20060422_WPF's LSBE review in Pakistan
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20060422_WPF's LSBE review in Pakistan

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Reviewing the World Population Foundation's (WPF) Life Skills Based Education (LSBE) programme in Hala, Sindh.

Reviewing the World Population Foundation's (WPF) Life Skills Based Education (LSBE) programme in Hala, Sindh.

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20060422_WPF's LSBE review in Pakistan 20060422_WPF's LSBE review in Pakistan Presentation Transcript

    • Reviewing the World Population Foundation’s (WPF) Life Skills Based Education (LSBE) programme convened by the World Population Foundation (WPF) and Health and Nutrition Development Society (HANDS) Saturday 22 April 2006 10:00 – 14:00 Government Rest House, Bhit Shah, Sindh, Pakistan.
    • What’s on the agenda?
    • Welcome, ground rules and objectives
    • Up-scaling of the LSBE programme:
      Rationale, Milestones, Budgetary implications
    • 1) Reviewing the LSBE programme- Group Work
      What went well? What could we do better? How will we change it in the future?
    • 2) Recruitment strategies
      How can we effectively recruit more classes/ teachers and students in LSBE programme?
    • 3) Presenting the broader picture of WPF’s LSBE programme – for participants new to the LSBE programme
    • Reports from the small group work discussions View slide
    • Concluding remarks and vote of thanks
    View slide
    • Ground-rules
      We trust that you will all agree to abide by the following values/norms WPF tries to bring to all our discussions:
      • Courtesy : meeting starts on time and discussion stays on track;
      • Respect : mobile phones on silent, only one voice at a time and all voices valued equally;
      • Professionalism : seek clarification as needed and allow time for translation;
      • Enjoyment : smoke free and fun environment;
      • Empathy : schedule breaks for religious observances.
    • Key objectives of today’s meeting:
    • To introduce the expansion of the World Population Foundation’s (WPF) Life Skills Based Education (LSBE) programme;
    • To explore ways in which the programme can be improved;
    • To increase the community ownership of the programme by involving stakeholders in the recruitment, review and planning process;
    • To broaden the conceptual understanding of those stakeholders new to WPF’s Life Skills Based Education (LSBE) programme.
    • Where are we at in the programme?
    • Welcome, ground rules and objectives
    • Up-scaling of the LSBE programme:
      Rationale, Milestones, Budgetary implications
    • 1) Reviewing the LSBE programme- Group Work
      What went well? What could we do better? How will we change it in the future?
    • 2) Recruitment strategies
      How can we effectively recruit more classes/ teachers and students in LSBE programme?
    • 3) Presenting the broader picture of WPF’s LSBE programme For participants new to the LSBE programme
    • Reports from the small group work discussions
    • Concluding remarks and vote of thanks
    • Funding and compromises
    • Notice from NACP for review and funding happens with too short a time frame and with insufficient funding to facilitate partner involvement.
    • This does not align with the collaborative approach to budget and proposal development we value.
    • We were not involved n the setting of targets and disagree with those set – but we have to live with them and strive to achieve them!
    • Ground gained and challenges
    • Inclusion of schools from WPF’s public sector Life Skills Based Education (LSBE) programme has been approved as a vehicle for meeting NACP’s numeric targets.
    • Funding available for the next two years is able to be accessed in the current year.
    • NACP’s numeric targets present an interesting challenge.
    • So, what are the numbers?
      For the current year, the challenge is for new outreach to:
        • Another 150 teachers trained to deliver WPF’s Life Skills Based Education (LSBE) programme in secondary schools
        • 70 new private secondary schools with WPF’s LSBE curriculum in place
        • In all schools, a further 13,600 young people who are enrolled in the LSBE programme
        • 22,600 additional young people more broadly exposed to HIV/AIDS education in schools
    • How can we get there?
      For the purposes of meeting NACP’s targets we have proposed:
        • Focusing on expansion to achieve numeric targets, at the expense of youth group formation ;
        • Merging funding support for both public and private sector schools;
        • Encouraging existing schools to offer the LSBE programme in three classrooms each ; and
        • Recruiting 70 new private sector schools, with three classes operating in each.
    • Budgetary implications?
    • NACP funds (USD $115,000) will be totally allocated to meet partner costs, based on the existing level of support (USD $20,000 per year) and the generic budget developed;
    • The shortfall (USD $5,000) will be met from WPF’s own sources (DGIS);
    • Other programmatic activities and overheads will be met from DGIS funding.
    • Where are we at in the programme?
    • Welcome, ground rules and objectives
    • Up-scaling of the LSBE programme:
      Rationale, Milestones, Budgetary implications
    • 1) Reviewing the LSBE programme- Group Work
      What went well? What could we do better? How will we change it in the future?
