Growing your school and freelance businesswith blended learningCleve Miller / English360
Agenda
Agenda
AgendaAcademic vs. performance-based models
AgendaAcademic vs. performance-based modelsTheoretical framework for tech-enabled PBL
AgendaAcademic vs. performance-based modelsTheoretical framework for tech-enabled PBLAligning PBL with customer business g...
AgendaAcademic vs. performance-based modelsTheoretical framework for tech-enabled PBLAligning PBL with customer business g...
AgendaAcademic vs. performance-based models
1. Competitive pressure
“Companies that fail to devise a language strategy are    essentially limiting their growth opportunities...putting themse...
1. Competitive pressure
1. Competitive pressure2. Globalization of tasks and resources
1. Competitive pressure2. Globalization of tasks and resources3. M&A integration across borders
Problem: corporate language training has beentrapped within the “academic model”
Output and accountability of the “academic model”is successful completion of courses and exams.
1. Competitive pressure2. Globalization of tasks and resources3. M&A integration across borders
Output and accountability of the “academic model”is successful completion of courses and exams.
Output and accountability of the “academic model”is successful completion of courses and exams.Academic model for company ...
Output and accountability of the “academic model”is successful completion of courses and exams.Academic model for company ...
Output and accountability of the “academic model”is successful completion of courses and exams.Academic model for company ...
Output and accountability of the “academic model”is successful completion of courses and exams.Academic model for company ...
Output and accountability of the “academic model”is successful completion of courses and exams.Academic model for company ...
Solution: expand the academic model toalign ESP training with business, performance goals
Performance-based learning: syllabus emergesfrom business needs and performance events
A performance event is an instance of authenticL2 communication in a professional context....
...a specific, future communicative performance inthe target language that merits sustained effort tooptimize the results o...
Different approaches to BE, ESP course designCurricular, needs-based, performance-based  Course design   Selection of outc...
Different approaches to BE, ESP course designCurricular, needs-based, performance-based  Course design     Selection of ou...
Different approaches to BE, ESP course designCurricular, needs-based, performance-based  Course design     Selection of ou...
Different approaches to BE, ESP course designCurricular, needs-based, performance-based  Course design     Selection of ou...
Different approaches to BE, ESP course designCurricular, needs-based, performance-based  Course design     Selection of ou...
Step 1: Select the performance event  • Learner drives selection of event  • Teacher supports and guides  • Other stakehol...
Step 2: Define the key messages  • Sales presentation: features, benefits  • Business dinner: personal anecdote, questioning...
Step 3: Plan, resource and teach  • Language needed for messages documented as goals  • Syllabus > material: authentic, co...
Step 4: Post-performance reflection, feedback  • Reflective narrative by the learner  • Were the linguistic objectives achie...
select eventpost-performance                      define    reflection                        messages                   pla...
4-step PBL cycle >>emergent syllabus driving the client’s business
Agenda
Agenda
AgendaAcademic vs. performance-based models
AgendaAcademic vs. performance-based modelsTheoretical framework for tech-enabled PBL
BE / ESP and technology: 2008-2018
BE / ESP and technology: 2008-2018“The future is already here - it’s just not evenly distributed” - Canadian author Willia...
Content from the cloud...
...delivered through a range      of mobile devices,
...ubiquitous,
personalised for each learner...
...adaptive,
...and social.
So, personalized, adaptive, and social, withubiquitous cloud-to-mobile delivery.How are these trends being implementedin b...
Time       Place
Time       together           apart                  Place
asynchronousTime   synchronous                 together           apart                            Place
asynchronousTime                 (classroom)   synchronous                   together            apart                    ...
asynchronousTime                 (classroom)   synchronous      IWB                 projector                 Ss mobile   ...
asynchronousTime                 (classroom)           (computer)   synchronous      IWB                 projector        ...
asynchronousTime                 (classroom)           (computer)   synchronous      IWB            phone / skype         ...
(computer)  asynchronousTime                 (classroom)           (computer)   synchronous      IWB            phone / sk...
(computer)  asynchronous                           forums                                          wikis                  ...
(computer)  asynchronous   language lab            forums                                          wikis                  ...
“blended learning”                                        (computer)   asynchronous   language lab            forums      ...
What is blended learning?“Blended, blended, the future is blended.”
What is blended learning?“Blended, blended, the future is blended.”             Combination of:               in-class    ...
What is blended learning?“Blended, blended, the future is blended.”             Combination of:               in-class    ...
Benefits of technology for BE / ESP
Benefits of technology for BE / ESP Flexibility for instructional design
Benefits of technology for BE / ESP Flexibility for instructional design Efficiency for teaching
Benefits of technology for BE / ESP Flexibility for instructional design Efficiency for teaching Hyper-personalisation
Benefits of technology for BE / ESP Flexibility for instructional design Efficiency for teaching Hyper-personalisation Botto...
A 2-minute history of the web(and how it effects us as teachers)
“Bottom-up: teacher-driven, student-centric”A 2-minute history of the web(and how it effects us as teachers)
The old web is aThe old web is a pipe.                 pipe.
What is the “old web” relationship?Top-down, expert-created, static, passively consumed
The new web is a platform....where we all work together to create, share, discuss, learn.
What direction is the relationship?Bottom-up, active user-generated, dynamic content
What direction is the relationship?Bottom-up, active user-generated, dynamic content
What direction is the relationship?Bottom-up, active user-generated, dynamic content
What direction is the relationship?Bottom-up, active user-generated, dynamic content
Active users: new skills for teachersWeb apps today support creativity: “teacher as DJ”                                   ...
Training materials developmentThe content continuum and a new way forward   Traditional                          Technolog...
Training materials developmentThe content continuum and a new way forward   Traditional                          Technolog...
Training materials developmentThe content continuum and a new way forward    Traditional                         Technolog...
Training materials developmentThe content continuum and a new way forward    Traditional                                  ...
Training materials developmentThe content continuum and a new way forward    Traditional                                  ...
The ESP ContinuumFrom the academic model to performance and specificity   Traditional                           Technology-...
The ESP ContinuumFrom the academic model to performance and specificity   Traditional                           Technology-...
The ESP ContinuumFrom the academic model to performance and specificity   Traditional                           Technology-...
The ESP ContinuumFrom the academic model to performance and specificity   Traditional                           Technology-...
The ESP ContinuumFrom the academic model to performance and specificity   Traditional                           Technology-...
The ESP ContinuumFrom the academic model to performance and specificity   Traditional                           Technology-...
The ESP ContinuumFrom the academic model to performance and specificity   Traditional                           Technology-...
The ESP ContinuumFrom the academic model to performance and specificity          “The more niche you go,     the higher pri...
Chia Suan www.chiasuanching.comEvan Frendo on specificity and ESP  Traditional                       Technology-supportedTO...
Chia Suan www.chiasuanching.comEvan Frendo on specificity and ESP     Traditional                                Technology...
Chia Suan www.chiasuanching.comEvan Frendo on specificity and ESP     Traditional                                       Tec...
Chia Suan www.chiasuanching.comEvan Frendo on specificity and ESP     Traditional                                          ...
Chia Suan www.chiasuanching.comEvan Frendo on specificity and ESP     Traditional                                          ...
Chia Suan www.chiasuanching.comEvan Frendo on specificity and ESP     Traditional                                          ...
Chia Suan www.chiasuanching.comEvan Frendo on specificity and ESP     Traditional                                          ...
The common coreESP and specificity                     common core
The common coreESP and specificity                     professional core                      common core
The common coreESP and specificity                     domain / performance specific                         professional co...
Chia Suan www.chiasuanching.comEvan Frendo on specificity and ESP     Traditional                                          ...
common core              professional core                                  domain / performance specific
general English            ESP: academic/professional            ESP: specific domain  lexis-grammar-functions           + ...
Agenda
Agenda
AgendaAcademic vs. performance-based models
AgendaAcademic vs. performance-based modelsTheoretical framework for tech-enabled PBL
AgendaAcademic vs. performance-based modelsTheoretical framework for tech-enabled PBLAligning PBL with customer business g...
The Framework
Driving business results through language training              1                             2        Design the Define Bu...
Driving business results through language training                                             1                          ...
Driving business results through language training                 2    Design the                       Complete         ...
Driving business results through language training       PBL            3                    Deliver for                  ...
Driving business results through language training                                     4                PBL               ...
Driving business results through language training              1                       2    Design the Define Business    ...
Driving business results through language training                    Academic       Performance   PBL frameworkDefine outc...
Driving business results through language training                    Academic        Performance   PBL frameworkDefine out...
Driving business results through language training                    Academic          Performance   PBL frameworkDefine o...
Driving business results through language training                    Academic          Performance   PBL frameworkDefine o...
Driving business results through language training                    Academic          Performance   PBL frameworkDefine o...
Driving business results through language training                    Academic          Performance   PBL frameworkDefine o...
Driving business results through language training                    Academic          Performance   PBL frameworkDefine o...
Driving business results through language training                    Academic          Performance   PBL frameworkDefine o...
Driving business results through language training                    Academic          Performance   PBL frameworkDefine o...
Agenda
Agenda
AgendaAcademic vs. performance-based models
AgendaAcademic vs. performance-based modelsTheoretical framework for tech-enabled PBL
AgendaAcademic vs. performance-based modelsTheoretical framework for tech-enabled PBLAligning PBL with customer business g...
AgendaAcademic vs. performance-based modelsTheoretical framework for tech-enabled PBLAligning PBL with customer business g...
