Elite Rentals e-Magazine

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Elite Rentals e-Magazine

  1. 1. Rentals J a n u a r y / F e b r u a r y 2010 MORE BROKER PER SQ FT
  2. 2. PUBLISHER and EDITOR-IN-CHIEFChristopher Dente, Director of PR cdente@citi-habitats.com WRITER Alicia Marenzana amarenzana@citi-habitats.com GRAPHIC DESIGN Chris Miolla cmiolla@citi-habitats.comCITI HABITATS’ EXECUTIVE TEAM Gary Malin, PresidentGordon Golub, Sr. Managing Director Greg Young, Director of Sales Citi Habitats is owned and operated by NRT LLC.
  3. 3. page 1In this IssueOn the Cover..............................................................1 page 5 page 4Sutton Place...............................................................4SoHo..............................................................................5Upper West Side.......................................................6 page 6West Village................................................................7Guid To Renting .......................................................8Rental Market Analysis: 4th Quarter............... 10Quick Clicks / Citi Habitats Services& Programs..............................................................17 page 8
  4. 4. experience speaks louder than words Sandi Rotkoff Senior Project Manager Matthew Van. Damm Project Manager New Development Planning & Marketing Christopher Miolla Graphic Design & Jill Kosow Project Manager Clifford Finn | Managing Director of New Development Marketing | 212 685 7777 | chmarketinggroup.com Owned & Operated by NRT, LLC
  5. 5. We find more New Yorkers homes than any other firm C i t i - H a b i t a t s . co m • Over 900,000 visits per month • Top 1% ranking among NYC-based real estate firms • Feeds to Google and New York Times • Top “real estate” ranking with the #1 search engine • Extensive resourses for buyers, sellers, and rentersOffice LocationsCorporate Headquarters Upper West Side Sales/Relocation Headquarters Greenwich Village250 Park Avenue S, 11th floor 222 West 72nd Street 250 Park Avenue S, 12th floor 214 Sullivan Street212.685.7777 212.712.2722 212.685.7777 212.253.2525Upper East Side Chelsea Union Square400 East 84th Street 155 Seventh Avenue 250 Park Avenue S, 5th floor212.794.1133 212.937.9677 212.683.8300Upper East Side Gramercy/Flatiron West Village1456 First Avenue 32 East 22nd Street 114 Perry Street212.774.3800 212.260.9720 212.400.2500Upper West Side Gramercy/Flatiron East Village465 Columbus Avenue 27 East 22nd Street 37 Third Avenue212.957.4100 212.685.7300 212.937.8500
  6. 6. On the Cover Lux LivingGramercy Park $9,999/mo Web ID # 6665743 bedrooms 3 bathrooms duplex340 East 23rd Street Remote control window treatments & custom walnut closetsOne-of-a-kind duplex designed byPhilip Starck Library lounge w/ fireplace, screening room & game room w/ bar & pool tableGorgeous views of the city from your privateterrace Landscaped outdoor deck w/ cabanas & fireplaceKit w/ breakfast bar, exotic marble counter-tops & Viking appliances 2,600 sq ft fitness center w/ steam & saunaBrian Morgan 646.872.9700 Luciane Serifovic 212.6857777 EliteRentals 1
  7. 7. A high-rise rental offering the very best in amenities and conveniences. Plus, it’s LEED certified, making eco-living as easy as walking in your door. Distance-wise, it’s one subway stop from Manhattan, but attitude-wise, it’s worlds away. Alcove Studios from $1,915 1 Bedrooms from $2,340 2 Bedrooms from $3,865 Immediate OccupancyFor Details Please ContactItzy Garay212.400.2500 | igaray@citi-habitats.comJay Heydt212.683.8300 | jheydt@citi-habitats.comEric Hamm212.957.4100 | ehamm@citi-habitats.com
  8. 8. RETHINKTHE RENTALLayouts are diverse, luxe and spacious.Sophisticated studio, one and two-bedroomsfeature innovative design, natural materials andhigh ceilings.Views are spectacular. Curtain windowwalls and multiple corner exposures capturepanoramas of the city and Hudson River.Amenities focus on an ideal urban lifestyle.Enjoy the park, outdoor terrace, innercourtyard, and unrivaled 75-foot pool.Rentals reconceived for the 21st Century byLarry Silverstein.STUDIO RESIDENCES FROM$2,250, 1BR’S FROM $2,945,AND 2 BR’S FROM $4,335.NOW LEASING FOR IMMEDIATEAND FALL OCCUPANCY.FOR DETAILS PLEASE CONTACTRussell Miller Eric Hamm212.712.2722 212.957.4100Rmiller@citi-habitats.com Ehamm@citi-habitats.com