    • 2) Recruitment strategies
      How can we effectively recruit more classes/ teachers and students in LSBE programme?
    • 3) Presenting the broader picture of WPF’s LSBE programme For participants new to the LSBE programme
    • Reports from the small group work discussions
    • Concluding remarks and vote of thanks
    • Group Work 1) Reviewing the LSBE programme What went well? What could we do better? - and for each issue ; Tell us how we can change it in the future? 2) Recruitment strategies How can we effectively recruit more classes/ teachers and students in LSBE programme?
    • Ground Rules for Group Work
      Groups comprised of individual stakeholders:
    • Students – facilitated by Chris
    • Male Parents, Teachers and Principals facilitated by Jameel
    • Female Parents, Teachers and Principals facilitated by Abida
    • People new to the LSBE programme facilitated by Dr Raana
      Time for group discussion and work = 1hour Presentation time - as required
    • Where are we at in the programme?
    • Welcome, ground rules and objectives
    • Up-scaling of the LSBE programme:
      Rationale, Milestones, Budgetary implications
    • 1) Reviewing the LSBE programme- Group Work
      What went well? What could we do better? How will we change it in the future?
    • 2) Recruitment strategies
      How can we effectively recruit more classes/ teachers and students in LSBE programme?
    • 3) Presenting the broader picture of WPF’s LSBE programme For participants new to the LSBE programme
    • Reports from the small group work discussions
    • Concluding remarks and vote of thanks
    • WPF’s BIG Picture
    • International NGO established in 1989, with its headquarters in Holland (22 staff);
    • Working in Pakistan since 1999 with a strong local commitment (20 staff) and programmes in all four provinces
    • Other field offices in Vietnam (10 staff) and Indonesia (2 staff)
    • WPF’s BIG Picture … (c’td)
      In Pakistan our focus is on Adolescent Reproductive Health (ARH) via three key intervention strategies:
    • Advocacy;
    • Resource production; and
    • Research and programmes – as a means of building local capacity.
    • Adolescent Reproductive Health
      … Adolescence is a strange time. A time when opportunities arise, freedom beckons, and personalities develop. Yet adolescence is also a time when expectations are high, vulnerability cannot be easily admitted, and risks are underestimated - a time between childhood and adulthood, and one that is becoming longer. These pressures present special difficulties for those concerned with health promotion and provision …
    • . . .Who is responsible for adolescent health?
      First and foremost, young people themselves. Without their participation in identifying problems and devising strategies nothing can be achieved. What society - schools, policy-makers, and health professionals in particular - has to provide is non-judgmental information and education and easy access to services geared for adolescents specifically. Adolescents will then have a real choice for healthy living.
          • From an editorial published in The Lancet on ‘Young People's Health in Context’ – a report by the WHO Regional Office for Europe on health and health behaviour of teenagers from 35 countries, released in June 2004.
    • What are life skills?
      The World Health Organisation (WHO) defines Life Skills as the abilities for adaptive and positive behaviour that enable individuals to deal effectively with the demands and challenges of everyday life.
    • Adolescents need to develop life skills in five core areas:
    • Self-awareness and empathy ;
    • Communication and interpersonal skills;
    • Critical thinking and creative thinking;
    • Decision making and problem solving; and
    • Coping with emotions and coping with stress.
    • What does WPF’s LSBE curriculum offer?
      Our Life Skills Based Education (LSBE) programme is a personality development programme which empowers students with core skills, knowledge and attitudes to help them:
      • Make lifelong, informed decisions;
      • Manage their emotions;
      • Communicate effectively; and
      • Practice positive, health-seeking behaviour.
    • How is WPF’s LSBE curriculum delivered?
    • Preliminary research was conducted on risk-taking behaviour with teachers and students in 42 schools across Pakistan, leading to locally-developed and tested teacher and student resources;
    • Volunteer teachers participate in a preparatory, comprehensive, residential training programme;
    • Classroom delivery occurs over the course of one full academic year, via 17 modules – offered to students through two 45 minute sessions per week; and
    • Ongoing monthly Professional Development Forums (PDFs) are offered for teachers to sustain interest and measure programme impact.