TextGROWTH IDEA #1
1. Competitive pressure
1. Competitive pressure2. Globalization of tasks and resources
1. Competitive pressure2. Globalization of tasks and resources3. M&A integration across borders
GROWTH IDEA #1Align training program to business needsas identified by senior management.
GROWTH IDEA #2Seek opportunities to bypass HRand go directly to senior management.
GROWTH IDEA #3Drive client’s business through PBL,boosting perceived ROI and raising training fees.
GROWTH IDEA #4“The more niche you go, the higher price you can charge.”
GROWTH IDEA #5Use enterprise needs assessments to thinkoutside the box, develop innovative products.
GROWTH IDEA #6Set prices by course, not by training hour.
Example of pricing strategy: eClass
GROWTH IDEA #7Use an open web platform such as English360to implement PBL.
Goals for English360 blended learning platform
Goals for English360 blended learning platform    5-minute school set up with logo, branding
Goals for English360 blended learning platform    5-minute school set up with logo, branding    publisher agnostic, wide r...
Goals for English360 blended learning platform    5-minute school set up with logo, branding    publisher agnostic, wide r...
Goals for English360 blended learning platform    5-minute school set up with logo, branding    publisher agnostic, wide r...
Goals for English360 blended learning platform    5-minute school set up with logo, branding    publisher agnostic, wide r...
Goals for English360 blended learning platform    5-minute school set up with logo, branding    publisher agnostic, wide r...
Driving business results through language training              1                       2    Design the Define Business    ...
For further information, please seewww.english360.comcleve@english360.comtwitter: cleve360
“The more niche you go,the higher price you can charge.”“Get them to think that a class     is a work meeting”. “We’re tra...
BESIG Stuttgart 2012
BESIG Stuttgart 2012
BESIG Stuttgart 2012
BESIG Stuttgart 2012
BESIG Stuttgart 2012
BESIG Stuttgart 2012
BESIG Stuttgart 2012
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

BESIG Stuttgart 2012

187

Published on

My session on performance-based corporate language training, and how it is enabled by technology. Sections on blended learning, enterprise needs assessment, and commercial benefits for language schools.

Published in: Education
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
187
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
15
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • Good morning everyone, thank you for coming, and I’d also like to thank the British Consulate for hosting this event. I’m going to be presenting a very short overview of how we can correct a major problem that most language programs have: most language training is not directly connected to business outcomes, and therefore waste a tremendous opportunity and lose value for the company.\n\nYou’ll see here on the slide that we have a photo of a boardroom, not a classroom, and that is a metaphor for my main message today: it’s all about the business results, not learning results.\n\nJust a brief background about me: I’ve been working in corporate language training for 24 years now, as a teacher, teacher trainer, school owner, and consultant, a director at Cambridge University Press in their learning technology unit, and now I run the web platform English360. I was very lucky at the start of my career, because two things happened: first, I did not have the traditional, academic teacher training, so in a way I was free of the teacher/classroom attitude. The second piece of luck was that I found some amazing business mentors in my students. I had some very high CEO-level students and they were very generous with their knowledge and experience. So from the beginning of my career 20 years ago I started with a solid understanding of how a business can benefit from a language program that is structured correctly. Now, 20 years later, we have an article in the Harvard Business Review that....\n
  • Good morning everyone, thank you for coming, and I’d also like to thank the British Consulate for hosting this event. I’m going to be presenting a very short overview of how we can correct a major problem that most language programs have: most language training is not directly connected to business outcomes, and therefore waste a tremendous opportunity and lose value for the company.\n\nYou’ll see here on the slide that we have a photo of a boardroom, not a classroom, and that is a metaphor for my main message today: it’s all about the business results, not learning results.\n\nJust a brief background about me: I’ve been working in corporate language training for 24 years now, as a teacher, teacher trainer, school owner, and consultant, a director at Cambridge University Press in their learning technology unit, and now I run the web platform English360. I was very lucky at the start of my career, because two things happened: first, I did not have the traditional, academic teacher training, so in a way I was free of the teacher/classroom attitude. The second piece of luck was that I found some amazing business mentors in my students. I had some very high CEO-level students and they were very generous with their knowledge and experience. So from the beginning of my career 20 years ago I started with a solid understanding of how a business can benefit from a language program that is structured correctly. Now, 20 years later, we have an article in the Harvard Business Review that....\n
  • Good morning everyone, thank you for coming, and I’d also like to thank the British Consulate for hosting this event. I’m going to be presenting a very short overview of how we can correct a major problem that most language programs have: most language training is not directly connected to business outcomes, and therefore waste a tremendous opportunity and lose value for the company.\n\nYou’ll see here on the slide that we have a photo of a boardroom, not a classroom, and that is a metaphor for my main message today: it’s all about the business results, not learning results.\n\nJust a brief background about me: I’ve been working in corporate language training for 24 years now, as a teacher, teacher trainer, school owner, and consultant, a director at Cambridge University Press in their learning technology unit, and now I run the web platform English360. I was very lucky at the start of my career, because two things happened: first, I did not have the traditional, academic teacher training, so in a way I was free of the teacher/classroom attitude. The second piece of luck was that I found some amazing business mentors in my students. I had some very high CEO-level students and they were very generous with their knowledge and experience. So from the beginning of my career 20 years ago I started with a solid understanding of how a business can benefit from a language program that is structured correctly. Now, 20 years later, we have an article in the Harvard Business Review that....\n
  • Good morning everyone, thank you for coming, and I’d also like to thank the British Consulate for hosting this event. I’m going to be presenting a very short overview of how we can correct a major problem that most language programs have: most language training is not directly connected to business outcomes, and therefore waste a tremendous opportunity and lose value for the company.\n\nYou’ll see here on the slide that we have a photo of a boardroom, not a classroom, and that is a metaphor for my main message today: it’s all about the business results, not learning results.\n\nJust a brief background about me: I’ve been working in corporate language training for 24 years now, as a teacher, teacher trainer, school owner, and consultant, a director at Cambridge University Press in their learning technology unit, and now I run the web platform English360. I was very lucky at the start of my career, because two things happened: first, I did not have the traditional, academic teacher training, so in a way I was free of the teacher/classroom attitude. The second piece of luck was that I found some amazing business mentors in my students. I had some very high CEO-level students and they were very generous with their knowledge and experience. So from the beginning of my career 20 years ago I started with a solid understanding of how a business can benefit from a language program that is structured correctly. Now, 20 years later, we have an article in the Harvard Business Review that....\n
  • Good morning everyone, thank you for coming, and I’d also like to thank the British Consulate for hosting this event. I’m going to be presenting a very short overview of how we can correct a major problem that most language programs have: most language training is not directly connected to business outcomes, and therefore waste a tremendous opportunity and lose value for the company.\n\nYou’ll see here on the slide that we have a photo of a boardroom, not a classroom, and that is a metaphor for my main message today: it’s all about the business results, not learning results.\n\nJust a brief background about me: I’ve been working in corporate language training for 24 years now, as a teacher, teacher trainer, school owner, and consultant, a director at Cambridge University Press in their learning technology unit, and now I run the web platform English360. I was very lucky at the start of my career, because two things happened: first, I did not have the traditional, academic teacher training, so in a way I was free of the teacher/classroom attitude. The second piece of luck was that I found some amazing business mentors in my students. I had some very high CEO-level students and they were very generous with their knowledge and experience. So from the beginning of my career 20 years ago I started with a solid understanding of how a business can benefit from a language program that is structured correctly. Now, 20 years later, we have an article in the Harvard Business Review that....\n
  • Good morning everyone, thank you for coming, and I’d also like to thank the British Consulate for hosting this event. I’m going to be presenting a very short overview of how we can correct a major problem that most language programs have: most language training is not directly connected to business outcomes, and therefore waste a tremendous opportunity and lose value for the company.\n\nYou’ll see here on the slide that we have a photo of a boardroom, not a classroom, and that is a metaphor for my main message today: it’s all about the business results, not learning results.\n\nJust a brief background about me: I’ve been working in corporate language training for 24 years now, as a teacher, teacher trainer, school owner, and consultant, a director at Cambridge University Press in their learning technology unit, and now I run the web platform English360. I was very lucky at the start of my career, because two things happened: first, I did not have the traditional, academic teacher training, so in a way I was free of the teacher/classroom attitude. The second piece of luck was that I found some amazing business mentors in my students. I had some very high CEO-level students and they were very generous with their knowledge and experience. So from the beginning of my career 20 years ago I started with a solid understanding of how a business can benefit from a language program that is structured correctly. Now, 20 years later, we have an article in the Harvard Business Review that....\n
  • Good morning everyone, thank you for coming, and I’d also like to thank the British Consulate for hosting this event. I’m going to be presenting a very short overview of how we can correct a major problem that most language programs have: most language training is not directly connected to business outcomes, and therefore waste a tremendous opportunity and lose value for the company.\n\nYou’ll see here on the slide that we have a photo of a boardroom, not a classroom, and that is a metaphor for my main message today: it’s all about the business results, not learning results.\n\nJust a brief background about me: I’ve been working in corporate language training for 24 years now, as a teacher, teacher trainer, school owner, and consultant, a director at Cambridge University Press in their learning technology unit, and now I run the web platform English360. I was very lucky at the start of my career, because two things happened: first, I did not have the traditional, academic teacher training, so in a way I was free of the teacher/classroom attitude. The second piece of luck was that I found some amazing business mentors in my students. I had some very high CEO-level students and they were very generous with their knowledge and experience. So from the beginning of my career 20 years ago I started with a solid understanding of how a business can benefit from a language program that is structured correctly. Now, 20 years later, we have an article in the Harvard Business Review that....\n
