Text complexity for tcms

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  • What is a text complexity band?
  • Overview of the protocol
  • What is a text complexity band?
  • Users read across the four columns for each row of checkboxes on the rubric, identifying which descriptors best match the text by marking a particular checkbox. As Appendix A states, “Few, if any, authentic texts will be low or high on all of these measures.” The goal is not for all of the checkmarks to be in a single column; the goal is to accurately reflect these factors of the text.The marked rubric can then serve as a guide as educators re-evaluate the initial placement of the work into a text complexity band. Such reflection may validate the text’s placement or may suggest that the placement needs to be changed.In fact, this marked rubric represents the evaluation of To Kill a Mockingbird completed by a committee of teachers.
  • Based upon all three legs of the model, we felt the most appropriate placement for the novel was grades 9-10.
  • An example of a completed template for To Kill a Mockingbird.
  • Text complexity for tcms

    1. 1. TCMS November 12, 2012Adapted from Kansas State EducationDepartment andPresentation by Monroe 2-Orleans BOCES
    2. 2.  Deepen understanding of text complexity Learn about text dependent questions Scaffolding understanding of complex text for students
    3. 3.  Complexity of texts students are expected to read is way below what is required to achieve college and career readiness:  High school textbooks have declined in all subject areas over several decades  Average length of sentences in K-8 textbooks has declined from 20 to 14 words  Vocabulary demands have declined, e.g., 8th grade textbooks = former 5th grade texts; 12th grade anthologies = former 7th grade texts Complexity of college and careers texts has remained steady or increased, resulting in a huge gap (350L)
    4. 4.  Too many students are reading at too low a level (<50% of graduates can read sufficiently complex texts) The complexity of what students can read is greatest predictor of success in college (ACT study)  Question type (main idea, word meanings, details) is NOT the chief differentiator  Question level (higher order vs. lower order; literal vs. inferential) is NOT the chief differentiator either
    5. 5.  Quantitative measures tend to measure:  Word difficulty (frequency, length)  Sentence length and syntax  Some newer measures also measure text cohesion and other features of vocabulary Qualitative measures complement quantitative measures:  Purpose  Language conventionality and clarity  Text structures  Knowledge demands
    6. 6.  Quantitative and qualitative measures are at once useful and imperfect. Quantitative measures are less valid for certain kinds of texts (poetry, drama, K-1 texts) but for all others can place most texts in a complexity band reliably. Qualitative measures are on a continuum (not grade/band specific) and most useful working in conjunction with quantitative measures.
    7. 7. General Rule: Use any one of the quantitative analyzer tools to place text into a complexity band level. For decisions about whether to place a text at the upper, lower, or middle of a band, use qualitative analysis. For drama and poetry, use qualitative measures.
    8. 8. 1. Quantitative measures – readability and other scores of text complexity often best measured by computer software. 2. Qualitative measures – levels of meaning, structure, language conventionality and clarity, and knowledge demands often best measured by an attentive human reader. Reader and Task 3. Reader and Task considerations – background knowledge of reader, motivation, interests, and complexity generated by tasks assigned often best made by educators employing their professional judgment.
    9. 9. • Grade Band Ranges Chart• Internet database for quantitative measures (Lexile level)
    10. 10. Quantitative Measures Ranges for Text Complexity Grade Bands Text Complexity Suggested Suggested ATOS Grade Bands Lexile Range Book Level Range** K-1 190L – 530L* 1.0 – 2.5 2-3 450L – 790L 2.0 – 4.0 4-5 770L – 980L 3.0 – 5.7 6-8 955L – 1155L 4.0 – 8.0 9-10 1080L – 1305L 4.6 – 10.0 11-CCR 1215L – 1355L 4.8 – 12.0.** Taken from Accelerated Reader and the Common Core State Standards, available at the following URL: http://doc.renlearn.com/KMNet/R004572117GKC46B.pdf
    11. 11. Lexile Analyzer:www.lexile.com/findabook/
    12. 12. • Rubric for Literary Text• Rubric for Informational Text
    13. 13. Qualitative Measures Resources The Qualitative Measures Rubrics for Literary and Informational Text:The rubric for literary text and the rubric for informational text alloweducators to evaluate the important elements of text that are oftenmissed by computer software that tends to focus on more easilymeasured factors.
    14. 14. • Questions for Professional Reflection
    15. 15. Reader and Task Considerations Resources Questions for Professional Reflection on Reader and Task Considerations: The questions provided in this resource are meant to spur teacher thought and reflection upon the text, students, and any tasks associated with the text.
    16. 16. For illustrative purposes, let’schoose Harper Lee’s 1960 novelTo Kill a Mockingbird.
    17. 17. A Four-step Process:1. Determine the quantitative measures of the text.2. Analyze the qualitative measures of the text.3. Reflect upon the reader and task Reader and Task considerations.4. Recommend placement in the appropriate text complexity band.
    18. 18. Lexile Text Measure: 870L ATOS Book Level: 5.6
    19. 19. Quantitative Measures Ranges for Text Complexity Grade Bands Text Complexity Suggested Suggested ATOS Grade Bands Lexile Range Book Level Range** K-1 190L – 530L* 1.0 – 2.5 2-3 450L – 790L 2.0 – 4.0 4-5 770L – 980L 3.0 – 5.7 6-8 955L – 1155L 4.0 – 8.0 9-10 1080L – 1305L 4.6 – 10.0 11-CCR 1215L – 1355L 4.8 – 12.0.** Taken from Accelerated Reader and the Common Core State Standards, available at the following URL: http://doc.renlearn.com/KMNet/R004572117GKC46B.pdf
    20. 20. 20
    21. 21. After reflecting upon the qualitative measures:
    22. 22. Step 3: Reader and Task Considerations
    23. 23. Step 4: Recommended Placement Based upon all the information—all three legs of the model—the final recommendation for To Kill a Mockingbird is….
    24. 24.  Cause the reader to pay careful attention to the text in order to draw evidence from the text Can only be answered by close reading Should be worth asking or exploring
    25. 25. Paraphrase
    26. 26.  You have to first read the text closely yourself Then think about what it is you want your students to gain from that text, keeping a particular standard in mind. (See handout for some ideas for each standard)
    27. 27. Don’t wait!!!!!“Don’t wait”: Ask questions frequently, andthroughout the selection rather than waitinguntil the end of a selection. Don’t Waitquestions are quick to maximize timeactually spent reading.(Uncommon Schools, 2011)
    28. 28. Lower the Level of QuestionsLower the Level: Ask questions about a textat all four levels of meaning (word/phraselevel, sentence level, passage level, text level)but pay particular attention to word, phraseand sentence level. These are often the root oflarger misunderstandings and are asked tooinfrequently by many teachers.(Uncommon Schools, 2011)
    29. 29.  Require students to cite all (or most) of the evidence presented in a particular segment of text. Ask students to paraphrase a particularly dense chunk of text. Focus on chunks of a text that are short, dense, and critical to the story. Look at clusters of chunks that build upon one another and reveal why a text was written. Re-read the text, line-by-line, multiple times.
    30. 30.  Probably not…entirely Students may need (lots of) modeling
    31. 31.  Gradual Release of Responsibility Model  Read aloud complex text  Re-read aloud portions of complex text  Read aloud complex text, and have students re-read small portion of complex text independently  Read aloud complex text, and have students continue to read complex text independently  Students read complex text independently, and teacher reads aloud portion of text for instruction
    32. 32.  Students may need strategies for deepening their thinking about text (in order to answer those text dependent questions!)
    33. 33. Focus standard Text dependent What strategy is needed? question Let’s try it!

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