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Crissy Turner - Information Literacy Lesson Plan
 

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    Crissy Turner - Information Literacy Lesson Plan Crissy Turner - Information Literacy Lesson Plan Document Transcript

    • Crissy J. Turner FRIT 7231 Key Assessment Description Instructional Design Project Part I: Identification of Learning Problem My target audience is a class of seventeen third graders. They are a heterogeneous mix of regular education students and special education students. They all are from different socioeconomic backgrounds, the most being low socioeconomic background. They are all in the age range of eight years old to eleven years old. Students have difficulty writing a persuasive paper using the writing process. Persuasive writing is a writing that tries to convince someone to feel the way you do. It was identified by the Third Grade Writing Assessment scores. There is an important need for the instruction because students must meet or exceeds the Fifth Grade Writing Assessment when they are in the fifth grade. Preparing them in third grade will hopefully improve the writing assessment when they take it in a few years. The discrepancy between the current state and the desired state is that students do not know how to use the writing process to develop a persuasive writing that meets or exceeds the standard. The goal of my instruction is for students to be able to use the writing process to develop a persuasive writing that meets or exceeds the standards. Students will participate in activities that are about the writing process. Students will use those practice skills to compose a writing that involves all five stages into writing that will meet or exceed the writing standard. Part II: Learner Analysis 1. Introduction: The students that I will be teaching are third grade students at Worth County Elementary School. In this class of 17, there are 11 boys and 6 girls. There are 7 special education students, 3 Early Intervention Students (EIP – a program designed to help struggling learners) students, and 7 regular education students. Ninety percent of these students qualify for free or reduced lunch. Of the seven special education students, one is deaf, two have a specific learning disability, one is developmentally delayed, two are Other Health Impaired (OHI – a disability based on a medical diagnosis), and one is autistic. This information was acquired by reviewing their Individual Education Plan (IEP), permanent folders, and class roster. Interest Inventory and Learning Style Questionnaires were given at the beginning of the year. Most information was mainly from observation of the teacher. 2. Entry Level Skills and Prior Knowledge: Entry Characteristics: Prerequisite skill & knowledge: Students will be able to use a sentence correctly. Students will be able to use capitalization and punctuation correctly. Students will be able to write a topic sentence with details. Students will be able to form a paragraph. Students will be able to use basic keyboarding skills.
    • Students will be able to use the Internet. Prior Experience: Students have all participated in Daily Language Review (DLR) which skills like conventions, editing, and revising are reviewed daily. Students have all participated in Writer’s Workshop in which the Writing Process is reviewed daily. 3. Attitudes Toward Content and Academic Motivation: Even though these students have been taught the Writing Process since kindergarten, most feel inadequate when it comes to writing. They seem unsure of what to do even with repeated directions. They lack in motivation unless it is just to get finished. Often they question, “Is this enough?” and there is only one or two paragraphs written. Most of these children struggle with writing their ideas down, therefore, they tend to rely on the teacher or other students for ideas. 4. Educational Ability Levels: Out of 17 students, 35% of students read on or above grade level while the other 65% read below grade level. Of the remaining 65%, these students are either EIP students or Special Education students. Because of their disabilities, the special education students have to have their word broken down in segments. 5. General Learning Preferences: At the beginning of the year, a learning style questionnaire was given. Most students (75%) learn kinesthetically, while the others learn visually (15%) and auditory (10%). (See attached.) 6. Attitude Toward Teachers and School: Most of the students in this class have a good attitude towards teachers. According to their Interest Inventory given at the beginning of school, a majority of the students said that they love school and were ready to go back to school. Students do receive marks on our classroom clipboard, but that is due to being off task or not following directions. They are very seldom written up for problems in the classroom, but three of them are written up for infractions on the bus consistently. Most students have pleasant attitudes. 7. Group Characteristics (including social characteristics and relevant cultural information) Most students have average social characteristics. They all communicate with others, get along with others, and work well together. The one student who is autistic does have social problems often wanting to work by himself. He has to be prodded to work with others and often corrected to show him how to work with others even though he is accepted by his peers, and they enjoy working with him. The deaf student in our class is of the Asian descent. He was abandoned when he was an infant and not adopted until he was eight years old. He has been in the United States for three years. He has an interpreter who is with him most of the day. He does have a language barrier because of his deafness, but does participate with the class daily.