  • ..says the same thing. It just came out this summer. It’s by Tsedal Neely, a professor at Harvard, and based on her research with international organizations. It is subtitled....\n
  • ...why you need a language strategy now. In the article she outlines three areas where businesses need English to compete.\n\nThe first is sales, new markets, customer service, which she summarizes as competitive pressure. She has a high impact quote...\n
  • \n
  • Her second area is globalization of tasks and resources, such as supply chain management, IT integrations and rollouts, that sort of task.\n\nAnd the third is with mergers and acquisitions, where the stakes may be in the billion euro range and miscommunication and cultural issues can cause failure.\n\nSo English is important, and I think we all here agree. It’s nice to get CEO level attention from Harvard though. \n\nSo why do we have so many problems with language programs?\n
  • Her second area is globalization of tasks and resources, such as supply chain management, IT integrations and rollouts, that sort of task.\n\nAnd the third is with mergers and acquisitions, where the stakes may be in the billion euro range and miscommunication and cultural issues can cause failure.\n\nSo English is important, and I think we all here agree. It’s nice to get CEO level attention from Harvard though. \n\nSo why do we have so many problems with language programs?\n
  • I think the answer is in this picture. The problem is that we have taken a model that is appropriate for one context and imposed it on a context where it is not valid. This is the academic model we use in schools and higher education, and a school is not a business.\n
  • One reason the academic model is wrong for business English is that the purpose is different. The whole purpose of the academic model, the reason we go to school, to to successfully pass classes and exams. But, if we look at the main strategic drivers for corporate language training...\n
  • ...you’ll note that classes and exams are not on this list.\n
  • One reason the academic model is wrong for business English is that the purpose is different. The whole purpose of the academic model, the reason we go to school, to to successfully pass classes and exams. But, if we look at the main strategic drivers for corporate language training...\n
  • One reason the academic model is wrong for business English is that the purpose is different. The whole purpose of the academic model, the reason we go to school, to to successfully pass classes and exams. But, if we look at the main strategic drivers for corporate language training...\n
  • One reason the academic model is wrong for business English is that the purpose is different. The whole purpose of the academic model, the reason we go to school, to to successfully pass classes and exams. But, if we look at the main strategic drivers for corporate language training...\n
  • One reason the academic model is wrong for business English is that the purpose is different. The whole purpose of the academic model, the reason we go to school, to to successfully pass classes and exams. But, if we look at the main strategic drivers for corporate language training...\n
  • One reason the academic model is wrong for business English is that the purpose is different. The whole purpose of the academic model, the reason we go to school, to to successfully pass classes and exams. But, if we look at the main strategic drivers for corporate language training...\n
  • So, what’s the solution? The solution of the problem is to change our purpose to authentic business goals, and align training to these business outcomes.\n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • Good morning everyone, thank you for coming, and I’d also like to thank the British Consulate for hosting this event. I’m going to be presenting a very short overview of how we can correct a major problem that most language programs have: most language training is not directly connected to business outcomes, and therefore waste a tremendous opportunity and lose value for the company.\n\nYou’ll see here on the slide that we have a photo of a boardroom, not a classroom, and that is a metaphor for my main message today: it’s all about the business results, not learning results.\n\nJust a brief background about me: I’ve been working in corporate language training for 24 years now, as a teacher, teacher trainer, school owner, and consultant, a director at Cambridge University Press in their learning technology unit, and now I run the web platform English360. I was very lucky at the start of my career, because two things happened: first, I did not have the traditional, academic teacher training, so in a way I was free of the teacher/classroom attitude. The second piece of luck was that I found some amazing business mentors in my students. I had some very high CEO-level students and they were very generous with their knowledge and experience. So from the beginning of my career 20 years ago I started with a solid understanding of how a business can benefit from a language program that is structured correctly. Now, 20 years later, we have an article in the Harvard Business Review that....\n
  • Good morning everyone, thank you for coming, and I’d also like to thank the British Consulate for hosting this event. I’m going to be presenting a very short overview of how we can correct a major problem that most language programs have: most language training is not directly connected to business outcomes, and therefore waste a tremendous opportunity and lose value for the company.\n\nYou’ll see here on the slide that we have a photo of a boardroom, not a classroom, and that is a metaphor for my main message today: it’s all about the business results, not learning results.\n\nJust a brief background about me: I’ve been working in corporate language training for 24 years now, as a teacher, teacher trainer, school owner, and consultant, a director at Cambridge University Press in their learning technology unit, and now I run the web platform English360. I was very lucky at the start of my career, because two things happened: first, I did not have the traditional, academic teacher training, so in a way I was free of the teacher/classroom attitude. The second piece of luck was that I found some amazing business mentors in my students. I had some very high CEO-level students and they were very generous with their knowledge and experience. So from the beginning of my career 20 years ago I started with a solid understanding of how a business can benefit from a language program that is structured correctly. Now, 20 years later, we have an article in the Harvard Business Review that....\n
  • Good morning everyone, thank you for coming, and I’d also like to thank the British Consulate for hosting this event. I’m going to be presenting a very short overview of how we can correct a major problem that most language programs have: most language training is not directly connected to business outcomes, and therefore waste a tremendous opportunity and lose value for the company.\n\nYou’ll see here on the slide that we have a photo of a boardroom, not a classroom, and that is a metaphor for my main message today: it’s all about the business results, not learning results.\n\nJust a brief background about me: I’ve been working in corporate language training for 24 years now, as a teacher, teacher trainer, school owner, and consultant, a director at Cambridge University Press in their learning technology unit, and now I run the web platform English360. I was very lucky at the start of my career, because two things happened: first, I did not have the traditional, academic teacher training, so in a way I was free of the teacher/classroom attitude. The second piece of luck was that I found some amazing business mentors in my students. I had some very high CEO-level students and they were very generous with their knowledge and experience. So from the beginning of my career 20 years ago I started with a solid understanding of how a business can benefit from a language program that is structured correctly. Now, 20 years later, we have an article in the Harvard Business Review that....\n
  • Good morning everyone, thank you for coming, and I’d also like to thank the British Consulate for hosting this event. I’m going to be presenting a very short overview of how we can correct a major problem that most language programs have: most language training is not directly connected to business outcomes, and therefore waste a tremendous opportunity and lose value for the company.\n\nYou’ll see here on the slide that we have a photo of a boardroom, not a classroom, and that is a metaphor for my main message today: it’s all about the business results, not learning results.\n\nJust a brief background about me: I’ve been working in corporate language training for 24 years now, as a teacher, teacher trainer, school owner, and consultant, a director at Cambridge University Press in their learning technology unit, and now I run the web platform English360. I was very lucky at the start of my career, because two things happened: first, I did not have the traditional, academic teacher training, so in a way I was free of the teacher/classroom attitude. The second piece of luck was that I found some amazing business mentors in my students. I had some very high CEO-level students and they were very generous with their knowledge and experience. So from the beginning of my career 20 years ago I started with a solid understanding of how a business can benefit from a language program that is structured correctly. Now, 20 years later, we have an article in the Harvard Business Review that....\n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • Three things about social:\n1) learning has always been social\n2) classroom is still supreme\n3) \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • Good morning everyone, thank you for coming, and I’d also like to thank the British Consulate for hosting this event. I’m going to be presenting a very short overview of how we can correct a major problem that most language programs have: most language training is not directly connected to business outcomes, and therefore waste a tremendous opportunity and lose value for the company.\n\nYou’ll see here on the slide that we have a photo of a boardroom, not a classroom, and that is a metaphor for my main message today: it’s all about the business results, not learning results.\n\nJust a brief background about me: I’ve been working in corporate language training for 24 years now, as a teacher, teacher trainer, school owner, and consultant, a director at Cambridge University Press in their learning technology unit, and now I run the web platform English360. I was very lucky at the start of my career, because two things happened: first, I did not have the traditional, academic teacher training, so in a way I was free of the teacher/classroom attitude. The second piece of luck was that I found some amazing business mentors in my students. I had some very high CEO-level students and they were very generous with their knowledge and experience. So from the beginning of my career 20 years ago I started with a solid understanding of how a business can benefit from a language program that is structured correctly. Now, 20 years later, we have an article in the Harvard Business Review that....\n
  • Good morning everyone, thank you for coming, and I’d also like to thank the British Consulate for hosting this event. I’m going to be presenting a very short overview of how we can correct a major problem that most language programs have: most language training is not directly connected to business outcomes, and therefore waste a tremendous opportunity and lose value for the company.\n\nYou’ll see here on the slide that we have a photo of a boardroom, not a classroom, and that is a metaphor for my main message today: it’s all about the business results, not learning results.\n\nJust a brief background about me: I’ve been working in corporate language training for 24 years now, as a teacher, teacher trainer, school owner, and consultant, a director at Cambridge University Press in their learning technology unit, and now I run the web platform English360. I was very lucky at the start of my career, because two things happened: first, I did not have the traditional, academic teacher training, so in a way I was free of the teacher/classroom attitude. The second piece of luck was that I found some amazing business mentors in my students. I had some very high CEO-level students and they were very generous with their knowledge and experience. So from the beginning of my career 20 years ago I started with a solid understanding of how a business can benefit from a language program that is structured correctly. Now, 20 years later, we have an article in the Harvard Business Review that....\n
