2 three principles of group leading lesson plan and ub-d

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2 three principles of group leading lesson plan and ub-d

  1. 1. The Three Principles of Group Leading!Lesson 2 Included in GLTI Combined Training ResourcesLength: 90 minutes • The Three Guiding Principles for Leading Service-Learning Programs • The Three Principles of Group LeadingMaterials Prepare before Session• Manual • Three Principles Handout• Chart Paper • Reasons We Have Principles• Tape • The Three Principles stickers• One pack of markers for each small group • Create the Context Matrix and hang it on the wall (see “The Three Principles of Group Leading” in GLTI Combined Training Resources)• Pens • Small group assignments• Note paper• Context Matrix Chart• StickersEstablished Outcomes• GLs will use the Three Principles as a conceptual framework for thinking and talking about their roles and responsibilities.• GLs will use the Three Principles as a conceptual framework when problem-solving on the job.• GLs will apply the Three Principles to their work and decision-making in the field.• GLs will identify the Three Principles as a factor increasing their effectiveness as group leaders.Flow!" Opening#" Introduce Principles$" The Context Matrix%" Energizer: Hokey Pokey (optional)&" Dear Abby" Decorate Stickers(" ConclusionThis material was developed by American Jewish World Service, Bend the Arc: A Jewish Partnership for Justice and BBYO PanimInstitute with support from Repair the World.
  2. 2. The Three Principles of Group Leading!Lesson/Activity Plan Time/Materials Content Opening !" Ask this framing/rhetorical question: “Have you ever been in a situation in which there is no policy or easy answer for what to do or how to proceed?” Consider asking participants for an example or two. 5 min. #" Explain: “Rules are excellent tools for specific, unwavering scenarios. But in our work, there are too many variables and too many scenarios to create rules for every possibility. It would be unmanageable to create, remember and execute a rule for every situation. Having so many rules also wouldn’t leave room for the opportunities that come with unpredictable teachable moments and a diverse, talented staff. When facing grey zones that depend more on judgment than instructions, principles provide vital general guidance where rules might be too specific.” $" Ask the group for reasons we might develop uniform principles and ask that everyone work and live by them. Group responses should include: a. To set a uniform standard and clear expectations. (This also enables a standard form of evaluation.) b. To offer ideas in a format that is easy to remember. c. To create a shared conceptual framework and expectations between co-leaders and AJWS staff. d. To help make decisions by providing guidance in hard situations. e. To be consistent in how the program is facilitated while embracing individual styles. Introduce !" Ask participants to refer to “The Three Guiding Principles for Leading Service-learning Programs” in their manual. Principles #" Provide a brief explanation and example of the each principle. Ask participants to share their own understanding 15 min. and/or offer an illustrative example of each principle before highlighting and integrating the “official” explanations and examples below. Manual $" The first principle: “I Put My Whole Self In.” a. I give my 100%, 100% of the time. b. I get enough rest, food, water, etc. to sustain being always “on” for the entire program. c. I participate in the physical work project, focus at meetings, arrive on time, am social at meals and during transportation, and join participants for optional excursions or discussions. %" The second principle: “We Meet Them Where They’re At.” a. “Them” includes everyone—participants, people in the host community, co-leaders, etc. b. It’s not about me, it’s about them. c. It’s about growth, learning and change. I recognize that not every group can get to the same place at theThis material was developed by American Jewish World Service, Bend the Arc: A Jewish Partnership for Justice and BBYO PanimInstitute with support from Repair the World.
