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Mentor program3

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This ppt. is used during our 5 hour mentoring course.

This ppt. is used during our 5 hour mentoring course.

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  • To really know how skillful you are in the area of Collaborative Relationships, you must find out how others see you. One of the hazards of being a coach is coming across as if your ideas are the only way to teach. The novice teacher may perceive this as the way they need to “be”. Mentoring is not another word for cloning and you don’t want it to come across that way. Effective communication depends on your ability to minimize any barriers.
  • The 12 barriers are viewed as high risk responses. Instead of promoting communication between you and the mentee….the dirty dozen will BLOCK conversation…. thwart the other person’s problem solving efficiency and increase the emotional distance between you and the mentee, You may be saying…some of these comments are positive….. As a mentor it is difficult not to praise evaluatively #4 or offer advice #9 or reassure #12. After all aren’t you supposed to PRAISE, ADVISE AND ASSURE??? YES…. But there is a good time and a not so good time to do this. Not if the mentee is stressed, overly anxious about teaching or experiencing personal problems. Not when it is at the onset of your conversation together. WHY?? These response can trigger feelings of inadequacy, anger or promote a dependency toward you.
  • The novice may even become rebellious and argumentative if you resort to such behaviors…especially the CRITICIZING, DIAGNOSING OR ORDERING. These are very common and habitual ways of responding to anyone in conversation. To communicate effectively you need to be cognizant of the risks these barriers may have on your relationship and learn to avoid them. To determine your communication style and minimize any communication roadblocks, you might respond first and then ask a very trusted colleague to give you honest feedback on these questions. Communication Inventory…. If you answered often to any of these questions, you may need to fine tune your listening skills. By seeing input on your communication style you can make sure that you are able to develop a relationship that fosters openness and trust. An overbearing or domineering model may prevent your mentee from developing his or her own teaching style.
  • Let’s spend a little bit of time on listening…just to refresh the what good skill may look ;like. First check out this slide…… The message here is we all tend to talk too much… many of us who believe that we are good listeners… talk too much……. Let’s look at some basic listening skills…..
  • ROLE PLAY…… PARTICIPANT SELECTS A PROB;EM AND PRESENTS IT TO ME BAD EXAMPLE FOLLOW BY GOOD EXAMPLE
  • METHODS: BRIEF ENCOURAGERS - Short audible indicators that you are interested in what the other person is saying DOOR OPENERS - a non-coercive invitation to talk or to continue talking.
  • Reflective listening is the skill of summarizing the thoughts and feelings of he speaker from the speaker’s perspective.
  • This reflection can feel very unnatural to you…especially if you are the type of person who is quick to advise…..suggest…respond…...
  • Use open ended questions to to challenge their thinking regarding their self examination…you want to make sure they learn to look at themselves…. Being a coach is very similar o being a cooperating teacher…a major difference is that as a cooperating teacher you are ultimately responsible for what happens in your classroom…as a peer mentor, you are not responsible BUT the key to success is being proactive….and preventing potential problems.
  • Conflict is apart of any dynamic organization, usually arising because individuals care and want to do their jobs well. As a mentor/coach you want to show the way when it comes to eff4ectively working through a problem because it helps to build stronger working relationships. Part of a mentor’s job is to be a professional role model. One of the most important skills you can help a novice develop is his or her ability to deal with conflict -- with peers, students parents and even with you. The process of conflict resolution needs to be discussed at the very beginning of the mentoring experience.
  • ONE FLIES, ONE DRIVES ONE GETS THE CAR, ONE GETS PAID FOR MILEAGE ONE TRAIN ONE BUS ONE CAN RENT AND BE REIMBURSED
  • Reflective teaching makes this method unique.
  • It is sometimes helpful to work to identify the source…… this will sometimes peel all those layers off the onion and you will find the problem may not be anything all that you believed it was.
  • Proceed slowly checking for understanding…and checking into how much they really want from you Be aware of Risks!!!
  • This is easier said than done….often the most difficult piece…….especially if you are feeling the mentee is tentative and lacking the skills you would expect them to have. If we prejudge new teachers we are automatically limiting the opportunities that we can provide for them…or worse…..if they read this judgement that we have in our tome or attitude …or…we actually state it….they will plod through their learning experience living in fear of making a mistake and losing your support. Begin by examining your own conventionalized ideas of things and people. You may believe that you have none…but let’s make sure. Prejudgments are often views we hold based on cultural values, experiences, or stereotypes
  • As a mentor you are going to confront a diverse group of adults. The first step for you is to clarify your own values and beliefs and see how these factors have shaped you as a teacher. It is important to see how these beliefs make you unique././/and your beliefs may not be seen as right by the mentee….they may not even be easily understood by the mentee…depending on their background DIVERSE>>>DIVERSE>>>DIVERSE…. We have individuals from different areas working together… We have experienced teachers from other districts… A variety of student teaching experiences. We must all recognize our values and beliefs and welcome the values and beliefs of others…EVEN IF THEY ARE DIFFERENT FROM OUR OWN.
