How to ask about satisfaction on a survey by @cjforms

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Surveys often include questions about satisfaction. What is satisfaction, and what does it mean for user experience? …

Surveys often include questions about satisfaction. What is satisfaction, and what does it mean for user experience?

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  • 1. How to ask aboutsatisfactionin a surveyCaroline Jarrett, November 2012
  • 2. This presentation is also available as an articlehttp://www.uxmatters.com/mt/archives/2012/11/how-to-ask-about-user-satisfaction-in-a-survey.phporhttp://bit.ly/RyCrJK 2
  • 3. Asking The backgroundabout The challenges The opportunitysatisfaction 3
  • 4. The other day, I got this survey 4
  • 5. It got me thinking: what does „satisfied‟ mean? An emotion that fits here? Disappointed Thrilled
  • 6. Or maybe on another scale? Disappointed ThrilledSomething missing Something extra Miserable Happy Below par Above par Unfair Privilege 6
  • 7. And would it be the same place on each scale? Disappointed ThrilledSomething missing Something extra Miserable Happy Below par Above par Unfair Privilege 7
  • 8. Or is it best representedby something else altogether? 8
  • 9. Or is it best representedby something else altogether? Maybe not. But someone must have thought so. 9
  • 10. Asking The backgroundabout The challenges The opportunitysatisfaction 10
  • 11. Satisfaction reflects different emotions depending on level of engagement Satisfaction here Engaged = “delight” Negative Emotion Positive Indifferent Satisfaction here = “pleasant”Adapted from Oliver, R. L. (1996)“Satisfaction: A Behavioral Perspective on the Consumer”
  • 12. Satisfaction requires comparisonof an experience to something elseCompared experience to what?(nothing)ExpectationsNeedsExcellence (the ideal product)FairnessEvents that might have beenAdapted from Oliver, R. L. (1996)“Satisfaction: A Behavioral Perspective on the Consumer” 12
  • 13. And the resulting thoughts differ accordinglyCompared experience to what? Resulting thoughts(nothing) IndifferenceExpectations Better / worse / differentNeeds Met / not met / mixtureExcellence (the ideal product) Good / poor quality (or „good enough‟)Fairness Treated equitably / inequitablyEvents that might have been Vindication / regretAdapted from Oliver, R. L. (1996)“Satisfaction: A Behavioral Perspective on the Consumer” 13
  • 14. Example: bronze medal winners tendto be happier than silver medal winners Nathan Twaddle, Olympic Bronze Medal Winner in Beijing Matsumoto D, & Willingham B (2006). The thrill of victory and the agony of defeat: spontaneous expressions of medal winners of the 14 2004 Athens Olympic Games. Photo credit: peter.cipollone, Flickr
  • 15. Not all experiences are equal Winning an Major life event Olympic medal Watching an event Occasional, from the 2012 salient Olympics on TV Watching the TV Unremarkable, news on a slow day repetitive 15News images from cnn.com
  • 16. The approximate curve of forgetting High Major life eventQualityof data Low Unremarkable, repetitive Occasional, salient Recent Long ago 16 Time since event
  • 17. Memorable experiences arelikely to be complex• Think about the experience of buying a car – What would you expect to happen? – What would you need to happen? – What would the ideal experience be? – How would you expect to be treated compared to other people who buy cars? – If you didn‟t do this, what else might have happened? 17 Image credit: Hugh90 on Flickr
  • 18. Asking The backgroundabout The challenges The opportunitysatisfaction 18
  • 19. A quick, interesting question is fine “Why did you come to this web site today?” This helps to learn about needs 19
  • 20. You could ask about…• Who ... “Tell us a bit about yourself”• What …• Where…• When …• Why…• How …• You can even ask: “Please rate your experience:” 20
  • 21. Other things you can ask about?Any bit from your preferred definition of UX 21
  • 22. But whatever you do,have a BIG BOX for the context 22
  • 23. Don‟t try to ask everythingTip A couple of questions: fine. Dozens? No thanks. 23
  • 24. Ask about recent vividTip experience 24 Image credit: Fraser Smith
  • 25. Ask a sample, not everyoneTip Make me feel special 25
  • 26. Interview firstTip 26
  • 27. Bonus SuccessfulTip Survey = Questionnaire + Process That involves lots of testing 27
  • 28. Caroline JarrettTwitter @cjformshttp://www.slideshare.net/cjformscarolinej@effortmark.co.uk 28
  • 29. More resources onhttp://www.slideshare.net/cjforms 29