• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
RCUK and open access
 

RCUK and open access

on

  • 395 views

Presentation given to brief academic staff

Presentation given to brief academic staff

Statistics

Views

Total Views
395
Views on SlideShare
395
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
1
Downloads
5
Comments
2

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel

12 of 2 previous next

  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
  • Thank you, a re-read highlights where my phrasing can confuse. I'll correct in subsequent advocacy. The HEFCE policy was deliberately left out at this stage to avoid over-complication. I'll re-visit this oneas and when HEFCE's policy becomes clearer.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
  • ONE ERROR, ONE OMISSION

    The explanation of the policy statement is wrong: Authors can choose Green OA whether or not their chosen journal offers Gold OA, regardless of Finch/RCUK's preference for Gold.

    And the proposed HEFCE/REF policy to complement the RCUK policy is that all refereed final drafts must be deposited in the author's institutional repository immediately upon publication, whether the journal is subscription or Gold, and whether or not access to the deposit is embargoed.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    RCUK and open access RCUK and open access Presentation Transcript

    • RCUK and open accessChris AwreHead of Information Management, Library and Learning Innovation12th March 2013
    • To cover…• Why this briefing?• Open access• Finch Report• RCUK open access policy• Implementation and local impact• Questions/discussionRCUK and open access | 12 March 2013 | 2
    • Briefing• To describe open access and current Government and funderinitiatives in this area of publication• To highlight specifically the RCUK open access policy andthe terms of this• To stimulate discussion on the impact and ways forward• To identify advice and guidance that will best serve theUniversity of Hull research community around researchdisseminationRCUK and open access | 12 March 2013 | 3
    • Why this briefing?“The Government, in line with our overarching commitment totransparency and open data, is committed that publicly-fundedresearch should be accessible free of charge. Free and open access totaxpayer-funded research offers significant social and economicbenefits by spreading knowledge, raising the prestige of UK researchand encouraging technology transfer”Innovation and Research Strategy for GrowthDepartment of Business, Innovation & Skills, 2011RCUK and open access | 12 March 2013 | 4
    • Why this briefing?“The Government, in line with our overarching commitment totransparency and open data, is committed that publicly-fundedresearch should be accessible free of charge. Free and open access totaxpayer-funded research offers significant social and economicbenefits by spreading knowledge, raising the prestige of UK researchand encouraging technology transfer”Innovation and Research Strategy for GrowthDepartment of Business, Innovation & Skills, 2011RCUK and open access | 12 March 2013 | 5
    • Why this briefing?“The Government, in line with our overarching commitment totransparency and open data, is committed that publicly-fundedresearch should be accessible free of charge. Free and open access totaxpayer-funded research offers significant social and economicbenefits by spreading knowledge, raising the prestige of UK researchand encouraging technology transfer”Innovation and Research Strategy for GrowthDepartment of Business, Innovation & Skills, 2011RCUK and open access | 12 March 2013 | 6
    • Why this briefing?“The Government, in line with our overarching commitment totransparency and open data, is committed that publicly-fundedresearch should be accessible free of charge. Free and open access totaxpayer-funded research offers significant social and economicbenefits by spreading knowledge, raising the prestige of UK researchand encouraging technology transfer”Innovation and Research Strategy for GrowthDepartment of Business, Innovation & Skills, 2011RCUK and open access | 12 March 2013 | 7
    • Why this briefing?“The Government, in line with our overarching commitment totransparency and open data, is committed that publicly-fundedresearch should be accessible free of charge. Free and open access totaxpayer-funded research offers significant social and economicbenefits by spreading knowledge, raising the prestige of UK researchand encouraging technology transfer”“The Research Councils expect the researchers they fund to depositpublished articles or conference proceedings in an open accessrepository at or around the time of publication. But this practice isunevenly enforced. Therefore, as an immediate step, we have askedthe Research Councils to ensure the researchers they fund fulfil thecurrent requirements.”Innovation and Research Strategy for GrowthDepartment of Business, Innovation & Skills, 2011RCUK and open access | 12 March 2013 | 8