  3. 3. The Three Principles of Group Leading! end of the program because they start in different places. Furthermore, our goal is not to move participants to any particular specific place, but rather to move them forward along their own continuum of growth and understanding. &" The third principle: “Everything I Say and Do is Part of the Curriculum.” a. I am role-modeling something with every behavior, even when I think no one is watching. Particular things to model include: cultural sensitivity, communication/listening, flexibility, patience, productive discomfort, appropriate language/tone, etc. b. I can find creative ways and moments to further educate outside of formal teaching sessions. We call these teachable moments (i.e. impromptu lessons or educational conversations inspired by unplanned opportunities). c. A special note about language: Certain words can improperly frame how participants perceive their experiences, setting up unfair hierarchies/biases. For example we suggest using “Orthodox/reform/renewal/culturally Jewish” not “more and less observant/traditional”, “participants” not “kids”, “Developing World” not “Third World”, “program” not “trip”, “locals” not “natives”, ”partners” not “hosts”. The Context !" Explain to GLs that in “The Three Principles of Group Leading” document in the manual that the Three Principles Matrix are written in the first column. Written across the top row are various environments and situation types (e.g., formal learning session, worksite, working with a co-leader, etc.). 25 min. #" Tell GLs to assemble in small groups of four or five. Assign each group one or more environment/situation. Context Instruct the small groups to brainstorm examples of how they could put each principle into action in that Matrix, Post- situation. All GLs should write their group’s ideas on individual Post-It notes that can later be included on the It Notes, large scale matrix in front of the full group. Markers $" Tell a volunteer from each group to stick their ideas in the correct spot on the Context Matrix that is posted on the wall. Ask each group to explain one or two of their ideas to the full group. %" Ask for any questions. Energizer: 1. Tell GLs to stand where they are and make circles of 8-10 by combining two small groups. Lead just three rounds Hokey of the dance, ending with “put your whole self in.” (Note: Do not invite chaos and time loss by trying to assemble Pokey a larger circle because you will need to return to small groups immediately afterward.) (optional) 5 min. Dear Abby 1. Remind GLs about Dear Abby, an etiquette and relationship newspaper column that readers could write to for anonymous advice. This column became famous not only for its succinct, straight-forward help, but also for 35 min. bringing to light fears and issues that many Americans had but did not talk about publicly. Say: “In this room there is a lot of experience, knowledge and expertise to be shared and probably common fears and questions as Note paper,This material was developed by American Jewish World Service, Bend the Arc: A Jewish Partnership for Justice and BBYO PanimInstitute with support from Repair the World.
  4. 4. The Three Principles of Group Leading! pens well.” 2. Say to the group: “Take a moment to reflect on the Three Principles and consider your own habits or concerns that relate to them. What might be a challenge for you professionally? What situation seems unclear or challenges your gut reaction? (Pause to allow thinking.) Take a moment to think of a question on which you would like another opinion or advice. In a moment you will have an opportunity to write this question down and send it off anonymously to someone outside your small group for a response. You will also anonymously be giving advice to someone else’s question. You will not know whom you are advising. If you are not seeking advice, think of a realistic scenario or question related to using one or all of the Three Principles that might challenge someone else to think about his/her own actions and decision-making in a new way.” 3. Distribute note paper and pens. 4. Say to the group: “After writing your Dear Abby letter, fold it up and mark it with a symbol different from anyone else in your small group (a star, smiley face, chamsah, etc.). Later we will ask for Abbys to share some of their mail and advice with the larger group. If you would prefer that your letter is not selected for “publication,” mark the outside of your letter “Return to Sender.” All letters will, in fact, be returned, but these will not be shared with the full group. Pass all the letters to one group member and they will get up and trade letters with another group.” 5. Say to the group: “When first receiving the letters, each participant should try to individually come up with an answer to the question. Then share the question and your proposed solution in your small group. Gather additional advice from your group. Put all of these ideas into a written response.” (Note: Facilitators should be listening to the small groups to check for understanding and to answer questions as needed.) 6. Ask for three to five people who think they have good advice to read aloud to the full group (noting that this is not a time for humor, even though questions were anonymous). 7. Place all the letters on the floor or on the side of the room so participants can find their own and read their advice later. Decorate 1. Distribute the Three Principles stickers to GLs. Stickers 2. Say: “Each sticker states one of the principles and should be stuck somewhere on your manual so that you will 2 min. see it regularly when you are working in the field, as a visual reminder of this framework and expectations.” (Note: GLs should affix their stickers during the session.) Stickers 3. Invite GLs to personalize their stickers by decorating them with the markers already distributed around the room. Conclusion !" Review the principles again by reading them aloud. Encourage GLs to relate to them as mantras. Mention that we will refer and return to them throughout training. 3 min. #" Optional: Ask GLs to repeat the Three Principles, one at a time, after you. (Decide whether to do this based on whether it feels right, whether it was already done in the beginning of this session and whether the group seems up for it.)This material was developed by American Jewish World Service, Bend the Arc: A Jewish Partnership for Justice and BBYO PanimInstitute with support from Repair the World.
