City and County of HonoluluWastewater Information Meeting     August 1, 2011, 7 p.m.,  Mission Memorial Auditorium
Agenda•   Welcome•   CCH Wastewater Video•   ENV Director Tim Steinberger•   Synagro CEO/President Bill Massa•   DOH Actin...
CCH Wastewater Video
Opening Statements• Building the Sand Island WWTP sludge treatment  had three objectives.   1) Replace old system   2) Rec...
Opening Statements• Second digester and interim treatment project was  eliminated from the budget.• We may have to truck s...
Sand Island WWTP         Solids Handling• Online circa 1976• Ocean outfall 1.7 miles, 240 ft. deep• 1981, low pressure oxi...
Solids Handling            Disinfection and DisposalCurrentNormal                                    Methane to flare     ...
Sand Island                                          Pellets                                                      Dryer   ...
Sand Island Wastewater Treatment Plant Service Area•   Salt Lake to Kuliouou•   Koolaus to the ocean•   Largest treatment ...
How we got here?
Federal and State Regulations   Cleaner          More    Water          Sludge
Response to System Failures        Failure Modes• Total Failure• Partial Failure  –Non-compliance with regulations,   perm...
The Contingency Plans1. Remove-Truck wastewater sludge from   the Sand Island WWTP and to other   suitably equipped WWTPs,...
Trucking the Sludge
Only 3 treatment plants with the   facilities to handle the job    Waianae            Kailua            HonouliuliRecoveri...
Things we don’t know• How much can we truck to each of the  other treatment plants before we create a  potential problem t...
Feasibility StudyStart date:                      August 2011Number of trucks:                No more than 1 tanker per da...
Environmental Assessment
Bill Massa President & CEOSynagro Headquarters    Houston, TX
Sina Pruder  State Department of HealthActing Chief Wastewater Branch
What are Biosolids?          Department of Heath   Environmental Management Division          Wastewater Branch
What are Biosolids?They are nutrient-rich organic materials resultingfrom the treatment of domestic sewage in atreatment f...
What is the difference between biosolidsand sludge?Biosolids are treated sewage sludge.Biosolids are carefully treated and...
Class A and Class B Biosolids To ensure that biosolids applied to the land do not threaten public health, the U.S. Environ...
Class A Biosolids•   Class A biosolids contain minute levels of pathogens. To achieve Class A    certification, biosolids ...
The term “exceptional quality” (EQ) is a category that wasdeveloped by EPA to characterize biosolids that may be used inbe...
The Synagro In-Vessel Bioconversion Facility and the Cityand County of Honolulu has an Individual Permit with DOHfor the t...
Synagro’s Annual Pellet Distribution Figures200854% distributed for reuse46% landfilled200937% distributed for reuse63% la...
Class B BiosolidsClass B biosolids have less stringent standards for thetreatment and contain detectible levels of pathoge...
Are biosolids safe?The National Academy of Sciences has reviewed current practices, public health concerns and regulator s...
Do biosolids smell?Biosolids may have their own distinctive odordepending on the type of treatment it has beenthrough. Som...
What are the benefits of recycling biosolids?Recycling biosolids is good for the environment.Organic matter and nutrients ...
The Department of Health supports and promotes reusefor both Biosolids and Water Reclamation.For biosolids, whatever can b...
What’s next?• Start $1.55 million for planning, permitting  and designing• Resubmit project in FY13 budget• Conduct Feasib...
City Council Briefing   August 3, 2011, 1:00 pm        Honolulu HaleWritten and/or oral comments accepted
Sewage Meeting Powerpoint
Sewage Meeting Powerpoint
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Sewage Meeting Powerpoint

  1. 1. City and County of HonoluluWastewater Information Meeting August 1, 2011, 7 p.m., Mission Memorial Auditorium
  2. 2. Agenda• Welcome• CCH Wastewater Video• ENV Director Tim Steinberger• Synagro CEO/President Bill Massa• DOH Acting Chief Sina Pruder, WWB• Aug. 3 City Council - Public Works
  3. 3. CCH Wastewater Video
  4. 4. Opening Statements• Building the Sand Island WWTP sludge treatment had three objectives. 1) Replace old system 2) Recycle/Sustainable 3) Reduce burden on WGSL• From the inception, the City anticipated the need for a second sludge digester to accommodate population growth and improve WW treatment.• The sludge digester makes wastewater solids ready for reuse as fertilizer.
  5. 5. Opening Statements• Second digester and interim treatment project was eliminated from the budget.• We may have to truck sludge and need to be ready in case it’s necessary.• What we’re planning to do now is begin a feasibility study.• We will conduct an Environmental Assessment to make sure we are fully prepared.
  6. 6. Sand Island WWTP Solids Handling• Online circa 1976• Ocean outfall 1.7 miles, 240 ft. deep• 1981, low pressure oxidation system online• 2004 City discontinues LPO and brought online anaerobic digestion, centrifuge, pellet reuse (Granulite)• In-vessel bioconversion
  7. 7. Solids Handling Disinfection and DisposalCurrentNormal Methane to flare Current Current Current Normal Normal Normal GT WSST
  8. 8. Sand Island Pellets Dryer Anaerobic HDWK Clarifier GT WSST Centrifuge DigestionHonouliuli LF Anaerobic HDWK Clarifier GT WSST Centrifuge Digestion
  9. 9. Sand Island Wastewater Treatment Plant Service Area• Salt Lake to Kuliouou• Koolaus to the ocean• Largest treatment plant in the state• Treats 60% of the island’s wastewater
  10. 10. How we got here?
