SURVEYS<br />FORMS<br />slightly different<br />10 tips for a better survey<br />Caroline Jarrett<br />UX Bristol 2011<br />
Caroline Jarretttwitter @cjforms		caroline.jarrett@effortmark.co.uk<br />2<br />
3<br />Successful<br />Survey = Questionnaire + Process<br />That involveslots of testing<br />
Outline<br />Tips about questions<br />Tips about process<br />Tips about testing<br />4<br />
5<br />120 characters<br />48 characters<br />
6<br />
Tip 1<br />One introduction is enough<br />(and think 140 characters)<br />7<br />
Try answering this question, then tell me how you worked out your answer<br />8<br />
The approximate curve of forgetting<br />9<br />High<br />Major life event<br />Qualityof data<br />Unremarkable,repetitiv...
Tip 2<br />Do not ask questions about unremarkable repetitive behaviours<br />10<br />
What’s missing from this question?<br />11<br />
Tip 3<br />Always include ‘other’ in category questions<br />Don’t know<br />Prefer not to answer<br />All of the above<br...
Watch the order of these two questions<br />13<br />
14<br />
Tip 4<br />Think of your questions as a conversation with your respondent<br />15<br />Jarrett, C. and Gaffney, G (2008) “...
Outline<br />Tips about questions<br />Tips about process<br />Tips about testing<br />16<br />
Response relies on effort, reward, and trust<br />17<br />Perceivedeffort<br />Perceivedreward<br />Trust<br />Diagram fro...
How are response, effort and trust working here?<br />18<br />
In mail surveys, a token incentive works better than no incentive or a prize draw<br />19<br />
Tip 5<br />Try to find an incentive that gives an immediate reward<br />20<br />
21<br />
22<br />
23<br />
24<br />
Tip 6<br />One good incentive:allowing the respondents to express their views<br />25<br />
Write down your answers to this questionnaire<br />1.	How many user surveys have you run?<br />NONE    1 to 5   6 to 10   ...
Now try it as an interview.In pairs: use this is a script for an interview<br />1.	How many user surveys have you run?<br ...
Now tell each other a story about your experience relevant to these questions<br />1.	How many user surveys have you run?<...
Now let’s share data and stories<br />What numbers have we collected?<br />What open answers?<br />What stories?<br />29<b...
Tip 7<br />Ask users for stories to explore their concerns<br />30<br />Quesenbery, W and Brooks, K (2010) “Storytelling i...
Did you answer the same questionthat I asked?<br />31<br />1.	How many user surveys have you run?<br />
Does your household have access to running water?<br />32<br />Picture credits: James Mooney, Caroline Jarrett<br />
“Shared reference”: both sides interpret in the same way<br />33<br />Service area?<br />Reiss, E. (2000) “Practical Infor...
Tip 8<br />Interview users to find out if questions mean the same to them as to you<br />34<br />
35<br />© Caroline Jarrett and Effortmark Ltd<br />If you use this cartoon in another context, please credit Caroline Jarr...
What recommendation will you make based on your results?<br />What decision will you make?<br />What happens if …<br />The...
Tip 9<br />Try writing your presentation first<br />(before the questions)<br />37<br />Natalie Webb, conversation at UPA2...
Outline<br />Tips about questions<br />Tips about process<br />Tips about testing<br />38<br />
“If you don’t have time to do the pilot,you don’t have time to do the study”<br />Oppenheim, A. P. (1992) “Questionnaire D...
Tip 10<br />Run a pilot<br />40<br />
Caroline Jarrett<br />Twitter: @cjforms <br />Slideshare: cjformscaroline.jarrett@effortmark.co.uk<br />I’m a consultant, ...
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10 tips for a better survey at UX Bristol

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Ten tips for creating a better survey - questions, process, and testing. Presented at UX Bristol, 15th July 2011.

This is an updated version of '10 tips for a better survey' presented at STC2011.