  • Good morning everyone, thank you for coming, and I’d also like to thank the British Consulate for hosting this event. I’m going to be presenting a very short overview of how we can correct a major problem that most language programs have: most language training is not directly connected to business outcomes, and therefore waste a tremendous opportunity and lose value for the company.\n\nYou’ll see here on the slide that we have a photo of a boardroom, not a classroom, and that is a metaphor for my main message today: it’s all about the business results, not learning results.\n\nJust a brief background about me: I’ve been working in corporate language training for 24 years now, as a teacher, teacher trainer, school owner, and consultant, a director at Cambridge University Press in their learning technology unit, and now I run the web platform English360. I was very lucky at the start of my career, because two things happened: first, I did not have the traditional, academic teacher training, so in a way I was free of the teacher/classroom attitude. The second piece of luck was that I found some amazing business mentors in my students. I had some very high CEO-level students and they were very generous with their knowledge and experience. So from the beginning of my career 20 years ago I started with a solid understanding of how a business can benefit from a language program that is structured correctly. Now, 20 years later, we have an article in the Harvard Business Review that....\n
  • Good morning everyone, thank you for coming, and I’d also like to thank the British Consulate for hosting this event. I’m going to be presenting a very short overview of how we can correct a major problem that most language programs have: most language training is not directly connected to business outcomes, and therefore waste a tremendous opportunity and lose value for the company.\n\nYou’ll see here on the slide that we have a photo of a boardroom, not a classroom, and that is a metaphor for my main message today: it’s all about the business results, not learning results.\n\nJust a brief background about me: I’ve been working in corporate language training for 24 years now, as a teacher, teacher trainer, school owner, and consultant, a director at Cambridge University Press in their learning technology unit, and now I run the web platform English360. I was very lucky at the start of my career, because two things happened: first, I did not have the traditional, academic teacher training, so in a way I was free of the teacher/classroom attitude. The second piece of luck was that I found some amazing business mentors in my students. I had some very high CEO-level students and they were very generous with their knowledge and experience. So from the beginning of my career 20 years ago I started with a solid understanding of how a business can benefit from a language program that is structured correctly. Now, 20 years later, we have an article in the Harvard Business Review that....\n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • Good morning everyone, thank you for coming, and I’d also like to thank the British Consulate for hosting this event. I’m going to be presenting a very short overview of how we can correct a major problem that most language programs have: most language training is not directly connected to business outcomes, and therefore waste a tremendous opportunity and lose value for the company.\n\nYou’ll see here on the slide that we have a photo of a boardroom, not a classroom, and that is a metaphor for my main message today: it’s all about the business results, not learning results.\n\nJust a brief background about me: I’ve been working in corporate language training for 24 years now, as a teacher, teacher trainer, school owner, and consultant, a director at Cambridge University Press in their learning technology unit, and now I run the web platform English360. I was very lucky at the start of my career, because two things happened: first, I did not have the traditional, academic teacher training, so in a way I was free of the teacher/classroom attitude. The second piece of luck was that I found some amazing business mentors in my students. I had some very high CEO-level students and they were very generous with their knowledge and experience. So from the beginning of my career 20 years ago I started with a solid understanding of how a business can benefit from a language program that is structured correctly. Now, 20 years later, we have an article in the Harvard Business Review that....\n
  • Good morning everyone, thank you for coming, and I’d also like to thank the British Consulate for hosting this event. I’m going to be presenting a very short overview of how we can correct a major problem that most language programs have: most language training is not directly connected to business outcomes, and therefore waste a tremendous opportunity and lose value for the company.\n\nYou’ll see here on the slide that we have a photo of a boardroom, not a classroom, and that is a metaphor for my main message today: it’s all about the business results, not learning results.\n\nJust a brief background about me: I’ve been working in corporate language training for 24 years now, as a teacher, teacher trainer, school owner, and consultant, a director at Cambridge University Press in their learning technology unit, and now I run the web platform English360. I was very lucky at the start of my career, because two things happened: first, I did not have the traditional, academic teacher training, so in a way I was free of the teacher/classroom attitude. The second piece of luck was that I found some amazing business mentors in my students. I had some very high CEO-level students and they were very generous with their knowledge and experience. So from the beginning of my career 20 years ago I started with a solid understanding of how a business can benefit from a language program that is structured correctly. Now, 20 years later, we have an article in the Harvard Business Review that....\n
  • Good morning everyone, thank you for coming, and I’d also like to thank the British Consulate for hosting this event. I’m going to be presenting a very short overview of how we can correct a major problem that most language programs have: most language training is not directly connected to business outcomes, and therefore waste a tremendous opportunity and lose value for the company.\n\nYou’ll see here on the slide that we have a photo of a boardroom, not a classroom, and that is a metaphor for my main message today: it’s all about the business results, not learning results.\n\nJust a brief background about me: I’ve been working in corporate language training for 24 years now, as a teacher, teacher trainer, school owner, and consultant, a director at Cambridge University Press in their learning technology unit, and now I run the web platform English360. I was very lucky at the start of my career, because two things happened: first, I did not have the traditional, academic teacher training, so in a way I was free of the teacher/classroom attitude. The second piece of luck was that I found some amazing business mentors in my students. I had some very high CEO-level students and they were very generous with their knowledge and experience. So from the beginning of my career 20 years ago I started with a solid understanding of how a business can benefit from a language program that is structured correctly. Now, 20 years later, we have an article in the Harvard Business Review that....\n
  • Good morning everyone, thank you for coming, and I’d also like to thank the British Consulate for hosting this event. I’m going to be presenting a very short overview of how we can correct a major problem that most language programs have: most language training is not directly connected to business outcomes, and therefore waste a tremendous opportunity and lose value for the company.\n\nYou’ll see here on the slide that we have a photo of a boardroom, not a classroom, and that is a metaphor for my main message today: it’s all about the business results, not learning results.\n\nJust a brief background about me: I’ve been working in corporate language training for 24 years now, as a teacher, teacher trainer, school owner, and consultant, a director at Cambridge University Press in their learning technology unit, and now I run the web platform English360. I was very lucky at the start of my career, because two things happened: first, I did not have the traditional, academic teacher training, so in a way I was free of the teacher/classroom attitude. The second piece of luck was that I found some amazing business mentors in my students. I had some very high CEO-level students and they were very generous with their knowledge and experience. So from the beginning of my career 20 years ago I started with a solid understanding of how a business can benefit from a language program that is structured correctly. Now, 20 years later, we have an article in the Harvard Business Review that....\n
  • Good morning everyone, thank you for coming, and I’d also like to thank the British Consulate for hosting this event. I’m going to be presenting a very short overview of how we can correct a major problem that most language programs have: most language training is not directly connected to business outcomes, and therefore waste a tremendous opportunity and lose value for the company.\n\nYou’ll see here on the slide that we have a photo of a boardroom, not a classroom, and that is a metaphor for my main message today: it’s all about the business results, not learning results.\n\nJust a brief background about me: I’ve been working in corporate language training for 24 years now, as a teacher, teacher trainer, school owner, and consultant, a director at Cambridge University Press in their learning technology unit, and now I run the web platform English360. I was very lucky at the start of my career, because two things happened: first, I did not have the traditional, academic teacher training, so in a way I was free of the teacher/classroom attitude. The second piece of luck was that I found some amazing business mentors in my students. I had some very high CEO-level students and they were very generous with their knowledge and experience. So from the beginning of my career 20 years ago I started with a solid understanding of how a business can benefit from a language program that is structured correctly. Now, 20 years later, we have an article in the Harvard Business Review that....\n
  • Good morning everyone, thank you for coming, and I’d also like to thank the British Consulate for hosting this event. I’m going to be presenting a very short overview of how we can correct a major problem that most language programs have: most language training is not directly connected to business outcomes, and therefore waste a tremendous opportunity and lose value for the company.\n\nYou’ll see here on the slide that we have a photo of a boardroom, not a classroom, and that is a metaphor for my main message today: it’s all about the business results, not learning results.\n\nJust a brief background about me: I’ve been working in corporate language training for 24 years now, as a teacher, teacher trainer, school owner, and consultant, a director at Cambridge University Press in their learning technology unit, and now I run the web platform English360. I was very lucky at the start of my career, because two things happened: first, I did not have the traditional, academic teacher training, so in a way I was free of the teacher/classroom attitude. The second piece of luck was that I found some amazing business mentors in my students. I had some very high CEO-level students and they were very generous with their knowledge and experience. So from the beginning of my career 20 years ago I started with a solid understanding of how a business can benefit from a language program that is structured correctly. Now, 20 years later, we have an article in the Harvard Business Review that....\n
  • Her second area is globalization of tasks and resources, such as supply chain management, IT integrations and rollouts, that sort of task.\n\nAnd the third is with mergers and acquisitions, where the stakes may be in the billion euro range and miscommunication and cultural issues can cause failure.\n\nSo English is important, and I think we all here agree. It’s nice to get CEO level attention from Harvard though. \n\nSo why do we have so many problems with language programs?\n
  • Her second area is globalization of tasks and resources, such as supply chain management, IT integrations and rollouts, that sort of task.\n\nAnd the third is with mergers and acquisitions, where the stakes may be in the billion euro range and miscommunication and cultural issues can cause failure.\n\nSo English is important, and I think we all here agree. It’s nice to get CEO level attention from Harvard though. \n\nSo why do we have so many problems with language programs?\n