  9. 9. Sutton Place $16,500/mo Web ID # 405354 5 bedrooms 4+ bathrooms High Rise 360 East 57th street Views facing north & east, over 59th Street bridge 2500 sq ft (aprx) Chef’s kitchen w/ large counter space Floor-to-ceiling windows Washer/dryer Oversized unit Full-time doorman 3 wraparound terraces Robin Schneiderman 917.847.3700 Luciane Serifovic 212.685.7777 Murray Hill $6,700 /mo Web ID # 737196 2 bedrooms 2 bathrooms 52 Park Avenue Eat-in kitchen w/ top of the line appliances Roof deck Master bed w/ en-suite bath Available Furnished Washer/dryer Bright living room w/ working fireplace Doorman, concierge Beautiful entry foyer Marble bath w/ jacuzzi tub Amedeo Pelin 917.262.7479 Luciane Serifovic 212.685.7777 Upper East Side $8,500/mo Web ID #347763 3 bedrooms 3 bathrooms 315 East 68th Street Natural light with views facing west & south 1900 sq ft Full-service building Pre-war charm w/ high beamed ceil- ings & custom built-in storage Roof deck Two wood-burning fireplaces Separate dining area Walk-in closets Tracie Hamersley 917.647.0056 Elizabeth Hamersley 917.560.73094 EliteRentals
  10. 10. Chelsea $8,300/mo Web ID # 704333 2 bedrooms 2 bathrooms duplex 153 West 18th Street Spacious layout w/ double living rooms 1100 sq ft private roof deck w/ Pergola Washer/dryer and outdoor shower Pets Allowed Four wood-burning fireplaces Eat-in kitchen w/ modern appliances David Feldman 917.449.4260 Eric McCarthy 212.685.7300 SoHo $7,400/mo Web ID # 382737loft 2 bathrooms489 Broome Street Private bedrooms2300 sq ft Eat-in kitchen w/ new appliancesTop floor, corner unit loft with fantastic Central A/C & heatnatural light Washer/dryerSoaring 12’-18’ ceilingsExpansive, spacious living spaceDavid Feldman 917.449.4260 Eric McCarthy 212.685.7300 Upper West Side $9,500/mo Web ID # 174661 3 bedrooms 2.5 bathrooms Triplex Private roof deck Master suite w/ 15’ of closet space, en- suite bath & full-size Jacuzzi Natural light throughout w/ 360° views Keyed elevator High ceilings, walnut floors, exposed beams & recessed lighting Pet friendly Home office w/ views of Manhattan Steps away from Central Park Chef’skitchenw/breakfastbar,granite&S/Sappl. Thomas McNichols 917.435.0420 Russell Miller 212.712.2722 EliteRentals 5
  11. 11. West Village $11,500/mo Web ID # 839707 2 bedrooms 2 .5 bathrooms triplex 176 Christopher Street Two Wood-burning fireplaces Two private terraces w/ Hudson River En- suite marble baths w/ radiant heated views floors State of the art open kitchen w/dining Home office alcove Pet Friendly Central A/C, hardwood floors, and exposed brick Mariola Hodun 917.312.7415 Upper West Side $16,000/mo Web ID # 285134 4 bedroom-duplex 4 bathrooms Building 257 W 93rd St Heated marble floors in bath 2550 sq ft triplex w/ patio Japanese jetted soaking tub Modern furnishings 16’ ceilings in living room Angola granite countertops Large gas fireplace Kitchen w/ mosaic tile backsplash Juliet balcony w/ sliding doors Sonia Rehani 917.686.9656 Concetta Testa 212.937.9677 Upper West Side $16,000/mo Web ID #459148 5 bedrooms 4 + bathrooms 101 West End Avenue Master chef’s kitchen Unique wraparound terrace w/ city and Custom lighting fixtures & separate Hudson River views laundry room Over 3135 sq ft w/ natural light Private health club, landscaped roof deck, in-house valet & maid service 2 separate entrances Double-sized living room w/ gas fireplace & separate dining area Nathaniel Faust 917.774.1473 Alexis Fleming 917.225.84146 EliteRentals
  12. 12. West Village $12,000/mo Web ID # 208934 2 bedrooms 2.5 bathrooms 122 Greenwich Avenue Shared landscaped courtyard roof deck Floor to ceiling reflective glass windows 24-hour concierge, valet service and fitness center Marble spa baths LEED-registered Green building Custom open Molteni kitchen w/ top of the line appliances Massive closet space Mitchell Cashwell 646.379.5830 Dan Marrello 212.794.1133 Upper West Side $11,950/mo Web ID # 1126314 bedrooms 3 bathrooms172 West 79th Street Great closet spaceClassic 7 Washer/dryerPlenty of natural light Doorman & elevatorViews of the city Pets allowedKitchen w/ ample counter space and woodcabinetryHuge bedroomsAndreas R. Metzger 917.945.9697 Sonya Smith 917.945.9697 West Village $10,000/mo Web ID # 303265 Convertible 3 bedroom 2 bathrooms 76 Bedford Street Two balconies overlooking private garden Three fully renovated floors & finished base- Washer/dryer ment Heart of the West Village Open kitchen w/ island Pets Allowed Exposed beams and four decorative fireplaces Ehud “Udi” Eliasi 646.382.7378 EliteRentals 7
