3 Ways Your Website Can Define Your Brand
Last month, I talked about the important questions to
ask before starting your n...
These three things offer a good start for organizations looking to define their brand on
a new website. What else do you t...
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3 Ways Your Website Can Define Your Brand

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Last month, I talked about the important questions to ask before starting your new website project. To offer you more insights into best practices, I thought I could focus on another important aspect of your website: what it says about your company.

Your website should speak for your brand.
Ultimately, your website is an online hub for your organization. It’s often the first place people go to find out about your company and the first place where they interact with your brand. You should take advantage and carefully craft the brand message you want to convey!

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3 Ways Your Website Can Define Your Brand

  1. 1. 3 Ways Your Website Can Define Your Brand Last month, I talked about the important questions to ask before starting your new website project. To offer you more insights into best practices, I thought I could focus on another important aspect of your website: what it says about your company. Your website should speak for your brand. Ultimately, your website is an online hub for your organization. It’s often the first place people go to find out about your company and the first place where they interact with your brand. You should take advantage and carefully craft the brand message you want to convey! In fact, here are three things you should include on your website to help define your brand: 1. Who you are. Take the time to introduce website visitors to your company and its people. These elements help personify your business, give insights into your culture and help clients and prospective clients forge a relationship with your organization. Through things like photos and profiles in your website copy, LinkedIn profile links and blog spotlights, your website should give visitors a firm idea of what your company is all about. When I’m working with clients on their new website projects, we’ll work together to help identify those core elements of “who they are” and how to best portray those through their website. 2. What you’re about. The most obvious part of your website is the ability to tell (and show) prospective clients what your company does. From outlining your capabilities and offerings to sharing a bit about your history, your website should also show clients and prospective clients what you have to offer. Visual aspects (like PDFs, presentations, videos, etc.) can help bring your website to life and show that your brand is at the cutting edge. Here at ClearEdge, we work with clients to make their presentations or other multimedia materials “web ready” so that they are optimized for their new website and can be easily viewed or downloaded by guests. This offers another level of depth and value to your website. 3. How to reach you. This can seem a bit obvious to some, but you’d be surprised how many websites make it incredibly difficult to find contact information. Don’t bury your contact info – display it prominently on every page of your website. The header and footer are common places for a phone number, or better yet, social media icons. Your clients and prospective clients don’t just want to connect with you on the phone or via email – they want to connect socially. So make it easy for them to “like” or “follow” you, then be sure to update your profiles frequently with relevant content that helps further illustrate the first two points I mentioned above. When I’m working with new website clients here at ClearEdge, we are often working simultaneously as an outsourced partner for social media management, so that we can solidify their messaging and elevate their brand across the web.
  2. 2. These three things offer a good start for organizations looking to define their brand on a new website. What else do you think company websites should include to educate visitors about your brand? Image courtesy of FreeDigitalPhotos.net/jscreationzs

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