    • Why this briefing?“The Government, in line with our overarching commitment totransparency and open data, is committed that publicly-fundedresearch should be accessible free of charge. Free and open access totaxpayer-funded research offers significant social and economicbenefits by spreading knowledge, raising the prestige of UK researchand encouraging technology transfer”“The Research Councils expect the researchers they fund to depositpublished articles or conference proceedings in an open accessrepository at or around the time of publication. But this practice isunevenly enforced. Therefore, as an immediate step, we have askedthe Research Councils to ensure the researchers they fund fulfil thecurrent requirements.”Innovation and Research Strategy for GrowthDepartment of Business, Innovation & Skills, 2011RCUK and open access | 12 March 2013 | 9
    • Why this briefing?“The Government, in line with our overarching commitment totransparency and open data, is committed that publicly-fundedresearch should be accessible free of charge. Free and open access totaxpayer-funded research offers significant social and economicbenefits by spreading knowledge, raising the prestige of UK researchand encouraging technology transfer”“The Research Councils expect the researchers they fund to depositpublished articles or conference proceedings in an open accessrepository at or around the time of publication. But this practice isunevenly enforced. Therefore, as an immediate step, we have askedthe Research Councils to ensure the researchers they fund fulfil thecurrent requirements.”Innovation and Research Strategy for GrowthDepartment of Business, Innovation & Skills, 2011RCUK and open access | 12 March 2013 | 10
    • Why open access?1• Improved visibility of research– Particularly to those unable to access all the journalliterature• Greater impact through wider awareness– Difference demonstrated through a range of studies• Easier to facilitate and manage use and re-use of outputs– Standard practice at Public Library of Science (PLoS)• Demonstrate greater value of publicly-funded research– The basis of the Government‟s approach1 – See UK Open Access Implementation Group, http://open-access.org.uk/RCUK and open access | 12 March 2013 | 11
    • Open access• “Open access (OA) literature is digital, online, free of charge, andfree of most copyright and licensing restrictions” (Peter Suber,http://legacy.earlham.edu/~peters/fos/overview.htm)– Free of price barriers– Free of permission barriers• Two common forms– Gold OA• Usually publication through a journal that makes the output freelyand openly available via the Web. Such a journal may charge a fee topublish– Green OA• Depositing the output in an open access repository that exposes theoutputs freely and openly to the Web (whilst also managing thecontent)RCUK and open access | 12 March 2013 | 12
    • Open access comparisonIntermediary OutputPublisherArticlePublisherRepositoryArticleArticleREADER££££££AUTHOROrganisation££RCUK and open access | 12 March 2013 | 13
    • Open access options• Gold– Can publish in completely open access journal• Directory of Open Access Journals, http://www.doaj.org– Most publishers charge an APC• Author or Article Processing Charge• Anything from £50 to £3,000– Hybrid OA option• Pay APC to journal normally charging a subscription to open up your article• Green– Institutional or subject repository• Deposit could be to one or other, or both– Repositories may also hold supplementary materials• E.g., data, reports, etcRCUK and open access | 12 March 2013 | 14
    • The Finch Report• Accessibility, sustainability, excellence: how to expand access toresearch publications (July 2012)• Explored the two open access options– Addressed question: How to make open access work on a scalablebasis for all publicly-funded research?• Recommendations:– Gold OA (also Hybrid OA)– Public funders should „establish more effective and flexiblearrangements to meet the costs of publishing in open access andhybrid journals‟– Policies to minimise restrictions on use and re-use of publications– More work should be done to explore models for open accessmonographs– Repositories should be developed to complement Gold OA,particularly in regard of associated data and grey literatureRCUK and open access | 12 March 2013 | 15
    • Finch debate• The Government accepted all the Finch recommendations in principle– The Committee will reconvene in July 2013 to review progress againstthem• Many are unconvinced that Finch has chosen the right course– Open access has been largely welcomed– Gold OA, though, appears to be giving more money to publishers (anduncertainty as to the source of that money)– Expectation that journal subscriptions will come down has beenreceived with scepticism• Two Parliamentary enquiries ongoing– House of Lords Select Committee on Science and Technology– House of Commons Business, Innovation & Skills Select Committee– Querying open access options and implementation of FinchrecommendationsRCUK and open access | 12 March 2013 | 16
