Stories of Change from Our Communities
in Indonesia, Malaysia and the Philippines
in Responding to HIV, AIDS and Other Cha...
© ISEAN, 2013
All rights reserved. Publications of the Islands of Southeast Asia Network on Male and Transgender Sexual He...
RAMPA
Rampa is used as the title of this publication to refer to the personal and organizational stories shared by GMT (Ga...
First Edition: July 2013
i| vii
Preface
The concept of community involvement in improving health outcomes is based on the
principle that if affecte...
ii| vii
program, CBO Capacity building is provided through a series of trainings and organizational
development activities...
iii| vii
Foreword
Communities are a critical stakeholder in any effort to tackle sexual health, human rights
and other dev...
iv| vii
RAMPA attempts to contrast the state of the community participation before and after the
commencement of IHP.
The ...
v| vii
Contents
Preface i
Foreword iii
Contents v
Indonesia at a Glance 2
Standing on The Thorns of Syaria
by Violet Grey ...
vi| vii
28
Shelter of Hope
by Keluarga Besar Waria Yogyakarta (KEBAYA) — Yogyakarta
30
VCT? Bring it on!
by Gaya Patriot —...
vii| vii
Malaysia at a Glance 75
Camouflage
by Singalang Charity Association (SCHA) — Sarawak
77
Legally TG
by Pertubuhan ...
2| 128
INDONESIA
at a glance
Indonesia, a country with a population of 237.5 million in 2010 has an estimated
HIV prevalen...
3| 128
Urban Centered BCC Strategy Development Regional Consultation
Jakarta, June 2012
4| 128
It’s a story about a land.
A land with privilege for them … but not for us
Violet Grey — Aceh
I
t was a Tuesday eve...
5| 128
happened to Cut Sherly, a 28 years old TG, living in Banda Aceh. Cut Sherly is an
entrepreneur. She owns and runs a...
6| 128
individually by the group due to the absence of a visible lesbian community in Aceh.
After the ISEAN-Hivos Training...
7| 128
MY ENEMY, MY ALLY
T
he full moon brightens Bandar Lampung that night. The sky was clear and
stars were clearly visi...
8| 128
naked, kissing other transgenders, and sometimes we have to perform oral sex in
front of the other officers… it bre...
9| 128
include the GWL-INA and other development groups in each district/city in the
province of Lampung. They also implem...
10| 128
T
he way gay and transgender communities are recognized in Banyuwangi district today is
very different from the wa...
11| 128
international levels.
Gaya Laros and IWABA are community-based organizations (CBOs) which aim to increase
communit...
12| 128
F
or Titin, the Blambangan hospital is like a second workplace. Titin, is a 33
year old transgender person who is ...
13| 128
attention from the Department of Health and PHC. Gaya Laros and Banyuwangi
Aids Commission advocated for gay and T...
14| 128
The expensive cost of medical treatment makes her desperate.
“I’m better off dead rather than living like this”
My...
15| 128
June, 2012, she suddenly fell ill. Yosi developed fever, diarrhea, as well as candidiasis
in her mouth. She decide...
16| 128
established. There are several transgender persons other than Yosi who were also
assisted by the organization to a...
17| 128
After three months, Puspa is finally healthy. Through HIWABA’s interventions,
Puspa slowly regained her weight. He...
18| 128
organizational structure. More work divisions were also formed within the organization” , said Ade
Lodni, the Chai...
19| 128
SWEET TWINKS TWENTIES
GWLmuda — Jakarta
It’s easier for me to find friends via
“manjam” in Jakarta
D
on’t always a...
20| 128
technology. ”It’s easier for me to find friends via “manjam” in Jakarta rather in
Bontang, because there is a lot ...
21| 128
Unlike Zeff, Radhit, another young MSM, feels that the existence of Brondongmanis
is helpful because he could get ...
22| 128
“Through this activity GWL Kawanua provides empowerment and
considerable benefits for the crowned queen, prince an...
23| 128
North Sulawesi. Representatives from GWL-INA, the national network of MSM and TG
organizations in Indonesia were a...
24| 128
According to Tiara and Davin, fulfilling their role as reigning Queen and Prince
of GWL Kawanua respectively was n...
25| 128
infection control and prevention of HIV and STIs. "As such, those who are at risk will be able to
protect themselv...
26| 128
“
Be like metals…we are like brass turned into gold”, said Sasha Rhamdani, a
healthcare advocate in Kuningan Regen...
27| 128
Sasha is just one out of the many TGs trained by Srikandi Pasundan (SP). SP has provided
trainings to many TGs in ...
28| 128
O
ky seems happier now days. Loads of activities such as accompanying
transgenders to the clinic, helping to get m...
29| 128
this organization has been working with the Executive Agency for Social Health
Insurance (BAPEL JAMKESOS) since 20...
30| 128
F
or Andre and most of his fellow gays, getting an HIV test is a frightening
experience. Being concerned that they...
31| 128
The HIV and STI testing that Andre went through was through a mobile
voluntary counseling and testing (VCT) initia...
32| 128
becoming an entry point towards accessing arrangements for services . This was
implemented as GP’s agreement for m...
33| 128
W
e often hear of many sad stories from young friends in the LGBT
(Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender) communi...
34| 128
named Jefri Aditya who is a member of GayLam community. Jefri also suffered the same
fate as her as he has also be...
35| 128
GayLam aims to establish more GayLam partners and help coordinate
activities for the lesbian community through a g...
36| 128
I
t has been one year since a house on Abdul Halim 46 road, Cimahi, became Srikandi
Perintis’ secretariat. Srikand...
37| 128
Srikandi Perintis is one of the several transgender organizations in West Java.
The organization was formerly name...
38| 128
Ike Diyah S.Sos, PKBI Bandung’s Program Manager said, “Transgender
organizations in the region have become more co...
40| 128
THE PHILIPPINES
at a glance
The number of HIV/AIDS cases in the Philippines has surpassed the 10,000-
mark. The De...
41| 128
O
ur organization, the Peer Ed ME-PAMACQ has four places where
we Rampa. Our name is an acronym for PAsay, MAnila,...
42| 128
non-government organizations (NGO) such as Philippine Rural Reconstruction
Movement (PRRM) under the HAPP HIV-AIDS...
43| 128
Part 2:
THE STORY OF WELLA
M
y name is Rowell B. Caayao, but only to friends
who know me well. I am more known by ...
44| 128
information that was disseminated so much so that I wanted to be a peer educator
myself. I asked if I could be par...
45| 128
I
n the recent years, Cebu City has experienced a surge in the number of
new HIV cases. In 2008 and 2009, our city...
46| 128
We are a Social Security and Exchange registered PLHIV NGO that has been actively
partnering with our city governm...
Isean 2013 stories of change from our communities  in indonesia, malaysia and the philippines
Isean 2013 stories of change from our communities  in indonesia, malaysia and the philippines
Isean 2013 stories of change from our communities  in indonesia, malaysia and the philippines
Isean 2013 stories of change from our communities  in indonesia, malaysia and the philippines
Isean 2013 stories of change from our communities  in indonesia, malaysia and the philippines
Isean 2013 stories of change from our communities  in indonesia, malaysia and the philippines
Isean 2013 stories of change from our communities  in indonesia, malaysia and the philippines
Isean 2013 stories of change from our communities  in indonesia, malaysia and the philippines
Isean 2013 stories of change from our communities  in indonesia, malaysia and the philippines
Isean 2013 stories of change from our communities  in indonesia, malaysia and the philippines
Isean 2013 stories of change from our communities  in indonesia, malaysia and the philippines
Isean 2013 stories of change from our communities  in indonesia, malaysia and the philippines
Isean 2013 stories of change from our communities  in indonesia, malaysia and the philippines
Isean 2013 stories of change from our communities  in indonesia, malaysia and the philippines
Isean 2013 stories of change from our communities  in indonesia, malaysia and the philippines
Isean 2013 stories of change from our communities  in indonesia, malaysia and the philippines
Isean 2013 stories of change from our communities  in indonesia, malaysia and the philippines
Isean 2013 stories of change from our communities  in indonesia, malaysia and the philippines
Isean 2013 stories of change from our communities  in indonesia, malaysia and the philippines
Isean 2013 stories of change from our communities  in indonesia, malaysia and the philippines
Isean 2013 stories of change from our communities  in indonesia, malaysia and the philippines
Isean 2013 stories of change from our communities  in indonesia, malaysia and the philippines
Isean 2013 stories of change from our communities  in indonesia, malaysia and the philippines
Isean 2013 stories of change from our communities  in indonesia, malaysia and the philippines
Isean 2013 stories of change from our communities  in indonesia, malaysia and the philippines
Isean 2013 stories of change from our communities  in indonesia, malaysia and the philippines
Isean 2013 stories of change from our communities  in indonesia, malaysia and the philippines
Isean 2013 stories of change from our communities  in indonesia, malaysia and the philippines
Isean 2013 stories of change from our communities  in indonesia, malaysia and the philippines
Isean 2013 stories of change from our communities  in indonesia, malaysia and the philippines
Isean 2013 stories of change from our communities  in indonesia, malaysia and the philippines
Isean 2013 stories of change from our communities  in indonesia, malaysia and the philippines
Isean 2013 stories of change from our communities  in indonesia, malaysia and the philippines
Isean 2013 stories of change from our communities  in indonesia, malaysia and the philippines
Isean 2013 stories of change from our communities  in indonesia, malaysia and the philippines
Isean 2013 stories of change from our communities  in indonesia, malaysia and the philippines
Isean 2013 stories of change from our communities  in indonesia, malaysia and the philippines
Isean 2013 stories of change from our communities  in indonesia, malaysia and the philippines
Isean 2013 stories of change from our communities  in indonesia, malaysia and the philippines
Isean 2013 stories of change from our communities  in indonesia, malaysia and the philippines
Isean 2013 stories of change from our communities  in indonesia, malaysia and the philippines
Isean 2013 stories of change from our communities  in indonesia, malaysia and the philippines
Isean 2013 stories of change from our communities  in indonesia, malaysia and the philippines
Isean 2013 stories of change from our communities  in indonesia, malaysia and the philippines
Isean 2013 stories of change from our communities  in indonesia, malaysia and the philippines
Isean 2013 stories of change from our communities  in indonesia, malaysia and the philippines
Isean 2013 stories of change from our communities  in indonesia, malaysia and the philippines
Isean 2013 stories of change from our communities  in indonesia, malaysia and the philippines
Isean 2013 stories of change from our communities  in indonesia, malaysia and the philippines
Isean 2013 stories of change from our communities  in indonesia, malaysia and the philippines
Isean 2013 stories of change from our communities  in indonesia, malaysia and the philippines
Isean 2013 stories of change from our communities  in indonesia, malaysia and the philippines
Isean 2013 stories of change from our communities  in indonesia, malaysia and the philippines
Isean 2013 stories of change from our communities  in indonesia, malaysia and the philippines
Isean 2013 stories of change from our communities  in indonesia, malaysia and the philippines
Isean 2013 stories of change from our communities  in indonesia, malaysia and the philippines
Isean 2013 stories of change from our communities  in indonesia, malaysia and the philippines
Isean 2013 stories of change from our communities  in indonesia, malaysia and the philippines
Isean 2013 stories of change from our communities  in indonesia, malaysia and the philippines
Isean 2013 stories of change from our communities  in indonesia, malaysia and the philippines
Isean 2013 stories of change from our communities  in indonesia, malaysia and the philippines
Isean 2013 stories of change from our communities  in indonesia, malaysia and the philippines
Isean 2013 stories of change from our communities  in indonesia, malaysia and the philippines
Isean 2013 stories of change from our communities  in indonesia, malaysia and the philippines
Isean 2013 stories of change from our communities  in indonesia, malaysia and the philippines
Isean 2013 stories of change from our communities  in indonesia, malaysia and the philippines
Isean 2013 stories of change from our communities  in indonesia, malaysia and the philippines
Isean 2013 stories of change from our communities  in indonesia, malaysia and the philippines
Isean 2013 stories of change from our communities  in indonesia, malaysia and the philippines
Isean 2013 stories of change from our communities  in indonesia, malaysia and the philippines
Isean 2013 stories of change from our communities  in indonesia, malaysia and the philippines
Isean 2013 stories of change from our communities  in indonesia, malaysia and the philippines
Isean 2013 stories of change from our communities  in indonesia, malaysia and the philippines
Isean 2013 stories of change from our communities  in indonesia, malaysia and the philippines
Isean 2013 stories of change from our communities  in indonesia, malaysia and the philippines
Isean 2013 stories of change from our communities  in indonesia, malaysia and the philippines
Isean 2013 stories of change from our communities  in indonesia, malaysia and the philippines
Isean 2013 stories of change from our communities  in indonesia, malaysia and the philippines
Isean 2013 stories of change from our communities  in indonesia, malaysia and the philippines
Isean 2013 stories of change from our communities  in indonesia, malaysia and the philippines
Isean 2013 stories of change from our communities  in indonesia, malaysia and the philippines
Isean 2013 stories of change from our communities  in indonesia, malaysia and the philippines
Isean 2013 stories of change from our communities  in indonesia, malaysia and the philippines
Isean 2013 stories of change from our communities  in indonesia, malaysia and the philippines
Isean 2013 stories of change from our communities  in indonesia, malaysia and the philippines
Isean 2013 stories of change from our communities  in indonesia, malaysia and the philippines
Isean 2013 stories of change from our communities  in indonesia, malaysia and the philippines
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  1. 1. Stories of Change from Our Communities in Indonesia, Malaysia and the Philippines in Responding to HIV, AIDS and Other Challenges
  2. 2. © ISEAN, 2013 All rights reserved. Publications of the Islands of Southeast Asia Network on Male and Transgender Sexual Health are available on www.isean.asia and can be obtained in ISEAN Secretariat Office in Jakarta, Indonesia. Request for permission to reproduce or translate ISEAN publications – whether for sale or for noncommercial distribution – should be addressed to ISEAN Secretariat. The designations employed and the presentation of the material in this publication do not imply the expression of any opinion what- soever on the part of the ISEAN concerning the legal status of any country, territory, city or area or of its authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers or boundaries. Dotted lines on maps represent approximate border lines for which there may not yet be full agreement. All reasonable precautions have been taken by ISEAN to verify the information contained in this publication. However, the published material is being distributed without warranty of any kind, either expressed or implied. The responsibility for the interpretation and use of the material lies with the reader. In no event shall the ISEAN be liable for damages arising from its use.