  5. 5. The Three Principles of Group Leading! $" Review the reasons we have the Three Principles: a. To set a uniform standard and clear expectations. (This also enables a standard form of evaluation.) b. To offer ideas in a format that is easy to remember. c. To create common language and expectations between co-leaders and AJWS staff. d. To help make decisions by providing guidance in hard situations. e. To be consistent in how the program is facilitated while embracing individual styles. 4. Say: “We know that by calling on these Three Principles throughout our programs, we will provide participants with high quality, consistent and educational experiences and we will model our values daily.”This material was developed by American Jewish World Service, Bend the Arc: A Jewish Partnership for Justice and BBYO PanimInstitute with support from Repair the World.
  6. 6. UbD, Lesson 2: The Three Principles of Group Leading Stage 1 – Desired Results Established Outcomes • GLs will use the Three Principles as a conceptual framework for thinking and talking about their roles and responsibilities. • GLs will use the Three Principles as a conceptual framework when problem-solving on the job. • GLs will apply the Three Principles to their work and decision-making in the field. • GLs will identify the Three Principles as a factor increasing their effectiveness as group leaders. Concepts to be Covered During the Session Key Questions to Ask Learners Big ideas presented: 1. Have you ever been in a situation in which there 1. Principles versus rules. is no policy or easy answer for what to do or how 2. I put my whole self in. to proceed? 3. We meet them where they’re at. 2. What situation(s) seems unclear or challenges 4. Everything I say and do is part of the curriculum. your gut reaction? Specific ideas/concepts to learn/remember: 3. What principle challenges you or makes you 1. There is a direct link between GLs’ behavior and uncomfortable? the outcomes of the program. 2. The Three Principles are standards by which GLs will be evaluated. 3. The Three Principles apply in all contexts (e.g., learning sessions, worksite, working with a co- leader, NGO partners, etc.). Predictable misunderstandings: 1. “I put my whole self in” means “I get no time off.” 2. “We meet them where they’re at” only refers to the participants. 3. “Everything I say and do…” doesn’t mean everything. Stage 2 – Assessment How Will We Check for Understanding at GLTI Field Work/Performance Assessment Methods Discuss: 1. GL Post-program report 1. How would you address someone else’s 2. Program debrief with supervisor concerns about putting the Three Principles into 3. GL log book or in-field tracking action? 4. Co-leader debrief Ask Direct Questions: 5. Cohen Center report 1. Why do we ask that everyone work and live by 6. Field Partner Organization debrief the same principles? 7. Participant survey 2. How will you put the Three Principles into action in different settings of your programs? Stage 3 – Lesson Plan Checklist • Materials and pre-session prep list. • Use 2-3 different modalities (not just • Each part of lesson has an assigned time limit. talk/listen/discuss; reflection/writing, small group presentations/poster making, theater games, • The presentation is significantly different from partners/smaller groups, art). past versions in order to maintain returning GL’s interest. • Check for understanding (e.g., ask direct questions, use group discussion to gauge, have • Taps into learners’ previous learners practice/demonstrate). knowledge/experience • Provides new content/information.This material was developed by American Jewish World Service, Bend the Arc: A Jewish Partnership forJustice and BBYO Panim Institute with support from Repair the World.!

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