  13. 13. Guide to Renting I t has never been easy to rent an apartment in Manhattan—and now with exceptionally low vacancy rates and the lack of new rental inventory in Manhattan. For those hoping to find a rental in the coming months, the market tightens even further during the peak season of May through September. Preparation is key—those who are famil- iar with Manhattan’s unique rental process and are prepared will have the best chance of securing an apartment. Following is a step-by-step guide to renting in New York City: First, gather your documents. Many a disappointed renter has missed an opportunity to live in their dream apartment because they took too much time searching for the paper- work. While there may be some exceptions, if you gather all the following, you will have the documentation needed to apply for virtually any apartment: • letter from your employer stating position, salary, and length of employment (or anticipated start date) • last two pay stubs (if already working) • last two years’ tax returns their agents thirty days prior to the expiration of the cur- • last two months’ bank statements rent tenant’s lease.) The time fame for viewing potential non-doorman apartments tends to be less, anywhere from • name, address, and phone number of previous landlords two weeks to a few days prior to future occupancy. If you • two personal reference letters attempt to begin your housing search too early, you may find • two business reference letters that your viewable housing options are extremely limited. • verification of other assets such as real estate, securities, etc. What you should let your agent know. Before you begin • photo identification. your search, discuss your financial and pet situation. Un- derstanding what your requirements are and what is pos- Find a qualified real estate agent. There is no substitute sible up front will save you both time and energy. for a good broker. With their knowledge of the market and inventory, they can guide tenants through the search and If you have yet to open a New York City bank account or application process quickly and efficiently. An agent can do not have a social security number, let your agent know. conduct a comprehensive assessment to establish your needs, determine a budget, and set up a time frame for The apartment search. Appointments can take anywhere your search. (For an example of what a broker would know from fifteen minutes to several hours. Plan on spending that the average renter may not, apartments in doorman two hours on each appointment. It might take one appoint- buildings are available to view by prospective tenants and ment to find your apartment, or it may take quite a few.8 EliteRentals
  14. 14. Applying for the apartment. Once you find an apartment • Most landlords prefer that you use a guarantor from thethat suits you, you must fill out an application, submit doc- tristate area, i.e., New York, New Jersey, or Connecticut.umentation, and pay application fees. Your agent will over- Some landlords are more flexible and will accept guar-see any negotiation of terms with the landlord. antors from anywhere in the U.S. If you intend to use a guarantor from outside the tristate area, notify your agentFinancial requirements. Most landlords require that before you start your search.your guaranteed income be between 40 and 50 times themonthly rent. For example, if the monthly rent were $3,000 • The guarantor will be required to produce the exacta month, you would need to show a guaranteed income of same paperwork as the potential tenants.at least $120,000 per year. ($3,000 x 40 = $120,000) Pets may limit your choices. The majority of landlords in• An estimated bonus may be considered if a documented Manhattan do not allow dogs. Some allow cats but not history of bonuses can be provided. dogs; some allow one dog only. Certain landlords have a weight requirement for dogs, usually 20 pounds or less.• If your guaranteed yearly income falls below the land- It may also depend on the breed and temperament of lord’s requirement, there are other factors that may be the dog. If you plan on keeping a pet, notify your agent taken into consideration, such as income form other prior to your apartment search so they can screen out the sources, housing allowances, or the use of a guarantor. buildings that do not accept pets. Moving an animal into a building if the policy prohibits pets will jeopardize your• Landlords may accept roommates’ combined incomes tenancy rights. to determine financial qualification for an apartment. In other words, if the rent for an apartment is $2,500, Application fees. Typical application fees can range from the landlord would want to see a total income of about $0 to $100 and are nonrefundable. $100,000. If both roommates make at least $50,000 annu- ally, they could combine their incomes in order to qualify Sign leases, present checks, set a move-in date: Rent, for the apartment. If the landlord does not allow for com- security, and any brokerage fees are due at lease signing in bined incomes, or if the combines total is not enough, the form of certified funds. When you have received official they will require a guarantor or lease cosigner, a person approval you will need to arrange for a move-in date with who accepts financial liability in the event you or your your landlord or the building superintendent, which may roommates fail to pay the rent. involve reserving a service elevator. Move-ins are gener- ally limited to Monday through Friday, 9 AM to 5 PM.Criteria for guarantors. Landlords require that guarantorsmust make between 80 to 100 times the monthly rent in an- Renting an apartment in New York is an adventure, and asnual income. This means that for a $2,000 apartment a guar- with any adventure, if you are prepared, you’ll be able toantor must show a guaranteed income of at least $160,000. handle and even appreciated the unexpected.