  3. 3. RAMPA Rampa is used as the title of this publication to refer to the personal and organizational stories shared by GMT (Gay, MSM & Transgender) communities in Indonesia, Malaysia and the Philippines in responding to HIV and AIDS and other challenges. Rampa is a word from the gay lingo used in the Philippines. According to Jay Arian C Caparida, the President of Peer Ed ME - PAMAQC, Rampa means ‘to have a group of friends to go to different places together’ or in other words, hang-out with buddies. The term rampa also means to show off or sashay while walking. The term may have been derived from the English word ‘ramp’, a runway for fashion shows, hence the meaning.
  4. 4. First Edition: July 2013
  5. 5. i| vii Preface The concept of community involvement in improving health outcomes is based on the principle that if affected communities are actively involved in initiatives that affect their health, better health outcomes are often achieved. This is because of the observation that members of communities often protect and support their other members. Communities of patients and other “affected and vulnerable groups” are acknowledged universally as important partners towards maximizing the reach and impact of health systems. This is particularly true for HIV- AIDS, a disease that affects predominantly young MSMs and Transgenders in the South East Asian Region. Since MSM and TG communities are often hidden and difficult to reach because of the social stigma attached to homosexual behaviors or identity, it is essential to involve MSM and TG communities in national HIV-AIDS responses (GFATM Community Systems Strengthening, 2011). This clearly goes beyond providing services and usual interventions. Community-Based Organizations or CBOs, and their networks, have a unique role and ability to interact with those who are affected in their communities. They are a valuable resource as they can respond quickly to their own needs and engage better with the affected and vulnerable groups. Indeed, local CBOs provide the key link in HIV prevention and control. Without the communities being actively involved from prevention to treatment, national and even regional responses to HIV-AIDS could not be as effective. According to the Community Systems Strengthening document of the GFATM (2011), “To have a real impact on health outcomes, however, community organizations and their members must have effective and sustainable systems in place to support their activities and services. This includes a strong focus on capacity building of human and financial resources, with the aim of enabling community actors to play a full and effective role alongside the health, social welfare, legal and political systems.” One such initiative is the ISEAN-Hivos Program , a Global Fund Round 10 Community Systems Strengthening (CSS) HIV and AIDS project that works with local partners and MSM-TG communities in Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines and Timor Leste. Under this 5-year
  6. 6. ii| vii program, CBO Capacity building is provided through a series of trainings and organizational development activities. Beyond the numbers of people trained, the success of the project may be better reflected through the stories of the participants and the CBOs themselves. To facilitate the qualitative documentation of the changes that have occurred due to the capacity building interventions provided, the ISEAN-Hivos Team embarked on this task. In-country Workshops were conducted adopting the a variation of the “Most Significant Change Story Technique” or MSC. MSC is a method of participatory monitoring and evaluation developed by Dr. Rick Davies and colleagues more than 15 years ago. This approach is being used in many settings globally as a qualitative documentation strategy and a tool for monitoring and evaluation. Based on the written narratives shared by CBO members who attended writing workshops organized by the Program and in partners in Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, this compilation of stories provides the point of view and experiences of the MSM and TG communities. Aside from documenting stories, this publication may also be used as a resource for further researches, advocacy and providing education on MSMs and TGs experiences in various contexts. The stories in this publication reflect how MSM and transgender communities in the three countries rise above the challenges and help themselves and their peers. It is hoped that their stories of struggle, challenge, encouragement and achievement provide a deeper understanding of the group and new perspectives to whoever reads it. CBOs are also hoped to be inspired by the narratives so that they too, continue documenting their experiences and share their stories with others. The Rampa Publication Team and Partners wish to thank everyone who participated in this multi-country initiative in documentation stories from community based organizations. Still, more stories remain unheard and need to be told. This will be the next challenge to all of us. Coming together is a beginning. Keeping together is progress. Working together is success. - Henry Ford
  7. 7. iii| vii Foreword Communities are a critical stakeholder in any effort to tackle sexual health, human rights and other development issues. Yet communities are often denied self-determination and the opportunity to make its diverse voices heard. The ISEAN-Hivos Program (IHP), supported by the Global Fund 1 , with assistance from SatuDunia2 and the United Nations Development Programme Asia-Pacific Regional Centre (UNDP APRC)3 , is focused improving prevention, care, treatment and support for males who have sex with males (MSM) and transgender people, two groups most-affected by HIV in Indo- nesia, Malaysia, the Philippines and Timor Leste. A guiding principle for IHP has been that sus- tained, positive outcomes in public health and human right will be maximized by strengthening the ability of community-based organizations (CBOs) and leaders to be able to stand and serve their beneficiaries. Following is a compilation of stories of significant change observed by community partic- ipants in Indonesia, Malaysia and the Philippines over the two years since the beginning of IHP in October 2011, these stories are from members of CBOs who share how they feel and see the changes that have occurred in recent years. This compilation is a product of an IHP activity that facilitated CBOs to document their experiences using a methodology localized and adapted from the Most Significant Change (MSC) Technique4 developed by Dr. Rick Davies and Dr. Jes- sica Dart. This technique enables the documentation and storytelling process to be enhanced with skills-building in basic research and data collection. CBOs were assisted in their process by local journalists, consultants and graphic designers. RAMPA shows both the vulnerability and strength of individuals and communities of sex- ual and gender minorities most-at risk of HIV in the three countries. These narratives play a vi- tal role in promoting civic participation and peer support to tackle the many issues that MSM and transgender people face in each country, especially regarding access to health, protection from discrimination and stigma, and also violence. These issues have manifested differently across the three countries, however the impact at the community-level is strikingly similar.
  8. 8. iv| vii RAMPA attempts to contrast the state of the community participation before and after the commencement of IHP. The stories from RAMPA tell us that CBOs and community leaders have a key role in ad- vocating for better health, protection from discrimination and equality before the law. This serves as compelling evidence of the need to maintain support for capacity-building of CBOs and community leaders so that they can scale-up their positive contributions to society. Our network is committed to continuing its work with community networks and strategic partners at the regional, national and local level to address the inequities that exist, while promoting health and social protection for those living with, and most-at-risk of HIV. Islands of Southeast Asia Network on Male and Transgender Sexual Health (ISEAN) June 2013 1 The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria is the world largest donor of public health initiatives. 2 http://www.satudunia.net/ 3 http://asia- pacific.undp.org/ 4 The ‘Most Significant Change’ (MSC) Technique, A Guide to Its Use by Rick Davies and Jess Dart; April 2005; http://mande.co.uk/ docs/MSCGuide.pdf
  9. 9. v| vii Contents Preface i Foreword iii Contents v Indonesia at a Glance 2 Standing on The Thorns of Syaria by Violet Grey — Aceh 4 My Enemy, My Ally by Gaya Lentera Muda (GAYLAM) — Lampung 7 Fabulous Drag, Existance through Art and Culture by Gaya Lare Osing (Gaya Laros) — Banyuwangi 10 Gaya Laros by Gaya Lare Osing (Gaya Laros) — Banyuwangi 12 My Second Family by Himpunan Waria Batam (HIWABA) — Batam 14 Sweet Twinks Twenties by GWL-Muda — Jakarta 19 The Condom Ambassador by GWL Kawanua — Manado 22 From Brass to Gold by Srikandi Pasundan— Bandung 26
  10. 10. vi| vii 28 Shelter of Hope by Keluarga Besar Waria Yogyakarta (KEBAYA) — Yogyakarta 30 VCT? Bring it on! by Gaya Patriot — Bekasi 33 The Power of Youth by Gaya Lentera Muda (GAYLAM) — Lampung 36 Independent Srikandi from Pasundan by Srikandi Pasundan — Bandung 40 The Philippines at a Glance 41 Rampa by Peer Educators Movement for Empowerment of Pasay, Manila, Caloocan and Quezon City (PAMACQ) — Metro Manila 45 VCT on Wheels by Cebu Plus Association, Inc — Cebu 50 Reaching Beyond Borders: Advocacies Extending to Davao Region’s Municipalities by Mindanao AIDS Advocates Association, Inc (MAAI) — Mindanao 53 STRAP on Its Way to Health: A Transgender Right by Society of Transsexual Women of The Philippines — Metro Manila 56 HIV Advocacy Turns Sexy: The Love Yourself Project Indulge by The Love Yourself, Inc — Metro Manila 60 Targeting 95% of Adherence in ARV Medication by Pinoy Plus Association, Inc; Metro Manila 64 The Wellness Lounge by Cebu Plus Association, Inc (Cebu) 67 Winning the Battle Against Discrimination by Transgender Coalition for the Liberation of the Reassigned Sex (COLORS), Inc — Cebu
  11. 11. vii| vii Malaysia at a Glance 75 Camouflage by Singalang Charity Association (SCHA) — Sarawak 77 Legally TG by Pertubuhan Advokasi Masyarakat Terpinggir (PAMT) — Negeri Sembilan, Kuala Lumpur, Selangor 81 Meet Emma… by Family Health Association — Kedah 85 The Future of Chinese MSM by KL Light — Kuala Lumpur 87 Me, Then and Now by Cahaya Harapan — Kedah 89 Mirror, Mirror – The Zai’s Story by Pertubuhan Advokasi Masyarakat Terpinggir (PAMT) — Negeri Sembilan, Kuala Lumpur , Selangor 91 My Journey Is Not Yet Over by Komited Malaysia — Pahang 94 It All Begins Here by Family Health Association — Kedah 98 ISEAN-Hivos Program Network, SR, CBOs INDONESIA 101 Network, SR CBOs The Philippines 107 Network, SR, CBOs Malaysia 117 About ISEAN, ISEAN-HIVOS 125 Regional Partners 127
  12. 12. 2| 128 INDONESIA at a glance Indonesia, a country with a population of 237.5 million in 2010 has an estimated HIV prevalence of 0.27% among the 15-49 years age group1 . Indonesia’s HIV and AIDS epidemic is concentrated amongst key affected population resulting from a mix of two modes of transmission- sexual transmission and drug injecting. The cumulative number of reported HIV infections in Indonesia has risen sharply from 7,195 in 2006 to 76,879 by 20112 . According to the 2009 national estimates of HIV infection, about 186,257 people were infected with HIV and 6.4 million people were at risk 3 . In the past 2 years, the commitment of the Government of Indonesia to respond effectively to the epidemic and to reach national and international 1 PWID, sex workers (male, female and transgender), men who have sex with men, high risk men, and prisoners targets has also been reflected at the regional level. The occasion of the 19th ASEAN Summit in November 2011 was used to mobilize Heads of State/Government of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations to declare their commitment towards “an ASEAN with Zero New HIV Infections, Zero Discrimination and Zero HIV Related Deaths” by 2015. Coverage of some categories of key affected populations is now approaching the national target. In 2011, the NAC (National AIDS Commission) recorded that over two thirds of direct Female Sex Workers (FSW) and transgender people had been reached by interventions as well as between one to two thirds of indirect FSW. One indicator also relates to behavior e.g. the percentage of people reporting condom use at last sex. The FSW, transgender and MSM groups have all met at least one of the national targets4 . The rising numbers of condoms distributed to key affected population suggests improvements in condom availability, acceptability, and use. On the other hand, less than one third of men who have sex with men (MSM) and high risk men have been reached5 . 1 MoH, Mathematic Model of HIV Epidemic in Indonesia 2008-2014 2 MoH, Year end Report on Situation of HIV and AIDS in Indonesia, 2006 and 2011 3 MoH, Estimation of at-risk Adult Population, 2009 4 MoH, IBBS, 2011 5 NAC, Program Monitoring, 2011 [Executive Summary of Republic Indonesia Country Report on The Follow Up To The Declaration of Commitment On HIV/AIDS by Indonesian National AIDS Commission, 2012]