  • Good morning everyone, thank you for coming, and I’d also like to thank the British Consulate for hosting this event. I’m going to be presenting a very short overview of how we can correct a major problem that most language programs have: most language training is not directly connected to business outcomes, and therefore waste a tremendous opportunity and lose value for the company.\n\nYou’ll see here on the slide that we have a photo of a boardroom, not a classroom, and that is a metaphor for my main message today: it’s all about the business results, not learning results.\n\nJust a brief background about me: I’ve been working in corporate language training for 24 years now, as a teacher, teacher trainer, school owner, and consultant, a director at Cambridge University Press in their learning technology unit, and now I run the web platform English360. I was very lucky at the start of my career, because two things happened: first, I did not have the traditional, academic teacher training, so in a way I was free of the teacher/classroom attitude. The second piece of luck was that I found some amazing business mentors in my students. I had some very high CEO-level students and they were very generous with their knowledge and experience. So from the beginning of my career 20 years ago I started with a solid understanding of how a business can benefit from a language program that is structured correctly. Now, 20 years later, we have an article in the Harvard Business Review that....\n
  • Good morning everyone, thank you for coming, and I’d also like to thank the British Consulate for hosting this event. I’m going to be presenting a very short overview of how we can correct a major problem that most language programs have: most language training is not directly connected to business outcomes, and therefore waste a tremendous opportunity and lose value for the company.\n\nYou’ll see here on the slide that we have a photo of a boardroom, not a classroom, and that is a metaphor for my main message today: it’s all about the business results, not learning results.\n\nJust a brief background about me: I’ve been working in corporate language training for 24 years now, as a teacher, teacher trainer, school owner, and consultant, a director at Cambridge University Press in their learning technology unit, and now I run the web platform English360. I was very lucky at the start of my career, because two things happened: first, I did not have the traditional, academic teacher training, so in a way I was free of the teacher/classroom attitude. The second piece of luck was that I found some amazing business mentors in my students. I had some very high CEO-level students and they were very generous with their knowledge and experience. So from the beginning of my career 20 years ago I started with a solid understanding of how a business can benefit from a language program that is structured correctly. Now, 20 years later, we have an article in the Harvard Business Review that....\n
  • Good morning everyone, thank you for coming, and I’d also like to thank the British Consulate for hosting this event. I’m going to be presenting a very short overview of how we can correct a major problem that most language programs have: most language training is not directly connected to business outcomes, and therefore waste a tremendous opportunity and lose value for the company.\n\nYou’ll see here on the slide that we have a photo of a boardroom, not a classroom, and that is a metaphor for my main message today: it’s all about the business results, not learning results.\n\nJust a brief background about me: I’ve been working in corporate language training for 24 years now, as a teacher, teacher trainer, school owner, and consultant, a director at Cambridge University Press in their learning technology unit, and now I run the web platform English360. I was very lucky at the start of my career, because two things happened: first, I did not have the traditional, academic teacher training, so in a way I was free of the teacher/classroom attitude. The second piece of luck was that I found some amazing business mentors in my students. I had some very high CEO-level students and they were very generous with their knowledge and experience. So from the beginning of my career 20 years ago I started with a solid understanding of how a business can benefit from a language program that is structured correctly. Now, 20 years later, we have an article in the Harvard Business Review that....\n
  • Good morning everyone, thank you for coming, and I’d also like to thank the British Consulate for hosting this event. I’m going to be presenting a very short overview of how we can correct a major problem that most language programs have: most language training is not directly connected to business outcomes, and therefore waste a tremendous opportunity and lose value for the company.\n\nYou’ll see here on the slide that we have a photo of a boardroom, not a classroom, and that is a metaphor for my main message today: it’s all about the business results, not learning results.\n\nJust a brief background about me: I’ve been working in corporate language training for 24 years now, as a teacher, teacher trainer, school owner, and consultant, a director at Cambridge University Press in their learning technology unit, and now I run the web platform English360. I was very lucky at the start of my career, because two things happened: first, I did not have the traditional, academic teacher training, so in a way I was free of the teacher/classroom attitude. The second piece of luck was that I found some amazing business mentors in my students. I had some very high CEO-level students and they were very generous with their knowledge and experience. So from the beginning of my career 20 years ago I started with a solid understanding of how a business can benefit from a language program that is structured correctly. Now, 20 years later, we have an article in the Harvard Business Review that....\n
  • Good morning everyone, thank you for coming, and I’d also like to thank the British Consulate for hosting this event. I’m going to be presenting a very short overview of how we can correct a major problem that most language programs have: most language training is not directly connected to business outcomes, and therefore waste a tremendous opportunity and lose value for the company.\n\nYou’ll see here on the slide that we have a photo of a boardroom, not a classroom, and that is a metaphor for my main message today: it’s all about the business results, not learning results.\n\nJust a brief background about me: I’ve been working in corporate language training for 24 years now, as a teacher, teacher trainer, school owner, and consultant, a director at Cambridge University Press in their learning technology unit, and now I run the web platform English360. I was very lucky at the start of my career, because two things happened: first, I did not have the traditional, academic teacher training, so in a way I was free of the teacher/classroom attitude. The second piece of luck was that I found some amazing business mentors in my students. I had some very high CEO-level students and they were very generous with their knowledge and experience. So from the beginning of my career 20 years ago I started with a solid understanding of how a business can benefit from a language program that is structured correctly. Now, 20 years later, we have an article in the Harvard Business Review that....\n
  • Good morning everyone, thank you for coming, and I’d also like to thank the British Consulate for hosting this event. I’m going to be presenting a very short overview of how we can correct a major problem that most language programs have: most language training is not directly connected to business outcomes, and therefore waste a tremendous opportunity and lose value for the company.\n\nYou’ll see here on the slide that we have a photo of a boardroom, not a classroom, and that is a metaphor for my main message today: it’s all about the business results, not learning results.\n\nJust a brief background about me: I’ve been working in corporate language training for 24 years now, as a teacher, teacher trainer, school owner, and consultant, a director at Cambridge University Press in their learning technology unit, and now I run the web platform English360. I was very lucky at the start of my career, because two things happened: first, I did not have the traditional, academic teacher training, so in a way I was free of the teacher/classroom attitude. The second piece of luck was that I found some amazing business mentors in my students. I had some very high CEO-level students and they were very generous with their knowledge and experience. So from the beginning of my career 20 years ago I started with a solid understanding of how a business can benefit from a language program that is structured correctly. Now, 20 years later, we have an article in the Harvard Business Review that....\n
  • Good morning everyone, thank you for coming, and I’d also like to thank the British Consulate for hosting this event. I’m going to be presenting a very short overview of how we can correct a major problem that most language programs have: most language training is not directly connected to business outcomes, and therefore waste a tremendous opportunity and lose value for the company.\n\nYou’ll see here on the slide that we have a photo of a boardroom, not a classroom, and that is a metaphor for my main message today: it’s all about the business results, not learning results.\n\nJust a brief background about me: I’ve been working in corporate language training for 24 years now, as a teacher, teacher trainer, school owner, and consultant, a director at Cambridge University Press in their learning technology unit, and now I run the web platform English360. I was very lucky at the start of my career, because two things happened: first, I did not have the traditional, academic teacher training, so in a way I was free of the teacher/classroom attitude. The second piece of luck was that I found some amazing business mentors in my students. I had some very high CEO-level students and they were very generous with their knowledge and experience. So from the beginning of my career 20 years ago I started with a solid understanding of how a business can benefit from a language program that is structured correctly. Now, 20 years later, we have an article in the Harvard Business Review that....\n
  • Good morning everyone, thank you for coming, and I’d also like to thank the British Consulate for hosting this event. I’m going to be presenting a very short overview of how we can correct a major problem that most language programs have: most language training is not directly connected to business outcomes, and therefore waste a tremendous opportunity and lose value for the company.\n\nYou’ll see here on the slide that we have a photo of a boardroom, not a classroom, and that is a metaphor for my main message today: it’s all about the business results, not learning results.\n\nJust a brief background about me: I’ve been working in corporate language training for 24 years now, as a teacher, teacher trainer, school owner, and consultant, a director at Cambridge University Press in their learning technology unit, and now I run the web platform English360. I was very lucky at the start of my career, because two things happened: first, I did not have the traditional, academic teacher training, so in a way I was free of the teacher/classroom attitude. The second piece of luck was that I found some amazing business mentors in my students. I had some very high CEO-level students and they were very generous with their knowledge and experience. So from the beginning of my career 20 years ago I started with a solid understanding of how a business can benefit from a language program that is structured correctly. Now, 20 years later, we have an article in the Harvard Business Review that....\n
  • \n
  • Good morning everyone, thank you for coming, and I’d also like to thank the British Consulate for hosting this event. I’m going to be presenting a very short overview of how we can correct a major problem that most language programs have: most language training is not directly connected to business outcomes, and therefore waste a tremendous opportunity and lose value for the company.\n\nYou’ll see here on the slide that we have a photo of a boardroom, not a classroom, and that is a metaphor for my main message today: it’s all about the business results, not learning results.\n\nJust a brief background about me: I’ve been working in corporate language training for 24 years now, as a teacher, teacher trainer, school owner, and consultant, a director at Cambridge University Press in their learning technology unit, and now I run the web platform English360. I was very lucky at the start of my career, because two things happened: first, I did not have the traditional, academic teacher training, so in a way I was free of the teacher/classroom attitude. The second piece of luck was that I found some amazing business mentors in my students. I had some very high CEO-level students and they were very generous with their knowledge and experience. So from the beginning of my career 20 years ago I started with a solid understanding of how a business can benefit from a language program that is structured correctly. Now, 20 years later, we have an article in the Harvard Business Review that....\n