($2,000 x 80 = $160,000) Top Three Reasons to Rent Luxury... Because you are renovating your primary residence and need a fabulous apartment until the repairs and construction are complete. Because you are currently in the market for a new home or considering a new neighborhood and perhaps are undecided as to a decision of whether to rent or buy. Because you deserve the best! EliteRentals 9
  15. 15. RESIDENTIAL RENTAL MARKET REPORTFourth Quarter 2009 / Year-End ReviewOwned and operated by NRT LLC.
  16. 16. Citi Habitats Residential Rental Market Report 4th Quarter / Year-End Review 2009 Our results for December 2009 continued the pattern seen during the prior eight months of 2009 of minor price adjustments providing us with further evidence that the Manhattan rental market had found its footing in terms of pricing. Additionally, vacancy rates which historically increase during this period actually decreased slightly over November’s rate, indicating positive absorption in the market. Results for the 4th Quarter 2009 vs. 3rd Quarter 2009 also were atypical of past market trends. Because the 3rd Quarter figures include peak season rental tallies, adjustments in rental prices and vacancy rates in the 4th Quarter are usually notable. However, during this 4th Quarter we saw only nominal decreases in both rental pricing and a marginal increase in the vacancy rate. As we expected, the 2009 rental market underwent price corrections. Prices on average are approximately 7% lower than in 2008 and this adjustment does not include landlord incentives such as free rent which, when factored in, would make price reductions greater. Vacancy rates are marginally higher in 2009 (but continue to remain below 2%) from 2008 totals. However, over 3,700 new rental units came to market during 2009 (south of 96th Street) and we saw incredible absorption with respect to this new product. During this period, CHMG, Citi Habitats’ development marketing group, rented Silver Towers at a very brisk pace, renting over 40% of market-rate units during its launch phase as well as the lease-up or completion of Dwell95, The Westbourne, Greystone, and The Hub. In 2009 Citi Habitats reached the incredible milestone of renting over 12,900 apartments in one year, an increase of 23% as compared with the 2008 total of more than 10,500 rental transactions. Many factors came into play during the year that contributed to achieving this incredible feat. 2009 was a great year to be a renter; because of the combination of lower prices and landlord incentives, amazing rental opportunities existed in the marketplace. Some, previously priced out of the Manhattan market and living in an outer borough were now able to afford an apartment in Manhattan. Many upgraded and moved to a larger space or a neighborhood closer to their job for less or equal rent. In any event, these indicators are a clear testament to the health and vitality of the rental market and the long-term prospects of our great City. Please note the following with respect to this report: 1. The statistics in this report were compiled using solely Citi Habitats closed transactions during the stated period(s). 2. Average rents cited in this report are, for the majority, gross rents, not net effective rents, and do not include landlord incentives, unless the face rent reported on the lease was the net-effective amount. Factoring in rent concessions, average rents may be between 5% to 7% lower. However, not every rental transaction contains a landlord concession. We hope you will find this study informative and we welcome any questions you may have regarding it. Sincerely, Gary Malin, President We find more New Yorkers homes than any other brokerage firm. total 4Q Rental tRansactions total 2009 Rental tRansactions5000 15,000 12,900+4000 12,500 10,500+3000 2600+ 10,0002000 1800+ 7,5001000 5,000 0 0 4Q 2008 4Q 2009 2008 2009Overall transactional volume for Citi Habitats for the 4Q 2009 Overall transactional volume for Citi Habitats for 2009 waswas more than 2,600 transactions, representing an increase more than 12,900 transactions, representing an increase ofof more than 30% in the total number of transactions from 23% in the total number of transactions from the 2008 totalthe 4Q 2008 total of more than 1,800 transactions. of more than 10,500 transactions.