  13. 13. 3| 128 Urban Centered BCC Strategy Development Regional Consultation Jakarta, June 2012
  14. 14. 4| 128 It’s a story about a land. A land with privilege for them … but not for us Violet Grey — Aceh I t was a Tuesday evening in April, the sun was slowly setting in Aceh. The time is now 4:00 PM. At VG — Violet Grey’s office, in Lamlagang, Banda Aceh, nine people were still engaged in a discussion even though the day is getting late. Cipi was at the “center” of the discussion. She is a “shemale”, a transgender person. She was beaten up and suffered from serious injuries and was unconscious. The case of Cipi is a bleak portrait of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) community members in Nanggroe Aceh Darussalam. Cipi was not the only transgender who experienced this kind of physical violence. Most transgender people in the area experienced various forms of violence as well. Many discussions around LGBTs are often held at VG, an LGBT organization in that province. In addition to Cipi’s case, the discussion also focused on what
  15. 15. 5| 128 happened to Cut Sherly, a 28 years old TG, living in Banda Aceh. Cut Sherly is an entrepreneur. She owns and runs a beauty salon in the city of Banda Aceh. Besides running a business, she is also active as a coordinator of TG organization called Putroe Sejati Aceh (PSA). Cut Sherly is a living witness on how Aceh can be a “hell on earth” for LGBT groups. “Beaten, molested, expelled and permitted to be killed are common things we experience or hear about in our daily lives. It is as common as eating rice in our daily meals”, said her. It is still fresh in her mind when a group of people entered into her salon two months ago. They confronted her and accused her of doing immoral activities within her premises. Her feelings were a mixture of anger, sadness and fear. She had to go through all these in spite of the fact that she did nothing. The time then was 02.00 AM. She was sleeping alone in her salon. It is very common for members of PSA community to experience similar situations. There will always be reasons for others to threaten them. Often these are silly reasons, illogical and with no valid grounds. PSA was initiated by VG. Initially PSA was only intended to help TGs get better health access related to HIV and AIDS. But fighting solely for the rights to health was not enough, because violence and discrimination happen not only in health care settings but in all other aspect of their lives. Effective advocacy would need to include knowledge and support for civil rights – the right to be equal under the law. In spite of feeling hopeless due to the violence that she had experienced, Cut Sherly explained that through the training activities conducted by VG, she learned that everyone, including TGs like herself, have the right to be treated well, just like others. Today, Cut Sherly performs the role of an advocate for her TG colleagues. She also helps fight various cases involving TGs living with HIV. Considering the number of violent events towards LGBT in Aceh, after attending ISEAN-Hivos Training for Local CBO Staff on Institutional and Program Development and Strategic Planning, VG is planning to raise the “pluralism issue” in any workplan that involves TG and lesbians. “We take a strong consideration towards these two groups since they are prone to violence because of their gender expression that might be judged as a form of misconduct that is against Islamic syari’a,” said Edi Saputra, Director of VG. Approach to TGs organized through PSA and they are already having a strong network among themselves. On the other hand, lesbians are being approached Before attending these meetings, VGs staffs provide instant training on crucial things such as how to perform as a good leader and how to position myself within the forum” “
  16. 16. 6| 128 individually by the group due to the absence of a visible lesbian community in Aceh. After the ISEAN-Hivos Training for Local CBO Staff on Community Leadership, Governance and Mobilization, VG formed a new community network for lesbians in Aceh under the management of VG. Atapku Aceh— which later changed its name into Learning Together (LeTo). As a newly formed community group, LeTo was managed by VG. In June 2012, Ezer El-Fauzan, coordinator of LeTo, who led the organization since the beginning, decided to resign and continue her study. The position was then replaced by Redsoul Eqqy, a member who is new in coordinating community activities. Eqqy admits that she learned a lot from VG especially in performing her new tasks. She was trained by VG to become a coordinator of LeTo. In many activities related to lesbians and women, VG always sends Eqqy to represent the organization. “Before attending these meetings, VG’s staff members provide instant training on needed skills such as how to perform as a good leader and how to position one’s self in a forum or a meeting”, she explained. VG also continuously conducts educational activities involving LeTo. Not only Eqqy, but everyone at LeTo is given equal opportunities. They are expected to someday be able to stand on their own, just like the other members of VG and PSA. Today, VG has become a “parent” for the LGBT community in Aceh. It helps protect community members and provides training and legal advice, including discussions on security measures and what are considered as unfriendly in Aceh for LGBT communities. PSA and LeTo wished that VG will remain to be a “home” for LGBT in Aceh, a home where every issue and problem faced by LGBT is discussed and resolved together.
  17. 17. 7| 128 MY ENEMY, MY ALLY T he full moon brightens Bandar Lampung that night. The sky was clear and stars were clearly visible. In a corner of the city, at the Pasar Tengah area, commonly called “Pasteng”, Asri Wijaya, who is often called “Oca”, is preparing herself to go out. At 11 pm, this 23-year old transgender puts on her accessories, red shoes, and a tight short dress that ends above her knee. Red lipstick is smeared on her lips to match her shoes. By the end of 2010, it has been eight years for Oca being in sex work. She would often find customers easily at Pasteng. For her, the “Satuan Polisi Pamong Praja” (SATPOL PP) siren is an unwelcome sound. “If I was hanging around Pasteng in the past, I had to be ready to be arrested by SATPOL PP. I ran away… because if I get caught by them, they would order me to do unpleasant things such as getting “sometimes we have to perform oral sex in front of the officers… it breaks my heart”, she said. Gaya Lentera Muda (GAYLAM) — Lampung
  18. 18. 8| 128 naked, kissing other transgenders, and sometimes we have to perform oral sex in front of the other officers… it breaks my heart”, she said. That was Oca’s bitter life experience which she had to go through to earn some money. The negative experiences are now in the past. Nowadays, it is all over and there is no more violent raids, according to Oca. She can peacefully continue her trade because SATPOL PP raids aren’t violent as it used to be. SATPOL PP are now able to appreciate transgender people as human being. The SATPOL PP’s policy towards transgenders has also changed. This makes Oca and her friends smile. Currently, SATPOL PP no longer conduct raids targeting transgenders who carry condoms. Now, they go after transgenders who don’t carry any condoms with them. SATPOL PP’s policy change has led to lesser violent behaviors towards the transgender community in the area. The current policy aims to support safer sexual behaviors- from risky sexual behaviors which they have become accustomed to, into “no-risk behaviors”. From not knowing into becoming aware of his or her HIV/AIDS status, especially among members of the “Gay, Waria dan Lelaki Sex Lelaki” (GWL) community. This policy change happened primarily due to the hard work of “GAYA LANTERA MUDA LAMPUNG” (GayLam), a GWL community organization that provides support and help to community members in Lampung. GayLam had no programs at the beginning. They just work with the National Aids Commission (KPA) Lampung province and not with other stakeholders. As time went by, GayLam has improved. Their membership has increased and so did their knowledge. Until finally, GayLam joined GWL-INA and developed more partnerships. From this point on, GayLam became more active. Hence, more opportunities were made available to them. GWL-INA provided the group access to trainings conducted with the help of the ISEAN-Hivos Program. GayLam was given an opportunity to receive new knowledge and skills, one of them is on Strategic Planning. This training changed the paradigm of GayLam personnel towards being more open minded. GayLam currently has a strategic plan and a work program for its activities. These include information dissemination, provision of information on Sexually Transmitted Infections (STI) and HIV-AIDS, outreach and assistance. They also provide referrals for STI service provision, Voluntary Counseling and Testing/HIV test counseling (VCT) referral and services, and working with organizations (national and international). These groups Gaylam distributes condom for TG community
  19. 19. 9| 128 include the GWL-INA and other development groups in each district/city in the province of Lampung. They also implement the SMS Gateway Service Hotline Program, Case Management Services, Assistance Group Training (Peer Educator), Facebook Program (Gay Lampung) and Facebook group (Gay and other MSM in Lampung). Moreover, they conduct condom distribution and development of Information Education Communication Media, Sport entertainment and Edutainment, Capacity building, Fundraising, and organize events. Particularly in their advocacy program, GayLam collaborates with GWL-INA, KPA Lampung province and the district/city government. GayLam advocates for health-related initiatives, such as friendly transgender health services, VCT and ARV examination. In addition, the group provides advocacy to key organizations such as SATPOL PP to improve the welfare of affected communities. Advocacy and networking activities will not be maximized without the awareness of the community to practice low risk sexual behaviors. From the various activities that GayLam does, its impact can be felt by friends at community. Jenita, a transgender who likes to hang out at the Pasteng hotspot revealed that the presence of GayLam makes transgender people feel comfortable. Jenita said “Now I feel safe hanging out here because the SATPOL PP only accosts transgenders who do not carry condoms and I feel happy because I can now be more secure when “selling” because I would never do sex without a condom “No Sex, No Condom”. I am often engaged by GayLam in activities such as HIV and AIDS discussion meetings. With the presence of GayLam, our access to health care facilities is very easy. If I inform the Simpur clinic that I am from GayLam community, access for health service becomes more open for me”. Advocacy programs will be continued by GayLam. These are envisioned to encourage the community to fight for their needs, as well as combating stigma and discrimination. GayLam continues to make progress internally and externally to maintain good relations with all parties. The group will work towards developing more “high-flying wings” to be able to help more people in need of GayLam. Now, GayLam organization has more friends and supporters. GayLam now has human resources that can be relied on for “Lampung GWL Empowerment”. This way GWL Lampung will become more efficient and useful. Gaylam outreach workers and city council officer Acronym: SATPOL PP (Satuan Polisi Pamong Praja) — n Lampung City Council Police
  20. 20. 10| 128 T he way gay and transgender communities are recognized in Banyuwangi district today is very different from the way things were ten years ago. ”This all began with the arts”, said Subari Sofyan (50 years old), a gay man who is also a cultural observer. Subari, a Gaya Laros member and one of the gay and transgender Banyuwangi community figures, sees that Banyuwangi Ethno Carnival (BEC) as an opportunity to improve the level of recognition of the local gay and transgender community. BEC is the highlight of the district’s rich traditions and art culture. Subari began to involve Gaya Lare Osing (Gaya Laros) and Ikatan Waria Banyuwangi (IWABA) members to participate in BEC performing arts or in other events as Arts Ambassadors representing the area. Gradually, the local government started to recognize the work of the members of Gaya Laros and IWABA. The groups were also able to gain some recognition at the national and “I always come to the show wherever it may be. I want to be involved in the arts. ” FABULOUS DRAG, EXISTENCE THROUGH ART AND CULTURE Gaya Lare Osing (Gaya Laros) — Banyuwangi