  • Good morning everyone, thank you for coming, and I’d also like to thank the British Consulate for hosting this event. I’m going to be presenting a very short overview of how we can correct a major problem that most language programs have: most language training is not directly connected to business outcomes, and therefore waste a tremendous opportunity and lose value for the company.\n\nYou’ll see here on the slide that we have a photo of a boardroom, not a classroom, and that is a metaphor for my main message today: it’s all about the business results, not learning results.\n\nJust a brief background about me: I’ve been working in corporate language training for 24 years now, as a teacher, teacher trainer, school owner, and consultant, a director at Cambridge University Press in their learning technology unit, and now I run the web platform English360. I was very lucky at the start of my career, because two things happened: first, I did not have the traditional, academic teacher training, so in a way I was free of the teacher/classroom attitude. The second piece of luck was that I found some amazing business mentors in my students. I had some very high CEO-level students and they were very generous with their knowledge and experience. So from the beginning of my career 20 years ago I started with a solid understanding of how a business can benefit from a language program that is structured correctly. Now, 20 years later, we have an article in the Harvard Business Review that....\n
  • Good morning everyone, thank you for coming, and I’d also like to thank the British Consulate for hosting this event. I’m going to be presenting a very short overview of how we can correct a major problem that most language programs have: most language training is not directly connected to business outcomes, and therefore waste a tremendous opportunity and lose value for the company.\n\nYou’ll see here on the slide that we have a photo of a boardroom, not a classroom, and that is a metaphor for my main message today: it’s all about the business results, not learning results.\n\nJust a brief background about me: I’ve been working in corporate language training for 24 years now, as a teacher, teacher trainer, school owner, and consultant, a director at Cambridge University Press in their learning technology unit, and now I run the web platform English360. I was very lucky at the start of my career, because two things happened: first, I did not have the traditional, academic teacher training, so in a way I was free of the teacher/classroom attitude. The second piece of luck was that I found some amazing business mentors in my students. I had some very high CEO-level students and they were very generous with their knowledge and experience. So from the beginning of my career 20 years ago I started with a solid understanding of how a business can benefit from a language program that is structured correctly. Now, 20 years later, we have an article in the Harvard Business Review that....\n
  • Good morning everyone, thank you for coming, and I’d also like to thank the British Consulate for hosting this event. I’m going to be presenting a very short overview of how we can correct a major problem that most language programs have: most language training is not directly connected to business outcomes, and therefore waste a tremendous opportunity and lose value for the company.\n\nYou’ll see here on the slide that we have a photo of a boardroom, not a classroom, and that is a metaphor for my main message today: it’s all about the business results, not learning results.\n\nJust a brief background about me: I’ve been working in corporate language training for 24 years now, as a teacher, teacher trainer, school owner, and consultant, a director at Cambridge University Press in their learning technology unit, and now I run the web platform English360. I was very lucky at the start of my career, because two things happened: first, I did not have the traditional, academic teacher training, so in a way I was free of the teacher/classroom attitude. The second piece of luck was that I found some amazing business mentors in my students. I had some very high CEO-level students and they were very generous with their knowledge and experience. So from the beginning of my career 20 years ago I started with a solid understanding of how a business can benefit from a language program that is structured correctly. Now, 20 years later, we have an article in the Harvard Business Review that....\n
  • Good morning everyone, thank you for coming, and I’d also like to thank the British Consulate for hosting this event. I’m going to be presenting a very short overview of how we can correct a major problem that most language programs have: most language training is not directly connected to business outcomes, and therefore waste a tremendous opportunity and lose value for the company.\n\nYou’ll see here on the slide that we have a photo of a boardroom, not a classroom, and that is a metaphor for my main message today: it’s all about the business results, not learning results.\n\nJust a brief background about me: I’ve been working in corporate language training for 24 years now, as a teacher, teacher trainer, school owner, and consultant, a director at Cambridge University Press in their learning technology unit, and now I run the web platform English360. I was very lucky at the start of my career, because two things happened: first, I did not have the traditional, academic teacher training, so in a way I was free of the teacher/classroom attitude. The second piece of luck was that I found some amazing business mentors in my students. I had some very high CEO-level students and they were very generous with their knowledge and experience. So from the beginning of my career 20 years ago I started with a solid understanding of how a business can benefit from a language program that is structured correctly. Now, 20 years later, we have an article in the Harvard Business Review that....\n
  • Good morning everyone, thank you for coming, and I’d also like to thank the British Consulate for hosting this event. I’m going to be presenting a very short overview of how we can correct a major problem that most language programs have: most language training is not directly connected to business outcomes, and therefore waste a tremendous opportunity and lose value for the company.\n\nYou’ll see here on the slide that we have a photo of a boardroom, not a classroom, and that is a metaphor for my main message today: it’s all about the business results, not learning results.\n\nJust a brief background about me: I’ve been working in corporate language training for 24 years now, as a teacher, teacher trainer, school owner, and consultant, a director at Cambridge University Press in their learning technology unit, and now I run the web platform English360. I was very lucky at the start of my career, because two things happened: first, I did not have the traditional, academic teacher training, so in a way I was free of the teacher/classroom attitude. The second piece of luck was that I found some amazing business mentors in my students. I had some very high CEO-level students and they were very generous with their knowledge and experience. So from the beginning of my career 20 years ago I started with a solid understanding of how a business can benefit from a language program that is structured correctly. Now, 20 years later, we have an article in the Harvard Business Review that....\n
  • Good morning everyone, thank you for coming, and I’d also like to thank the British Consulate for hosting this event. I’m going to be presenting a very short overview of how we can correct a major problem that most language programs have: most language training is not directly connected to business outcomes, and therefore waste a tremendous opportunity and lose value for the company.\n\nYou’ll see here on the slide that we have a photo of a boardroom, not a classroom, and that is a metaphor for my main message today: it’s all about the business results, not learning results.\n\nJust a brief background about me: I’ve been working in corporate language training for 24 years now, as a teacher, teacher trainer, school owner, and consultant, a director at Cambridge University Press in their learning technology unit, and now I run the web platform English360. I was very lucky at the start of my career, because two things happened: first, I did not have the traditional, academic teacher training, so in a way I was free of the teacher/classroom attitude. The second piece of luck was that I found some amazing business mentors in my students. I had some very high CEO-level students and they were very generous with their knowledge and experience. So from the beginning of my career 20 years ago I started with a solid understanding of how a business can benefit from a language program that is structured correctly. Now, 20 years later, we have an article in the Harvard Business Review that....\n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • BESIG Stuttgart 2012

    1. 1. Growing your school and freelance businesswith blended learningCleve Miller / English360
    2. 2. Agenda
    3. 3. Agenda
    4. 4. AgendaAcademic vs. performance-based models
    5. 5. AgendaAcademic vs. performance-based modelsTheoretical framework for tech-enabled PBL
    6. 6. AgendaAcademic vs. performance-based modelsTheoretical framework for tech-enabled PBLAligning PBL with customer business goalsthrough enterprise needs assessment
    7. 7. AgendaAcademic vs. performance-based modelsTheoretical framework for tech-enabled PBLAligning PBL with customer business goalsthrough enterprise needs assessmentPBL boosts customer ROI, and thus fees,margins, and retention
    8. 8. AgendaAcademic vs. performance-based models
    9. 9. 1. Competitive pressure
    10. 10. “Companies that fail to devise a language strategy are essentially limiting their growth opportunities...putting themselves at a disadvantage to competitors that have adopted English....”
    11. 11. 1. Competitive pressure
    12. 12. 1. Competitive pressure2. Globalization of tasks and resources
    13. 13. 1. Competitive pressure2. Globalization of tasks and resources3. M&A integration across borders
    14. 14. Problem: corporate language training has beentrapped within the “academic model”
    15. 15. Output and accountability of the “academic model”is successful completion of courses and exams.
    16. 16. 1. Competitive pressure2. Globalization of tasks and resources3. M&A integration across borders
    17. 17. Output and accountability of the “academic model”is successful completion of courses and exams.
    18. 18. Output and accountability of the “academic model”is successful completion of courses and exams.Academic model for company trainingpromotes over-reliance on:
    19. 19. Output and accountability of the “academic model”is successful completion of courses and exams.Academic model for company trainingpromotes over-reliance on: • generic coursebooks
    20. 20. Output and accountability of the “academic model”is successful completion of courses and exams.Academic model for company trainingpromotes over-reliance on: • generic coursebooks • attendance as key metric
    21. 21. Output and accountability of the “academic model”is successful completion of courses and exams.Academic model for company trainingpromotes over-reliance on: • generic coursebooks • attendance as key metric • large groups, grouped by language level
    22. 22. Output and accountability of the “academic model”is successful completion of courses and exams.Academic model for company trainingpromotes over-reliance on: • generic coursebooks • attendance as key metric • large groups, grouped by language level • standardized ELT tests
    23. 23. Solution: expand the academic model toalign ESP training with business, performance goals
    24. 24. Performance-based learning: syllabus emergesfrom business needs and performance events
    25. 25. A performance event is an instance of authenticL2 communication in a professional context....
    26. 26. ...a specific, future communicative performance inthe target language that merits sustained effort tooptimize the results of that event.
