Module One<br />By: Christopher K. Shumaker<br />
A main idea is the author’s controlling point about <br />                                       the topic.<br />      In ...
To Identify the Main Idea<br />ask yourself<br /> WHO or WHAT is the paragraph or reading selection about?<br />          ...
MAIN IDEA<br />     What is the author’s controlling point about the<br />                 topic?<br />The answer is the m...
Consider those questions as you read the following. . .<br />The context of communication influences what you say and how ...
Who or what is the paragraph about?<br />“the communication context”<br /> What is the point the author is trying to make?...
the topic<br />
topic<br />main idea<br />supporting details<br />
the communication context<br />The communication context consists <br />           of at least 4 aspects.<br />social psyc...
Social psychologists have found that almost everyone gossips.  Male or female, young or old, blue-collar or professional, ...
What is the topic?<br />Social psychologists have found that almost everyone gossips.  Male or female, young or old, blue-...
Topic=Gossip<br />Social psychologists have found that almost everyone gossips.  Male or female, young or old, blue-collar...
What is the point the author is trying to make?<br />Social psychologists have found that almost everyone gossips.  Male o...
The point is this:<br />Social psychologists have found that almost everyone gossips.  Male or female, young or old, blue-...
and the Main Idea goes to ?<br />Social psychologists have found that almost everyone gossips.  Male or female, young or o...
gossip<br />Gossip serves several important functions in the human community.<br />It is a form of networking.<br />It is ...
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Main idea module one

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This is an overview module defining the main idea and explaining to the reader what the main idea actually is.