  21. 21. 11| 128 international levels. Gaya Laros and IWABA are community-based organizations (CBOs) which aim to increase community understanding of sexual health for the gay, transgender, and male-sex-with-men (GWL) communities. The CBOs were established around 1996, with programs to conduct outreach and mentoring on HIV/AIDS for gay and transgender community members. They also provide discussions on Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs), and conduct edutainment activities. Gaya Laros initially stands as a collective community. However, the increase of HIV and AIDS cases, an issue that affects the GWL in Banyuwangi encouraged the organization to be more active in this area. Based on Banyuwangi Health Office’s data, as of March 2012, the total number of patients with HIV/AIDS recorded were around 1,400. Included in this number are groups of gays and transgenders. Using art as an entry point, Subari showed his concern in relation to the HIV problem that affects the community. He also helped to fund activities on edutainment advocacy and participate in International AIDS Day commemoration activities. He also sponsored gay and transgender individuals who received invitations for shows locally and abroad. A very significant change for the Gaya Laros and IWABA community is the increase of the level of their economic empowerment and self-actualization. “I always come and attend the show wherever it is held… my self existence and my creativity are being developed through my involvement in the arts” said Dede, a 22-year-old gay person and a member of Gaya Laros. Additionally, Rendra Tirtana, also known as Ocha, a 25-year-old transgender became part of the Banyuwangi Tourisms Office’s artistic team. They help prepare and coordinate cultural shows for the district. Through art, gay and transgender community members became closer to the regional governments. In addition, part of their revenue from costume-making, are set aside to support social missions that prioritize gay and transgender individuals who are infected with HIV and AIDS in Banyuwangi. NGOs such as Gaya Laros and IWABA regularly participate in the annual dance festival. They often get a big round of applause from the audience because of their performance. Their appearance is not inferior to the other participants who are mostly women. They also often won dance festivals both at the district and the provincial levels. One such achievement is being the national champion of the dance festival in 2011 through their Gandrung Marsan dance performance. They are often invited as a featured performer in many other important events. Apart from the variety shows at local level, Gaya Laros gets more opportunities to perform in a variety of state activities. One of these is the Independence Day celebrations at the Presidential Palace, in which they have performed for two years in a row. “This is a reward for us because this shows that GWL groups can have a meaningful existence and contribute well to the benefit of other community members”, said Subari. *** This all began with the arts”, said Subari Sofyan. “
  22. 22. 12| 128 F or Titin, the Blambangan hospital is like a second workplace. Titin, is a 33 year old transgender person who is also a make-up artist. She often visited this health care center. She also dedicatedly accompanied her friends to the clinic and assisted them to get medical services. “I have become close friends with the doctors and nurses here,” said Titin. If we look back at her condition before 1996, Titin’s close relationship with healthcare provider at that hospital was very much different, “Back in the old days, I could barely receive decent service from them. The doctor would refuse to even just give her a health check-up. They would often prescribe medications without a proper diagnosis. The truth was, I only wanted to know what has caused my illness,” she said. Another story was shared by Lalu, a gay guy who is also a friend of Titin’s. Lalu recalls that things nowadays have changed compared to the way things were in 1996. During that time, gay and TG community members didn't get much Prior to 1996, the gay and TG community didn't get any attention from the Department of Health and PHC. Gaya Laros and Banyuwangi Aids Commission advocate for gay and TG’s health services in Banyuwangi. GAYA LAROS Gaya Lare Osing (Gaya Laros) — Banyuwangi
  23. 23. 13| 128 attention from the Department of Health and PHC. Gaya Laros and Banyuwangi Aids Commission advocated for gay and TG’s health services in the district of Banyuwangi. Titin and Lalu are both volunteers at Gaya Laros, an organization focusing on health issues, particularly on HIV and AIDS. There are several other Community Based Organizations in Banyuwangi, including IWABA (Ikatan Waria Banyuwangi). Gaya Laros and Iwaba are the two main organizations where gay and TG individuals in the locality are gathered under one umbrella. They are actively involved in many social activities, including HIV prevention in the Banyuwangi Regency. Every year, the number of PLHIVs living in Banyuwangi is increasing. According to data from the Department of Health of Banyuwangi, up to March 2012, the number of HIV and AIDS cases had reached 1,400, some of them are gays and TGs. To help further enhance their work on gay and TG community in areas such as networking, Gaya Laros became a member of GWL-INA, Indonesia’s national network of organizations working with MSM and TG communities. As a follow up to the strategic planning leadership and training conducted by GWL-INA and the ISEAN-HIVOS Program which they attended, Gaya Laros members also held a discussion on STI, HIV and AIDS among their members and other individuals By conducting such activity, they hope that members of their local gay and TG community could become more aware and educated on the topic. Being aware, they would know how to live a healthy life without HIV and STI infections which previously they would simply ignore They wished that such socialization activities won’t stop here. It is expected that the discussion will continue in other districts and remote areas to support the wider gay and TG community. As an outcome of the discussions, Gaya Laros agreed to facilitate a mobile VCT and provide STI tests. They also formed a group of peer educators (PEs) and volunteers in several regions in Banyuwangi. Gaya Laros hopes that in the future. there will be a healthy and dynamic social environment for LGBTs in Banyuwangi. ..., Gaya Laros agreed to facilitate mobile VCT, provide STI test and forming group of peer educator (PE) and volunteer in several regions in Banyuwangi.” “
  24. 24. 14| 128 The expensive cost of medical treatment makes her desperate. “I’m better off dead rather than living like this” My Second Family Himpunan Waria Batam (HIWABA) — Batam Y osi has been living in the dark for three months. She is a 40 years old transgender, who has a negative view of the world. This started when she developed blindness due to a toxoplasmosis infection that affected her eyes. “It’s like being at the edge of death” according to Yosi. The expensive cost of medical treatment makes her desperate. “I’m better off dead rather than living like this”, she said. Yosi comes from Lampung, but she has been plying the trade as a sex worker in Jakarta since 1993. She also went to Batam in 1996, but her main goal was to work in Malaysia. Being stubborn and independent, she initially thought that the organization HIMPUNAN WARIA BATAM (HIWABA) was of no significance to her. Yosi described herself as a wanderer who lives by a “live alone, die alone” principle. By
  25. 25. 15| 128 June, 2012, she suddenly fell ill. Yosi developed fever, diarrhea, as well as candidiasis in her mouth. She decided to get treatment, but nothing can seem to cure her at that time. Around August of that year, word spread among the transgender community that a certain transgender named Yosi has fallen very ill. After seeking her consent, the HIWABA management visited Yosi to talk to her and find out more about her illness. Yosi shared with them that she suffers from a bad stomach disorder. She already received treatments from everywhere but nothing seemed to work. Seeing how bad Yosi’s condition is, the HIWABA management gave her the contact number of a counselor. They also provided her the contact of HIWABA’s HIV case manager whom she can call in case she decides to have a medical check-up or tests for STIs and HIV. On her own initiative, Yosi contacted the HIWABA recommended counselor and the HIV case manager. She took an HIV antibody test, which came back with a reactive result. Yosi found out that she is HIV-positive with a CD4 count of only 16. This was way below normal values. Because of this, the doctor recommended Yosi to immediately start taking antiretroviral medications (ARV) to suppress the virus inside her body and help her get better . Two months after Yosi started taking ARV, she developed a toxoplasmosis co-infection which can cause blindness. This situation required the HIWABA case manager to bring Yosi to an ophthalmologist. The doctor only gave her two options for treatment. Either Yosi had to raise her CD4 level up to 250 in 1 month and if she cannot do it, then she should undergo an injectable eye treatment which was only available at the Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital in Jakarta. This treatment would be too expensive for Yosi. However, HIWABA knows that there is a possible funding from her social health insurance. This Jamkesos support isn’t easy to get. HIWABA had to advocate to the Department of Health (DoH) and Department of Social Welfare (DoSW), to be able to get support from JAMKESMAS (to cover the medical expense) and JAMKESDA (to cover the transport and accommodation) for Yosi’s treatment. HIWABA spent more than a month to coordinate and prepare everything. After being unnecessarily made to go back and forth or getting “ping-ponged” by the DoH and DoSW, HIWABA was finally able to get the needed approvals and support from JAMKESMAS and JAMKESDA. When the time to go to Jakarta came, one of the HIWABA staff, Angel Nasution, accompanied Yosi. After four months of treatment, Yosi was slowly able to improve her vision. She started to differentiate colors and regained more control of her life.. Assisting people in need like Yosi is one of the reasons why HIWABA was Hiwaba had to advocate Department of Health (DOH) and Department of Social Welfare (DoSW), in order to get support from JAMKESMAS (to cover the medical expense) and JAMKESDA (to cover the transport and accommodation) for Yosi’s treatment.” “
  26. 26. 16| 128 established. There are several transgender persons other than Yosi who were also assisted by the organization to access good healthcare. HIWABA was formally established in 2005, through the initiative of Angel (Nikmattua Nasution), Bela (Deaxel Sibarani), Ida Rusdi (Rusdi Harahap), Ling Bareta (Ecok). It was approved by the Notary two years later. Based on the 2012 mapping results, there are 536 transgender persons in Batam. The 2012 estimation also indicated that there are around 140 transgenders who are living with HIV. As of March 2013, records indicate that there are 200 transgenders in Batam and 70 of them were projected to be living with HIV. From the above data, it can be concluded that the numbers of transgender persons living with HIV are increasing. Overall, HIV has infected nearly 35% of the local transgender population. There were many transgender people who went to Malaysia and Singapore for work. But after some time, they were either deported due to being infected by HIV or decided to come home on their own because of illness. This means that Interventions are needed to promote prevention of HIV among these at-risk populations. There is similar case which happened to a member of the transgender community in Batam. 20 years old Puspa, a transgender person from Java was referred to the Budi Kemuliaan Hospital with a positive HIV status. Puspa, who was very thin at 38 kg, had a CD4 count of only 195 and weight only 38 kg, felt hopeless, because she does not have the local identification card (like in the case of many transgenders in Indonesia), Puspa cannot receive free health care services and treatment from the government. “The medical cost is expensive, and this discourages me from going to the hospital and getting treated”, said Puspa. HIWABA first heard of the case of Puspa after finding out from the TG community that there was a young transgender who was very sick but nevertheless got evicted out of her living space because she was not able to pay her rent. HIWABA’s members arranged for her to be able to have temporary shelter. Aside from this, HIWABA brought Puspa to Budi Kemuliaan Hospital as soon as possible as her condition was getting worse. HIWABA acted as a guarantor so that Puspa can obtain the necessary health care. When HIWABA found out that Puspa doesn’t have a local ID card, HIWABA tried to ask for a domicile letter in order to get free health care from JAMKESMAS for Puspa. After trying for some time, the Seraya Atas Neighborhood Association was finally willing to give Puspa the letter. With the residency letter on hand, HIWABA advocated to DoSW for JAMKESMAS and follow up on Puspa’s discontinued treatment and care. Hearing news that there was a young transgender who is terribly ill and evicted from her place because she cannot afford the rent, HIWABA decided to move Puspa to one of HIWABA’s members residence in order to give her temporary protection and shelter.” “
