Top 4 Tips from the Smart Content Panel at Social Media Week Chicago
Social Media Week took place last week, with Chicago ...
gotten them to “like” your page. Sweepstakes and contests work great for
building your numbers short-term, but getting fan...
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Top 4 Tips from the Smart Content Panel at Social Media Week Chicago

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Social Media Week took place last week, with Chicago being one of only 26 cities worldwide to participate. I had the privilege of facilitating a panel discussion on “Beyond the Re-tweet: Social Success Begins with Smart Content” and I wanted to share some of the key points that were made. Panelists for this insightful discussion included Steve Griffiths, VP of Marketing and Product Strategy at Ifbyphone, Melissa Harris, Business Columnist at the Chicago Tribune, Brad Spirrison, Managing Editor at Appolicious and Syndicated Columnist for The Huffington Post, and Carla Riseman, Integrated Marketing Communications Manager at Analyte Health.

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Top 4 Tips from the Smart Content Panel at Social Media Week Chicago

  1. 1. Top 4 Tips from the Smart Content Panel at Social Media Week Chicago Social Media Week took place last week, with Chicago being one of only 26 cities worldwide to participate. I had the privilege of facilitating a panel discussion on “Beyond the Re-tweet: Social Success Begins with Smart Content” and I wanted to share some of the key points that were made. Panelists for this insightful discussion included Steve Griffiths, VP of Marketing and Product Strategy at Ifbyphone, Melissa Harris, Business Columnist at the Chicago Tribune, Brad Spirrison, Managing Editor at Appolicious and Syndicated Columnist for The Huffington Post, and Carla Riseman, Integrated Marketing Communications Manager at Analyte Health. After quick introductions using 140 characters or less (this was a social media panel, after all!) we jumped right into the discussion. Here are the top 4 key takeaways: • • • • Consumers are being deluged by marketing messages. Did you know that the average person sees almost 3,000 marketing messages a day, pays attention to 52 and remembers only 4? Amazing! That’s why it’s so crucial to make sure you have a content strategy and an ongoing content cadence. Steve shared that the content cadence is important to help establish the flow and tone of your content and to determine what content is resonating with your audience. And from a keyword perspective when it comes to content generation, write for humans first, then look for opportunities to optimize for SEO. Reporters are also on information overload. Social media is a great way for reporters to extend the reach of the stories they’ve written, but it also means there are more channels available through which to try to reach them. Facebook and LinkedIn are NOT platforms through which to pitch a reporter. Melissa and Brad both agreed that nothing is more important than the subject line when submitting an email pitch to a reporter. It cannot be vague (i.e., “you might be interested in this”) and absolutely has to be customized. By the way, Melissa said that to get past the “pay wall” on the Tribune site, click on the social media links she shares. Twitter chats are great but keep in mind how your tweets read to someone not involved in the Twitter chat. While Twitter users who partake in the conversation may know exactly what you mean, a tweet can definitely be taken out of context so keep that in mind. This is not only great advice for Twitter chats but also applies to times when there’s a national tragedy. You don’t want your brand to look like it’s not keeping up with current events, yet posting “our thoughts are with you” when your brand is not personally connected to the tragedy is just fluff. Instead, it’s better to cancel any prescheduled tweets or posts and just stay silent. Think creatively when advertising on Facebook. Carla shared some great tips on using self-serve ads on Facebook which includes thinking beyond the obvious characteristics of your target audience and instead targeting the media they consume. Plus, give them a reason to come back to your page once you’ve
  2. 2. gotten them to “like” your page. Sweepstakes and contests work great for building your numbers short-term, but getting fans to “stick” is what ultimately pays off in the long run. How do you do that? Give them a reason to come back to your page after the initial offer. There were many more tips that were shared and a ton of questions from the audience. For more pictures and tweets from this session, see our Storify. Many thanks to Steve, Melissa, Brad and Carla for their participation!

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