    27. 27. Different approaches to BE, ESP course designCurricular, needs-based, performance-based Course design Selection of outcomes Material and process Source: Cleve Miller in 2/2010 Business Issues (BESIG)
    28. 28. Different approaches to BE, ESP course designCurricular, needs-based, performance-based Course design Selection of outcomes Material and processCurriculum-basedNeeds-basedPerformance-based Source: Cleve Miller in 2/2010 Business Issues (BESIG)
    29. 29. Different approaches to BE, ESP course designCurricular, needs-based, performance-based Course design Selection of outcomes Material and process predicts genericCurriculum-based Work through a coursebook performance goalsNeeds-basedPerformance-based Source: Cleve Miller in 2/2010 Business Issues (BESIG)
    30. 30. Different approaches to BE, ESP course designCurricular, needs-based, performance-based Course design Selection of outcomes Material and process predicts genericCurriculum-based Work through a coursebook performance goals identifies categories Select from range of resources,Needs-based of performance goals based on needs analysisPerformance-based Source: Cleve Miller in 2/2010 Business Issues (BESIG)
    31. 31. Different approaches to BE, ESP course designCurricular, needs-based, performance-based Course design Selection of outcomes Material and process predicts genericCurriculum-based Work through a coursebook performance goals identifies categories Select from range of resources,Needs-based of performance goals based on needs analysis responds to specific Language needs for the eventPerformance-based performance events define materials, methods Source: Cleve Miller in 2/2010 Business Issues (BESIG)
    32. 32. Step 1: Select the performance event • Learner drives selection of event • Teacher supports and guides • Other stakeholders (HR, line manager) may be involved
    33. 33. Step 2: Define the key messages • Sales presentation: features, benefits • Business dinner: personal anecdote, questioning • Teacher identifies language needed (e.g. structures, lexis)
    34. 34. Step 3: Plan, resource and teach • Language needed for messages documented as goals • Syllabus > material: authentic, courses, learner’s material • Transition from practice to production closer to event
    35. 35. Step 4: Post-performance reflection, feedback • Reflective narrative by the learner • Were the linguistic objectives achieved in actual event? • Results feed into next stage of syllabus
    36. 36. select eventpost-performance define reflection messages plan, resource, train
    37. 37. 4-step PBL cycle >>emergent syllabus driving the client’s business
    38. 38. Agenda
    39. 39. Agenda
    40. 40. AgendaAcademic vs. performance-based models
    41. 41. AgendaAcademic vs. performance-based modelsTheoretical framework for tech-enabled PBL
    42. 42. BE / ESP and technology: 2008-2018
    43. 43. BE / ESP and technology: 2008-2018“The future is already here - it’s just not evenly distributed” - Canadian author William Gibson
    44. 44. Content from the cloud...
    45. 45. ...delivered through a range of mobile devices,
    46. 46. ...ubiquitous,
    47. 47. personalised for each learner...
    48. 48. ...adaptive,
    49. 49. ...and social.
    50. 50. So, personalized, adaptive, and social, withubiquitous cloud-to-mobile delivery.How are these trends being implementedin blended learning programs?
    51. 51. Time Place
    52. 52. Time together apart Place
    53. 53. asynchronousTime synchronous together apart Place
    54. 54. asynchronousTime (classroom) synchronous together apart Place
    55. 55. asynchronousTime (classroom) synchronous IWB projector Ss mobile together apart Place
    56. 56. asynchronousTime (classroom) (computer) synchronous IWB projector Ss mobile together apart Place
    57. 57. asynchronousTime (classroom) (computer) synchronous IWB phone / skype projector chat Ss mobile web conference together apart Place
    58. 58. (computer) asynchronousTime (classroom) (computer) synchronous IWB phone / skype projector chat Ss mobile web conference together apart Place
    59. 59. (computer) asynchronous forums wikis tasks, drillsTime (classroom) (computer) synchronous IWB phone / skype projector chat Ss mobile web conference together apart Place
    60. 60. (computer) asynchronous language lab forums wikis tasks, drillsTime (classroom) (computer) synchronous IWB phone / skype projector chat Ss mobile web conference together apart Place
    61. 61. “blended learning” (computer) asynchronous language lab forums wikis tasks, drillsTime (classroom) (computer) synchronous IWB phone / skype projector chat Ss mobile web conference together apart Place
    62. 62. What is blended learning?“Blended, blended, the future is blended.”
    63. 63. What is blended learning?“Blended, blended, the future is blended.” Combination of: in-class (F2F, synchronous) + out-of-class (online, asynchronous)
    64. 64. What is blended learning?“Blended, blended, the future is blended.” Combination of: in-class (F2F, synchronous) + out-of-class (online, asynchronous) typically organized in a Learning Management System (LMS) or Virtual Learning Environment (VLE)
    65. 65. Benefits of technology for BE / ESP
    66. 66. Benefits of technology for BE / ESP Flexibility for instructional design
    67. 67. Benefits of technology for BE / ESP Flexibility for instructional design Efficiency for teaching
    68. 68. Benefits of technology for BE / ESP Flexibility for instructional design Efficiency for teaching Hyper-personalisation
    69. 69. Benefits of technology for BE / ESP Flexibility for instructional design Efficiency for teaching Hyper-personalisation Bottom-up: teacher-driven, student-centric
    70. 70. A 2-minute history of the web(and how it effects us as teachers)
    71. 71. “Bottom-up: teacher-driven, student-centric”A 2-minute history of the web(and how it effects us as teachers)
    72. 72. The old web is aThe old web is a pipe. pipe.
    73. 73. What is the “old web” relationship?Top-down, expert-created, static, passively consumed
    74. 74. The new web is a platform....where we all work together to create, share, discuss, learn.
    75. 75. What direction is the relationship?Bottom-up, active user-generated, dynamic content
    76. 76. What direction is the relationship?Bottom-up, active user-generated, dynamic content
    77. 77. What direction is the relationship?Bottom-up, active user-generated, dynamic content
    78. 78. What direction is the relationship?Bottom-up, active user-generated, dynamic content
    79. 79. Active users: new skills for teachersWeb apps today support creativity: “teacher as DJ” Source: Jamie Keddie 11/6/09
    80. 80. Training materials developmentThe content continuum and a new way forward Traditional Technology-supportedTOP DOWN BOTTOM UP model model
    81. 81. Training materials developmentThe content continuum and a new way forward Traditional Technology-supportedTOP DOWN BOTTOM UP model model SCHOOL PUBLISHER TEACHER STUDENT
    82. 82. Training materials developmentThe content continuum and a new way forward Traditional Technology-supportedTOP DOWN BOTTOM UP model model SCHOOL PUBLISHER TEACHER STUDENTreliable, validated pedagogic qualityeasy to use, saves timequality production
    83. 83. Training materials developmentThe content continuum and a new way forward Traditional Technology-supportedTOP DOWN BOTTOM UP model model SCHOOL PUBLISHER TEACHER STUDENTreliable, validated pedagogic quality fast, up-to-date, and “inexpensive”easy to use, saves time closer fit to language, culture, student needsquality production essential for performance-based training
    84. 84. Training materials developmentThe content continuum and a new way forward Traditional Technology-supportedTOP DOWN BOTTOM UP model model SCHOOL PUBLISHER TEACHER STUDENTreliable, validated pedagogic quality fast, up-to-date, and “inexpensive”easy to use, saves time closer fit to language, culture, student needsquality production essential for performance-based training English360 allows trainers to move along this continuum to fit learner needs (i.e. specificity).