  17. 17. RENTAL MARKET ANALYSIS: 4th Quarter 2009 aVeRaGe Rent sUMMaRY: Q4/09 location stUDio 1BR 2BR 3BR location stUDio 1BR 2BR 3BR Chelsea 2048 2908 4381 5239 Upper East Side 1569 2087 3043 5131 East Village 1804 2281 3224 4100 Upper West Side 1688 2351 3484 5401 Gramercy/Flatiron 2035 2852 3912 5047 Wall Street/BPC 2054 2728 3781 4943 Harlem 1112 1438 1680 2215 Washington Heights 1073 1360 1800 2049 Lower East Side 1698 2033 2782 3490 West Village 1993 2845 3916 5383 Midtown East 1818 2370 3520 5026 average: Q4/09 1733 2343 3294 4438 Midtown West 1926 2494 3428 4422 average: Q3/09 1760 2423 3381 4591 Morningside Heights 1321 1851 2262 3012 % change -1.5% -3.3% -2.6% -3.3% Murray Hill 1731 2398 3157 4213 average: Q4/08 1841 2527 3551 4712 SoHo/TriBeCa 2130 3145 5042 6898 % change: Q4-08/09 -5.9% -7.3% -7.2% -5.8% AVERAGE RENTS: Q4/09 Market-wide for Manhattan, the average 4Q 2009 rental price for a studio was $1,733, representing a decrease of 1.5% from 3Q 2009; a one bedroom, $2,343 representing a decrease of 3.3% from 3Q 2009; a two bedroom, $3,294 representing a decrease of 2.6% from 3Q 2009; and three bedroom, $4,591 representing a decrease of 3.3% from 3Q 2009. VacancY sUMMaRY: Q4/09 neiGHBoRHooD VacancY Rate neiGHBoRHooD VacancY Rate BPC / Financial Dist 2.05% Upper East Side 2.24% Chelsea 1.33% Upper West Side 2.06% East Village 1.72% West Village 1.34% Gramercy 2.09% overall Vacancy: Q4/09 1.79% Midtown East 2.18% overall Vacancy: Q3/09 1.71% Midtown West 1.53% Difference 0.08% Murray Hill 2.05% overall Vacancy: Q4/08 1.96% SoHo/TriBeCa 1.05% Difference: Q4 - 08/09 (0.17%) VACANCY RATES: Q4/09 The overall vacancy rate for Manhattan for 4Q 2009 was 1.79% representing a 0.08% increase in the vacancy rate from the 3Q 2009 rate of 1.71%. A comparison of vacancy rates, by neighborhood, reveals that the SoHo/Tribeca area had the least amount of available apartments at 1.05%, while the Upper East Side, at 2.24%, ranked highest. oVeRall BlenDeD aVeRaGes: Q4/09 ManHattan Rental VacancY Rates: Q4/09 2.5 BlDG classiFication stUDio 1BR 2BR 3BR 2 2.36 1.76 New Development w/ DM* 2434 3573 5972 8396 1.96 1.88 Owned and operated by NRT LLC. 1.5 1.71 Doorman 2144 3054 4402 5659 1 .5 Elevator*** 1758 2452 3723 5412 0 Walkup** 1602 2041 2686 3910 Q4/08 Q1/09 Q2/09 Q3/09 Q4/09* New Developments include all rental and condo buildings built after 2003.**Walkup averages include brownstone and townhouse rentals.***Elevator averages in the downtown neighborhoods include a significant number of loft rentals compared to other neighborhoods.