    • Name _____________________________ Date ____________________ #______ Learning Styles Inventory 1. If I have to learn how to do something, I learn best when I: (V) Watch someone show me how. (A) Hear someone tell me how. (K) Try to do it myself. 2. When I read, I often find that I: (V) Visualize what I am reading in my mind's eye. (A) Read out loud or hear the words inside my head. (K) Fidget and try to "feel" the content. 3. When asked to give directions, I: (V) See the actual places in my mind as I say them or prefer to draw them. (A) Have no difficulty in giving them verbally. (K) Have to point or move my body as I give them.. 4. If I am unsure how to spell a word, I: (V) Write it in order to determine if it looks right. (A) Spell it out loud in order to determine if it sounds right. (K) Write it in order to determine if it feels right. 5. When I write, I: (V) Am concerned how neat and well-spaced my letters and words appear. (A) Often say the letters and words to myself. (K) Push hard on my pen or pencil and can feel the flow of the words or letters as I form them. 6. If I had to remember a list of items, I would remember it best if I: (V) wrote them down. (A) Said them over and over to myself. (K) Moved around and used my fingers to name each item. 7. I prefer teachers who: (V) Use the board or overhead projector while they lecture. (A) Talk with a lot of expression. (K) Use hands-on activities. 8. When trying to concentrate, I have a difficult time when: (V) There is a lot of clutter or movement in the room. (A) There is a lot of noise in the room. (K) I have to sit still for any length of time.
    • 9. When solving a problem, I: (V) Write or draw diagrams to see it. (A) Talk myself through it. (K) Use my entire body or move objects to help me think. 10. When given written instructions on how to build something, I: (V) Read them silently and try to visualize how the parts will fit together. (A) Read them out loud and talk to myself as I put the parts together. (K) Try to put the parts together first and read later. 11. To keep occupied while waiting, I: (V) Look around, stare, or read.. (A) Talk or listen to others. (K) Walk around, manipulate things with my hands, or move/shake my feet as I sit. 12. If I had to verbally describe something to another person, I would: (V) Be brief because I do not like to talk at length. (A) Go into great detail because I like to talk. (K) Gesture and move around while talking. 13. If someone were verbally describing something to me, I would: (V) Try to visualize what she was saying. (A) Enjoy listening but want to interrupt and talk myself. (K) Become bored if her description got too long and detailed. 14. When trying to recall names, I remember: (V) Faces but forget names. (A) Names, but forget faces. (K) The situation that I met the person other than the person's name or face. Scoring Instructions: Add the number of responses for each letter and enter the total below. The area with the highest number of responses is probably your primary mode of learning. Because most people learn through a mixture of all three styles, read all of the learning suggestions given and select those you feel will work best for you. Visual – Auditory - Kinesthetic V = _____ A = ______ K = ______
    • Part III: Task Analysis Once I started preparing for this lesson, I first read over the standards and decided on what steps would be taken to ensure it was carried out effectively. I began by having students to define what they thought persuasion meant. I next had them participate in an activity that would help them understand reasons for persuasion. Next, they brainstormed ideas to help determine reasons for or against having recess every day. Next, they described their reason for or against having recess every day. Then, they used their conventions skills that they have been learning all year long. They helped a classmate and themselves by correcting their papers. Last, they typed their final draft. I will be serving at my SME for this lesson. I am a third grade teacher with fifteen years of teaching experience. I have a Bachelor’s degree in Early Childhood Education, a Master’s degree in Post-Secondary Education, a Specialist’s degree in Teacher Leadership, and is presently taking classes for certification in the Media Specialist field. I have attended several workshops on the writing process, and participate in weekly/biweekly meetings with other third grade teachers who discuss the writing process. I will conduct the lesson and explain as needed to students. I will conference with students online periodically throughout the writing process to ensure understanding of the procedure. Task: 1. Define persuasion. 1.1. Convincing others to think your way 1.2. Explain ways of persuasion Describe persuasion. Brainstorm ideas about having/not having recess daily. Write a rough draft with an introduction, body, and conclusion describing reasons for or against recess daily. Review a partner's rought draft as well as review your own rough draft. Make revising and editing corrections where needed. After you have made corrections, type your final draft and submit.