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

Published in: Design

10 tips for a better survey at UX Bristol

  1. 1. SURVEYS<br />FORMS<br />slightly different<br />10 tips for a better survey<br />Caroline Jarrett<br />UX Bristol 2011<br />
  2. 2. Caroline Jarretttwitter @cjforms caroline.jarrett@effortmark.co.uk<br />2<br />
  3. 3. 3<br />Successful<br />Survey = Questionnaire + Process<br />That involveslots of testing<br />
  4. 4. Outline<br />Tips about questions<br />Tips about process<br />Tips about testing<br />4<br />
  5. 5. 5<br />120 characters<br />48 characters<br />
  6. 6. 6<br />
  7. 7. Tip 1<br />One introduction is enough<br />(and think 140 characters)<br />7<br />
  8. 8. Try answering this question, then tell me how you worked out your answer<br />8<br />
  9. 9. The approximate curve of forgetting<br />9<br />High<br />Major life event<br />Qualityof data<br />Unremarkable,repetitive<br />Low<br />Occasional, salient<br />Long ago<br />Recent<br />Time since event<br />
  10. 10. Tip 2<br />Do not ask questions about unremarkable repetitive behaviours<br />10<br />
  11. 11. What’s missing from this question?<br />11<br />
  12. 12. Tip 3<br />Always include ‘other’ in category questions<br />Don’t know<br />Prefer not to answer<br />All of the above<br />12<br />
  13. 13. Watch the order of these two questions<br />13<br />
  14. 14. 14<br />
  15. 15. Tip 4<br />Think of your questions as a conversation with your respondent<br />15<br />Jarrett, C. and Gaffney, G (2008) “Forms that work: Designing web forms for usability”<br />Janice (Ginny) Redish (2007) “Letting go of the words:Writing web content that works”<br />
  16. 16. Outline<br />Tips about questions<br />Tips about process<br />Tips about testing<br />16<br />
  17. 17. Response relies on effort, reward, and trust<br />17<br />Perceivedeffort<br />Perceivedreward<br />Trust<br />Diagram from Jarrett, C, and Gaffney, G (2008) “Forms that work: Designing web forms for usability” inspired by Dillman, D.A. (2000) “Internet, Mail and Mixed Mode Surveys: The Tailored Design Method”<br />
  18. 18. How are response, effort and trust working here?<br />18<br />
  19. 19. In mail surveys, a token incentive works better than no incentive or a prize draw<br />19<br />
  20. 20. Tip 5<br />Try to find an incentive that gives an immediate reward<br />20<br />
  21. 21. 21<br />
  22. 22. 22<br />
  23. 23. 23<br />
  24. 24. 24<br />
  25. 25. Tip 6<br />One good incentive:allowing the respondents to express their views<br />25<br />
  26. 26. Write down your answers to this questionnaire<br />1. How many user surveys have you run?<br />NONE 1 to 5 6 to 10 more than 10<br />2. What is your top tip for a better user survey, based on experience of writing or answering?<br />__________________________________<br />__________________________________<br />26<br />
  27. 27. Now try it as an interview.In pairs: use this is a script for an interview<br />1. How many user surveys have you run?<br />NONE 1 to 5 6 to 10 more than 10<br />2. What is your top tip for a better user survey, based on experience of writing or answering?<br />__________________________________<br />__________________________________<br />27<br />
  28. 28. Now tell each other a story about your experience relevant to these questions<br />1. How many user surveys have you run?<br />NONE 1 to 5 6 to 10 more than 10<br />2. What is your top tip for a better user survey, based on experience of writing or answering?<br />__________________________________<br />__________________________________<br />28<br />
  29. 29. Now let’s share data and stories<br />What numbers have we collected?<br />What open answers?<br />What stories?<br />29<br />
  30. 30. Tip 7<br />Ask users for stories to explore their concerns<br />30<br />Quesenbery, W and Brooks, K (2010) “Storytelling in User Experience Design” <br />
  31. 31. Did you answer the same questionthat I asked?<br />31<br />1. How many user surveys have you run?<br />
  32. 32. Does your household have access to running water?<br />32<br />Picture credits: James Mooney, Caroline Jarrett<br />
  33. 33. “Shared reference”: both sides interpret in the same way<br />33<br />Service area?<br />Reiss, E. (2000) “Practical Information Architecture: A Hands-On Approach to Structuring Successful Web Sites” <br />Photo: chaptstickaddict<br />
  34. 34. Tip 8<br />Interview users to find out if questions mean the same to them as to you<br />34<br />
  35. 35. 35<br />© Caroline Jarrett and Effortmark Ltd<br />If you use this cartoon in another context, please credit Caroline Jarrett and Effortmark Ltd.<br />
  36. 36. What recommendation will you make based on your results?<br />What decision will you make?<br />What happens if …<br />The users all agree with your gut feel?<br />The users all disagree with your gut feel?<br />The users don’t care either way?<br />36<br />
  37. 37. Tip 9<br />Try writing your presentation first<br />(before the questions)<br />37<br />Natalie Webb, conversation at UPA2010<br />
  38. 38. Outline<br />Tips about questions<br />Tips about process<br />Tips about testing<br />38<br />
  39. 39. “If you don’t have time to do the pilot,you don’t have time to do the study”<br />Oppenheim, A. P. (1992) “Questionnaire Design, Interviewing and Attitude Measurement “<br />And in each subsequent edition<br />Dillman, D.A. (2000) “Internet, Mail and Mixed Mode Surveys: The Tailored Design Method”<br />And in each subsequent edition<br />Gillham, B (2000) “Developing a Questionnaire”<br />And in the second edition<br />39<br />I wish I’d run a pilot<br />Jarrett, C. (2010)<br />
  40. 40. Tip 10<br />Run a pilot<br />40<br />
  41. 41. Caroline Jarrett<br />Twitter: @cjforms <br />Slideshare: cjformscaroline.jarrett@effortmark.co.uk<br />I’m a consultant, hire me:<br />Consultancy: www.effortmark.co.uk<br />Training: www.usabilitythatworks.com<br />Free stuff:<br />Forms advice: www.formsthatwork.com<br />Editing: www.editingthatworks.com<br />Columns: www.uxmatters.com “Good Questions” <br />41<br />
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