  18. 18. RENTAL MARKET ANALYSIS: 2009 vs 2008 aVeRaGe Rent sUMMaRY: 2009 vs 2008location stUDio 1BR 2BR 3BR location stUDio 1BR 2BR 3BRChelsea 2058 2959 4369 5463 Upper East Side 1608 2167 3070 5164East Village 1824 2372 3286 4281 Upper West Side 1760 2366 3497 5475Gramercy/Flatiron 1994 2965 4124 5132 Wall Street/BPC 2069 2819 4001 5081Harlem 1170 1504 1855 2192 Washington Heights 1064 1393 1820 2092Lower East Side 1719 2162 2951 3750 West Village 2037 2945 4009 5431Midtown East 1805 2399 3819 5210 average: 2009 1757 2406 3411 4560Midtown West 1866 2457 3574 4664 average: 2008 1883 2608 3700 4898Morningside Heights 1372 1952 2455 2999 % change -6.7% -7.7% -7.8% -6.9%Murray Hill 1835 2408 3255 4364 overall % change -7.3%SoHo/TriBeCa 2181 3230 5086 7097 AVERAGE RENTS: 2009 Market-wide for Manhattan, the average 2009 rental price for a studio was $1,757, representing a decrease of 6.7% from 2008; a one bedroom, $2,406 representing a decrease of 7.7% from 2008; a two bedroom, $3,411 represent- ing a decrease of 7.8% from 2008; and three bedroom, $4,560 representing a decrease of 6.9% from 2008. VacancY sUMMaRY: 2009 vs 2008neiGHBoRHooD VacancY Rate neiGHBoRHooD VacancY RateBPC / Financial Dist 2.02% SoHo/TriBeCa 1.35%Chelsea 1.58% Upper East Side 2.38%East Village 2.10% Upper West Side 1.98%Gramercy 1.99% West Village 1.64%Midtown East 2.36% overall Vacancy: 2009 1.93%Midtown West 1.76% overall Vacancy: 2008 1.42%Murray Hill 2.09% Difference: 2009/2008 0.51% VACANCY RATES: 2009 The overall vacancy rate for Manhattan for 2009 was 1.93% representing a 0.51% increase in the vacancy rate from the 2008 rate of 1.42%. A comparison of vacancy rates, by neighborhood, reveals that the SoHo/Tribeca area had the least amount of available apartments at 1.35%, while the Upper East Side, at 2.38%, ranked highest. ManHattan Rental VacancY Rates: 20092.50 Owned and operated by NRT LLC. 2.46 2.37 2.24 2.28 1.84 1.83 1.86 1.871.50 1.72 1.65 1.67 1.620.00 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
  19. 19. RENTAL MARKET ANALYSIS: December 2009 aVeRaGe Rent sUMMaRY: 12/09 location stUDio 1BR 2BR 3BR location stUDio 1BR 2BR 3BR Chelsea 2100 2909 4384 5150 Murray Hill 1701 2234 3130 3710 East Village 1841 2159 3289 4050 SoHo/TriBeCa 2190 3048 5130 6900 Gramercy/Flatiron 2075 2804 3883 5087 Upper East Side 1504 2056 3026 5150 Harlem 1120 1455 1648 2132 Upper West Side 1605 2276 3466 5400 Lower East Side 1731 2031 2725 3500 Wall Street/BPC 2053 2637 3778 4877 Midtown East 1826 2413 3491 5028 Washington Heights 1050 1330 1813 1973 Midtown West 1904 2544 3351 4338 West Village 2065 2827 3857 5425 Morningside Heights 1340 1767 2199 2898 average 1740 2299 3278 4375 AVERAGE RENTS: 12/09 Market-wide for Manhattan, the average December 2009 rental price for a studio was $1,740, representing an increase of 1% from November 2009; a one bedroom, $2,299 representing a decrease of 2% from November 2009; a two bedroom, $3,278 representing a decrease of 1% from November 2009; and three bedroom, $4,375 representing a decrease of 2% from November 2009. VacancY sUMMaRY: 12/09 neiGHBoRHooD VacancY Rate neiGHBoRHooD VacancY Rate BPC / Financial Dist 1.86% Murray Hill 2.03% Chelsea 1.20% SoHo / TriBeCa 1.23% East Village 1.90% Upper East Side 2.16% Gramercy 1.86% Upper West Side 2.17% Midtown East 2.24% West Village 1.41% Midtown West 1.53% overall Vacancy 1.84% VACANCY RATES: 12/09 The overall vacancy rate