    • 2. Brainstorm reasons for having/not having recess every day. 2.1. Determine reasons 2.2. Examine rubric 2.3. Review Writing Process 2.4. Complete graphic organizer 3. Describe reasons for having/not having recess every day 3.1. Write introduction paragraph. 3.2. Write 3 paragraphs describing reasons for or against. 3.3. Write a conclusion. 4. Use revision and editing skills. 4.1. Revise and edit practice paragraph 4.2. Revise and edit partner’s rough draft 4.3. Revise and edit personal rough draft 5. Publish final draft. 5.1. Type and submit final draft Part IV: Example of Instructional Objectives Terminal Objective 1: Students will define persuasion. Enabling Objectives: 1A: To define persuasion as trying to convince others to think the way you think about something. 1B: To explain ways someone might try to persuade you. Terminal Objective 2: Students will brainstorm reasons for having/not having recess every day. Enabling Objectives: 2A.To determine reasons why they chose the book they chose 2B.To examine the persuasive essay rubric. 2C. To review the first step in the Writing Process. 2D. To complete a graphic organizer that will aid in the first step of the writing process. Terminal Objective 3: Students will write a paragraph describing reasons for having/not having recess every day. Enabling Objectives: 3A: To write his/her introduction paragraph by stating his thesis statement. 3B: To write his/her next three paragraphs using the three reasons and facts that go with each reason. 3C: To write his/her conclusion that summarizes the three reasons that support his/her thesis. Terminal Terminal Objective 4: Students will correct his/her writing using conventions skills.
    • Enabling Objectives: 4A:To revise and edit a paragraph written by the teacher. 4B. To revise and edit a partner’s rough draft. 4C: To revise and edit his/her own rough draft. Terminal Objective 5: Students will publish the final draft of his/her paper. Enabling Objectives: 5A: To type the final draft using Microsoft Word or Word Pad. Classification of Instructional Objectives Content Performance Recall Application Fact 1, Concept 2, 2a, 2c, 2b, Principles and Rules Procedure 1a, 1b, 2d, 3, 3a, 3b, 3c, 4, 4a, 4b, 4c, 5, 5a Interpersonal Attitude Terminal and Enabling Objectives Common Core Georgia Performance Standards (CCGPS) 1 ELACC3W1 1a ELACC3W1 1b ELACC3W1 2 ELACC3W1a 2a ELACC3W1 2b ELACC3W5 2c ELACC3W5 2d ELACC3W5 3 ELACC3W5 3a ELACC3W5 3b ELACC3W5 3c ELACC3W5 4 ELACC3W5 4a ELACC3W5 4b ELACC3W5 4c ELACC3W5 5 ELACC3W5 5a ELACC3W5
    • Part V: Development of Assessments Lesson 1: What is Persuasion? List favorite book and reasons why on discussion board. Compare and contrast answers on classroom blog. View PowerPoint about ways people try to convince others. Lesson 2: What is Prewriting? Think about their reasoning for choosing the book they chose. Review writing rubric. Read about the first step of the writing process. Complete the Persuasion Map. Lesson 3: What is Drafting? Read about the second step of the writing process. Compose an introduction paragraph, three paragraphs that describe reasons and facts, and a conclusion paragraph. Lesson 4 – What is Revising and Editing? Tutorial about revising. Practice revising and editing. Lesson 5 – What is Publishing? Tutorial about how to use a word processor. Goals Students will determine that not everyone has the same opinion or point of view. Students will view different ways people try to convince others. Students will determine that in order to persuade someone to believe something that they do, they will have to write a persuasive essay using the Writing Process. Students will determine that in order to persuade someone to believe something that they do, they will have to write a persuasive essay using the Writing Process. Students will determine that in order to persuade someone to believe something that they do, they will have to write a persuasive essay using the Writing Process. Students will determine that in order to persuade someone to believe something that they do, they will have to write a persuasive essay using the Writing Process. Objectives Terminal Objective 1: Students will define persuasion. 1A: To define persuasion as trying to convince others to think Terminal Objective 2: Students will brainstorm reasons for having/not having recess every day. 2A. To determine Terminal Objective 3: Students will write a paragraph describing reasons for having/not having recess every day. Terminal Objective 4: Students will correct his/her writing using conventions skills. 4A: To revise and edit a paragraph written by Terminal Objective 5: Students will publish the final draft of his/her paper. 5A: To type the final draft using Microsoft
    • the way you think about something. 1B: To explain ways someone might try to persuade you. reasons why they chose the book they chose. 2B. To examine the persuasive essay rubric. 2C. To review the first step in the Writing Process. 2D. To complete a graphic organizer that will aid in the first step of the writing process. 3A: To write his/her introduction paragraph by stating his thesis statement. 3B: To write his/her next three paragraphs using the three reasons and facts that go with each reason. 3C: To write his/her conclusion that summarizes the three reasons that support his/her thesis. the teacher. 4B. To revise and edit a partner’s rough draft. 4C: To revise and edit his/her own rough draft. Word or Word Pad. Assessments Discussion Board Rubric Online Newspaper Worksheet Discussion Board Answers Persuasion Map Student’s Rough Draft Teacher’s Paragraph Partner’s Rough Draft Student’s Rough Draft Student’s Final Draft Persuasive Writing Rubric UDL Multiple Means of Representation Multiple Means of Representation Multiple Means of Expression Multiple Means of Expression and Multiple Means of Engagement Multiple Means of Representation Multiple Means of Engagement