    85. 85. The ESP ContinuumFrom the academic model to performance and specificity Traditional Technology-supportedTOP DOWN BOTTOM UP model model SCHOOL PUBLISHER TEACHER STUDENT
    86. 86. The ESP ContinuumFrom the academic model to performance and specificity Traditional Technology-supportedTOP DOWN BOTTOM UP model model SCHOOL PUBLISHER TEACHER STUDENTGeneric Specific
    87. 87. The ESP ContinuumFrom the academic model to performance and specificity Traditional Technology-supportedTOP DOWN BOTTOM UP model model SCHOOL PUBLISHER TEACHER STUDENTGeneric SpecificCurriculum-based Event-based
    88. 88. The ESP ContinuumFrom the academic model to performance and specificity Traditional Technology-supportedTOP DOWN BOTTOM UP model model SCHOOL PUBLISHER TEACHER STUDENTGeneric SpecificCurriculum-based Event-basedAcademic model Performance model
    89. 89. The ESP ContinuumFrom the academic model to performance and specificity Traditional Technology-supportedTOP DOWN BOTTOM UP model model SCHOOL PUBLISHER TEACHER STUDENTGeneric SpecificCurriculum-based Event-basedAcademic model Performance modelProduct Process
    90. 90. The ESP ContinuumFrom the academic model to performance and specificity Traditional Technology-supportedTOP DOWN BOTTOM UP model model SCHOOL PUBLISHER TEACHER STUDENTGeneric SpecificCurriculum-based Event-basedAcademic model Performance modelProduct ProcessPre-defined syllabus Emergent syllabus
    91. 91. The ESP ContinuumFrom the academic model to performance and specificity Traditional Technology-supportedTOP DOWN BOTTOM UP model model SCHOOL PUBLISHER TEACHER STUDENTGeneric SpecificCurriculum-based Event-basedAcademic model Performance modelProduct ProcessPre-defined syllabus Emergent syllabusCommodity priced Premium priced
    92. 92. The ESP ContinuumFrom the academic model to performance and specificity “The more niche you go, the higher price you can charge.” Mike Hogan 11/16/12
    93. 93. Chia Suan www.chiasuanching.comEvan Frendo on specificity and ESP Traditional Technology-supportedTOP DOWN BOTTOM UP model model SCHOOL PUBLISHER TEACHER STUDENT
    94. 94. Chia Suan www.chiasuanching.comEvan Frendo on specificity and ESP Traditional Technology-supported TOP DOWN BOTTOM UP model model SCHOOL PUBLISHER TEACHER STUDENTgeneral English ESP: academic/professional ESP: specific domain
    95. 95. Chia Suan www.chiasuanching.comEvan Frendo on specificity and ESP Traditional Technology-supported TOP DOWN BOTTOM UP model model SCHOOL PUBLISHER TEACHER STUDENTgeneral English ESP: academic/professional ESP: specific domainlexis-grammar-functions + more specific functions + domain-specific lexis
    96. 96. Chia Suan www.chiasuanching.comEvan Frendo on specificity and ESP Traditional Technology-supported TOP DOWN BOTTOM UP model model SCHOOL PUBLISHER TEACHER STUDENTgeneral English ESP: academic/professional ESP: specific domainlexis-grammar-functions + more specific functions + domain-specific lexisgeneric coursebook specific coursebook resource/emergent syllabus
    97. 97. Chia Suan www.chiasuanching.comEvan Frendo on specificity and ESP Traditional Technology-supported TOP DOWN BOTTOM UP model model SCHOOL PUBLISHER TEACHER STUDENTgeneral English ESP: academic/professional ESP: specific domainlexis-grammar-functions + more specific functions + domain-specific lexisgeneric coursebook specific coursebook resource/emergent syllabusclassroom class / work workplace
    98. 98. Chia Suan www.chiasuanching.comEvan Frendo on specificity and ESP Traditional Technology-supported TOP DOWN BOTTOM UP model model SCHOOL PUBLISHER TEACHER STUDENTgeneral English ESP: academic/professional ESP: specific domainlexis-grammar-functions + more specific functions + domain-specific lexisgeneric coursebook specific coursebook resource/emergent syllabusclassroom class / work workplacelight genre/discourse analysis generalized g/d analysis specific g/d analysis
    99. 99. Chia Suan www.chiasuanching.comEvan Frendo on specificity and ESP Traditional Technology-supported TOP DOWN BOTTOM UP model model SCHOOL PUBLISHER TEACHER STUDENTgeneral English ESP: academic/professional ESP: specific domainlexis-grammar-functions + more specific functions + domain-specific lexisgeneric coursebook specific coursebook resource/emergent syllabusclassroom class / work workplacelight genre/discourse analysis generalized g/d analysis specific g/d analysisany student pre-experience Ss Ss in discourse community
    100. 100. The common coreESP and specificity common core
    101. 101. The common coreESP and specificity professional core common core
    102. 102. The common coreESP and specificity domain / performance specific professional core common core
    103. 103. Chia Suan www.chiasuanching.comEvan Frendo on specificity and ESP Traditional Technology-supported TOP DOWN BOTTOM UP model model SCHOOL PUBLISHER TEACHER STUDENTgeneral English ESP: academic/professional ESP: specific domainlexis-grammar-functions + more specific functions + domain-specific lexisgeneric coursebook specific coursebook resource/emergent syllabusclassroom class / work workplacelight genre/discourse analysis generalized g/d analysis specific g/d analysisany student pre-experience Ss Ss in discourse community
    104. 104. common core professional core domain / performance specific
    105. 105. general English ESP: academic/professional ESP: specific domain lexis-grammar-functions + more specific functions + domain-specific lexis generic coursebook specific coursebook resource/emergent syllabus classroom class / work workplacelight genre/discourse analysis generalized g/d analysis specific g/d analysis any student primarily pre-experience Ss primarily Ss in discourse community common core professional core domain / performance specific
    106. 106. Agenda
    107. 107. Agenda
    108. 108. AgendaAcademic vs. performance-based models
    109. 109. AgendaAcademic vs. performance-based modelsTheoretical framework for tech-enabled PBL
    110. 110. AgendaAcademic vs. performance-based modelsTheoretical framework for tech-enabled PBLAligning PBL with customer business goalsthrough enterprise needs assessment.
    111. 111. The Framework
    112. 112. Driving business results through language training 1 2 Design the Define Business Complete Outcomes Experience Performance-based Framework for Language Training 4 3 Document Deliver for Results Application Adapted from Wick, Pollock, Jefferson 2010
    113. 113. Driving business results through language training 1 Define Business Outcomes PBLCarry out enterprise needs assessment• Work with senior mgmt to identify business goals supported by improved language capabilities• Work down through line management to find potential performance improvements• Iterate with individual needs assessments based on performance events
    114. 114. Driving business results through language training 2 Design the Complete Experience PBL • Use blended approach with both F2F and online components, group + individual • Consider grouping by function, not level • Business goals and performance events drive the curriculum • Content from client, not only coursebook
    115. 115. Driving business results through language training PBL 3 Deliver for Application Ongoing training delivery • Focus on application and performance support • Management support and engagement crucial • Consider grouping by function, not level
    116. 116. Driving business results through language training 4 PBL Document Results• Measure both language and performance• Use self-, peer-, and manager-assessment for performance events• Use quantitative when possible (e.g email response times)
    117. 117. Driving business results through language training 1 2 Design the Define Business Complete Outcomes Experience Performance-based Framework for Language Training 4 3 Document Deliver for Results Application
    118. 118. Driving business results through language training Academic Performance PBL frameworkDefine outcomesDesign trainingDeliver trainingDocument results
    119. 119. Driving business results through language training Academic Performance PBL frameworkDefine outcomes learning goalsDesign trainingDeliver trainingDocument results
    120. 120. Driving business results through language training Academic Performance PBL frameworkDefine outcomes learning goals business outcomesDesign trainingDeliver trainingDocument results
    121. 121. Driving business results through language training Academic Performance PBL frameworkDefine outcomes learning goals business outcomes top-downDesign training coursebookDeliver trainingDocument results
    122. 122. Driving business results through language training Academic Performance PBL frameworkDefine outcomes learning goals business outcomes top-down bottom-upDesign training coursebook job requirementsDeliver trainingDocument results
    123. 123. Driving business results through language training Academic Performance PBL frameworkDefine outcomes learning goals business outcomes top-down bottom-upDesign training coursebook job requirementsDeliver training “in class”Document results
    124. 124. Driving business results through language training Academic Performance PBL frameworkDefine outcomes learning goals business outcomes top-down bottom-upDesign training coursebook job requirements on task,Deliver training “in class” still workingDocument results
    125. 125. Driving business results through language training Academic Performance PBL frameworkDefine outcomes learning goals business outcomes top-down bottom-upDesign training coursebook job requirements on task,Deliver training “in class” still workingDocument results language only
    126. 126. Driving business results through language training Academic Performance PBL frameworkDefine outcomes learning goals business outcomes top-down bottom-upDesign training coursebook job requirements on task,Deliver training “in class” still working language andDocument results language only performance
    127. 127. Agenda
    128. 128. Agenda
    129. 129. AgendaAcademic vs. performance-based models
    130. 130. AgendaAcademic vs. performance-based modelsTheoretical framework for tech-enabled PBL
    131. 131. AgendaAcademic vs. performance-based modelsTheoretical framework for tech-enabled PBLAligning PBL with customer business goalsthrough enterprise needs assessment.
    132. 132. AgendaAcademic vs. performance-based modelsTheoretical framework for tech-enabled PBLAligning PBL with customer business goalsthrough enterprise needs assessment.PBL boosts customer ROI, and thus fees,margins, and retention.
    133. 133. TextGROWTH IDEA #1
    134. 134. 1. Competitive pressure
    135. 135. 1. Competitive pressure2. Globalization of tasks and resources
    136. 136. 1. Competitive pressure2. Globalization of tasks and resources3. M&A integration across borders
    137. 137. GROWTH IDEA #1Align training program to business needsas identified by senior management.
    138. 138. GROWTH IDEA #2Seek opportunities to bypass HRand go directly to senior management.
    139. 139. GROWTH IDEA #3Drive client’s business through PBL,boosting perceived ROI and raising training fees.
    140. 140. GROWTH IDEA #4“The more niche you go, the higher price you can charge.”
    141. 141. GROWTH IDEA #5Use enterprise needs assessments to thinkoutside the box, develop innovative products.
    142. 142. GROWTH IDEA #6Set prices by course, not by training hour.
    143. 143. Example of pricing strategy: eClass
    144. 144. GROWTH IDEA #7Use an open web platform such as English360to implement PBL.
    145. 145. Goals for English360 blended learning platform
    146. 146. Goals for English360 blended learning platform 5-minute school set up with logo, branding
    147. 147. Goals for English360 blended learning platform 5-minute school set up with logo, branding publisher agnostic, wide range of courses
    148. 148. Goals for English360 blended learning platform 5-minute school set up with logo, branding publisher agnostic, wide range of courses remix capability for all courses
    149. 149. Goals for English360 blended learning platform 5-minute school set up with logo, branding publisher agnostic, wide range of courses remix capability for all courses authoring tools, self-publishing
    150. 150. Goals for English360 blended learning platform 5-minute school set up with logo, branding publisher agnostic, wide range of courses remix capability for all courses authoring tools, self-publishing roughly same price as print coursebook
    151. 151. Goals for English360 blended learning platform 5-minute school set up with logo, branding publisher agnostic, wide range of courses remix capability for all courses authoring tools, self-publishing roughly same price as print coursebook
    152. 152. Driving business results through language training 1 2 Design the Define Business Complete Outcomes Experience Performance-based Framework for Language Training 4 3 Document Deliver for Results Application
    153. 153. For further information, please seewww.english360.comcleve@english360.comtwitter: cleve360
    154. 154. “The more niche you go,the higher price you can charge.”“Get them to think that a class is a work meeting”. “We’re trainers, not teachers. Mike Hogan, Friday afternoon PCE
    1. A particular slide catching your eye?

      Clipping is a handy way to collect important slides you want to go back to later.

    ×