  • “ Inexperienced” doesn’t always mean less knowledgeable or less competent. Recognizing different teaching styles and exploring ways to use these styles in the classroom helps to build mutual support and respect, even if they are different from your teaching practices. Take a moment to complete the Through the Looking Glass Activity……. Try to identify any stereotypical lenses you may be using.
  • The time demands required in lesson planning, noninstructional duties, and preparing teaching materials is HUGE! They are expected to hit the ground running. We need to help them know what is expected of them as professionals and faculty members and how to meet those expectations. By sharing your “shortcuts” to creating learning materials, planning lessons and handling the paperwork, peer mentors can reduce job stress and help their mentees prioritize their schedules to focus more time on essential teaching tasks and less time on extraneous activities. REFER TO … Needs Assessment for Beginning Teachers
  • Transcript

    • 1. Mentoring
      • West Seneca Central School District
      • Carolyn Kick
      • Kristin Kurtzworth-Keen
    • 2. “ Produce great people, the rest will follow.” E. Hubbard
    • 3. Peer Coaching/Mentoring
      • Program Goal
        • To build a collegial relationship with an exemplary educator to reach the standards of tenure.
    • 4. Your Responsibilities as a Mentor
      • Advise the mentee on lesson planning, teaching strategies and classroom management
      • Provide guidance and assistance in establishing routines in the classroom and the school
      • Provide information and guidance on building/district level process, procedures and routines
    • 5. What is a Mentor?
      • A mentor is a master teacher who models exemplary instruction and knowledge in a supportive manner
      • A mentor responds to a mentee’s needs as they are identified by both the mentee and the mentor
    • 6. The Goal is Student Achievement
      • Encouragement and effective feedback is provided to the mentee through proactive and collaborative activities
      • The mentor/mentee relationship is confidential and non-evaluative
    • 7. Confidentiality
      • What happens between a mentor and their mentee…remains between a mentor and their mentee
      • You are not an evaluator
      • You are not part of their professional review
      • The degree to which you hold true to confidentiality….is the degree to which trust exists in your relationship
    • 8. The Role of the Mentor
      • Many different roles fit together to support the mentee
      Advocate Role-model Performance coach Critical friend Reflective Partner Subject expert guide Confidante’
    • 9. Mentor/Mentee Log
    • 10. Relationships with your mentee should be:
      • Professional
      • Flexible
      • Trustful
      • Frequent contact
      • Based on mutual education goals
    • 11. Factors that cause entry level difficulties:
      • Difficult work assignments
      • Unclear expectations
      • Inadequate resources
      • Isolation
      • Reality shock
      • Knowledge without application
    • 12. Frequent New Teacher Concerns
      • Classroom discipline
      • Motivating students
      • Addressing individual differences/needs
      • Assessing student work
      • Relations with parents
      • Classroom organization
      • Unfamiliarity with people and materials
      • Individual student problems
      • District procedures and policies
      • Terminology- acronyms
      • Time Management
    • 13. “ The most valuable gift you can give to a colleague is a good example”
              • -V. Estrem 1993
    • 14. Effective Classroom Management- Techniques for:
      • Positive management
      • Group work
      • Desk work
      • Inquiry method
      • How to set up and run a lab
      • Technology use…
    • 15. Classroom Structure and Activity
      • Furniture placement
      • Self-serve areas
      • Student duties and roles
      • Material storage
      • Routines and rules
      • Transitions
    • 16. Take a minute and list all the names of district or building forms you think a new teacher will need to know about-
      • IEP/CSE/504 plan/ testing modifications
      • Teacher handbook
      • Teacher Center catalog and ARO forms
      • Conference request form
      • Substitute call in directions
      • Phone directions
    • 17. And that’s not all…
      • Standards
      • Performance indicators
      • Pre-conference goal setting form
      • Referral forms
      • Discipline incident…
      • Report cards and grades
      • Parent conference forms
    • 18. Being proactive and communicating well are the keys to a successful relationship for both the mentor and the mentee!
      • You are just the person to do it!