    • Discussion Board Rubric Criteria Exemplary = 3 Proficient = 2 Limited = 1 Unsatisfactory = 0 Score Critical Analysis Discussion posting shows an excellent understanding that the discussion question was understood. Discussion posting showsa good understanding that the discussion question was understood. Discussion posting shows some evidence that the discussion question was understood. Discussion posting shows little or no evidence that the discussion question was not understood. Professional Communication and Etiquette Written interactions on the discussion board show respect and interest in the viewpoints of others. Written interactions on the discussion board show a good respect and interest in the viewpoints of others. Written interactions on the discussion board show some respect and interest in the viewpoints of others. Written interactions on the discussion board show no respect or interest in the viewpoints of others. Conventions Written responses are free of grammatical, spelling, or punctuation errors (0 errors). Written responses have few grammatical, spelling or punctuation errors (1 or 2 errors) Written responses have some grammatical, spelling, or punctuation errors (3 or 4 errors). Written responses have many grammatical, spelling, or punctuation errors (5 or more errors). TOTAL /9 Grade/Rating Scale Points Grade Letter Grade Rating Points Grade Letter Grade Rating 9/9 100 A Superior 4/9 44 F Unacceptable 8/9 88 B Target 3/9 33 F Unacceptable 7/9 77 C Acceptable 2/9 22 F Unacceptable 6/9 66 D Unacceptable 1/9 11 F Unacceptable 5/9 55 F Unacceptable
    • Name:______________________________Date: _______________________________ PERSUASIVESTRATEGYDEFINITIONS Definition Example Claim–yourmain point BigNames–experts and important people that support yourside of the argument Logos– usinglogic, numbers, facts, and data to support your argument Pathos– appealing to your audience’s emotions Ethos–making yourself seem trustworthy and believable Kairos- buildinga sense of urgency for your cause Research– using studies and informationto make yourargument seem more convincing; you can use words, graphs, tables, illustrations
    • PERSUASIVE WRITING ASSESSMENT Grade/Rating Scale: 20 – 24 points – Target 17 – 19 points – Acceptable Below 16 points – Unacceptable Excellent (4) Good (3) Satisfactory (2) Needs Improvement(1)Introduction (Organization) The introduction is inviting, states the main topic, and previews the structure of the paper. The introduction clearly states the main topic and previews the structure of the paper, but is not particularly inviting to the reader. The introduction states the main topic, but does not adequately preview the structure of the paper, nor is it particularly inviting to the reader. There is no clear introduction of the main topic or structure of the paper. Sequencing (Organization) Details are placed in a logical order and the way they are presented effectively keeps the interest of the reader. Details are placed in a logical order, but the way in which they are presented sometimes makes the writing less interesting. Some details are not in a logical or expected order, and this distracts the reader. Many details are not in a logical or expected order. There is little sense that the writing is organized. Conclusion (Organization) The conclusion is strong and leaves readers with a feeling that they understand what the writer is arguing for. The conclusion is recognizable and ties up almost all the loose ends. The conclusion is recognizable, but does not tie up several loose ends. There is no clear conclusion. The paper just ends. Accuracy of Facts (Content) All supporting facts are reported accurately. Almost all supporting facts are reported accurately. Most supporting facts are reported accurately. No facts are reported or most are inaccurately reported. Commitment (Voice) The writer successfully uses several persuasive strategies to try to show why the reader should care or want to know more about the topic. The writer successfully uses one or two persuasive strategies to try to show why the reader should care or want to know more about the topic. The writer attempts to make the reader care about the topic, but is not really successful. The writer makes no attempt to make the reader care about the topic. Cooperation Partners successfully collaborated and cooperated with one another to write a persuasive essay. Partners collaborated and cooperated with one another to write a persuasive essay. Partners needed minimal problem solving help from the teacher. Partners wrote a persuasive essay together. Partners needed a great deal of help from the teacher to solve cooperation issues. Partners were unable to successfully complete their essay. Partners had a difficult time cooperating and collaborating. TOTAL /24
    • Lesson 1: What is Persuasion? Objective 1: The student will define what persuasion means. 1A: To define persuasion as trying to convince others to think the way you think about something. 1B: To explain ways someone might try to persuade you. Assessments: After watching a PowerPoint, students will complete a worksheet over ways people try to convince you. Students will then read online about the Writing Process. UDL Principles: Multiple means of representation will be used. The PowerPoint and Writing Process website may be read or listened to audibly. Lesson 2: What is Prewriting? Objective 2: Students will brainstorm reasons for having/not having recess every day. 2A. Using the online website, http://www.readwritethink.org/files/resources/interactives/persuasion_map/, the students will think about their topic, thesis statement, reasons that support their statement, facts and examples for each reason, and a conclusion. Assessments: Students will enter information into an online persuasion map. UDL Principles: Multiple Means of Representation will be used. The persuasion map that is online may be read or listened to audibly. Lesson 3: What is Drafting? Objective 3: Students will write a paragraph describing reasons for having/not having recess every day. 3A: To examine the persuasive essay rubric from the Georgia Department of Education. 3B: To write his/her introduction paragraph by stating his thesis statement. 3C: To write his/her next three paragraphs using the three reasons and facts that go with each reason. 3D: To write his/her conclusion that summarizes the three reasons that support his/her thesis. Assessments: Students will write their first draft. UDL Principles: Multiple Means of Expression will be used. If needed, prompts will be made for students who find difficulty in describing reasons for or against daily recess. Lesson 4 – What is Revising and Editing? Objective 4: Students will correct his/her writing using conventions skills.
