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Writing Religion and Theology for Multiple Audiences - Professor Richard Ascough
 

Writing Religion and Theology for Multiple Audiences - Professor Richard Ascough

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Writing Religion and Theology for Multiple Audiences - Professor Richard Ascough, Queens University, Canada.

Writing Religion and Theology for Multiple Audiences - Professor Richard Ascough, Queens University, Canada.

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    Writing Religion and Theology for Multiple Audiences - Professor Richard Ascough Writing Religion and Theology for Multiple Audiences - Professor Richard Ascough Presentation Transcript

    • Professor Richard Ascough Queens University, Canada Writing Religion & Theology for Multiple Audiences© 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd
    • Is it important to distinguish theaudience for whom one’s books and articles are written?
    • Is it realistic to write for multiple audiences at the same time?
    • When you have a specific audience in mind, does this affect where you submit a piece for publication?
    • Is there increasing pressure fromgovernment organizations and fundingagencies on the academic community to demonstrate the relevance of its research to a wider audience outside the academy?
    • Are these criteria the Canadian government uses to measure studentlearning outcomes in religious studies specific to the discipline?
    • How much does the need to demonstrate impact affect whatavenues of research you pursue?
    • Do you ever find yourself, in thecourse of writing for a wider audience, wanting to make the case for the importance of religious studies?
    • Is there an important distinction to be made between making your work relevant to a wider audience and making it accessible to a wider audience?
    • Over the course of your teachingcareer, has your classroom experience affected the way you write?
    • Is engaging with the wider community, participating in public lectures and discussions, a more effective way of reaching a broader audience than writing accessible scholarly works?
    • If you had to distil a few fundamental principles that should guide early career scholars wishing to write scholarly but accessible work, what would they be?