How to ask about satisfaction on a survey by @cjforms
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How to ask about satisfaction on a survey by @cjforms

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Surveys often include questions about satisfaction. What is satisfaction, and what does it mean for user experience?

Surveys often include questions about satisfaction. What is satisfaction, and what does it mean for user experience?

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  • 1. How to ask aboutsatisfactionin a surveyCaroline Jarrett, November 2012
  • 2. This presentation is also available as an articlehttp://www.uxmatters.com/mt/archives/2012/11/how-to-ask-about-user-satisfaction-in-a-survey.phporhttp://bit.ly/RyCrJK 2
  • 3. Asking The backgroundabout The challenges The opportunitysatisfaction 3
  • 4. The other day, I got this survey 4
  • 5. It got me thinking: what does „satisfied‟ mean? An emotion that fits here? Disappointed Thrilled
  • 6. Or maybe on another scale? Disappointed ThrilledSomething missing Something extra Miserable Happy Below par Above par Unfair Privilege 6
  • 7. And would it be the same place on each scale? Disappointed ThrilledSomething missing Something extra Miserable Happy Below par Above par Unfair Privilege 7
  • 8. Or is it best representedby something else altogether? 8
  • 9. Or is it best representedby something else altogether? Maybe not. But someone must have thought so. 9
  • 10. Asking The backgroundabout The challenges The opportunitysatisfaction 10
  • 11. Satisfaction reflects different emotions depending on level of engagement Satisfaction here Engaged = “delight” Negative Emotion Positive Indifferent Satisfaction here = “pleasant”Adapted from Oliver, R. L. (1996)“Satisfaction: A Behavioral Perspective on the Consumer”
  • 12. Satisfaction requires comparisonof an experience to something elseCompared experience to what?(nothing)ExpectationsNeedsExcellence (the ideal product)FairnessEvents that might have beenAdapted from Oliver, R. L. (1996)“Satisfaction: A Behavioral Perspective on the Consumer” 12
  • 13. And the resulting thoughts differ accordinglyCompared experience to what? Resulting thoughts(nothing) IndifferenceExpectations Better / worse / differentNeeds Met / not met / mixtureExcellence (the ideal product) Good / poor quality (or „good enough‟)Fairness Treated equitably / inequitablyEvents that might have been Vindication / regretAdapted from Oliver, R. L. (1996)“Satisfaction: A Behavioral Perspective on the Consumer” 13
  • 14. Example: bronze medal winners tendto be happier than silver medal winners Nathan Twaddle, Olympic Bronze Medal Winner in Beijing Matsumoto D, & Willingham B (2006). The thrill of victory and the agony of defeat: spontaneous expressions of medal winners of the 14 2004 Athens Olympic Games. Photo credit: peter.cipollone, Flickr
  • 15. Not all experiences are equal Winning an Major life event Olympic medal Watching an event Occasional, from the 2012 salient Olympics on TV Watching the TV Unremarkable, news on a slow day repetitive 15News images from cnn.com
  • 16. The approximate curve of forgetting High Major life eventQualityof data Low Unremarkable, repetitive Occasional, salient Recent Long ago 16 Time since event
  • 17. Memorable experiences arelikely to be complex• Think about the experience of buying a car – What would you expect to happen? – What would you need to happen? – What would the ideal experience be? – How would you expect to be treated compared to other people who buy cars? – If you didn‟t do this, what else might have happened? 17 Image credit: Hugh90 on Flickr
  • 18. Asking The backgroundabout The challenges The opportunitysatisfaction 18
  • 19. A quick, interesting question is fine “Why did you come to this web site today?” This helps to learn about needs 19
  • 20. You could ask about…• Who ... “Tell us a bit about yourself”• What …• Where…• When …• Why…• How …• You can even ask: “Please rate your experience:” 20
  • 21. Other things you can ask about?Any bit from your preferred definition of UX 21
  • 22. But whatever you do,have a BIG BOX for the context 22
  • 23. Don‟t try to ask everythingTip A couple of questions: fine. Dozens? No thanks. 23
  • 24. Ask about recent vividTip experience 24 Image credit: Fraser Smith
  • 25. Ask a sample, not everyoneTip Make me feel special 25
  • 26. Interview firstTip 26
  • 27. Bonus SuccessfulTip Survey = Questionnaire + Process That involves lots of testing 27
  • 28. Caroline JarrettTwitter @cjformshttp://www.slideshare.net/cjformscarolinej@effortmark.co.uk 28
  • 29. More resources onhttp://www.slideshare.net/cjforms 29