Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Introduction
Introduction
Introduction
Introduction
Introduction
Introduction
Introduction
Introduction
Introduction
Introduction
Introduction
Introduction
Introduction
Introduction
Introduction
Introduction
Introduction
Introduction
Introduction
Introduction
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Introduction

45

Published on

Published in: Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
45
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Introduction to Computer Science Lewis University 70-200
  • 2. Who?  Dr. Cindy Kersey Assistant Professor Math/Computer Science  Office: AS-113-S  Office Hours: MWF 11:00-12:00 and 2:00-3:00  Office phone number: 815-836-5134  Email: kerseycy@lewisu.edu 2
  • 3. What?  This course explores the field of computer science.  It provides an overview of  computer architecture  networking  data organization  computational theory  Students will be introduced to fundamental concepts underlying all of computing such as  data representation  algorithms  abstractions  programming 3
  • 4. What?  On the successful completion of this course you will  think algorithmically  be familiar with data representations and encodings understand how computers manipulate data to generate output  be able to read, understand, modify, and assemble from pieces programs that achieve useful tasks  master using basic constructs provided by high-level imperative programming languages: sequencing, selection, and iteration  be familiar with using basic data structures such as arrays in simple programs  be familiar with the fundamentals of networking and the internet  be able to create a simple relational database 4
  • 5. What? Weeks Topic Chapter/Software 1-4 Number system, data representation, hardware and operating systems Chapters 1-5 and 10- 11 5-10 Programming using Scratch and Java Scratch DrJava and the Java JDK 11-12 Networking and the Internet Chapter 15-16 13 Computer Security Chapter 17 14-15 Database systems Chapter 12 5
  • 6. Where?  Here in class  In the CS labs  At home, but you will need to install software  But it’s (almost) all free!!! 6
  • 7. When?  9:30-10:45 Tuesday and Thursday  Office Hours:  Scheduled: 11:30-2:00 TR  Make an appointment 7
  • 8. How?  Textbook  Nell Dale and John Lewis, Computer Science Illuminated, Jones & Bartlett Learning; 5th edition, 2013. ISBN-13: 978-1449672843.  Blackboard  http://lewisuniversity.blackboard.com 8
  • 9. How?  Grading Opportunities  Homework (50%)  Two mid-terms (15% each)  Final exam (20%)  Grading Scale  A: 90-100  B: 80-89  C: 70-79  D: 60-69  F: Below 60 9
  • 10. How?  Course Policies  Come to class  Pay attention  Don't surf the web  Turn in homework  on time!  Take tests  when scheduled  Don’t cheat 10
  • 11. What is a Computer?  A device that performs high- speed mathematical and/or logical operations or that assembles, stores, correlates, or otherwise processes information.  The first computers were people who did computations 11
  • 12. Why Do Computers Keep Getting Cheaper?  The number of transistors (a major component of the brain of a computer) at the same price doubles every 18 months  making computers faster, smaller, and cheaper over time  This notion is know as Moore’s Law  For Gordon Moore, a founder of Intel  This “Law” has held true for decades  And is predicted to hold true at least one more 12
  • 13. What are Computers Good At?  Doing calculations and comparisons  Producing the same answer every time  Like calculating the sum of hundreds of numbers  Computer don’t tire of tedious tasks  Storing information  They don’t forget information  Looking up information quickly  Search through a phone book to find the customer name for a phone number 13
  • 14. But computers aren’t intelligent…  They don’t “think”  At least not yet  They require detailed instructions in order to perform tasks  These instructions are called algorithms 14
  • 15. Computer Science  The science of algorithms  Draws from other subjects, including  Mathematics  Engineering  Psychology  Business Administration 15
  • 16. An algorithm 16
  • 17. The Euclidean Algorithm 17
  • 18. Computing as a Tool 18 Programmer / User Applications Programmer (uses tools) User with No Computer Background Systems Programmer (builds tools) Domain-Specific Programs
  • 19. Computing as a Discipline  What can be (efficiently) automated?  Four Necessary Skills  Algorithmic Thinking  Representation  Programming  Design 1921
  • 20. Computing as a Discipline 20 Is Computer Science a mathematical, scientific, or engineering discipline? 22 What do you think?

×