  27. 27. 17| 128 After three months, Puspa is finally healthy. Through HIWABA’s interventions, Puspa slowly regained her weight. Her CD4 count also increased to 270 which was a better figure than before. Aside from these, HIWABA helped find a job for Puspa at a local restaurant. She started to resume her normal activities and regained a more positive outlook in life. Yosi and Puspa are just two of the many transgender people whose lives have been touched by HIWABA and its members. A similar story than can be told is about two friends named Evi bule (39 years old) and Rachel (37 years old). Both of them are transgender persons from South Tapanuli, North Sumatera. Both suffered from a stroke which caused paralysis in half of their bodies. Both of them are also HIV- positive with very low CD4 counts. HIWABA first found out about Evi Bule and Rachel after they were suddenly sent home from Malaysia due to their illness. On the day of their arrival back in Indonesia, members of HIWABA picked them up at the Batam Center Port. Evi Bukle and Rachel were then brought to the house of one of HIWABA’s members where they temporarily stayed. HIWABA once again encountered a situation where a very ill TG patient did not have a local ID card. This made it hard for them to get free health care. Nevertheless, some of the HIWABA members gave donations so Evi Bule and Rachel could be taken to the hospital and get the treatments they needed. Because both of them were not HIWABA members, there were other members who initially objected to the idea of giving aid to non members. They thought that other transgenders who are not members were not supposed to be their burden. However, other members continued giving voluntary donations. This encouraged HIBAWA staff to immediately take Evi and Rachel to the hospital. Like in the case of Yosi and Puspa, HIWABA advocated to DoSW to getting the JAMKESMAS (government medical insurance) facilities for Evi and Rachel under the status of displaced patients, so they could undergo treatment and medication. Luckily, the process that HIWABA went through to get the needed documents for the two was faster than before, In less than one week, Evi bule and Rachel have received their JAMKESMAS documents. Within three months of treatment, they recovered fully and went back to their usual routines. Aside from providing advocacy services, HIWABA members are also actively building networks across Indonesia. HIWABA was involved in the Indonesian national network such as GWL-INA since 2009. Furthermore, since 2012, HIWABA began to participate in the capacity building activities organized by GWL-INA and ISEAN-HIVOS. “This involvement has great influence on HIWABA to have a more effective This involvement has great impact on HIWABA to have a more well- organized organization structure and more division are also formed”, said Ade Lodni, HIWABA Chairman. “
  28. 28. 18| 128 organizational structure. More work divisions were also formed within the organization” , said Ade Lodni, the Chair of HIBAWA. HIWABA’s increasing work divisions were eventually able to reach out to more and more transgender members in Batam. Being better coordinated with an efficient organizational structure, more new members were enticed to join HIBAWA. Eventually, HIBAWA became an organization that has a strong and credible reputation. It has become is widely recognized in their area and acknowledged not only by the transgender communities but the local government, as well. Joining capacity building activities has improved HIWABA’s ability to advocate with partners and to empower transgenders in Batam. This also helps the TG community have a more accepted presence in their locales. HIWABA strives to focus on the advocacy services. In places where there are a lot of transgenders who cannot access medical care. HIWABA works towards promoting access to such healthcare services. After attending advocacy and networking trainings, HIWABA is getting stronger in coordinating with other agencies such as DoH, DoSW, Local AIDS Commission, and YGB especially in activities related to prevent HIV/AIDS. HIWABA continued developing its work programs, one of which is the health program. Other areas developed was in the terms of advocacy and collaboration which is manifested in an MoU (Memorandum of Understanding) between Forum LSM Peduli HIV dan AIDS (with HIWABA as one of the members) and the City Health Department for HIV and STI’s check up. As for the CST, HIWABA made a deal with the State Social Service to be able to provide hospital services to displaced patients. Those MoUs and special agreements have been communicated to HIWABA members, so they can themselves feel comfortable in accessing health services, if needed. HIWABA also conducted informal discussions with health workers at the Community Health Center related to transgender concerns, including how to better provide health care services to this group. The group also held joint activities with the DoH in cooperation with YGB for their outreach and mentoring programs. VCT and CST programs were also implemented in cooperation with Budi Kemuliaan Hospital, while STIs and VCT programs were done in cooperation with DoSW through Lubuk Baja primary healthcare service provider. For condom purchase subsidies, HIWABA cooperates with the Local AIDS Commission in Batam. ”The Department of Social Welfare is already cooperating with Jamsostek while the Department of Health cooperates with JAMKESDA”, said Angel. In the future, HIWABA expects more transgender persons in Batam to join the organization so their voices as individuals and as a group can be better heard, They also aim to improve their group solidarity and be more organized in their activities. HIWABA also expects significant support and cooperation with partner agencies to ensure that transgender’s health rights are protected and their health further improved.
  29. 29. 19| 128 SWEET TWINKS TWENTIES GWLmuda — Jakarta It’s easier for me to find friends via “manjam” in Jakarta D on’t always assume the negative impact of using internet-based media. Indeed, Internet becomes a challenge for mobilizing young people in Indonesia. In 2011, the number of Internet users in Indonesia is dominated by 64 % young people aged 15-19 years old. Then how is the situation for GWL youth group in Indonesia? I was discussing it with a gay friend through social networking named Ridwan. I asked, “What impact do you feel the most with Internet technology?, especially associated with Gays”. He answered, “ The most dominant impact is, it’s easier to get information, all kind of information. It’s easier for us to find sexual partners. This is the impact for people like us”. Ridwan, a 21-year-old gay, comes from Bontang and currently lives in Jakarta for college. Ridwan said, although Internet technology has also been widely used in Bontang, it’s still easier to get a sexual partner in Jakarta using this kind of
  30. 30. 20| 128 technology. ”It’s easier for me to find friends via “manjam” in Jakarta rather in Bontang, because there is a lot more people who use “manjam” in Jakarta”, said Ridwan. On the other hand, it is something to be worried about after seeing the HIV case data in the youth GWL population. HIV prevalence among gay youth group aged 20-24 years is about 5%, 14% in the group of transgender adolescents, 22% for gonorrhea prevalence in adolescent group, and 34 % in the transgender youth group with same ages. Outreach workers had reached only 35% of these gay adolescent groups. These numbers represents the lowest percentage when compared with other adolescent groups population with same age.1 These challenges made GWLmuda to start an initiative to create an information infrastructure that is intended for adolescents in Indonesia, mainly large cities using internet-based media technology. This kind of infrastructure is intended to provide comprehensive information for GWL adolescent related with being healthy behavior and body development. In early 2012, the infrastructure was made and named Brondongmanis: a website infrastructure that integrates with popular social media. It uses fun approach and friendly contents for GWL adolescent to waive its scary disease-based approach and makes them reluctant to read it. Not long after the infrastructure was made, GWLmuda had an opportunity to attend a workshop and consultation in developing Urban Centered BCC Regional Strategy for GWL in the South East Asia nations organized by ISEAN-Hivos Program in June 2012. The meeting output produced a strategic framework document for GWLmuda input on strengthening the ICT communication infrastructure, especially in developing effective content and messages for GWL adolescent group in Indonesia. In the past year, over 12,000 unique visitors have visited Brondongmanis2 and were followed by more than 3,000 subscribers3 every day through social media. Brondongmanis become one of the favorite media and website recommended by online gay community4 in 2012. I interviewed a Brondongmanis loyal visitor to find out his reason to access it. “Finally there is a website with “bahasa” language for gays that contains not merely nude photos but also informative content which is needed”, said Zeffa, a Brondongmanis loyal visitor who always follow its development through social media. Zeffa, usually called Zeff is a 21-year-old teenager who is very active commenting and providing input for Brondongmanis infrastructure strengthening. 1 UNICEF Secondary Analysis Disaggregated Data for Most at Risk young people – 2009 2 Google Analytic 3 Facebook pages and Twitter analytic 4 @GayIndonesia is the biggest social media for gay community in Indonesia
  31. 31. 21| 128 Unlike Zeff, Radhit, another young MSM, feels that the existence of Brondongmanis is helpful because he could get friendly recommendations regarding health. ”At that time, I read a reference about Procare clinic written on the Brondongmanis website. The reference really fits with what I was looking for, so I went there”, said Radhit via telephone interview. I even had the opportunity having a discussion with Touchemagz owner, a media partner of Brondongmanis. He expressed his happiness because there is now an alternative media for LGBT, especially young gay persons that is not focused on pornographic content. On that occasion I also asked the reason why he wants to be a Brondongmanis partner. His answer really gave a very critical point, “Ultimately, we want to see a change, not only being the most accessible website. It is important to have a collaboration with partners who has the same goal”, he replied. Both Zeffa and Radhit have the same expectations to popularize Brondongmanis, and involve more youth participation in its development strategy. Zeffa who often provides critical input for Brondongmanis, provides inputs on how important their participation would be by giving a sense of ownership for the community
  32. 32. 22| 128 “Through this activity GWL Kawanua provides empowerment and considerable benefits for the crowned queen, prince and finalists of the PPR Beauty Pageant” The Condom Ambassador GWL Kawanua — Manado T iara Vanessa Quiin, is a transgender person with Bachelor’s degree in Engineering who was crowned as the Queen of GWL Kawanua 2010. Tiara is well known among the members of GWL Kawanua community in North Sulawesi. Her achievements have inspired her other TG friends. But of course, having getting those achievements was not easy. “It needs hard work and loyalty to the organization,” said Cris Roy, Chairman of GWL Kawanua The selection of Tiara as the Queen of GWL Kawanua was due to her artistic talent in dancing as well as her very good public speaking skills. With those talents, Tiara always felt confident. She recalled that it was in mid-2010 when she received information about the King and Queen of GWL Kawanua Pageant (PPR). With no hesitation, Tiara registered for the contest. GWL Kawanua is the organizing committee of the PPR. It was founded in 16th November 2009. It’s inauguration was a big event, attended by community representatives from several cities in
  33. 33. 23| 128 North Sulawesi. Representatives from GWL-INA, the national network of MSM and TG organizations in Indonesia were also present. The GWL Kawanua’s elected board members include among others. Cris Lengkong Roy (Chairman), Feybi (vice chairman), Samuel Rompas (Secretary) and Indra (Treasurer). "A year after being formed, GWL Kawanua held the PPR in 2010 for the first time," said Cris The PPR pageant garnered a lot of positive responses from others, including friends from the gay, transgender and MSM community. Each year, the PPR has continuously improved in terms of the quantity and quality of its participants, materials for selection, and many other aspects. On its 3rd year (2012), the PPR event had a total of 54 participants. 16 finalists were selected for the drag (Queen) category and 8 finalists for the gay/MSM (Prince) category. This was an improvement since in its previous year, only 27 people registered as pageant candidates. The GWL Kawanua PPR includes activities other than the main pageant event itself. As Tiara shared, the events were held across three days wherein they were “quarantined” at a local hotel. On the first day, there was a training on important topics such as HIV, AIDS, STI, Condoms, health services and addressing stigma, discrimination among the GWL community. The training was held by representatives from the North Sulawesi AIDS Commission. Subsequently, the training was followed by sessions on improving general knowledge as well as beauty-related topics as many members are in the beauty profession and working in saloons. All materials and resources were supported by the sponsors. On Day 2, a talent show was held at the Manado Trade Center. There was an overwhelming positive response from the people of North Sulawesi who attended. They enjoyed witnessing the talent presentation of the PPR candidates. To help in the overall judging process, the talent event was followed by an interview to know more about the candidates’ knowledge on important topics . Day 3 was the highlight of the PPR Beauty Pageant . The main event was opened by no less than the Governor of North Sulawesi, Sinyo Harry Sarundayang. This is a matter of pride for the local GWL community because his presence sent the message that GWL communities and their contributions are also acknowledged by the government of North Sulawesi. Approximately 400 people from the GWL community and invited guests were in attendance to witness the final pageant of the PPR. The competition on stage was very stiff. The judges had a hard time in determining the winners. After a long process, Ms. Tiara Vanessa Quiin was crowned as Queen of GWL Kawanua. Mr. Davin Laluyan was also crowned as the Prince of GWL Kawanua. A year after being formed, GWL Kawanua held PPR in 2010 for the first time,” said Chris. “
