Subject/Verb Agreement
Subject/Verb Agreement <ul><li>Since the subject and verb work together in a sentence, they must also “agree.”  Different ...
Mistakes to Watch For… <ul><li>With two or more subjects: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Incorrect:  Nancy  and  Lee   wants  to le...
Mistakes to Watch For… <ul><li>With indefinite pronouns: pronouns that do not refer to a specific person (someone, everyon...
Subject/Verb Agreement: Practice <ul><li>Someone (want/wants) to revise the work schedule. </li></ul><ul><li>Computers (is...
Resources <ul><li>Content for this presentation was borrowed from: </li></ul><ul><li>“ The Least You Should Know About Wri...
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Subject Verb Agreement

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Subject Verb Agreement

  1. 1. Subject/Verb Agreement
  2. 2. Subject/Verb Agreement <ul><li>Since the subject and verb work together in a sentence, they must also “agree.” Different subjects need different forms of verbs. </li></ul><ul><li>When the correct verb follows a subject, it is called subject/verb agreement. </li></ul><ul><li>A verb must agree with its subject in number. A subject that refers to one person, place, or thing is a singular subject . A subject that refers to more than one is called a plural subject . </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Singular: The dog wants to go running with me. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Plural: The dogs want to go running with me. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Rule of Thumb: “s” verbs follow most singular subjects but NOT plural subjects. </li></ul>
  3. 3. Mistakes to Watch For… <ul><li>With two or more subjects: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Incorrect: Nancy and Lee wants to lead the way. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Correct: Nancy and Lee want to lead the way. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>When the verb comes BEFORE the subject: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Incorrect: There is four restaurants on Main St. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Correct: There are four restaurants on Main St. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>When a word or phrase comes between the subject and the verb: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Incorrect: The teacher, in addition to three of her best students, agree that tests should not be tricky. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Correct: The teacher, in addition to three of her best students, agrees that tests should not be tricky. </li></ul></ul>
  4. 4. Mistakes to Watch For… <ul><li>With indefinite pronouns: pronouns that do not refer to a specific person (someone, everyone, each, neither, such as) </li></ul><ul><li>Some indefinite pronouns (everyone, each, neither, such as) take a singular verb. </li></ul><ul><li>Others (both, many) always take a plural verb. </li></ul><ul><li>Treat the indefinite pronoun as singular if it refers to something that cannot be counted. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Each wishes to be included in the invitation. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Treat the indefinite pronoun as plural if it refers to more than one of something that can be counted. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Neither wish to be included in the invitation. </li></ul></ul>
  5. 5. Subject/Verb Agreement: Practice <ul><li>Someone (want/wants) to revise the work schedule. </li></ul><ul><li>Computers (is, are) more dependable than they were five years ago. </li></ul><ul><li>The sheriff, together with three deputies, (agree, agrees) to establish a roadblock. </li></ul><ul><li>Trisha and I (swim, swims) together every morning. </li></ul><ul><li>Neither Bo nor Jeff (know, knows) the answer. </li></ul><ul><li>Here (is, are) the technical manual. </li></ul><ul><li>Letters and memos (is, are) printed on company letterhead stationery. </li></ul><ul><li>(Candy, Candies) harms teeth because of its high sugar content. </li></ul><ul><li>(Sabrina, Sabrina and Mary) is going to the fireworks display tonight. </li></ul><ul><li>On my front lawn (was, were) two discarded beer cans. </li></ul>
  6. 6. Resources <ul><li>Content for this presentation was borrowed from: </li></ul><ul><li>“ The Least You Should Know About Writing Skills,” by Paige Wilson and Teresa Ferster Glazier. </li></ul><ul><li>“ Expressways for Writing Scenarios: From Paragraph to Essay,” by Kathleen T. McWhorter </li></ul>
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