and back 100 images at a time. • Screen, designed for use in index mode, jumps you forward and back a screen, or page of thumbnails, at a time. • Date jumps you forward or back to the first picture taken on the next or previous date. • Folder jumps folder by folder. • Movies jumps you to the first movie and then to other movies. • Stills jumps you to the first still image, then through other stills. In all modes other than 1 image, as you turn the Main Dial to jump, a position bar on the screen indicates where the currently displayed images fall within the total collection of images on the card. Also turning the Quick Control Dial continues to scroll through images one at a time. SELECTING A JUMP METHOD 1. Press MENU and display the Playback 2 menu tab. 2. Turn the Quick Control Dial to highlight Image jump, and press SET to display a list jump methods. 3. Turn the Quick Control Dial to highlight your choice, and press SET to select it. 4. When finished, press MENU and turn the Main Dial in playback mode to jump by the specified method. The current jump method and location are displayed in the lowerright corner of the monitor. IMAGE RECOVERY SOFTWARE • If you delete images by mistake, don’t despair. There is software that will let you recover them provided you don’t first save other photos on the same card. One such program is PhotoRescue at (http://www.datarescue.com/photorescue/) but you can find others by Googling “digital image recovery.”for more on digital PhotograPhy, viSit httP://WWW.ShortCourSeS.Com 21
  22. 22. ChaPter 1. Camera ControlS and CreativityuSing the PlayBaCk menu The Playback menu tabs list a variety of commands. Although only Protect TIPS images, Rotate, and Erase images from the Playback 1 menu tab are dis- • When looking for cussed here, the other playback commands are discussed elsewhere in this pictures to erase, protect, or rotate, book (page 18). it’s often faster if you press the In- dex/Reduce button MANAGING YOUR IMAGES—USING MENUS to switch to index display. 1. Press MENU and display the Playback 1 menu tab. • You can rotate im- ● To protect selected images so they won’t be inadvertently erased, ages automatically with the Set up 1 or to unprotect previously protected images, turn the Quick Control menu’s Auto rotate Dial to highlight Protect images and press SET. Turn the Quick Con- command (page trol Dial to scroll through images and press SET to protect or unpro- 162). tect selected images. (When you select a protected image, the protect • Print order is used icon is displayed at the top of the screen.) to specify which images are to be ● To rotate selected images, turn the Quick Control Dial to highlight printed. Rotate, and press SET. Turn the Quick Control Dial to scroll through • Transfer Order your images and press SET one or more times to rotate an image. is used to select which photos are ● To erase selected images, turn the Quick Control Dial to highlight transferred to your computer. Erase images and press SET. Turn the Quick Control Dial to high- light Select and erase images and press SET. Turn the Quick Control Dial to scroll through images and press SET to check those to be deleted. (Press Index and Magnify to toggle between 1 or 3 images.) When finished selecting images, press the Erase button to delete them and select OK when asked to confirm.The protect icon. ● To erase all images in a folder, turn the Quick Control Dial to highlight Erase images and press SET. Turn the Quick Control Dial Tip to highlight All images in folder, and press SET to display a list of The best way to de- folders. Turn the Quick Control Dial again to select a folder and press lete images depends SET, then turn it again to select OK and press SET. on how many you are deleting. ● To erase all images on the card, turn the Quick Control Dial to • When deleting highlight Erase images and press SET. Turn the Quick Control Dial 100% of the images, to highlight All images on card, and press SET, then turn it again to use the All images on card choice. select OK and press SET. • When deleting less 2. When finished, press MENU. than 50%, use the Select and erase im- ages choice. • When deleting more than 50%, pro- tect the images you want to save, and then use the All im- ages on card choice to delete the rest.22 for more on digital PhotograPhy, viSit httP://WWW.ShortCourSeS.Com