    • 19. “ No one knows better than teachers what teachers need to become skillful practitioners.” Chase, 1988
    • 20. Creating a Connection
      • It’s up to you to establish rapport
      • It’s up to you to start building trust
      • (refer to handout on FIRST YEAR PEER MENTOR INTERVIEW GUIDE - a suggested guideline to get to know your mentee)
    • 21. PLANNING FOR SUCCESS
      • Failing to Plan……….
      • Is Planning to Fail.
    • 22. Clarity of Purpose
      • Both the mentee and the mentor need a framework to determine which aspect of teaching requires their attention
      • Charlotte Danielson’s Enhancing Professional Practice- A Framework for Teaching is the framework we are using in the district!
    • 23. No matter how skilled an educator or how experienced you may be…you will not be a successful mentor/coach if your communication skills are not effective. COMMUNICATION IS KEY...
    • 24. Effective Communication exists..
      • When the receiver interprets the sender’s message in the same manner the sender intended
      • When both parties strive for the highest possible degree of accuracy in interpretation of intentions and meaning
    • 25. Improving Your Facilitation Skills
      • “ Be the Guide on the Side…
      • Not the Sage on the Stage”
    • 26. The Dirty Dozen -Analyzing the Barriers
      • #1 Criticizing
      Making a negative evaluation of the novice. #2 Name Calling Putting down or stereotyping the novice. #3 Diagnosing Analyzing why the novice is behaving the way that he or she is…… playing amateur psychiatrist
    • 27. The Dirty Dozen -Analyzing the Barriers -cont.
      • #4 Praising evaluatively
      Making a positive judgement about the novice. #5 Disagreeing Judgmental, makes them feel unknowing #6 Ordering/Threatening Commanding the novice or trying to control their actions by warning of a negative consequence.
    • 28. The Dirty Dozen -Analyzing the Barriers -cont.
      • #7 Moralizing
      Preaching, telling the novice what he should do. #8 Excessive Questioning Asking closed questions. #9 Advising Giving the novice a solution to his or her problem.
    • 29. The Dirty Dozen -Analyzing the Barriers -cont.
      • #10 Diverting
      Pushing the novice’s problem aside through distraction. #11 Logical Arguments Attempting to convince the novice with an appeal to facts or logic without consideration of the emotional factors involved. #12 Reassuring Trying to stop the other person from feeling the negative emotions he or she is experiencing.
    • 30. Conversation in the United States is a competitive Exercise in which the first person to draw a breath is declared the……. LISTENER
    • 31. LISTENING…..
          • a set of skills
          • for demonstrating that you understand the thoughts and feelings being communicated
          • from the SPEAKER’S frame of reference not yours
    • 32. When to Use Listening Skills
      • When you need information
      • Before acting on a request
      • When the other person has a strong need to talk
      • To make all other communications work well
    • 33. THREE BASIC LISTENING SKILLS
      • ATTENDING
      FOLLOWING REFLECTING
    • 34. ATTENDING
      • The use of body language and physical environment to create a good climate for the speaker.
        • STOP what you are doing
        • Look attentively at the other person
        • Listen intently to what she/he is saying
    • 35.
      • YOU CAN’T DO TWO THINGS AT ONCE…...
      IF ONE OF THEM IS LISTENING!
    • 36. FOLLOWING SKILLS
      • LISTENERS TEND TO TALK TOO MUCH
      • TYPICAL LISTENER LEADS, DIRECTS AND DIVERTS A CONVERSATION
      • IT IS THE LISTENERS JOB TO HELP THE SPEAKER TELL HIS OWN STORY IN HIS OWN WAY
    • 37. REFLECTING
      • SEARCH FOR THE SPEAKER’S MEANING
      • RESTATE THE MEANING CLEARLY
        • From the speaker’s frame of reference
        • Core of thoughts/feelings
        • In your own words
        • Brief
        • Statement form, not question
        • empathic
    • 38. Sentence starters for reflective listening….
      • “ You’re saying that…….”
      • “ As you see it…”
      • “ You think…”
      • “ Sounds like…”
      • “ For you…”
      • “ From your point of view..”
      • “ In other words…”
      • “ You feel…”
    • 39. ADVANTAGES OF REFLECTIVE LISTENING
      • Increases chances that you’re receiving the real message.
      • Helps you stay focused and pay attention.
      • Takes the burden off you as a friend.
      • Allows you to get to the real problem.
      • Usually the best way to encourage others share more of themselves with you.
      • Allows the speaker to “vent”.
      • Speaker “feels” heard.