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Main idea module one

  1. 1. Module One<br />By: Christopher K. Shumaker<br />
  2. 2. A main idea is the author’s controlling point about <br /> the topic.<br /> In other words, the point the author is trying to <br /> make in the reading passage is the main idea.<br />It usually includes the topic and the author’s <br /> attitude or opinion about the topic.<br />
  3. 3. To Identify the Main Idea<br />ask yourself<br /> WHO or WHAT is the paragraph or reading selection about?<br /> The answer is the topic.<br /> The topic can be stated in just a few words. <br />
  4. 4. MAIN IDEA<br /> What is the author’s controlling point about the<br /> topic?<br />The answer is the main idea. The main idea is stated in one sentence.<br />
  5. 5. Consider those questions as you read the following. . .<br />The context of communication influences what you say and how you say it. You communicate differently depending on the context you’re in. The communication context consists of at least four aspects. They physical context refers to the tangible environment, the room, park, or auditorium; you don’t talk the same way at a noisy football game as you do at a quiet funeral. The cultural context refers to lifestyles, beliefs, values, behavior, and communication of a group; it is the rules of a group of people for considering something is right or wrong. The social psychological context refers to the status relationships among speakers, the formality of the situation; you don’t talk the same way in the cafeteria as you would at a formal dinner at your boss’s house. The temporal context refers to the position in which a message fits into a sequence of events; you don’t talk the same way after someone tells of the death of a close relative as you do after someone tells of winning the lottery.<br />
  6. 6. Who or what is the paragraph about?<br />“the communication context”<br /> What is the point the author is trying to make?<br /> “that is consists of at least 4 aspects”<br /> Putting the topic and the author’s point together you get<br /> . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .<br /> The communication context consists of at least 4 aspects. <br />
  7. 7. the topic<br />
  8. 8. topic<br />main idea<br />supporting details<br />
  9. 9. the communication context<br />The communication context consists <br /> of at least 4 aspects.<br />social psychological context<br />cultural <br />context<br />supporting details<br />physical <br />context<br />temporal<br />context<br />
  10. 10. Social psychologists have found that almost everyone gossips. Male or female, young or old, blue-collar or professional, humans love to talk about one another. All too often, such gossip is viewed as a frivolous waste of time. However, it actually serves several important functions in the human community. For one thing, gossip is a form of networking. Talking with our friends and coworkers about each other is our most effective means of keeping track of the ever changing social dynamic. It tells us who is in, who is out, and who can help us climb the social or professional ladder. A second function of gossip is the building of influence. When we engage in gossip, we are able to shape people’s opinions of ourselves. We tell stories that show ourselves in a good light—wise, compassionate, insightful, clever. And when we listen sympathetically to the gossip of other people, they perceive us as warm and likable. A final and very powerful function of gossip is the creating of social alliances. There are few quicker ways to form a bond with another person than to share private information with him or her. The words “I wouldn’t tell most people this, but . . .” instantly interest and flatter the listener. To talk about a third party, especially in a critical way, creates a bond with our listener and gives a feeling of shared superiority.<br />
  11. 11. What is the topic?<br />Social psychologists have found that almost everyone gossips. Male or female, young or old, blue-collar or professional, humans love to talk about one another. All too often, such gossip is viewed as a frivolous waste of time. However, it actually serves several important functions in the human community. For one thing, gossip is a form of networking. Talking with our friends and coworkers about each other is our most effective means of keeping track of the ever changing social dynamic. It tells us who is in, who is out, and who can help us climb the social or professional ladder. A second function of gossip is the building of influence. When we engage in gossip, we are able to shape people’s opinions of ourselves. We tell stories that show ourselves in a good light—wise, compassionate, insightful, clever. And when we listen sympathetically to the gossip of other people, they perceive us as warm and likable. A final and very powerful function of gossip is the creating of social alliances. There are few quicker ways to form a bond with another person than to share private information with him or her. The words “I wouldn’t tell most people this, but . . .” instantly interest and flatter the listener. To talk about a third party, especially in a critical way, creates a bond with our listener and gives a feeling of shared superiority.<br />
  12. 12. Topic=Gossip<br />Social psychologists have found that almost everyone gossips. Male or female, young or old, blue-collar or professional, humans love to talk about one another. All too often, such gossip is viewed as a frivolous waste of time. However, it actually serves several important functions in the human community. For one thing, gossip is a form of networking. Talking with our friends and coworkers about each other is our most effective means of keeping track of the ever changing social dynamic. It tells us who is in, who is out, and who can help us climb the social or professional ladder. A second function of gossip is the building of influence. When we engage in gossip, we are able to shape people’s opinions of ourselves. We tell stories that show ourselves in a good light—wise, compassionate, insightful, clever. And when we listen sympathetically to the gossip of other people, they perceive us as warm and likable. A final and very powerful function of gossip is the creating of social alliances. There are few quicker ways to form a bond with another person than to share private information with him or her. The words “I wouldn’t tell most people this, but . . .” instantly interest and flatter the listener. To talk about a third party, especially in a critical way, creates a bond with our listener and gives a feeling of shared superiority.<br />
  13. 13. What is the point the author is trying to make?<br />Social psychologists have found that almost everyone gossips. Male or female, young or old, blue-collar or professional, humans love to talk about one another. All too often, such gossip is viewed as a frivolous waste of time. However, it actually serves several important functions in the human community. For one thing, gossip is a form of networking. Talking with our friends and coworkers about each other is our most effective means of keeping track of the ever changing social dynamic. It tells us who is in, who is out, and who can help us climb the social or professional ladder. A second function of gossip is the building of influence. When we engage in gossip, we are able to shape people’s opinions of ourselves. We tell stories that show ourselves in a good light—wise, compassionate, insightful, clever. And when we listen sympathetically to the gossip of other people, they perceive us as warm and likable. A final and very powerful function of gossip is the creating of social alliances. There are few quicker ways to form a bond with another person than to share private information with him or her. The words “I wouldn’t tell most people this, but . . .” instantly interest and flatter the listener. To talk about a third party, especially in a critical way, creates a bond with our listener and gives a feeling of shared superiority.<br />
  14. 14. The point is this:<br />Social psychologists have found that almost everyone gossips. Male or female, young or old, blue-collar or professional, humans love to talk about one another. All too often, such gossip is viewed as a frivolous waste of time. However, it actually serves several important functions in the human community. For one thing, gossip is a form of networking. Talking with our friends and coworkers about each other is our most effective means of keeping track of the ever changing social dynamic. It tells us who is in, who is out, and who can help us climb the social or professional ladder. A second function of gossip is the building of influence. When we engage in gossip, we are able to shape people’s opinions of ourselves. We tell stories that show ourselves in a good light—wise, compassionate, insightful, clever. And when we listen sympathetically to the gossip of other people, they perceive us as warm and likable. A final and very powerful function of gossip is the creating of social alliances. There are few quicker ways to form a bond with another person than to share private information with him or her. The words “I wouldn’t tell most people this, but . . .” instantly interest and flatter the listener. To talk about a third party, especially in a critical way, creates a bond with our listener and gives a feeling of shared superiority.<br />gossip serves several important <br /> functions in the human community<br />
  15. 15. and the Main Idea goes to ?<br />Social psychologists have found that almost everyone gossips. Male or female, young or old, blue-collar or professional, humans love to talk about one another. All too often, such gossip is viewed as a frivolous waste of time. However, it actually serves several important functions in the human community. For one thing, gossip is a form of networking. Talking with our friends and coworkers about each other is our most effective means of keeping track of the ever changing social dynamic. It tells us who is in, who is out, and who can help us climb the social or professional ladder. A second function of gossip is the building of influence. When we engage in gossip, we are able to shape people’s opinions of ourselves. We tell stories that show ourselves in a good light—wise, compassionate, insightful, clever. And when we listen sympathetically to the gossip of other people, they perceive us as warm and likable. A final and very powerful function of gossip is the creating of social alliances. There are few quicker ways to form a bond with another person than to share private information with him or her. The words “I wouldn’t tell most people this, but . . .” instantly interest and flatter the listener. To talk about a third party, especially in a critical way, creates a bond with our listener and gives a feeling of shared superiority.<br />
  16. 16. gossip<br />Gossip serves several important functions in the human community.<br />It is a form of networking.<br />It is a building of influence.<br />It helps to create social alliances.<br />

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