Risk

2,056 views
1,649 views

Published on

Published in: Education, Technology
1 Comment
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
2,056
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
153
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
26
Comments
1
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Risk

  1. 1. RISK<br />& <br />riskrelationships<br />
  2. 2. The probability of a hazardeventcausingharmfulconsequences ( expectedlosses in terms of death, injuries, propertydamage,economy and environment).<br />Definition of risk<br />
  3. 3. THE DISASTER RISK EQUATION<br />Hazard [H] X Vulnerability [V]<br />Risk [R] = <br />Capacity to cope [C]<br />The risk of a disaster increases as the frequency or severity of hazards increases, people’s vulnerability increases and people’s capacity to cope (ability to cope with the consequences) is decreased. <br />
  4. 4. Whatfactors tend to increaserisk perception?<br />
  5. 5. Factorsincreasingrisk perception<br />Involuntaryhazard (Chernobyl)<br />Immediate impact ( Cyclone Nargis)<br />Direct impact ( Sichuan earthquake)<br />Dreaded impact ( cancer)<br />Manyfatalities per disaster ( Katrina)<br />Identifiable victims (Bhopal)<br />Unfamiliarhazard ( tsunami 04)<br />Lackbelief in authority ( young pop)<br />Media attention<br />Deathsgrouped in space & time (Bhuj)<br />
  6. 6. Whatfactors tend to reducerisk perception?<br />
  7. 7. Factors which reduce risk perception<br />Voluntary hazard ( mountaineers)<br />Delayed impact ( Ethiopia 03,08)<br />Common accident ( car crash)<br />Few fatalities per disaster ( floods UK 07)<br />Deaths random in space & time ( stomach cancer)<br />Statistical victims ( cigarette smokers)<br />Controllabel hazard ( ice on motorway)<br />Familiar hazard ( river flooding)<br />Belief in authority ( university scientist)<br />Little media attention.<br />Indirect impact ( drought in Spain & impact on tourism)<br />
  8. 8. Factorswhich influence an Individual’sresponses<br />Experience<br />Materialwellbeing– thosewho are better off have more choices.<br />Personality – is the person a leader or a follower, a risktaker or minimiser?<br />
  9. 9. Psychologicaldenial of the risk<br />Many people living in hazardprone areas, the riskmanybeknown and understood, but ispsychologicallysuppressedsothat the benefits of living in an area are not challenged.<br />
  10. 10. 5 Most Dangerous U.S. Earthquake Hot Spots BeyondCalifornia<br />Cascadia Subduction Zone, thiscolliding land mass 50 miles offshore is capable of magnitude 9 earthquakes 30 times more powerful<br />The 2ndlargestearthquakeeverrecordedstruckAlaska’s Prince William Sound in 64. The mag 9.2 quakekilled 128 people, most by the resulting tsunami.<br />Geologicalenigma in Missouri, that has producedsome of the largestquakes on record for the US but has yet to befullyexplained by scientists.<br />Running along the base of the Rocky Mountains, the 240-mile Wasatch Fault lies underneath Salt Lake City and the state’surban corridor, home to 1.6 million people.<br />Hawaii - the islands are also susceptible to major earthquakessuch as a mag 7.9 quake in 1868 thatkilled 77 people. <br />
  11. 11.
  12. 12. Reasons people may place themselvesatrisk<br />Hazards are unpredictable.<br />Changingrisks – sealevelsrising, deforestationleading to more frequent flash floods.<br />Lack of alternatives.<br />People mayweigh up the costs and benefits.<br />Perceptions of hazardrisks tend to beoptimistic.<br />
  13. 13.
  14. 14. Riskassessment<br />Likelihood of harm and damage.<br />
  15. 15. Map of death<br />
  16. 16. Physicalexposure to hazards i.e. risk<br />Humanvulnerability to disaster ( insecurity)<br />
  17. 17. There are a number of factors why disasters are increasing:<br />
  18. 18. Sources<br />Geography for IB diploma by Nagle & Cooke<br />Natural Hazards & Disasters by Holmes & Warn<br />Deathmap - http://www.popsci.com/scitech/article/2008-12/map-death<br />Five mostdangerous hot spots - http://www.wired.com/wiredscience/2008/10/five-us-earthqu<br />

×