Writing (and editing)for the webCaroline Jarrett                   Longer                   version
Introductions• Tell us your name and role• Give us a 20-word explanation  of the piece of writing you chose for today   – ...
Part A: Choose your focus         1.Understand context of useAgenda   Part B: Edit for the web         2.Choose what to sa...
4
1. Understand context of use• Who are you writing for?• Where, when and why will  the users use what you create?• How will...
1. Understand context of use• Who are you writing for?   – Choose a photograph of someone you are writing for   – Write th...
2. Choose what to say                        7
2. Choose what to say• Decide on the key message of this text• Apply a (temporary) heading to each paragraph• Remove any p...
9
Science doesn’t have to be verbose                                     10
Science doesn’t have to be verbose                                     11
3. Slash everything else• Slash by half, slash by half again• Use short paragraphs and short sentences• Try deleting the f...
3. Slash everything else• Don’t rewrite the text just yet• Decide whether to cut any paragraph• Decide which order the par...
14
4. Edit sentences• Be active• Use action verbs, not nouns that hide verbs• Be positive• Avoid whiz-deletions• "They" is OK...
4. Edit sentences• Identify which of these sentences are in passive voice• Edit these sentences to:   – Turn passive sente...
Part A: Choose your focus         1.Understand context of useAgenda   Part B: Edit for the web         2.Choose what to sa...
A short exercise based on Dixon, 1987• Dixon, P. 1987. "The Processing of Organizational and  Component Step Information i...
19
5. Put into logical order• IF before THEN• List conditions separately• First things first, second things second• Try writi...
5. Put into logical order• This document has several chunks• Organise them into logical order:   – First things first   – ...
22
6. Demolish walls of words• Use bulleted lists for items or choices• Use numbered lists and imperatives for instructions• ...
6. Demolish walls of words• This is a paragraph from a larger document• Split it up                                       ...
Part 1: Choose your focus         1.Understand context of useAgenda   Part 2: Edit for the web         2.Choose what to sa...
26
7. Meaningful links• Give a reward for each click• Write meaningful links• Position important links higher                ...
7. Choose links• Review the list of links on this page• Rewrite them so that:   – You would know whether you want to click...
29
8. Check it’s consistent• Launch and land on the same name• Call each concept by one name                                 ...
8. Check it’s consistent• Review the links on this page to see  whether they have the correct titles.   – Do any of them n...
32
9. Rest it and test it• Rest: leave it alone for a few hours, then review.• Test: try it out on someone, preferably a real...
9. Rest it and test it• In pairs:   – Decide on who is who is the test participant and who is the facilitator• Test partic...
Caroline Jarretttwitter @cjformscaroline.jarrett@effortmark.co.uk                                    35
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Writing and editing for the web - expanded version

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One-day course on writing and editing for the web, based on www.editingthatworks.com. This is a longer version with summaries of the key teaching points.

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

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Writing and editing for the web - expanded version