    • 4A: The student will email his/her paper to his/her partner for suggestions of revisions and editing and will consider the thoughts and ideas suggested from the partner. 4B: The student will correct his/her essay. Assessments: Students will revise and edit their partner’s rough draft as well as their own. UDL Principles: Multiple Means of Expression and Multiple Means of Engagement will be used. If needed, students will be allowed to use software that aids in revising and editing their paper. Lesson 5 – What is Publishing? Objective 5: Students will publish the final draft of his/her paper. 5A: To type the final draft using Microsoft Word. Assessments: Students will type their final draft of his/her paper. UDL Principles: Multiple Means of Representation and Multiple Means of Engagement will be used. If needed, students will be allowed to use software that types voice commanded text and also watch a tutorial on how to use Microsoft Word and WordPad. Part VI: Instructional Sequence Sequence Description Objective 1 Define persuasion. 1 2 Produce the first stage of the writing process. 2 3 Produce the second stage of the writing process. 3 4 Complete the fourth and fifth stages of the writing process. 4 5 Produce the fifth stage of the writing process. 5 This sequence builds on concepts in a world-related order. The learner will proceed through the instruction just as a teacher would proceed through planning a lesson. This sequence also alternates reading and group discussion with hands-on activities to maintain high learner motivation and involvement. Finally, this sequence allows the learner to self-generate questions that most likely are addressed by the next step in the sequence. Lesson 1: What is Persuasion? Objective 1: The student will define what persuasion means. 1A: To define persuasion as trying to convince others to think the way you think about something. 1B: To explain ways someone might try to persuade you. Initial Presentation: Have students to think about their favorite book and reasons why it is their favorite book. Have them list their reasons on the discussion board. For students with
    • disabilities, allow them to use a K-W-L chart or other charts needed to access prior knowledge (Carr & Thompson, 1996). Generative Strategy: Have students type their favorite book and reasons why it is their favorite book in their classroom blog. Continuing with the discussion board, allow students to compare their answers briefly with each other. Direct students to understand that people all have reasons for thinking their book is the best. Next, have students watch an online PowerPoint from the website, http://www.readwritethink.org/classroom-resources/lesson-plans/convince-developing- persuasive-writing-56.html?tab=4#tabs, which gives ways people try to convince others of something that they believe in. When they are finished with the PowerPoint, have students read an advertisement from any online newspaper. Have students complete the worksheet from the website, http://www.readwritethink.org/files/resources/lesson_images/lesson56/strategy- definition.pdf. For students with disabilities, allow them to read along with the audio version of the PowerPoint (Ebro, Rasmussen, and Spelling 1996). Lesson 2: What is Prewriting? Objective 2: Students will brainstorm reasons for having/not having recess every day. 2A. Using the online website, http://www.readwritethink.org/files/resources/interactives/persuasion_map/, the students will think about their topic, thesis statement, reasons that support their statement, facts and examples for each reason, and a conclusion. Motivational Strategy: Guide students to think about their reasoning for choosing their favorite book. Have them answer the question on the online discussion board. Guide students that one way to convince others how they feel is to produce an argument for their belief. Have students go use the website, http://www.readwritethink.org/professional-development/strategy- guides/implementing-writing-process-30386.html#research-basis. They should read and discuss the first step of writing which is prewriting. For students with disabilities, use audio story webs or audio outlining tools (Lott, 1983). Initial Presentation: Next, using their online webcam, instruct students that there are parts of a persuasion map. Allow students to view the map located from the website: http://www.readwritethink.org/files/resources/interactives/persuasion_map/. Describe each part of the map and allow students to ask questions if needed. Now, instruct students that their persuasive argument is where students should or should not have recess every day. Generative Strategy: Next, instruct students to work independently on their persuasion map from the website above. When they have finished instruct them to email it to the teacher. Also, have them print it for their copy. Lesson 3: What is Drafting? Objective 3: Students will write a paragraph describing reasons for having/not having recess every day. 3A: To examine the persuasive essay rubric from the Georgia Department of Education.