    • RCUK open access policy• “Researchers, as the generators of all of the research papersand responsible for much of their peer review, are expectedto publish any peer-reviewed research papers whichacknowledge Research Council funding in journals that arecompliant with the RCUK policy on Open Access.• All papers must include details of the funding that supportedthe research and, if applicable, a statement on how theunderlying research materials – such as data, samples ormodels – can be accessed.”RCUK and open access | 12 March 2013 | 17
    • RCUK – compliant journals• Taking a lead from Finch, Gold OA is preferred• Journals must– Provide immediate and unrestricted access to the finalpublished version of the paper, using the CreativeCommons Attribution (CC-BY) licence. An APC may bepaid• Many journals are seeking to demonstrate RCUK compliance– Recommended to ask publishers their approach– SHERPA FACT tool will offer compliance advice fromApril• http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/fact/RCUK and open access | 12 March 2013 | 18
    • RCUK Gold OA policyIntermediary OutputPublisherArticlePublisherRepositoryArticleArticleREADERAUTHORRCUK and open access | 12 March 2013 | 19Optional
    • RCUK – alternative option• Where a publisher does not offer compliant Gold OA, or no APC fundingis available, a normal subscription journal may be used• The journal consents to deposit of the final Accepted Manuscripts (thatinclude all changes resulting from peer review but not necessarilyincorporating the publisher‟s formatting) in repositories for open access– Without restriction on non-commercial re-use (CC-BY-NC)– Without payment of an APC– No more than a 6 month delay between publication and deposit torepository• Except for AHRC and ESRC, which allow for 12 months• May be some initial exception up to 24 months• If the journal does not meet these requirements, they should be asked todo so, or an alternative title identifiedRCUK and open access | 12 March 2013 | 20
    • RCUK Green OA policyIntermediary OutputPublisherArticleRepository ArticleREADERAUTHOR6/12 monthsRCUK and open access | 12 March 2013 | 21
    • RCUK – additional points• Gold OA preferred due to publisher role in QA process– But Green OA considered perfectly acceptable where no Gold OAcompliant journal is available• RCUK views open access as a journey, not an event– Five-year transition anticipated• RCUK terms and conditions have been amended to incorporate the openaccess policy• RCUK will expect an annual report on adoption from each institution• RCUK policy covers journal articles and conference proceedings, thoughfocuses on the former– Issue of open access to conference proceedings needs resolutionRCUK and open access | 12 March 2013 | 22
    • Implementation and local impact• Gold OA– LLI is monitoring RCUK developments re: the policy andcompliant journals• Relevant information will be circulated as it becomes available– All those publishing outputs from RCUK grants need to askpublishers to check journal compliance• Research Councils may ask about publication decisions– APCs need to come from block grants, not research grants• Re-consideration of how funds are allocated• Many publishers offer this route and are compliant, others aremoving in this direction– Watch for novel models and offers, plus new publishersRCUK and open access | 12 March 2013 | 23
    • Implementation and local impact• Green OA– Hydra institutional digital repository available for use at Hull –http://hydra.hull.ac.uk• Submission is via Converis– Does your discipline make a repository (or archive) available?• E.g., arXiv, http://arxiv.org– All open content in repositories are crawled by Google tomaximise access possibilities• Almost all UK universities have repositories– See OpenDOAR – http://opendoar.org - for a full global listRCUK and open access | 12 March 2013 | 24
    • In conclusion• RCUK have expressed the wish that all research outputsgenerated from their research should be open access– This has been the case since 2006• Revised policy in the light of the Finch Report and withGovernment backing seeks to give teeth to the previousapproach– RCUK wish to work with the research community to getthe best out of open access• Preferred Gold OA route seeks publisher transformation– Changes will happen– Green OA a viable back-up during the journeyRCUK and open access | 12 March 2013 | 25
    • Summary flowchart (local)Article to publishIdentify journalCheck RCUKcompatibilityFind and pay APCCheck repositorydeposit policyDeposit in repositoryPublishConference item topublishCheck proceedings’open access policyFind and pay APC?Yes YesNoNoOKNot OK££No£No£No£RCUK and open access | 12 March 2013 | 26
    • Research publicly funded?Yes NoGold OA option available from your publisher?Yes NoAre APC funds available fromresearch funder?Green OA after 6 months(AHRC/ ESRC after 12 months)Yes NoImmediate Gold OA Green OA after 12-24 monthsSummary flowchart(RCUK)RCUK and open access | 12 March 2013 | 27
    • Thank you…Questions?Chris Awre, c.awre@hull.ac.uk