  34. 34. 24| 128 According to Tiara and Davin, fulfilling their role as reigning Queen and Prince of GWL Kawanua respectively was not easy. This is because they were, by default, also given another title and responsibility as the HIV-AIDS ambassadors of North Sulawesi. They were expected to deliver correct information about HIV, AIDS, STIs, condoms and health services to others in the community. "This role was a challenge for me," said Tiara. Through this PPR activity, GWL Kawanua provides empowerment and considerable benefits for the crowned Queen, Prince and finalists of PPR. The form of empowerment given is the opportunity to attend the Peer Educators’ Training for HIV and AIDS, Field Officers’ Training and a variety of other trainings both at provincial and national levels. These trainings were not only in the area of HIV and AIDS, but also in other areas such as psychosocial training on the concept of self-knowledge. “After participating in this training, communities are more open and confident about their sexual orientation, sexuality and gender identity. In addition, they also became more aware of existing laws, especially those related to Human Rights" said Cris. As the Prince and Queen, Tiara and Davin served for one year to provide counseling on HIV and AIDS to others, as well as representing GWL Kawanua in events. Education is indeed, the main activity of this organization. In addition to the gay, transgender and MSM communities, GWL Kawanua also provides counseling to the general public. "We conduct outreach activities every day," said Tiara, who also served as a coordinator for Peer Educators. Meetings with government agencies such as Social Department and Health Department, and even with the Department of Tourism were also undertaken by GWL Kawanua for advocacy purposes. GWL Kawanua held advocacy meetings to facilitate further collaboration between the community and government agencies. Cris said that, in addition to establishing relationships with government agencies, GWL Kawanua also conducts regular advocacy and outreach within the community. The organization’s goal is to increase awareness and understanding of HIV, AIDS, STIs, condom use, and positive behavioral changes. By far, their advocacy within the community has been successful. Evidently, the increase in awareness among MSMs and TGs to check their own health through Voluntary Counseling and Testing (VCT) indicates that they have developed a heightened level of knowledge on
  35. 35. 25| 128 infection control and prevention of HIV and STIs. "As such, those who are at risk will be able to protect themselves and their partners," he said. As they shared earlier. Davin and Tiara carried a huge responsibility as the crowned Prince and Queen for that year. “GWL Kawanua will act decisively in case the Prince and the Queen did not perform tasks that have been set by the board for the duration of their assignment. If they do not carry out their responsibilities as directed, the board has the right to revoke their titles”, they commented. This shows that the PPR is more than just a beauty contest. There is an important social mission that must be carried out by the selected ambassadors/winners. This is one reason why the PPR is well recognized by community, local government and in general, by the people of North Sulawesi. "The success of crowning the Prince and Queen of GWL Kawanua has been widely recognized in North Sulawesi," said Rhey, the Committee Chairman of PPR in 2012. In addition to the selection of the Prince and the Queen, a number of other programs are also being implemented by GWL Kawanua. For example, GWL Kawanua partners and networks with the AIDS Commission (KPA) in three districts, namely Manado, Bitung and Tomohon in North Sulawesi for HIV and AIDS prevention, care and support. GWL Kawanua is also actively involved in the activities undertaken by GWL-INA since 2009. Through this national network of Gay, MSM and Transgenders, GWL Kawanua finally started to take part in various activities organized by the ISEAN-HIVOS Program. ISEAN-HIVOS organizes various training programs to improve the capacity and quality of community-based organizations particularly the gay community, transgenders and other MSMs. “The first capacity building training attended by GWL Kawanua is CBO mobilization training, where we truly felt a positive impact on the development and organizational structure of GWL Kawanua”, said Tiara.. Tiara, as the Queen of GWL Kawanua, actively participated in the training. According to her, the training is not only beneficial to the organization, but also for her personally. After attending a series of training and courses held by ISEAN - HIVOS and GWLmuda in 2012 Tiara initiated the establishment of GWLmuda Kawanua. This is a group focused on young MSMs and transgender people in North Sulawesi. This idea was well received by the Board of GWL Kawanua GWL and communities in North Sulawesi. GWLmuda Kawanua is expected to be a forum for responsible, dedicated and knowledgeable young transgenders and gays who would be the “next-in- line” or successors to GWL Kawanua, and carry out the tradition of “beauty with a purpose”.
  36. 36. 26| 128 “ Be like metals…we are like brass turned into gold”, said Sasha Rhamdani, a healthcare advocate in Kuningan Regency. The speaker is a 30 year old transgender person who knows a lot about HIV and AIDS. She can explain many HIV-related topics from the challenge of the epidemic to the response of various groups. Sasha, as everyone who knows her calls her , is a not certified health care worker like doctor. She is, in fact, a TG activist. Everyday she goes to different places to provide information about HIV and other health issues. “At first I know nothing, but after attending several trainings, I had become aware and well informed about HIV and AIDS, I can now share the knowledge to my TG friends, as well”, said Sasha. “Be like metals...we are like brass turned into gold” From Brass to Gold Srikandi Pasundan — Bandung
  37. 37. 27| 128 Sasha is just one out of the many TGs trained by Srikandi Pasundan (SP). SP has provided trainings to many TGs in West Java. Through their capacity building program, individuals participate in activities to help them develop a deeper social concern for the community. In addition, they are also equipped with various knowledge and skills, one of which is on HIV and AIDS. SP has carried out its activities since 2005 and has since gained support from various groups and individuals parties. One of the factors that supported the achievements of the organization is the leadership trainings conducted by the ISEAN-HIVOS Program through GWL-INA. This activity has led to the better provision of trainings for more and more local TG groups and individuals. The biggest challenge faced by the organization is how to further develop in each individual a strong sense of social responsibility towards the community. But these challenges can be addressed gradually. “The concerns and issues among the TGs are increasing”, said Riri Wirayadi, Chairman of Srikandi Pasundan Apart from Sasha, there are several other TGs who are actively contributing to the community in their own locales. For example, Farah, a 34 years old TG, served as an extension agent in Bandung. The same is true for Bugi Lesmana (42 years old) who was also an extension agent (volunteer) in Cimahi and Odah Saodah (44 years old) who held a similar post in West Bandung. They, as well as many others, are examples of individuals who were trained by Srikandi Pasundan. They are now utilizing in various ways, the knowledge that they have acquired, to benefit their communities. For most TG community members, the usefulness of the trainings they attended is reflected in their own increased level of self-confidence. “SP has helped me a lot. Now I am more independent and confident,” said Farah, one of its members. The increase of knowledge and the self-confidence to talk in front of the public are perceived by them to be particularly important benefits. “At first I was not confident talk in public. Today, it’s a piece of cake,” said Odah. The overall positive impact is not only felt by the TGs alone. This is also felt by the organizations and agencies that work with SP. “SP is very helpful in reinforcing insightful knowledge and promoting the commitment of TGs in running programs particularly in Indramayu”, said Kristiyanti, Program Manager of National AIDS Commission of Indramayu district. A similar sentiment was expressed also by Asep Susan Sonjaya, Program Manager of AIDS Commission in Kuningan. He explained that the presence of the SP outreach workers is very helpful. They make his work in mobilizing the community and carrying out activities much easier. This activities of SP are expected to continue for years to come. The organization aims to develop more advocates who are compassionate, independent and beautifully confident.
  38. 38. 28| 128 O ky seems happier now days. Loads of activities such as accompanying transgenders to the clinic, helping to get medicines at the hospital, and checking transgender health conditions keeps her busy everyday. “It has been one year for me being busy helping my friends”, said the 35 years old transgender. Oky’s condition is very different three years ago. In early 2011, this transgender person from Medan health was in a very bad shape. She was weak and unable to walk. Accompanied by a friend, she went to the KEBAYA secretariat, a transgender organization at Gowongan Lor Region, Yogyakarta. Oky’s tragic story is just one example from the many transgender immigrants who access health care services through KEBAYA. They contacted KEBAYA because “I was treated at the shelter when I got the information on how to independently access the healthcare services, and I spread this information to other friends.” SHELTER OF HOPE Keluarga Besar Waria Yogyakarta (KEBAYA) — Yogyakarta
  39. 39. 29| 128 this organization has been working with the Executive Agency for Social Health Insurance (BAPEL JAMKESOS) since 2007. The cooperation was achieved by KEBAYA’s efforts to provide local transgender people some convenience. This is in accordance with the organization’s vision, which is to promote the health and empowerment of Yogyakarta’s transgender people. Its mission is to promote improved perspectives, mindsets, and behaviors through organizing advocacy, empowerment and health services with a gender and human rights perspective that is friendly towards transgenders. Before, Yogyakarta’s transgender persons would often experience difficulties with the hospital administration. This negatively affects their health care access. Therefore, KEBAYA initiated a cooperation agreement with BAPEL JAMKESOS, Sardjito Hospital and Yogyakarta Social Service to address the concern. Almost all of Yogyakarta transgender persons access health care using the BAPEL JAMKESOS social health insurance. KEBAYA often helps immigrants like Oky to access transgender-friendly services. Because of KEBAYA, they are able to use the transgender group health insurance in hospital. After that, they can get further treatment at the KEBAYA shelter when needed. Since 2007, 180 transgender persons in Yogyakarta accessed health care using BAPEL JAMKESOS. Of these, 78 received full hospitalization services, and the rest availed outpatient benefit. Among those hospitalized, 12 eventually passed away because they only received information and interventions when they are already at their Stage Four of HIV infection and had very low CD4 counts. A total of 66 trans genders were treated at the KEBAYA home shelter while 36 received treatment at their own place of residents. Based on the records, shelters were needed since transgender people who are affected by the disease may need further treatment to recover after checking out from the hospital. Therefore, KEBAYA attempts to establish more shelters. With support from ISEAN-HIVOS Program, through GWL-INA, members of KEBAYA have participated in trainings on Strategic Planning, Leadership, ICT & conducting Online Surveys. They also acquired knowledge about UNGASS and how to conduct Community Consultations and Mobilization. The members of KEBAYA still continue their mission towards providing services and support for transgenders. “ I was treated at the KEBAYA’s shelter where I got information to independently access health care, and I spread this information to other friends”, said Oky.