    • 3B: To write his/her introduction paragraph by stating his thesis statement. 3C: To write his/her next three paragraphs using the three reasons and facts that go with each reason. 3D: To write his/her conclusion that summarizes the three reasons that support his/her thesis. Motivational Strategy: Now that students have completed their persuasion map, have them think and brainstorm of how to present their argument. Have students write in one way they would do it on the classroom blog. Guide students that the one way they will be doing it is by creating a persuasive essay. Initial Presentation: Using the website, http://www.readwritethink.org/professional- development/strategy-guides/implementing-writing-process-30386.html#research-basis, discuss the steps of the writing process. For students with disabilities, provide explicit prompts for each step in a sequential process (Blankenship, Ayres, &Langone, 2005). Generative Strategy: Before beginning the rough draft, have students examine the persuasive essay rubric from the Georgia Department of Education. Next, using the website from above, help students construct a persuasive essay based on the reasons, facts, and examples from the persuasion map. Also, have student construct a conclusion paragraph. Guide students to use transition words, describing words, etc. When finished, conference with students as needed. For students with disabilities, introduce graduated scaffolds that support information processing strategies (Boon, Burke, Fore III, & Spencer, 2006). Lesson 4 – What is Revising and Editing? Objective 4: Students will correct his/her writing using conventions skills. 4A: The student will email his/her paper to his/her partner for suggestions of revisions and editing and will consider the thoughts and ideas suggested from the partner. 4B: The student will correct his/her essay. Motivational Strategy: Now that students have written their essays, explain to them that sometimes ideas are not clear and mistakes have been made. Have students read an article the teacher has written with errors on it on purpose. Next, have them answer the following on the discussion board: Tell students that they are going to make changes to the story two different ways: first they are going to talk about ways to make the story even better, and then they can make any corrections that they think are necessary. For students with disabilities, provide spellcheckers, grammar checkers, and/or word prediction software (Joram, 1992). Initial Presentation: Demonstrate on an online white board how to revise specific aspects of their writing to make it more coherent and clear. You can model reading your own writing and do a think aloud about how you could add more details and make it clearer. Teach students to reread their own work more than once as they think about whether it really conveys what they want to their reader. For students with disabilities, provide spellcheckers, grammar checkers, and word prediction software (Joram, 1992).
    • Generative Strategy: Students will then review their own writing considering what was discussed in the discussion question and what the teacher modeled online. Instruct them to read over them and look for errors that need revision and/or editing. Next have students e-mail their stories with their partners for their suggestions on how to make it better. For students with disabilities, provide spellcheckers, grammar checkers, and word prediction software (Joram, 1992). Lesson 5 – What is Publishing? Objective 5: Students will publish the final draft of his/her paper. 5A: To type the final draft using Microsoft Word. Motivational Strategy: Have students think about the possible ways to present their paper. They could publish their works in a variety of ways, such as a class book, bulletin board, letters to the editor, school newsletter, or website. For students with disabilities, provide Text-To-Speech software (voice recognition), human dictation, and recording (Crealock&Sitko, 1990). Initial Presentation: Instruct students that they are going to publish it using Microsoft Word. The teacher will go over the basics of Microsoft Word. Students will watch a tutorial on Microsoft Word and WordPad from the website http://www.sabrinasterling.com/. Generative Strategy: Students will then use Microsoft Word to publish their persuasive essay. References Blankenship, T. L., Ayres, K. M., &Langone, J. (2005). Effects of computer-based cognitive mapping on reading comprehension for students with emotional behavior disorders. Journal of Special Education Technology, 20(2), 15-23. Boon, R. T., Burke, M. D., Fore III, C., & Spencer, V. G. (2006).The impact of cognitive organizers and technology-based practices on student success in secondary social studies classrooms.Journal of Special Education Technology, 21(1), 5-15. Carr, S. C., & Thompson, B. (1996). The effects of prior knowledge and schema activation strategies on the inferential reading comprehension of children with and without learning disabilities.,Learning Disability Quarterly 19(1), 48-61. Crealock, C., &Sitko, M. (1990). Comparison between computer and handwriting technologies in writing training with learning disabled students. International Journal of Special Education, 5(2), 173-183. Dalton, B., Schleper, D., Kennedy, M., Lutz, L., &Strangman, N. (2005).A universally designed digital strategic reading environment for adolescents who are deaf and hard of hearing.Final Report to Gallaudet University. Wakefield, MA: CAST.