for Manhattan for December 2009 was 1.84% representing a 0.03% decrease in the va- cancy rate from the November 2009 rate of 1.87%. A comparison of vacancy rates, by neighborhood, reveals that the Chelsea area had the least amount of available apartments at 1.20%, while Mid-Town East, at 2.24%, ranked highest. oVeRall BlenDeD aVeRaGes: 12/09 ManHattan Rental VacancY Rates: 12/09 BlDG classiFication stUDio 1BR 2BR 3BR 2.50% 2.28 2.46 2.37 2.24 2.24 New Development w/ DM* 2430 3681 5977 8784 1.86 1.87 1.84 Owned and operated by NRT LLC. 1.83 1.72 1.65 1.67 1.62 1.25% Doorman 2096 2978 4322 5695 Elevator*** 1708 2419 3690 5279 0% Walkup** 1539 1988 2601 3751 Dec Jan Feb Mar Apr May June July Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 09* New Developments include all rental and condo buildings built after 2003.**Walkup averages include brownstone and townhouse rentals.***Elevator averages in the downtown neighborhoods include a significant number of loft rentals compared to other neighborhoods.
  20. 20. RENTAL MARKET ANALYSIS: November 2009 aVeRaGe Rent sUMMaRY: 11/09 location stUDio 1BR 2BR 3BR location stUDio 1BR 2BR 3BR Chelsea 2006 2898 4434 5215 Murray Hill 1750 2385 3164 4410 East Village 1754 2292 3308 4099 SoHo/TriBeCa 2134 3199 4999 6889 Gramercy/Flatiron 2013 2842 3925 5017 Upper East Side 1577 2081 2998 5175 Harlem 1125 1402 1653 2156 Upper West Side 1674 2378 3502 5360 Lower East Side 1750 2009 2799 3466 Wall Street/BPC 2089 2784 3745 4925 Midtown East 1816 2376 3555 5028 Washington Heights 1083 1341 1800 2089 Midtown West 1920 2486 3402 4428 West Village 1936 2863 3913 5325 Morningside Heights 1300 1838 2267 3095 average 1728 2345 3298 4445 AVERAGE RENTS: 11/09 Market-wide for Manhattan, the average November 2009 rental price for a studio was $1,728, representing no change from October 2009; a one bedroom, $2,345 representing a decrease of 2% from October 2009; a two bedroom, $3,298 representing no change from October 2009; and three bedroom, $4,445 representing a decrease of 1% from October 2009. VacancY sUMMaRY: 11/09 neiGHBoRHooD VacancY Rate neiGHBoRHooD VacancY Rate BPC / Financial Dist 2.22% Murray Hill 2.00% Chelsea 1.50% SoHo / TriBeCa .98% East Village 1.59% Upper East Side 2.15% Gramercy 2.20% Upper West Side 2.07% Midtown East 2.18% West Village 1.38% Midtown West 1.44% overall Vacancy 1.87% VACANCY RATES: 11/09 The overall vacancy rate for Manhattan for November 2009 was 1.87% representing no change in the vacancy rate from the October 2009 rate of 1.86%. A comparison of vacancy rates, by neighborhood, reveals that the SoHo/Tribeca area had the least amount of available apartments at .98%, while the BPC/Financial District, at 2.22%, ranked highest. oVeRall BlenDeD aVeRaGes: 11/09 ManHattan Rental VacancY Rates: 11/09 BlDG classiFication stUDio 1BR 2BR 3BR 2.50% 2.28 2.46 2.37 2.24 2.24 2.04 New Development w/ DM* 2406 3550 5942 8330 1.86 1.87 Owned and operated by NRT LLC. 1.83 1.72 1.65 1.67 1.62 1.25% Doorman 2137 3042 4391 5575 Elevator** 1766 2472 3713 5386 0% Walkup*** 1592 1985 2621 3953 Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar Apr May June July Aug Sep Oct nov 09* New Developments include all rental and condo buildings built after 2003.** Walkup averages include brownstone and townhouse rentals.*** Elevator averages in the downtown neighborhoods include a significant number of loft rentals compared to other neighborhoods.