  23. 23. giving Slide ShoWSgiving Slide ShoWS You can display your images as a slide show on the camera’s monitor or on a connected TV. • To show your images on a non-HD TV, turn both the TV and the camera off while you connect the supplied video cable (don’t use any other) to the A/V OUT terminal on the camera. On the TV connect the red plug to the audio right channel, the white to the audio left channel, and the yellow to video in. Turn on the TV and set it for video input. • To show your images on a High Definition HD TV connect the camera andThe optional HDMI TV using the camera’s built-in HDMI OUT terminal and an optional HDMICable HTC-100 used to Cable HTC-100. Output resolution is automatically set to match the modeldisplay images on HD of HDTV you are using and photos are displayed in their original 3:2 aspectTVs. ratio. Once the camera and TV are connected, turn on the camera and set it to Slide show as described below. Shows can include all of the still images and movies on the memory card, just movies or still images, or specific photos selected by their date or folder. For added convenience you can control the playback rate (from one to five seconds per image) and set the show to end or loop when finished. Auto power off does not operate in slide show mode so you have to remember to turn it off. If you are traveling and need to switch between NTSC and PAL video systems see page 161.The camera’s HDMIterminal. GIVING SLIDE SHOWS TIPS 1. Press MENU and select the Playback 2 menu tab. • Canon’s optional 2. Turn the Quick Control Dial to highlight Slide show, and press SET AC adapter kit (ACK- E6) lets you give to display the slide show settings screen. slide shows without draining your battery 3. Do one of the following: pack. ● Turn the Quick Control Dial to highlight All images and press SET. • When giving a slide Turn it again to select All images, Folder, Date, Movies or Stills and show, due to differ- ences in the aspect press SET. If you select Folder or Date, before pressing SET press ratio of the screen INFO to display a list of folders or dates from which to choose. Use and image, im- the Quick Control Dial and SET to select a folder or date and press ages may not fill the screen, or if they do, MENU to return to the slide show screen. parts may be cut off. ● Turn the Quick Control Dial to highlight Set up and press SET. • You can’t use the Turn it again to select Play time or Repeat and press SET. Use the camera’s A/V OUT and HDMI OUT ter- Quick Control Dial and SET to select a setting and press MENU to minals at the same return to the slide show screen. time. 4. Turn the Quick Control Dial to highlight Start and press SET to begin the show. ● To pause and restart the show, press SET. When paused, a pause icon is displayed in the upper left corner of the monitor. ● To manually scroll through images, turn the Main or Quick Control Dial.When paused, a pauseicon is displayed in the ● To specify what information is displayed, press INFO.upper left corner of themonitor. 5. To stop the show at any point, press the MENU or shutter button.for more on digital PhotograPhy, viSit httP://WWW.ShortCourSeS.Com 23
  24. 24. ChaPter 1. Camera ControlS and Creativity SeleCting image Quality and Sizehttp://www.photocourse.com/itext/dots/ Digital photographs are made up of millions of tiny squares called picture el- ements—or just pixels. Like the impressionists who painted wonderful scenesClick to see how dots with small dabs of paint, your computer and printer can use these tiny pixelsare used in printing. to display or print photographs. To do so, the computer divides the screen or printed page into a grid of pixels. It then uses the values stored in the digital photograph to specify the brightness and color of each pixel in this grid—a form of painting by number. Any image that looks sharp and has smooth transitions in tones (top) is actually made up of millions of individual square pixels (bottom). Each pixel is a solid, uniform color. Tip • The term “resolu- tion” has two mean- ings in photography. Originally it referred to the ability of a camera system to resolve pairs of fine lines such as those found on a test chart. In this usage it’s an indicator of sharpness, not im- age size. With the introduction of digital cameras it began be- ing used to indicate the number of pixels a camera could cap- ture. numBer of PixelS http://www.photocourse.com/itext/resolution/Click to explore the The quality of a digital image depends in part on the number of pixels used tooriginal meaning of create the image (sometimes referred to as resolution). At a given size, more“resolution”. pixels add detail and sharpen edges. However, there are always size limits. When you enlarge any digital image enough, the pixels begin to show—anhttp://www.photocourse.com/itext/pixelzoom/ effect called pixelization. This is not unlike traditional silver-based printsClick to see the effects where grain begins to show when prints are enlarged past a certain point.of pixelization as animage is enlarged. 24 for more on digital PhotograPhy, viSit httP://WWW.ShortCourSeS.Com
