Senior concerns report by Claire E. Cunningham
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Senior concerns report by Claire E. Cunningham

on

  • 861 views

overview of issues facing older adults

overview of issues facing older adults

Statistics

Views

Total Views
861
Slideshare-icon Views on SlideShare
861
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
24
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    Senior concerns report by Claire E. Cunningham Senior concerns report by Claire E. Cunningham Document Transcript

    • SENIOR CONCERNS By: Claire E. Cunningham clairec529@msn.com January 2011 © Copyright 2011 Claire E. Cunningham
    • IntroductionThis is not a classic problem/solution paper.  Instead it’s meant to be a discussion‐starter.  I am just beginning to learn about the concerns facing people as they age.  I have opinions but no answers.  I see that different programs are being tried, but it seems we’re in that messy stage where we don’t yet have enough data to tell us what’s working best. My interest in issues facing older adults comes from three sources.    • First is my 92‐year‐old mother who calmly faces the challenges life throws  at her and deals with them.  Through her I’ve become aware of some of  the not‐so‐pleasant things our older adults face.    • Second is the fact that I am part of the aging baby boomer cohort and  have a personal interest in what’s in store.  • Third is that so many friends, colleagues, and acquaintances are faced with  how to serve the needs of their aging parents. I wish I had fixes to recommend, but I don’t.  I believe an important part of the solution is changing attitudes towards aging.  My expertise in marketing and communications could help with this task. I’ve included some of the programs I know of as “Solution Ideas”, but the list’s not complete.  Let’s keep sharing so we know what’s being tried and how it’s going. Claire E. Cunningham  © 2011    Page 2 
    • Method To get smarter about issues facing seniors, I posed a question on an Internet forum of professionals who provide care services to seniors.  The question was:  What do you see as the top 3 issues facing seniors besides health,  insurance, and where to live? A four‐week discussion ensued, with over 30 people participating.  While this wasn’t a scientifically conducted survey, responses pointed clearly to two major issues:    1. The desire for independence      2. The negative realities of isolation and loneliness  Since gathering these answers I’ve talked to experts, researched programs, and attended a local conference to learn more about solutions.  Claire E. Cunningham  © 2011    Page 3 
    • #1 Issue:   Independence – How to hang on to itIs it any surprise that in this, the land of the free and home of the brave, retaining independence is a major issue for older adults?  As children, teenagers, and young adults we strive to separate ourselves from our parents and move out into the world on our own.  We want to make our own decisions and even our own mistakes (of course, a safety net is appreciated). Seniors are loath to give up their hard‐won independence.  They want CHOICE.  Their choice.  Not decisions forced on them by circumstances or family. Several issues relate to independence:  1. Housing:  Most seniors (some studies say as many as 90%) want to stay in  their own homes as long as possible.  This can require a multitude of  services plus overall coordination.  For others, though, the freedom of a  planned retirement community is ideal.    2. Finances:   Whether it’s Social Security, savings, a pension, or a  combination of sources, retired adults have concerns about whether  they’ll have enough to fund retirement.  With life expectancies increasing,  a stagnating economy, and rising medical and housing costs, money  concerns are very real.     Some baby boomers who were looking forward to comfortable early  retirements have been hit by unemployment, shrunken 401Ks, or  disappearing pensions.  Retirement may have to come later for this  generation, and government programs like Social Security and Medicare  may be not be able to handle the boomers.   Claire E. Cunningham  © 2011    Page 4 
    • 3. Transportation:  When an older adult gives up driving, he or she becomes  dependent on family, friends, and/or public transportation to get around.   Appointments, shopping, and social get‐togethers transform from  independent, often spontaneous, activities into events that require  planning ahead and asking for help.  Asking for assistance can be  demoralizing.    4. Nutrition/meals:  For some seniors getting nutritious meals consistently is  a problem.   Perhaps she doesn’t know how to cook.    Could be he can’t get to the grocery store.    Maybe the loss of a spouse has left her too depressed to eat.    Possibly money worries mean he skips meals.    Poor nutrition can lead to physical and mental health issues.    5. Health care/insurance:  As we age we’re more apt to have medical issues  – arthritis, hearing loss, macular degeneration, high blood pressure….   Just ask an actuary.  The need for medical care goes up as we get older.     6. Personal and/or health care:  When a senior can no longer do a task for  himself or herself, their concerns are who will do it and will the provider  have their best interests in mind.  Options and choices may soften the  feeling of loss. Solution IdeasIssue #1: IndependenceThere appears to be focus on this issue in some states.  I know my own state of Minnesota has put huge amounts of time, thought, and creativity into this, in anticipation of the aging of the population. Claire E. Cunningham  © 2011    Page 5 
    • 1. Housing  The Village Movement:  This is a grassroots community initiative that  coordinates the delivery of services to seniors in a neighborhood.   It’s  basically neighbors helping neighbors and allows elders to stay in their  homes.  It can also alleviate loneliness by building connections within a  community.  Based on a Boston, MA, model, these initiatives require  commitment, drive, and organization to set up and run.      Age‐in‐Place Services:  There are for‐profit and non‐profit organizations that  will put together the services an individual or couple needs to stay in their  home.  These services can include organizing, de‐cluttering, remodeling,  transportation, and home health and personal care services.    Retirement communities and other housing:  There is a building boom in  communities for seniors.   There are many forward‐thinking communities  that offer a wealth of services and activities.    For many seniors, though, the cost of renovating a house to make it age‐in‐ place friendly is beyond their means, as is moving into a retirement  community, as is hiring help.  What can they do?  Can we make all options  available to everyone?  2. Transportation:  Many communities have some sort of fixed‐route transit  system; however, it may be difficult for seniors to get to a transit stop.   Mobility services provided by some communities for the handicapped and  elderly require advance planning.  Regular cabs are expensive.  Some lucky  communities have Independent Transportation Networks (another  community‐based co‐op initiative), but not enough.  Claire E. Cunningham  © 2011    Page 6 