    • Elbro, C., Rasmussen, I., & Spelling, B. (1996). Teaching reading to disabled readers with language disorders: A controlled evaluation of synthetic speech feedback. Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, 37(2), 140-155. Joram, E. (1992). The effects of revising with a word processor on written composition. Research in the Teaching of English, 26(2), 167-193. Lange, A. A., McPhillips, M., Mulhern, G., & Wylie, J. (2006). Assistive software tools for secondary-level students with literacy difficulties. Journal of Special Education Technology, 21(3), 13-22. Lott, G. W. (1983). The effect of inquiry teaching and advance organizers upon student outcomes in science education.Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 20(5), 437-451. Shephard, K. (2003). Questioning, promoting and evaluating the use of streaming video to support student learning. British Journal of Educational Technology, 34(3), 295-308.
    • Part VII: Design of Instruction Lesson 1: What is Persuasion? List favorite book and reasons why on discussion board. Compare and contrast answers on classroom blog. View PowerPoint about ways people try to convince others. Lesson 2: What is Prewriting? Think about their reasoning for choosing the book they chose. Review writing rubric. Read about the first step of the writing process. Complete the Persuasion Map. Lesson 3: What is Drafting? Read about the second step of the writing process. Compose an introduction paragraph, three paragraphs that describe reasons and facts, and a conclusion paragraph. Lesson 4 – What is Revising and Editing? Tutorial about revising. Practice revising and editing. Lesson 5 – What is Publishing? Tutorial about how to use a word processor. Goals Students will determine that not everyone has the same opinion or point of view. Students will view different ways people try to convince others. Students will determine that in order to persuade someone to believe something that they do, they will have to write a persuasive essay using the Writing Process. Students will determine that in order to persuade someone to believe something that they do, they will have to write a persuasive essay using the Writing Process. Students will determine that in order to persuade someone to believe something that they do, they will have to write a persuasive essay using the Writing Process. Students will determine that in order to persuade someone to believe something that they do, they will have to write a persuasive essay using the Writing Process. Objectives Terminal Objective 1: Students will define persuasion. 1A: To define persuasion as trying to convince others to think the way you think about Terminal Objective 2: Students will brainstorm reasons for having/not having recess every day. 2A. To determine reasons why they chose Terminal Objective 3: Students will write a paragraph describing reasons for having/not having recess every day. 3A: To write his/her Terminal Objective 4: Students will correct his/her writing using conventions skills. 4A: To revise and edit a paragraph written by the teacher. Terminal Objective 5: Students will publish the final draft of his/her paper. 5A: To type the final draft using Microsoft Word or Word Pad.
    • something. 1B: To explain ways someone might try to persuade you. the book they chose. 2B. To examine the persuasive essay rubric. 2C. To review the first step in the Writing Process. 2D. To complete a graphic organizer that will aid in the first step of the writing process. introduction paragraph by stating his thesis statement. 3B: To write his/her next three paragraphs using the three reasons and facts that go with each reason. 3C: To write his/her conclusion that summarizes the three reasons that support his/her thesis. 4B. To revise and edit a partner’s rough draft. 4C: To revise and edit his/her own rough draft. Assessments Discussion Board Rubric Online Newspaper Worksheet Discussion Board Answers Persuasion Map Student’s Rough Draft Teacher’s Paragraph Partner’s Rough Draft Student’s Rough Draft Student’s Final Draft Persuasive Writing Rubric UDL Multiple Means of Expression Multiple Means of Representation Multiple Means of Representation Multiple Means of Representation Multiple Means of Representation Multiple Means of Engagement Multiple Means of Representation Multiple Means of Engagement