  25. 25. SeleCting image Quality and SizeWhen a digital imageis displayed or printedat the correct size forthe number of pixels itcontains, it looks likea normal photograph.When enlarged toomuch (as is the eyehere), its square pixelsbegin to show. Eachpixel is a small squaremade up of a singlecolor.http://www.photocourse.com/itext/imagesize/Click to see howthe output devicedetermines image sizes.http://www.photocourse.com/itext/pixelresolution/ Click to explore how more pixels give sharper images.http://www.photocourse.com/itext/excel/math-imagesize.xls in The size of a photograph is specified in one of two ways—by its dimensions pixels or by the total number of pixels it contains. For example, the same im-Click for Excel worksheet on image sizes. age can be said to have 5616 × 3744 pixels (where “×” is pronounced “by” as in “5616 by 3744”), or to contain a little over 21 million pixels or megapixels (5616 multiplied by 3744).Image sizes areexpressed asdimensions in pixels(5616 × 3744) or bythe total number ofpixels (21 megapixels). 5D MARk ii iMAgE SizES • The 5D Mark II gives you a choice of three image sizes: 5616 × 3744 (large), 4080 x 2720 (medium), and 2353 × 1856 (small) plus small RAW images.for more on digital PhotograPhy, viSit httP://WWW.ShortCourSeS.Com 25
  26. 26. ChaPter 1. Camera ControlS and Creativity hoW an image iS CaPtured Digital cameras are very much like the rapidly disappearing 35mm film cameras. Both types contain a lens, an aperture, and a shutter. The lens brings light from the scene into focus inside the camera so it can expose an image. The aperture is a hole that can be made smaller or larger to control the amount of light entering the camera. The shutter is a device that can be opened or closed to control the length of time the light is allowed to enter. The big difference between traditional film cameras and digital cameras is how they capture the image. Instead of film, digital cameras use a solid- state device called an image sensor. In the 5D Mark II, the image sensor is a CMOS chip. On the surface of this full-frame silicon chip is a grid containing over 21 million photosensitive diodes called photosites, photoelements, or pixels. Each photosite captures a single pixel in the photograph to be. the exPoSure When you press the shutter button of a digital camera, an exposure system measures the light coming through the lens and sets the aperture and shutter speed for the correct exposure. When the shutter opens briefly, each pixel on the image sensor records the brightness of the light that falls on it by accu- mulating an electrical charge. The more light that hits a pixel, the higher the charge it records. Pixels capturing light from highlights in the scene will have high charges. Those capturing light from shadows will have low charges.An image sensor When the shutter closes to end the exposure, the charge from each pixel isagainst a backgroundenlargement of its measured and converted into a digital number. This series of numbers is thensquare pixels, each used to reconstruct the image by setting the color and brightness of matchingcapable of capturing pixels on the screen or printed page.one pixel in the finalimage. it’S all BlaCk and White after all It may be surprising, but pixels on an image sensor can only capture bright- ness, not color. They record only the gray scale—a series of 256 increasingly darker tones ranging from pure white to pure black. How the camera creates a color image from the brightness recorded by each pixel is an interesting story.The gray scale containsa range of tones frompure white to pureblack. When photography was first invented, it could only record black and white TipS images. The search for color was a long and arduous process, and a lot of • You can change hand coloring went on in the interim (causing one photographer to comment contrast, sharpness, “so you have to know how to paint after all!”). One major breakthrough was saturation, and color tone settings using James Clerk Maxwell’s 1860 discovery that color photographs could be cre- Picture Styles (page ated using black and white film and red, blue, and green filters. He had the 149). photographer Thomas Sutton photograph a tartan ribbon three times, each • When you change time with a different color filter over the lens. The three black and white im- image quality, the ages were then projected onto a screen with three different projectors, each LCD panel always equipped with the same color filter used to take the image being projected. indicates the number of new shots that will When brought into alignment, the three images formed a full-color photo- fit on the current CF graph. Over a century later, image sensors work much the same way. card.26 for more on digital PhotograPhy, viSit httP://WWW.ShortCourSeS.Com

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