  40. 40. 30| 128 F or Andre and most of his fellow gays, getting an HIV test is a frightening experience. Being concerned that they will receive a sero-positive result makes them reluctant to have themselves tested even though an HIV-antibody test is very important for preventive measures and early treatment. "At first I was afraid. Nevertheless, I dared to take the test. After I found out my results, there are many changes in my life that I will pursue, especially in maintaining a better lifestyle and using a condom every time", said Andre. In the waiting room of Rawa Tembaga health center, Bekasi, Andre felt his heart is pounding hard. It was not due to cardiac pain. He’s waiting for the results of his first HIV test. This 30 years old gay man was incredibly worried because he realized that he often did not wear a condom when having sexual intercourse. An hour passed, he received the test result. "NON REACTIVE" ... Andre was relieved. Gaya Patriot — Bekasi
  41. 41. 31| 128 The HIV and STI testing that Andre went through was through a mobile voluntary counseling and testing (VCT) initiated by Gaya Patriot (GP) Bekasi. The program aims to address existing problems in the Gay, TG and MSM community since generally, many community members have difficulty in accessing health services. This activity has been carried out since 2011 and is being conducted four times a year. The main issue for the MSM and TG community in Bekasi is the poor access to services. Even though actually in this city, four service providers are available. There are available services at the Community Health Center (PKM) for STI screening and 17 PKMs provide VCT services. GP helps fellow gay, TG and MSM by providing information on the specific location of the service providers that they can access. GP is a community-based organization for gays and transgender persons which was legitimated by Notary Deed No. 36. GP was initially only engaged in the field of HIV and AIDS in Bekasi but the activities of this organization have now extended as well to the larger issues of Human Rights (HAM), Sexual Health and Reproductive Rights (SRHR) and the capacity building for their staffs and community members. In terms of the need for health services, GP is also working with the National AIDS Commission (KPA) and non-governmental organizations (NGOs) both within and outside Bekasi. It has formed allies and became a member of GWL-INA, the network of MSM and TG CBOs in Indonesia. From the network, GP received many benefits including several trainings on organizational development and related topics. In addition, GP is also endorsed by the AIDS Commission (KPA) and Health Office (PHO) Bekasi. In networking with health office and National AIDS Commission, GP felt the need to further improve its advocacy and networking skills. This was fulfilled after GP became a member of GWL-INA. GP representatives attended the CBO Training for Local Staff on Institutional and Program Development and Strategic Planning which was supported by ISEAN Hivos Global Fund Round 10. In this training, GP learned the ways of improving their organization, formulation of their organization’s vision and mission, developing a strategic plan and conducting a SWOT analysis (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threat) as part of an overall organizational strategic planning initiative. Through this training, GP developed its own 3-year strategic plan. This plan includes activities related to coming up with Memorandums of Understanding (MoUs) with service providers in Bekasi for Sexually Transmitted Infections (STI) testing, voluntary counseling and testing (VCT). The organizational goals include The service was superb! No more bitching towards TG persons accessing services”, Ira Irawati (TG, 27 years old). “
  42. 42. 32| 128 becoming an entry point towards accessing arrangements for services . This was implemented as GP’s agreement for mobile VCT and STI testing for fellow GWLs. The organization runs mobile VCT and STI testing at night. It also suggested improvements towards achieving more friendly health services. The MoU made by GP with PHC Rawa Tembaga, PHC Bantar Gebang and Mitra Sehati clinics aim to provide better and more accessible STI services through mobile VCT clinics for the GWL community. Various positive opinions related to the services were shared by fellow GWLs. These activities also encourage a change towards safer sexual behaviors such as in choosing a partner, and also during sex. They also began to feel more comfortable when accessing the service because the services are GWL friendly. “I today feel more comfortable being in the clinic”, said M. S Ginanjar (Gay, 19 years old) “I just did VCT for the first time, but I experienced comfortable services. They were friendly”, said Hamz (Gay, 23 years old). “The service was superb! No more bitching towards TG persons accessing services”, Ira Irawati (TG, 27 years old)” Positive feedback was also given by the PHC officer towards GWL community. They feel that the GWL community members are extraordinary. “Fellow GWL are smart, and more open in disclosing their personal issues”, said dr. Dedes (Medical Person in Charge at STI & VCT clinic in Rawa Tembaga). Dr. Dedes also added that one significant change resulting from this activity was the increase in the number of other GWLs visiting clinics and receiving tests and treatments. Previously, at most, only 20 people per week came. But with the VCT mobile initiated since April 2013, the number was increased to 47. This information has been disseminated widely by GP to the GWL community in Bekasi through social media network such as Facebook, BBM and local site cruising area. For PHC, the increase in the number of clients encouraged them to provide better services to improve VCT and STI services furthermore. “This is due to the increasing number of HIV cases that needs attention”, said dr. Ellis Z.D.,chief of Rawa Tembaga PHC. I just did VCT for the first time, but I experience comfortable services. They were friendly”, said Hamz (Gay, 23 years old). “
  43. 43. 33| 128 W e often hear of many sad stories from young friends in the LGBT (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender) community. One of those stories is the story of Marlina, a 20 year old lesbian teenager, Marlina, called Indra by her friends, had to leave her family, after they found out that she was lesbian. Indra is young person who was born as a woman but acts like a “tomboy”. She would be often be involved in brawls, consumed alcohol, and would steal money or valuables even from her own family. This has led to her staying away from her family and live a life of an “unstable adolescent”. Also, she does not yet fully understand the concept of gender identity. She would often change sex partners, many of whom do not really understand her being a lesbian. One day, Marlina met a new gay friend “I’m very proud and lucky to be involved …” THE POWER OF YOUTH Gaya Lentera Muda (GAYLAM) — Lampung
  44. 44. 34| 128 named Jefri Aditya who is a member of GayLam community. Jefri also suffered the same fate as her as he has also been outcasted by his family. Indra and Jefri are adolescents who are going through a transition period in there lives. They are experiencing changes in all aspects, among them physically and psychologically. Many of the local LGBT Youth (with ages from 15-24 years) encounter stigma and discrimination because of their having a different gender identity and sexual orientation. Due to the negative reaction of their own families and their communities, many of them live troubled lives as teenagers and have very limited achievements. They also often drop out from school in order to avoid stigma and discrimination from people who refuse to tolerate their being different. Lampung GayLam works with young lesbians, MSMs and other community members. Their involvement with GayLam helps make the local LGBT youth stronger as a community. Gaylam tried to form cadres of youth groups who participate in programs especially targeting younger populations in their locales. To achieve behavior change and healthier lifestyles, Lampung GayLam conducts capacity building activities for the LGBT Youth. These activities help to equip them with skills to become peer educators who will reach out to other young LGBTs, especially in issues related to HIV/AIDS, Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity (SOGI) and LGBT rights. GatyLam’s initatives which Involve GWL teens and adolescents, are expected to enable them to play an important role on these issues. One of these initiatives is a forum called the Lampung LGBT Youth Forum whicj was designed especially for adolescents and young adults This forum aims to empower young LGBTs towards reducing the transmission rate of HIV/AIDS among adolescents. The forum also provides participants with knowledge and better understanding about sexual orientation, gender identities, LGBT rights and other adolescent issues. They also work towards reducing stigma and discrimination against LGBTs in their communities. GayLam is very open to all LGBT community members. Their activities include capacity building on basic HIV/AIDS prevention, including the correct use of condoms. Gender and Sexuality and Human Rights are also discussed. Young LGBTs are involved in training and meetings such as the national level training for young GWL, ToT Peer Educator, Leadership Training and mobilization of young GWL held by GWL-INA and the ISEAN-Hivos Program. “These events were very useful and have a positive impact on the lives of young GWL in Lampung. The hope is for them to become GWL adolescents who can positively contribute to their communities”, according to Indra and Ari. “I’m very proud and feel lucky to be involved in activities held by GayLam. There is a lot of knowledge and perception that I get from the organization that’s why I decided to become one of the staff at GayLam”, said Indra. …, there is a lot of knowledge and perception that I get from the organization and I decided to become one of the staff at GayLam”, said Indra. “
  45. 45. 35| 128 GayLam aims to establish more GayLam partners and help coordinate activities for the lesbian community through a group called Gendhis in Lampung province. “Having Gendhis as a lesbian community makes me feel that I do not live alone as a lesbian. Because of this, I was able to encourage myself to talk to my family that being a lesbian is not a disease. And that lesbians are not “scum” and that I am also entitled to have an equal position in the society the same as others”, said Indra. She added, “ In fact, I am involved in the Bandar Lampung AIDS Commission in coordinating a Mobile Condom Outlet. Also, I was often involved in many national meetings such as National Youth Forum and activities held by Ardhanary”, said Indra. In addition to their activities, GayLam Lampung already has a leadership pool. According to Jefri “Before I joined GayLam, I was just like any other ordinary young person. But when I started actively involved in the organization’s activities and programs, I saw a significant improvement in myself as well as in others. This is specially in relation to SOGI, LGBT Youth Rights, HIV and AIDS and other concerns. Because of my having more roles and responsibilities, my commitment to the LGBT community became stronger. I am a living proof that there is space for teens to be able to lead the community on certain issues”, said Jefri. The LGBT Youth have had significant participation in all organization activities and programs implemented by GayLam. Moreover, the youth members and volunteers actively get involved in the implementation of programs. They also contribute significantly in terms of planning, organizational operations, as well as in monitoring and evaluation. One proof is the official formation of cadres as part of the leadership process for the organization to reach out to the other potential LGBT Youth groups. The expectation is that with a meaningful involvement of LGBT Youth, stigma and discrimination would finally be minimized if not eradicated at all levels. The proof is in me, and it is related to the availability of space for teens to be able to lead the community”, said Jefri. “
  46. 46. 36| 128 I t has been one year since a house on Abdul Halim 46 road, Cimahi, became Srikandi Perintis’ secretariat. Srikandi Perintis is the transgender organization in the city. In many occasions, five of the organization’s administrators seemed to drown with tasks related to their group’s activities. From writing to typing on the computer, and developing information leaflets, every one had a lot of things to do. “These are our day to day activities”, said Berby Gita, leader of Srikandi Perintis. The main initiative of this organization is to provide education and counseling on HIV and AIDS to the public as well as transgenders. “We do this kind of activity every day”, said Bugi Lesmana, the group’s Counseling Officer Coordinator. Srikandi Perintis is also actively involved in meetings with Cimahi government agencies. Berby said, “The purpose of holding this kind of event is to facilitate cooperation between private or civic organizations with the government”. “We also want to see some changes of attitude from the public towards transgender groups.” Srikandi Pasundan — Bandung
  47. 47. 37| 128 Srikandi Perintis is one of the several transgender organizations in West Java. The organization was formerly named Himpunan Waria Cimahi when it was formed at 2000. Back then, their activities focused mainly on sports and the arts. Himpunan Waria Cimahi rapidly developed into an organization with a lot of activities after the members gained skills and knowledge on running an organization properly. Like any other transgender organizations in West Java, Srikandi Perintis gained skills and knowledge from Srikandi Pasundan, which usually called “SP” in short. SP is the main transgender organization in this province. As the main organization, SP went through a lengthy process in setting up and supporting other transgender organizations in the area since 2006. One of the supports provided to help develop organizations is through Srikandi Pasundan’s participation in various activities organized by the ISEAN-HIVOS Program through GWL-INA. The activities that seemed to be most beneficial for the group are the strategic planning training and leadership trainings. With the knowledge gained from those activities, Srikandi Pasundan is now better able to facilitate the quality improvement and autonomy of transgender organizations in West Java. Srikandi Perintis is one of the more active TG organizations developed transgender by SP. There are also similar organizations in other localities such as Srikandi Patuha in Bandung regency, Srikandi Pantura in Indramayu regency, Srikandi Panyawangan in Kuningan regency. Several Srikandis are also spread across West Java. There are challenges and obstacles in the early stages of their organizational development. The obstacles are mostly related to the resources available to transgenders as well as their mindset in working with the organization. “Thanks to the training attended by the SP staff, challenges can be overcome” said Riri Wirayadi, Leader of SP. The main objective of this organization is to improve the capacities of human resources and support a healthier mindset for its transgender members. “Besides, we also want to see some changes of attitude from public towards transgender groups” Riri added. Aside from forming organizations, SP also encourages these organizations to cooperate with stakeholders and agencies in their respective regions. The goal is for these organizations to contribute to their communities. SP’s efforts are beginning to show results. For example, other transgender organizations in West Java are now conducting their own activities. Some of them had become formal program implementers, such as Srikandi Patuha which is currently an implementing organization for the national HIV and AIDS Prevention Program in Bandung Regency. Thanks to the training attended by SP staff, challenges can be overcome”, said Riri Wirayadi, Leader of SP. “
  48. 48. 38| 128 Ike Diyah S.Sos, PKBI Bandung’s Program Manager said, “Transgender organizations in the region have become more competent in running these programs and we felt that positive change. Now, Srikandi Patuha is one of our Implementing Units in Bandung Regency. SP’s support for transgender organization in diverse areas has received positive feedback from stakeholders. “After we received support from SP, we became closer with stakeholders in Indramayu”. This was expressed by Erna Zaen, the Head of Srikandi Pantura Indramayu. Another comment was shared by Selva Setiady, head of Srikandi Patuha Bandung, “Now we can manage our organization more professionally”. By creating more capable transgender organizations across West Java, it is expected that SP will continue its goal towards improved quality, empowerment, and independence so eventually stigma and discrimination from the society against TG people can be reduced. “It is a goal that we continue to fight for”, said Riri.