    • Public school implementation (Mar 06)
    • Private school implementation (Mar 06)
    • Distinct features of WPF’s approach
    • Acceptability of ‘personality development’ by conservative elements and clarity that this is not a ‘Sex Ed’ programme;
    • Provincial level MOU with Secretary Education Balochistan, Punjab & NWFP;
    • A clear focus on the empowerment of adolescents;
    • Strong volunteer ethos – no financial incentives to participating teachers;
    • Capacity-building and shared vision with partner NGOs, leading to a unified implementation strategy;
    • Engaging with the media as partners in development;
    • Interest from the National AIDS Control Programme leading to expansion to private sector schools;
    • Distinct features of WPF’s approach …(c’td)
    • Interest from religious leaders and their desire to see it replicated in madrassas;
    • Meaningful involvement of young people in programmatic review and design – not just as research subjects;
    • Enthusiasm of participating adolescents, teachers, principals and parents;
    • Use of MSC (Most Significant Change) monitoring and evaluation technique to measure programme impact;
    • Sustainability through shifting the ownership of the program from civil society to Government
    • Results to date:
    • Personality development: Enthusiastic, attentive, empowered students communicating well, thinking logically, focussing on their work and better equipped to face life’s hurdles;
    • Professional development: Committed, motivated teachers who relate better with their students;
    • Recognition of value and demand for expansion: Other staff and students request to participate in the programme and existing participants demand that it be expanded nationally.
    • Difficulties overcome
    • Recruitment of schools and selection of teachers;
    • Creating an enabling whole-of-school environment;
    • Threat of transfer of trained teachers;
    • Attempts at obstruction by financially self-interested gatekeepers;
    • Provincial differences in the school calendar;
    • Time management.
    • Challenges ahead
    • Assimilation of our public and private schools programme;
    • Transferring programme ownership to Government and expanding its reach in the formal education sector;
    • Working with religious leaders to deliver a pilot programme in madrassas;
    • Gaining the additional financial resources to achieve our advocacy objective – the integration of LSBE into the national core curriculum at both teacher training and student delivery levels.
    • Where are we at in the programme?
    • Welcome, ground rules and objectives
    • Up-scaling of the LSBE programme:
      Rationale, Milestones, Budgetary implications
    • 1) Reviewing the LSBE programme- Group Work
      What went well? What could we do better? How will we change it in the future?
    • 2) Recruitment strategies
      How can we effectively recruit more classes/ teachers and students in LSBE programme?
    • 3) Presenting the broader picture of WPF’s LSBE programme For participants new to the LSBE programme
    • Reports from the small group work discussions
    • Concluding remarks and vote of thanks
    • Where are we at in the programme?
    • Welcome, ground rules and objectives
    • Up-scaling of the LSBE programme:
      Rationale, Milestones, Budgetary implications
    • 1) Reviewing the LSBE programme- Group Work
      What went well? What could we do better? How will we change it in the future?
    • 2) Recruitment strategies
      How can we effectively recruit more classes/ teachers and students in LSBE programme?
    • 3) Presenting the broader picture of WPF’s LSBE programme For participants new to the LSBE programme
    • Reports from the small group work discussions
    • Concluding remarks and vote of thanks
    • For further information or to offer your support for our work please contact: Christopher John Wardle Country Representative for Pakistan World Population Foundation (WPF) PO Box 736 Islamabad voice: 051 211 0539 fax: 051 211 0536 email: [email_address]
    • Results from Pishin students
      Broadly categorised into:
    • Systematic and implementation changes
    • Teacher training
    • Advocacy
    • Engaging with the media more
    • Alternative resource production
    • Results from Pishin students (c’td)
      What went well?
    • LSBE programme is relevant and necessary to adolescent life and well-being and reflects core Islamic values;
    • Confidence and skills are built and problem-solving is particularly valued – “ we solve issues ourselves”;
    • Communication is enhanced at all levels;
    • Understanding of our common humanity and human rights has improved;
    • Parents appreciate the programme and it is interesting – “not boring”;
    • We value the difference between right and wrong and can identify good and bad habits.
    • Results from Pishin students (c’td)
      What could be done better? 1) Make it examinable 2) Use the workbook 3) Offer to classes 8/9/10 4) Share student problems 5) Valued teacher attention to programme
      What would we change next time/ 1) Include tests and/or link it to assessment of workbooks 2) Make workbooks available during programme, not at end 3) Expand the programme – train other teachers 4) Share key points through peer education approach 5) Curriculum reform / training / whole of school activities
    • Results from Pishin students (c’td)
      What could be done better? 6) Students share knowledge with others 7) Gaining parental permission 8) Additional content
      What would we change next time/ 6) MSC contributions / Advocate for LSBE via pettion / Include LSBE in debates with other schools / Quiz programmes / Integrate in college programmes 7) Build support through sharing appropriate resources 8) Discipline / Road safety / Youth rights / Animal rights
    • Results from Pishin students (c’td)
      Recruitment solutions:
    • Train more teachers
    • Get existing teachers to take classes one by one
    • Greater media involvement
    • Fact sheets – “small-small documents in Urdu” – capturing the key lessons
    • Cartoon repackaging of LSBE programme contents – in the style of ‘Mena’
    • Feature stakeholders on ‘Rising Pakistan’