  1. 1. Writing (and editing)for the webCaroline Jarrett Longer version
  2. 2. Introductions• Tell us your name and role• Give us a 20-word explanation of the piece of writing you chose for today – Why you chose it – What you aim to achieve with it 2
  3. 3. Part A: Choose your focus 1.Understand context of useAgenda Part B: Edit for the web 2.Choose what to say 3.Slash everything else 4.Edit sentences 5.Put into logical order 6.Demolish walls of words 7.Choose links 8.Check it’s consistent 9.Rest it then test it 3
  4. 4. 4
  5. 5. 1. Understand context of use• Who are you writing for?• Where, when and why will the users use what you create?• How will they use it?• What are you trying to achieve? Picture credits: Flickr @chelmsfordpubliclibrary 5
  6. 6. 1. Understand context of use• Who are you writing for? – Choose a photograph of someone you are writing for – Write the story of who that person is• Where, when and why will the users use what you create? – Add that to your story 6
  7. 7. 2. Choose what to say 7
  8. 8. 2. Choose what to say• Decide on the key message of this text• Apply a (temporary) heading to each paragraph• Remove any paragraphs that don’t help 8
  9. 9. 9
  10. 10. Science doesn’t have to be verbose 10
  11. 11. Science doesn’t have to be verbose 11
  12. 12. 3. Slash everything else• Slash by half, slash by half again• Use short paragraphs and short sentences• Try deleting the first bit Picture credit: John Sankey 12
  13. 13. 3. Slash everything else• Don’t rewrite the text just yet• Decide whether to cut any paragraph• Decide which order the paragraphs should go in• Decide whether to cut any sentence, or part of a sentence 13
  14. 14. 14
  15. 15. 4. Edit sentences• Be active• Use action verbs, not nouns that hide verbs• Be positive• Avoid whiz-deletions• "They" is OK• Use personal pronouns or name the actors• Unstring noun strings• No woolly words 15 Picture credit: Flickr Canadian Film Centre
  16. 16. 4. Edit sentences• Identify which of these sentences are in passive voice• Edit these sentences to: – Turn passive sentence to active ones – Name the actors – Make the text seem more approachable• (Bonus task: decide if the text is in the right order) 16
  17. 17. Part A: Choose your focus 1.Understand context of useAgenda Part B: Edit for the web 2.Choose what to say 3.Slash everything else 4.Edit sentences 5.Put into logical order 6.Demolish walls of words 7.Choose links 8.Check it’s consistent 9.Rest it then test it 17
  18. 18. A short exercise based on Dixon, 1987• Dixon, P. 1987. "The Processing of Organizational and Component Step Information in Written Directions" Journal of Memory and Language, 26, pp24-35, Academic Press, Inc. 18
  19. 19. 19
  20. 20. 5. Put into logical order• IF before THEN• List conditions separately• First things first, second things second• Try writing like a recipe Picture credit: Flickr _Raúl_ 20
  21. 21. 5. Put into logical order• This document has several chunks• Organise them into logical order: – First things first – Second things second 21
  22. 22. 22
  23. 23. 6. Demolish walls of words• Use bulleted lists for items or choices• Use numbered lists and imperatives for instructions• Use tables for "if, then" or "to do that, do this" sentences• Use highlighting techniques, but dont overuse them• Use visuals when they help Picture credit: Flickr G A R N E T 23
  24. 24. 6. Demolish walls of words• This is a paragraph from a larger document• Split it up 24
  25. 25. Part 1: Choose your focus 1.Understand context of useAgenda Part 2: Edit for the web 2.Choose what to say 3.Slash everything else 4.Edit sentences 5.Put into logical order 6.Demolish walls of words 7.Choose links 8.Check consistency 9.Rest it then test it 25
  26. 26. 26
  27. 27. 7. Meaningful links• Give a reward for each click• Write meaningful links• Position important links higher Picture credit: Flickr jek in the box 27
  28. 28. 7. Choose links• Review the list of links on this page• Rewrite them so that: – You would know whether you want to click it – You give a reward for each click 28
  29. 29. 29
  30. 30. 8. Check it’s consistent• Launch and land on the same name• Call each concept by one name Picture credits: Flickr super_luminal, pierrepo 30
  31. 31. 8. Check it’s consistent• Review the links on this page to see whether they have the correct titles. – Do any of them need better titles? – If so, write the new title• (Harder challenge: rewrite the page) 31
  32. 32. 32
  33. 33. 9. Rest it and test it• Rest: leave it alone for a few hours, then review.• Test: try it out on someone, preferably a real user. Picture credit: infodesign.com.au 33
  34. 34. 9. Rest it and test it• In pairs: – Decide on who is who is the test participant and who is the facilitator• Test participant: – Please read this document – As you read, identify any parts that are unclear – At the end, explain the key messages of the document to the facilitator• Facilitator: – Write notes – You will report back on the key messages to the group 34
  35. 35. Caroline Jarretttwitter @cjformscaroline.jarrett@effortmark.co.uk 35
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