    • Discussion Board Rubric Criteria Exemplary = 3 Proficient = 2 Limited = 1 Unsatisfactory = 0 Score Critical Analysis Discussion posting shows an excellent understanding that the discussion question was understood. Discussion posting showsa good understanding that the discussion question was understood. Discussion posting shows some evidence that the discussion question was understood. Discussion posting shows little or no evidence that the discussion question was not understood. Professional Communication and Etiquette Written interactions on the discussion board show respect and interest in the viewpoints of others. Written interactions on the discussion board show a good respect and interest in the viewpoints of others. Written interactions on the discussion board show some respect and interest in the viewpoints of others. Written interactions on the discussion board show no respect or interest in the viewpoints of others. Conventions Written responses are free of grammatical, spelling, or punctuation errors (0 errors). Written responses have few grammatical, spelling or punctuation errors (1 or 2 errors) Written responses have some grammatical, spelling, or punctuation errors (3 or 4 errors). Written responses have many grammatical, spelling, or punctuation errors (5 or more errors). TOTAL /9 Grade/Rating Scale Points Grade Letter Grade Rating Points Grade Letter Grade Rating 9/9 100 A Superior 4/9 44 F Unacceptable 8/9 88 B Target 3/9 33 F Unacceptable 7/9 77 C Acceptable 2/9 22 F Unacceptable 6/9 66 D Unacceptable 1/9 11 F Unacceptable 5/9 55 F Unacceptable
    • Copyright2006IRA/NCTE.Allrightsreserved.ReadWriteThink.orgmaterialsmaybereproducedfore ducationalpurposes.Images©2006MicrosoftCorporation.Allrightsreserved. Definition Example Claim–yourmain point BigNames–experts and important people that support yourside of the argument Logos– usinglogic, numbers, facts, and data to support your argument Pathos– appealing to your audience’s emotions Ethos–making yourself seem trustworthy and believable Kairos- buildinga sense of urgency for your cause Research– using studies and informationto make yourargument seem more convincing; you can use words, graphs, tables, illustrations
    • PERSUASIVEWRITINGASSESSMENT Grade/Rating Scale: 20 – 24 points – Target 17 – 19 points – Acceptable Below 16 points –Unacceptable Excellent (4) Good (3) Satisfactory (2) Needs Improvement(1) Introduction (Organization) Theintroductionis inviting,statesthemai ntopic,and previewsthestructure of thepaper. Theintroduction clearlystatesthemain topicandpreviewsthes tructureof thepaper,butisnot particularlyinvitingto thereader. Theintroduction statesthemaintopic,b utdoesnot adequatelypreview thestructureofthepa per,noris it particularlyinvitingto thereader. Thereisnoclear introduction ofthemaintopicor structureof thepaper. Sequencing (Organization) Detailsareplacedinalo gicalorderandthewayt heyare presentedeffectively keepstheinterestof thereader. Detailsareplacedinalo gicalorder,butthewayi nwhichtheyare presentedsometimes makesthewritinglessi nteresting. Somedetailsarenot inalogicalor expectedorder,and thisdistractstheread er. Manydetailsarenotin alogicalorexpectedord er.Thereislittle sensethatthewritingis organized. Conclusion (Organization) Theconclusionis strongandleavesread erswith a feeling thattheyunderstand whatthewriteris arguingfor. Theconclusionis recognizable and ties upalmostallthelooseen ds. Theconclusionis recognizable,butdoes nottieupseveral looseends. Thereisnoclear conclusion.Thepaperj ust ends. Accuracyof Facts (Content) Allsupportingfacts are reported accurately. Almostallsupporting factsarereported accurately. Mostsupportingfacts are reported accurately. Nofactsare reported ormostare inaccuratelyreported. Commitmen t (Voice) Thewriter successfullyusessever alpersuasivestrategie stotryto showwhythereader shouldcareorwantto knowmoreabouttheto pic. Thewriter successfullyusesone ortwopersuasive strategiestotryto showwhythereader shouldcareorwantto knowmoreabouttheto pic. Thewriterattemptsto makethereader careaboutthetopic,bu tisnotreallysuccessful . Thewritermakesno attempttomakethere adercareaboutthetop ic. Cooperation Partnerssuccessfully collaboratedand cooperatedwithone anothertowriteapers uasiveessay. Partnerscollaborated andcooperatedwith oneanother to write apersuasiveessay.Part ners needed minimalproblemsolvin ghelpfromtheteacher. Partnerswroteapersua siveessaytogether.Par tners neededagreatdealof helpfromtheteachert osolvecooperation issues. Partners wereunable tosuccessfullycomplet etheiressay.Partnersh adadifficult time cooperatingand collaborating. TOTAL /24
    • Part VIII: Formative Evaluation Plan 1a. How will you collect learner evaluation of your online module? I will collect learner evaluation of my online module by creating an online survey using Survey Monkey. Students will be invited to the online evaluation via e-mail. Students will answer the questions, and then the data will be delivered to me. 1b. What set up will you put into place so that an SME can evaluate your online module? Since I am the SME, I have another writing teacher evaluate my online module. 2. Student Survey: http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/GKF75YG SME Survey: http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/LQBLKSN 3. Data from the online student survey will be reviewed immediately. Charts will be created using the online software. I will look for weaknesses and areas of improvement. I will then look at the SME teacher rubric. I will also look for weaknesses and areas of improvement. I will then make notes and find ways to improve my instruction. I will then create a narrative that has my new goals and improve instruction for those areas.