Popcorn making in year 1

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Popcorn making in year 1

  1. 1. Let’s make popcorn!<br />
  2. 2. We are learning about the heating and cooling of substances in Year 1. We decided to make some popcorn and to find out what happens when the kernel is heated. <br />Our genre focus is how to write instructions, so our teachers thought that it would be a yummy treat to make popcorn ! Look at the photos to find out how to make popcorn using a popcorn maker.<br />
  3. 3. Plug the popcorn maker into the wall socket. Ask an adult to help you. <br />
  4. 4. Switch on the popcorn maker. <br />
  5. 5. Wait for the popcorn machine to heat up.<br />
  6. 6. Lift the lid of the popcorn maker. <br />
  7. 7. Pour the kernels into the popcorn maker. <br />
  8. 8. Place a bowl below the spout to catch the popcorn!<br />
  9. 9. Eat and enjoy!<br />
  10. 10. This is what we found out!<br />Believe it or not, there is more to popcorn than just good looks, sounds, aroma and flavour – there's a lot of science in those little kernels! So, what's the secret behind those hard little kernels that suddenly burst into crispy, flavourful morsels?<br />Popcorn is made up of starch and a small amount of moisture that is locked inside the kernel's hard shell, called the enamel coating.<br />As the cooking temperature rises to about 450° F, the moisture inside the kernel turns to steam and pressure begins to build. The steam, now surrounded by normal-pressure air, becomes the driving force that expands the kernel.<br />When the enamel coating cannot withstand the force any longer, it "POPS!"<br />The starch granules do not actually explode, but expand into thin, jelly-like bubbles. Neighbouring bubbles fuse together and solidify, forming a three-dimensional network – much like a sink full of soapsuds. This is the white, fluffy, solid material we call popcorn!<br />

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