  21. 21. RENTAL MARKET ANALYSIS: October 2009 aVeRaGe Rent sUMMaRY: 10/09 location stUDio 1BR 2BR 3BR location stUDio 1BR 2BR 3BR Chelsea 2039 2916 4325 5353 Murray Hill 1742 2576 3176 4519 East Village 1817 2393 3075 4150 SoHo/TriBeCa 2067 3187 4998 6905 Gramercy/Flatiron 2016 2911 3928 5038 Upper East Side 1625 2123 3104 5068 Harlem 1090 1458 1739 2358 Upper West Side 1786 2398 3485 5444 Lower East Side 1613 2058 2821 3505 Wall Street/BPC 2019 2762 3820 5026 Midtown East 1811 2322 3515 5023 Washington Heights 1086 1410 1786 2086 Midtown West 1954 2453 3530 4500 West Village 1977 2846 3977 5400 Morningside Heights 1322 1948 2319 3042 average 1731 2384 3307 4494 PEAK SEASoN AVERAGE RENTS: 10/09 Market-wide for Manhattan, the average October 2009 rental price for a studio was $1,731, representing a decrease of 1% from September 2009; a one bedroom, $2,384 representing a decrease of 1% from September 2009; a two bedroom, $3,307 representing a decrease of 1% from September 2009; and three bedroom, $4,494 representing a decrease of 1% from September 2009. VacancY sUMMaRY: 10/09 neiGHBoRHooD VacancY Rate neiGHBoRHooD VacancY Rate BPC / Financial Dist 2.06% Murray Hill 2.12% Chelsea 1.30% SoHo / TriBeCa .95% East Village 1.66% Upper East Side 2.41% Gramercy 2.20% Upper West Side 1.93% Midtown East 2.12% West Village 1.22% Midtown West 1.61% overall Vacancy 1.86% PEAK SEASoN VACANCY RATES: 10/09 The overall vacancy rate for Manhattan for October 2009 was 1.86% representing a slight increase in the vacancy rate from the September 2009 rate of 1.83%. A comparison of vacancy rates, by neighborhood, reveals that the SoHo/Tribeca area had the least amount of available apartments at .95%, while the Upper East Side, at 2.41%, ranked highest. oVeRall BlenDeD aVeRaGes: 10/09 ManHattan Rental VacancY Rates: 10/09 BlDG classiFication stUDio 1BR 2BR 3BR 2.50% 2.28 2.46 2.37 2.24 2.24 2.04 1.86 New Development w/ DM* 2465 3489 5998 8075 Owned and operated by NRT LLC. 1.83 1.71 1.72 1.65 1.67 1.62 1.25% Doorman 2199 3141 4493 5708 Elevator** 1801 2465 3765 5571 0% Walkup*** 1675 2149 2836 4027 Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar Apr May June July Aug Sep oct 09* New Developments include all rental and condo buildings built after 2003.** Walkup averages include brownstone and townhouse rentals.*** Elevator averages in the downtown neighborhoods include a significant number of loft rentals compared to other neighborhoods.
  22. 22. Quick Clicks Residential Rental Residential Rental The Black & White Report 11 Market Report Market Report A comprehensive analysis 4th Quarter Report Peak Season 2009 of the Manhattan real estate market 2009 May - August for 2008. RESIDENTIAL RENTAL MARKET REPORT Fourth Quarter 2009 / Year-End Review Owned and operated by NRT LLC. Citi Habitats Services & Programs Citi Furnished specializes in providing both short and long-term furnished rentals with all the comforts of home. CitiFurnished.com Citi Relocation provides personal attention and professional service from start to finish to help families, professionals and corporations with all of their relocation needs. CitiRelocation.com Through Citi Outreach, Citi Habitats agents and staff give back to the community by supporting a number of local and national charity organizations. Citi-Habitats.com/community.php Citi Habitats’ on-site marketing division represents many of New York’s top developers and landlords. CHMarketingGroup.com V i s i t C i t i - H a b i tat s . c o m17 EliteRentals
  23. 23. Owned and operated by NRT LLC.

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