  49. 49. 40| 128 THE PHILIPPINES at a glance The number of HIV/AIDS cases in the Philippines has surpassed the 10,000- mark. The Department of Health's Philippine HIV/AIDS Registry showed that from 1984 to September 2012, there were a total of 10,830 HIV cases and 1,078 of them became AIDS with 353 deaths. By 2013, about 10 new cases are reported daily. Since the first AIDS case was diagnosed in 1984, the HIV/AIDS level in the Philippines has been regarded as mysteriously “low and slow.” However, latest statistics seem to suggest that the country's luck is running out. Although HIV prevalence remains below one percent of the general population, it has already breached one percent among key population at higher risk. Sexual contact is the most common mode of HIV transmission, but from 2007 there has been a shift in the predominant trend of sexual transmission from heterosexual contact (20%) to males having sex with other males (MSM, 80%). The DOH clarified that men who engage in sex with men were not all homosexuals. It reiterated that HIV/AIDS is not about being gay but about men having unprotected sex with men. In October, the DOH announced the results of its study conducted last year that showed online social networking contributes to the rise in the HIV/AIDS cases in the country. The study covered 180 MSM respondents. Of the 180 respondents, 124 admitted to using online network sites for dating and sex, while 133 said they had sex with people they contacted through online network sites. Those who engaged in sex were between the age of 14 and 36. Health Assistant Secretary and Director of the National Epidemiology Center Dr. Enrique Tayag said, “Through online networking sites, MSM can meet without fear of negative social consequences. He added that with the Internet increasing the rates of risky behavior, online social networking can now be included as an evolving risk factor for HIV/AIDS. The list the risky behaviors contributing to the rise of HIV/AIDS includes not using condoms, multiple sex partners, men having sex with men and injecting drug users. [Philippines Department of Health Report on Internet, Prostitution and HIV/AIDS]
  50. 50. 41| 128 O ur organization, the Peer Ed ME-PAMACQ has four places where we Rampa. Our name is an acronym for PAsay, MAnila, Caloocan and Quezon Cities. The name is catchy but beyond that, this is where we became known and remembered. Because of the large area covered by the four cities, it was difficult for us to conduct our peer education activities. We circumvent this by assigning active members who are lodged at each site and they have the leeway to do specific activities or events at that site. Each member is just required to inform the organization of these activities. This allows each member to be more comfortable handling his own activity . Peer Ed ME-PAMACQ is a true grassroots organization that started with members having various goals and perspectives. With the help of other people and “Because of our continued participation in trainings under ISEAN- HIVOS Program, members of PAMACQ were able to better themselves”. RAMPA Peer Educators Movement for Empowerment of Pasay, Manila, Caloocan and Quezon City (PAMACQ) — Metro Manila
  51. 51. 42| 128 non-government organizations (NGO) such as Philippine Rural Reconstruction Movement (PRRM) under the HAPP HIV-AIDS Project Program, UNICEF, Pinoy Competence, Youth Consortium, The Library Foundation (TLF) and Catholics for Reproductive Health (C4RH) who believed in our capacity and contributed greatly to our development as an organization. During that time, we were becoming more known to the community and had started to make a name in peer education and service with regards to Adolescent Reproductive Health (ARH), HIV and AIDS. We understand that we still have a lot to learn. We have said time and again that if we are given the opportunity to learn outside of ourselves in order to achieve our full potential and if given the needed resources, we would go for it! It was this spirit and attitude that brought us this far. In 2012, when we were invited to join in trainings geared towards strengthening the capacity of community based organizations in order to improve the services we can give to MSM and TG with regards to HIV-AIDS, we did not hesitate to heed the call. We felt that a door had opened for us in order to gain knowledge. With the help of Philippine NGO Council on Population, Health and Welfare, Inc. (PNGOC) under the ISEAN-HIVOS Program, we were able to attend these various trainings. Our continued participation in trainings under ISEAN-HIVOS Program, members of PAMACQ were able to better themselves. This includes how to network and partner with other stakeholders to solicit support for our programs and activities. Even with other competing organizations, we found ways to harmonize our activities and work together. Each organization was able to help the other in spite of the difference in program goals. This increased our skills and capacity in dealing with other organizations and maximizing our activities. With these activities, we were able to realize our strength in mobilizing resources and found an avenue to improve in the aspect of management, research, documentation, monitoring and evaluation. We understand that we still have a lot to learn”. “
  52. 52. 43| 128 Part 2: THE STORY OF WELLA M y name is Rowell B. Caayao, but only to friends who know me well. I am more known by the name Wela. I am 24 years of age and I am proud to say that I am a bisexual. I live in Barangay Bagong Silang, one of the biggest barangays in Caloocan City. I finished my course in Bachelor in Science in Elementary Education in one of the colleges here in the city. My life is a series of RAMPAs. I underwent a lot of experiences before I found my final place of RAMPA in the Peer Ed ME-PAMACQ. Once upon a time, I was a teacher. But later on, I chose to be an employee in a company as a telemarketer (Call Center Agent) because of the demand and the higher pay. I was also a candidate in Miss Gay Pageants in our Barangay. The first time I joined a pageant, I was crowned the most beautiful contestant. It was in joining pageants that started my exposure to the community. In mid-2012, an outreach activity was done by a peer educator trained by the ISEAN-HIVOS Program in our community. I was one of the clients. I learned a lot from this activity. Indeed, my interest was captured when we talked about MSM and TG rights. Even more so, my attention engaged when the talk turned to HIV education. I was very surprised that the peer educator was very good at public speaking and of the
  53. 53. 44| 128 information that was disseminated so much so that I wanted to be a peer educator myself. I asked if I could be part of the organization, and he gladly told me all about Peer Ed ME-PAMACQ. In other words, I became a member on the spot. Since then, I became a part of the organization. With the help of their Facebook site, I was able to learn more about the organization and understood and appreciate the activities being conducted. And because of this, I decided to give my time to the activities that they were conducting. After the first batch of peer educators training under the ISEAN-HIVOS Program, Peer Ed ME-PAMACQ recommended me to join the next batch of trainees. When I was asked, I agreed to be part of the training without hesitation and immediately prepared all my requirements. It was this training that opened my mind and deepened my understanding. I became a person who achieved enlightenment, understanding, respect and acceptance of my personality and character. The ISEAN-HIVOS Program has helped my persona by opening my mind and adding to my knowledge. They helped me achieve greater confidence and paved a way for me to be able to stand in front of my peers regardless of status in life. I have become more responsible. I am able to trust my organization fully in the short time that I have spent with it. After the training, we proceeded to go back to our community to fulfill our responsibility. There were instances that could not be avoided that may cause harm to us as peer educators. On occasions, we were mistakenly thought to be assets for the police, pimps, drug pushers or worse a prostitute. These are experiences that I will never forget while conducting Peer Education under the IHP Program. I know that this obligation that I took is not something to joke about. While conducting peer education, I saw and heard from my clients that many of them need to open themselves up to knowledge about their rights as homosexuals. Many of them have high level knowledge of what HIV is but lack the knowledge on how to prevent the disease. With my background as a teacher, I take the effort to learn more about the disease when time permits. Every time I join a Pageant, I take this as an opportunity to interject HIV education and MSM/TG rights when the judge’s interview comes. I see this as a way to provide further all that I learned about IHP especially to those who are like me. Because even now, many of us are still blind to the facts and lack knowledge. I am grateful to my family and friends who have given me full support. I became a person who achieved enlighten, understanding, respect and acceptance of my personality and character.” “
  54. 54. 45| 128 I n the recent years, Cebu City has experienced a surge in the number of new HIV cases. In 2008 and 2009, our city’s HIV Registry recorded 10 and 11 new cases per day but in the last three years, the daily number of new cases increased more than tenfold. Thus from 1989 (the year when the first HIV case was recorded) up to 2012, our city has registered a total of 604 PLHIV. A majority are males and injecting drug users who are engaged in same sex and bisexual exposures. They also have low knowledge about HIV, low condom use during their last anal sex, and poor access to health and other services. Many of them are not coming to the city’s health facilities for counseling and testing mainly due to the continuing stigma attached to the disease. The increasing number of HIV cases in our city especially among males who have sex with other males (MSM) and transgenders has alarmed our organization. VCT ON WHEELS Cebu Plus Association, Inc — Cebu “It is easier for us who have no transportation money to go to the city health office for testing because the van or Cebu Mobile Plus comes to us.”
  55. 55. 46| 128 We are a Social Security and Exchange registered PLHIV NGO that has been actively partnering with our city government’s Multi-Sectoral STD/AIDS Council (CCMSAC), the Sangguniang Kabataan (Youth Legislative) Federation, our City Health Department particularly its Social Hygiene Clinic, and the Vicente Sotto Memorial Medical Center (VSMMC), a public hospital. VSMMC provides office space in its compound for our association to facilitate our coordination regarding clients who need treatment and support. We network with local and national NGOs and the private sector in a number of HIV and reproductive health activities. Our city has a Social Hygiene Clinic but the MSM and transgender are not coming to this facility because they perceive that this clinic is solely for female sex workers. It is also operated by relatively older female health providers who are viewed as unresponsive to the MSM and transgenders (TG) health and psycho-social needs. We know that our city has several MSM and transgender people (estimated number is around 12,000 out of 304,000 males 10 years and older in 2007) but many are not coming out for VCT. They can be reached in their barangays but we needed an effective strategy to get to where they are converging and to make them utilize the services of our Social Hygiene Clinic. Our participation in the PNGOC-IHP for about two years now has professionalized our organization but most importantly, it is beginning to improve our target clientele’s HIV knowledge and change their behavior and attitudes toward VCT. The transformation that we are experiencing now can be directly attributed to the IHP SAN Fund support to our proposal to have the Cebu Mobile Plus clinic and the Wellness Lounge at the Social Hygiene Clinic that exclusively caters to MSM and TG. VCT on wheels: Service at their doorsteps! The Cebu Mobile Plus was created to promote on-site HIV voluntary counseling and testing (VCT) for community-based MSM, TG, PWID and other population segments that are interested to know about their HIV status for prevention and care. This mobile facility intends to create acceptance and demand for HIV and AIDS services especially among the population groups that are hesitant or do not have the time and resources to visit the government’s health facilities. It aims to reduce the stigma surrounding HIV and AIDS and to enhance partnership between our association and the different groups in our city. One community-based client gave the following feedback regarding our services. “Mass sayun ug dali na para namu nga walai ika plete kung mag pa testme sa City Health kai ang van o ang Cebu Mobile Plus ra ang moadto para namu. Unya ang impact is sayun ra ug di na hasol para namu.” Our participation in the PNGOC-IHP for about two years now has professionalized our organization but most importantly, it is beginning to improve our target clientele’s HIV knowledge and change their behavior and attitudes toward VCT. “

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