    • 3. Nutrition:  The long‐established Meals‐on‐Wheels program provides over 1  million meals a day across the country through both delivery services and  central locations.  Deliveries and meal participation can also provide  important human contact and interaction.  Meals‐on‐Wheels and similar programs are available in many places, but not  all.  How can we ensure that no senior goes hungry?   4. Health care/insurance:  Medicare is a wonderful program, but the decision  of what type of coverage to get can be horribly confusing.    5. Finances:  Good planning can help with money issues, but finding a  trustworthy advisor can be daunting.   Sharks and scams abound, and  seniors have become wary   How can the confusion and wariness be eased?  Perhaps having trained  advisors available is the answer.  See #6 below.   6. Training for professionals:  There are now more and better trained  professionals serving the senior population.  Social gerontology is growing,  as is the field of geriatric medicine.  There is also Certified Senior Advisor  training for legal, financial, real estate, personal care, and other  professionals who serve elders.  Is this training helpful?  If so, how do we  promote it?  7. Technology:  Wireless phones, computers, and assistive listening devices  are some of the technological advances that can keep seniors independent  and connected.  Some states offer funding; however, seniors may also need  training and advice to ensure they have the right things and know how to  use them.  How can we ensure the right tools and training get to the right  people? Claire E. Cunningham  © 2011    Page 7 
    • #2 Issue:   Isolation and LonelinessThis may be a more tricky issue to deal with than independence because it involves the way in which our society views and deals with people as they age.   Attitudes are difficult to change, and the process can be complex and time‐consuming. Certainly, getting older is not seen as glamorous.  We tend to value youth rather than experience.   Older adults are often ignored or avoided.  Unless a senior has strong family connections or is active in a multi‐generational community, s/he may become isolated as friends stop driving, become incapacitated, or die.  The illness or death of a spouse can be devastating.   Isolation leads to loneliness which can exacerbate depression.  These combine to create health problems and diminish quality of life. There are several issues related to the isolation of seniors.  1. Attitudes/Value:  We are a cult of the new.  We worship youth.  Is it any  wonder we don’t value the contributions and experience of our elders?      2. Community/connections:  Connections with other people can keep us  healthy.  However, as people age their connections may fall apart – friends  and spouse are no longer there; family members may have moved away.    Even the most socially‐adept senior can find it a daunting task to build a new  community.  Those who are introverted may find it impossible.  Claire E. Cunningham  © 2011    Page 8 
    • 3. Hearing:  The prevalence of hearing loss increases as people age. (It’s  estimated that three in ten people over 60 have some degree of hearing  loss.  About 14% of those 40‐59 have some type of hearing problem.)   Hearing loss can adversely affect a person’s ability to communicate and stay  connected.  Because there is a significant social stigma attached to hearing  loss, many do not seek treatment.  Others may not have insurance coverage  that includes hearing aids.  4. Need for Meaningful Activity:  Some people love the freedom of retirement  and find plenty to fill their days.  Others yearn for ways to use their time and  talents in a way that contributes something.  5. End of Life:  Death comes to us all, but no one wants to talk about it.  The  fact that seniors are statistically closer to death may be why they are  avoided. Solution IdeasIssue #2: Isolation and LonelinessThis is a complex issue, and solutions need to be tailored for each person since the need for interaction is individual.  Some things like exercise classes, technology, and even a Meals‐on‐Wheels program do double‐duty, supporting aspects of independence and alleviating isolation 1. Community/Activity   Exercise Programs:   SilverSneakers is a national example of an senior  exercise program, but there are many local classes as well.   These programs  improve health and fitness and also help reduce loneliness by getting the  individual involved in a group.    Companion Programs:  There are volunteer companion programs in various  communities that provide a chance to build connections.   Claire E. Cunningham  © 2011    Page 9 
    • Meaningful Activity:  SCORE, “grandparenting” programs, and volunteer  opportunities are available.  Community connections:  Exercise groups, volunteering, interaction with  companions, service providers, or caregivers may be sufficient for some but  not for others.  How do we ensure that each individual has access to connections they need  to stay healthy?   2. Hearing Loss:   There are many choices in hearing aids to alleviate this loss,  and there are providers available.  Changing attitudes towards hearing loss is  a major issue that needs to be tackled.  While there is some funding available  for hearing aids, perhaps the better answer is improving insurance coverage  so it pays some of the cost of hearing aids.  3. End Of Life   Hospice care:  Great services are available, but there is a lack of  understanding about the concept.    Attitudes:  Death is a universal experience, so shouldn’t we put as much care  and effort into it as we do birth?  Legal and medical details such as Advance  Directives and wills are important, but they don’t get at the human issues.    How can we educate about end‐of‐life issues and increase our level of  comfort with the realities of death and dying?     Claire E. Cunningham  © 2011    Page 10 
    • 4. Attitudes/Value   Changing the value our society places on older adults requires a shift in  attitude – a process that may be spurred by the number of baby boomers  and their tendency to be out‐spoken and have high expectations.    How can we harness the energy of the baby boom group and use it to  change attitudes?            Report by    Claire E. Cunningham  clairec529@msn.com Claire E. Cunningham  © 2011    Page 11