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Dna extraction lab
Dna extraction lab
Dna extraction lab
Dna extraction lab
Dna extraction lab
Dna extraction lab
Dna extraction lab
Dna extraction lab
Dna extraction lab
Dna extraction lab
Dna extraction lab
Dna extraction lab
Dna extraction lab
Dna extraction lab
Dna extraction lab
Dna extraction lab
Dna extraction lab
Dna extraction lab
Dna extraction lab
Dna extraction lab
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Dna extraction lab

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  • Commercial strawberries are larger than wild ones and it is related to the fact that they’re polyploid. Specifically, octoploid. They have 8 full sets of chromosomes. Most other organisms are diploid which means they have only one full set of chromosomes. Diploid because the chromosomes come in pairs. Typically, wild strawberries have 14 chromosomes (7 pairs).
  • examples of some chromosomes. These are human. Shown in the “doubled” state after the S phase of the cell cycle and before mitosis.
  • examples of some chromosomes. These are human. Shown in the “doubled” state after the S phase of the cell cycle and before mitosis.
  • examples of some chromosomes. These are human. Shown in the “doubled” state after the S phase of the cell cycle and before mitosis.
  • examples of some chromosomes. These are human. Shown in the “doubled” state after the S phase of the cell cycle and before mitosis.
  • ripe strawberries are soft because they’re producing enzymes (pectinases and cellulases) that are already breaking down the cells walls and this makes getting the DNA out into solution easier.
  • ripe strawberries are soft because they’re producing enzymes (pectinases and cellulases) that are already breaking down the cells walls and this makes getting the DNA out into solution easier.
  • ripe strawberries are soft because they’re producing enzymes (pectinases and cellulases) that are already breaking down the cells walls and this makes getting the DNA out into solution easier.
  • ripe strawberries are soft because they’re producing enzymes (pectinases and cellulases) that are already breaking down the cells walls and this makes getting the DNA out into solution easier.
  • ripe strawberries are soft because they’re producing enzymes (pectinases and cellulases) that are already breaking down the cells walls and this makes getting the DNA out into solution easier.
  • ripe strawberries are soft because they’re producing enzymes (pectinases and cellulases) that are already breaking down the cells walls and this makes getting the DNA out into solution easier.
  • ripe strawberries are soft because they’re producing enzymes (pectinases and cellulases) that are already breaking down the cells walls and this makes getting the DNA out into solution easier.
  • ripe strawberries are soft because they’re producing enzymes (pectinases and cellulases) that are already breaking down the cells walls and this makes getting the DNA out into solution easier.
  • ripe strawberries are soft because they’re producing enzymes (pectinases and cellulases) that are already breaking down the cells walls and this makes getting the DNA out into solution easier.
  • ripe strawberries are soft because they’re producing enzymes (pectinases and cellulases) that are already breaking down the cells walls and this makes getting the DNA out into solution easier.
  • ripe strawberries are soft because they’re producing enzymes (pectinases and cellulases) that are already breaking down the cells walls and this makes getting the DNA out into solution easier.
  • ripe strawberries are soft because they’re producing enzymes (pectinases and cellulases) that are already breaking down the cells walls and this makes getting the DNA out into solution easier.
  • ripe strawberries are soft because they’re producing enzymes (pectinases and cellulases) that are already breaking down the cells walls and this makes getting the DNA out into solution easier.
  • Transcript

    • 1. strawberries DNA Extraction
    • 2. commercial vs. wild strawberries <ul><li>polyploid </li></ul><ul><li>diploid </li></ul>
    • 3. Diploid means there are 2 of each kind of chromosome. For example, humans have a set of 46 chromosomes in 23 pairs (here are the X and Y chromosomes highly magnified).
    • 4. Polyploid means an organism has multiple sets of chromosomes.
    • 5. Polyploid means an organism has multiple sets of chromosomes. Polyploidy is often associated with larger plant size.
    • 6. Polyploid means an organism has multiple sets of chromosomes. Polyploidy is often associated with larger plant size. But it does NOT work this way with animals! Polyploidy in animals is usually lethal .
    • 7. Why use strawberries for this?
    • 8. Why use strawberries for this? <ul><li>they have a LOT of DNA because they’re octoploid </li></ul>
    • 9. Why use strawberries for this? <ul><li>they have a LOT of DNA because they’re octoploid </li></ul>they have 8 full sets of chromosomes
    • 10. Why use strawberries for this? <ul><li>they have a LOT of DNA because they’re octoploid </li></ul><ul><li>they’re soft & easy to pulverize </li></ul>
    • 11. Why use strawberries for this? <ul><li>they have a LOT of DNA because they’re octoploid </li></ul><ul><li>they’re soft & easy to pulverize </li></ul><ul><li>they smell good when you crush them </li></ul>
    • 12. Follow the instructions for the lab and we’ll talk about the procedure afterwards.
    • 13. What was in the DNA extraction fluid?
    • 14. What was in the DNA extraction fluid? <ul><li>water </li></ul><ul><li>dish soap </li></ul><ul><li>salt </li></ul>
    • 15. What was in the DNA extraction fluid? <ul><li>water </li></ul><ul><li>dish soap </li></ul><ul><li>salt </li></ul>dish soap has detergents that break down lipids (fats, grease, etc.)
    • 16. What was in the DNA extraction fluid? <ul><li>water </li></ul><ul><li>dish soap </li></ul><ul><li>salt </li></ul>dish soap has detergents that break down lipids (fats, grease, etc.) cell membranes & nuclear membranes have phospholipids
    • 17. What was in the DNA extraction fluid? <ul><li>water </li></ul><ul><li>dish soap </li></ul><ul><li>salt </li></ul>dish soap has detergents that break down lipids (fats, grease, etc.) cell membranes & nuclear membranes have phospholipids It neutralizes the positive charges on the phosphate molecules of DNA’s backbone. The positive charges repel each other and makes it hard for DNA to clump up enough for us to see it.
    • 18. Why don’t we use a microscope to look at the DNA we extracted?
    • 19. Why don’t we use a microscope to look at the DNA we extracted? <ul><li>All we’d see is a mass of goo. Remember that DNA is a molecule and we can’t see that helical shape pictured in your textbook with a light microscope. </li></ul>
    • 20. <ul><li>that’s it! </li></ul>

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