An analysis of first-year business
students’ mobile phones and their use
for learning
Dr Debbie Holley
Principal Lecturer ...
Structure of talk
 Background to
research
 Student cohort
 Report on
longitudinal study
 Student attitudes
 Use for l...
Background to research
 Ongoing research into mobile learning with year one ‘new
entry’ students
 Survey over 5 years
 ...
Student cohort
Date No. of
students in
sample
Gender
No. of
females
Age range
18-20 21-25 26-30 31-35 36+
2005 69 67% 60% ...
Report on longitudinal study
Features of students’ mobile phones
%
Features of students’ mobile phones
 Colour screen standard for 97%
 Capture and generate content
now possible:
 96% ha...
Attitudes to using phones for learning
Attitudes to using phones for learning
 Pattern in data of
score 1 – extremely
important
 Some undecided or
unsure
 Ver...
Further data we have in our paper
 How useful would it be to access learning
materials via your mobile
25% keen, others m...
Uses for learning (Autumn 2009)
Category Mobile phone use Total uses
per category
Communicating Email (4 students) 6
Conta...
Uses for learning
 Category showing most
growth ‘conducting
research/getting
information
 Rise in ‘generating
content/ar...
Conclusions
 At start of survey, aim was to ensure no student
disadvantaged by mobile phone pilots
 Can now assume they ...
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Altc 2010 paper_0188_cb_dh

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Altc 2010 paper_0188_cb_dh

  1. 1. An analysis of first-year business students’ mobile phones and their use for learning Dr Debbie Holley Principal Lecturer Learning and Teaching London Metropolitan University Business School d.holley@londonmet.ac.uk Claire Bradley Research Fellow Learning Technology Research Institute c.bradley@londonmet.ac.uk ALT-C 2010
  2. 2. Structure of talk  Background to research  Student cohort  Report on longitudinal study  Student attitudes  Use for learning
  3. 3. Background to research  Ongoing research into mobile learning with year one ‘new entry’ students  Survey over 5 years  Timely: New Horizon Report 2010 - mobile computing one of six ‘technologies to watch’  16 million people in the UK accessed the internet from mobile phones in December 2009 (Guardian Report)  Mobile devices – can be defined around mobility of device, mobility of the learner, facilitation beyond the confines of the classroom (Laurillard 2007; Sharples et al 2007; Wali et al 2008)  Mobile technologies – can help to engage some students into taking part (Bradley et al 2009)
  4. 4. Student cohort Date No. of students in sample Gender No. of females Age range 18-20 21-25 26-30 31-35 36+ 2005 69 67% 60% 25% 10% 3% 2% 2006 101 71% 45% 37% 10% 3% 5% 2007 65 69% 53% 36% 8% 3% 0% 2008 91 68% 49% 45% 4% 2% 0% 2009 76 72% 61% 33% 5% 1% 0%
  5. 5. Report on longitudinal study Features of students’ mobile phones %
  6. 6. Features of students’ mobile phones  Colour screen standard for 97%  Capture and generate content now possible:  96% have camera  86% can record video  84% can record audio/voice  Access data:  80% Internet  50% WIFI  91% Bluetooth  46% 3G  50% GPS
  7. 7. Attitudes to using phones for learning
  8. 8. Attitudes to using phones for learning  Pattern in data of score 1 – extremely important  Some undecided or unsure  Very low number of ‘not at all important’ responses
  9. 9. Further data we have in our paper  How useful would it be to access learning materials via your mobile 25% keen, others more reticent – our follow-up interviews should unpack this further  How would you view university contacting you… Around a third every year keen, growing over time, others unsure, early interviews indicate university tutors = yes, admin = no  Do you currently use your mobile phone for learning? Significant increase to 29% this year, citing 34 different uses n=76
  10. 10. Uses for learning (Autumn 2009) Category Mobile phone use Total uses per category Communicating Email (4 students) 6 Contacting group assignment members Fashion facebook group Using tools/ Calculator (3 students) 4 applications Microsoft Office Organising Putting reminder alarms for meetings 3 Check my exams Organiser Generating content/ Take pictures/photos (3 students) 4 artefacts Voice recording Conducting research/ Internet (4 students) 12 getting information Google (3 students) Research / search info. (5 students) Note-taking Write notes 1 Other Accessing learning materials 4 Presentations / record presentations (2 students) Transport files (PDF, Word, PowerPoint …)
  11. 11. Uses for learning  Category showing most growth ‘conducting research/getting information  Rise in ‘generating content/artefacts’  Other – presentations, new uses ‘accessing learning materials’ and ‘transporting files (pdf, word, powerpoint)
  12. 12. Conclusions  At start of survey, aim was to ensure no student disadvantaged by mobile phone pilots  Can now assume they will all have a device and research focus switched to how they are using their mobile phones for learning and the associated tasks  Survey may not be indicative of all students, but does provide an insight, and some baseline data for future work  Have individual material now from students capturing their mobile learning on flipcams and a project website: http://www.londonmet.ac.uk/learningonthemove
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