    • 40. Fostering Open Dialog
      • Encourage discussion revolving
      • around specific teaching behaviors
      • such as…..
        • How was this lesson planned
        • How do you plan to teach this lesson
      • Draw out the mentees thoughts
      • Get them to critically assess their methods and procedures before suggesting more effective or
      • appropriate techniques.
    • 41. Use Open Ended Questions
      • Use phrases beginning with……
        • What
        • How
        • Describe
        • Explain
        • Justify
        • Illustrate
    • 42. Other examples of Open Ended questions…..
      • Tell me about…….
      • Would you tell me about…
      • I’d be interested in knowing…
      • How did you feel about…
      • Would you explain..
      • I’m not certain I understand…
      • Would you explain that in more detail…
      • What do you mean by that...
      • Tell me more about…
      • Perhaps you could clarify…
      • What was there about…that appealed to you?…
      • What prompted your decision to?…
      • How did you happen to…
      • Has there been any opportunity to…
    • 43. Ineffective Listening
      • Sit and Stare Blankly
      • Non-verbal turn-off
      • Roadblocks (Directing, threatening, preaching, providing answers, disapproving, praising, sympathizing,psychoanalyzing, questioning, joking)
      • Happy Hooker
      • Ships Passing in the Night
    • 44. Active Listening
      • Non-verbal Turn-On;
      • Door Openers;
          • “ Tell me more…”
          • “ Sounds interesting.”
          • “ Say a little bit more about that.”
      • Paraphrase Content Accurately;
      • Paraphrase Feelings Accurately
    • 45. Confronting Problems……..
      • CONFLICT
      Is neither good or bad It simply EXISTS, Should be expected And managed effectively.
    • 46. Six Key Problem Solving Steps
      • Identify and define the problem in terms of needs -- not solutions
    • 47.
      • A PROBLEM WELL DEFINED IS
      • HALF -SOLVED
    • 48. AIMING FOR A WIN-WIN
      • DEFINING THE PROBLEM IN TERMS OF NEEDS NOT SOLUTIONS
      EXAMPLE: * I NEED THE SCHOOL CAR TO GET TO A MEETING IN ALBANY AT10 AM ON WEDNESDAY. • I NEED THE SCHOOL CAR TO GET TO A MEETING IN SYRACUSE AT 10 AM ON WEDNESDAY. Only 2 solutions…and one person Loses!
    • 49. STATE THE PROBLEM IN TERMS OF NEEDS
      • I need to be at a Wednesday morning meeting in Albany at 10 AM on Wednesday.
      • I need to be at a Wednesday morning meeting in Syracuse at 10 AM on Wednesday.
      “ Important to make a mental shift from presenting solutions to searching for real needs.”
    • 50. Identifying Possible Sources of Problems
      • Student Source
      • Teacher Source
      • System Source
      • Extraneous Source
    • 51. TRANSITION
      • State the Problem
      • State the Goal
      • Ask what’s been thought or done
      • Reflect
    • 52. Resolve
        • Ask if your input is wanted
      • …… if yes
      • USE:
      • - Speak
      • - Check for understanding and acceptance
      • - Reflect
    • 53. RESERVING CRITICISM AND JUDGEMENT
      • It is essential to create a learning climate of acceptance
      • The goal is to convey that ALL problems can be handled and a positive outcome can occur even when mistakes are made.
    • 54. Cooperative Problem Solving Steps
      • Identify and define the problem in terms of the needs-not solutions.
      • Agree on Problem
      • Brainstorm Options
      • Evaluate
      • Choose
      • Implementation
      • Follow up, assessment and revision
    • 55. Examples…...
      • Cooperative Learning is a waste of time.
      • Lecturing is the best method to teach tough content.
      • Women are better teachers than men.
      • Special education students just don’t belong in the regular classroom.
      • Teaching an interdisciplinary unit isn’t worth the time and effort.
      • Minority students are usually discipline problems.
    • 56. Effective Mentors are able to recognize the strengths of novices by utilizing the talents, skills and cultural knowledge they bring to the teaching situation.
    • 57. Nurturing the Novice…….. whatever it takes
      • Building a collegial, collaborative,communicative relationship
      • Help them balance
      • Many times they don’t know, what they don’t know.
      • Help them prioritize what they should be concerned about!
    • 58.
      • Being a Mentor is like a __________
      • Because____________
      • ___________________
    • 59.
      • “ Treat people as if they were what they ought to be…...and you can help them to become what they are capable of being.”
      Johann Wolfgang von Goethe 1998