  11. 11. Federal and State Regulations Cleaner More Water Sludge
  12. 12. Response to System Failures Failure Modes• Total Failure• Partial Failure –Non-compliance with regulations, permits, GCD• Preventive Measures –Minimizing Risks
  13. 13. The Contingency Plans1. Remove-Truck wastewater sludge from the Sand Island WWTP and to other suitably equipped WWTPs, including Honouliuli, Waianae and Kailua.2. Place a moratorium on new metropolitan area building permits that require sewer connection to the Sand Island WWTP. Only permits not yet issued would be affected.
  14. 14. Trucking the Sludge
  15. 15. Only 3 treatment plants with the facilities to handle the job Waianae Kailua HonouliuliRecovering from In the middle oftrucking of flood CIP improvementwaters from projects that needWaimanalo to be completedGulch Landfill before it is suitable
  16. 16. Things we don’t know• How much can we truck to each of the other treatment plants before we create a potential problem there?• Can we realistically accomplish the transfer with the equipment we have?• What odor problems will be created and how can they be resolved?
  17. 17. Feasibility StudyStart date: August 2011Number of trucks: No more than 1 tanker per dayDestination: Honouliuli WWTPTrucking period: No more than 30 daysMonitoring: Initial hauling will be evaluatedFurther study options include: hauling to Honouliuli WWTP toaddress any issues that arose in the initial testing or to initiatesimilar tests with Kailua Regional WWTP and Waianae WWTP toevaluate the ability to treat the hauled sludge.
  18. 18. Environmental Assessment
  19. 19. Bill Massa President & CEOSynagro Headquarters Houston, TX
  20. 20. Sina Pruder State Department of HealthActing Chief Wastewater Branch
  21. 21. What are Biosolids? Department of Heath Environmental Management Division Wastewater Branch
  22. 22. What are Biosolids?They are nutrient-rich organic materials resultingfrom the treatment of domestic sewage in atreatment facility. When treated and processed,these residuals can be recycled and applied asfertilizer to improve and maintain productivesoils and stimulate plant growth.
  23. 23. What is the difference between biosolidsand sludge?Biosolids are treated sewage sludge.Biosolids are carefully treated and monitoredand must be used in accordance withregulatory requirements.
  24. 24. Class A and Class B Biosolids To ensure that biosolids applied to the land do not threaten public health, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) created the 40 CFR Part 503 Rule (effective on March 1993). It categorizes biosolids as Class A or B, depending on the level of pathogens in the material, and describes specific processes to reduce pathogens to these levels. The rule also requires “vector attraction reduction” (VAR) – reducing the potential for spreading of infectious disease agents by vectors (i.e., flies, rodents and birds).
  25. 25. Class A Biosolids• Class A biosolids contain minute levels of pathogens. To achieve Class A certification, biosolids must undergo heating, composting, digestion or increased pH that reduces pathogens to below detectable levels. Some treatment processes change the composition of the biosolids to a pellet or granular substance, which can be used as a commercial fertilizer.• The biosolids must also meet stringent pollutant ceiling concentration limits for 10 metals. Lead, Arsenic, Cadmium, Chromium, Copper, Mercury, Molybdenum, Nickel, Selenium and Zinc.• It must also meet a vector attraction method specified by 503.• Once these goals are achieved, Class A biosolids can be land applied without any pathogen-related restrictions at the site. Class A biosolids can be bagged and marketed to the public for application to lawns and gardens.
  26. 26. The term “exceptional quality” (EQ) is a category that wasdeveloped by EPA to characterize biosolids that may be used inbeneficial use programs without a lot of regulatory oversight.“Exceptional quality” is an EPA term to define biosolids thatmeet the highest level of quality in three categories:1. Reduction of pathogens;2. Reduction of vector attraction (odor); and3. Low concentrations of specific metals.EQ biosolids have relatively few restrictions for use. They can, infact, be used in home gardens.The Synagro plant produces Exceptional Quality Biosolids.
  27. 27. The Synagro In-Vessel Bioconversion Facility and the Cityand County of Honolulu has an Individual Permit with DOHfor the treatment of Sand Island WWTP sludge to EQBiosolids.Synagro submits monthly pathogen, metals, and totalsolids data for their pellets for our review and approvalbefore release to the public.Synagro has met the specific 503 pathogen, metals andvector attraction requirements since 2006 for EQ biosolids..
  28. 28. Synagro’s Annual Pellet Distribution Figures200854% distributed for reuse46% landfilled200937% distributed for reuse63% landfilled201082% distributed for reuse17% landfilled2011Projected to be on mark with 2010 figures.
  29. 29. Class B BiosolidsClass B biosolids have less stringent standards for thetreatment and contain detectible levels of pathogens.Class B requirements ensure that pathogens in biosolidshave been reduced to levels that protect public health andthe environment and include certain restrictions for cropharvesting, grazing animals and public contact for all formsof Class B biosolids.
  30. 30. Are biosolids safe?The National Academy of Sciences has reviewed current practices, public health concerns and regulator standards, and has concluded that "the useof these materials in the production of crops for human consumption whenpracticed in accordance with existing federal guidelines and regulations,presents negligible risk to the consumer, to crop production and to theenvironment."Note: To date, there has been no reported cases of foodcontamination outbreaks or illnesses associated with theuse of biosolids produced by Synagro and Maui Eko..
  31. 31. Do biosolids smell?Biosolids may have their own distinctive odordepending on the type of treatment it has beenthrough. Some biosolids may have only a slight musty,ammonia odor. Others have a stronger odor that maybe offensive to some people. Much of the odor iscaused by compounds containing sulfur and ammonia,both of which are plant nutrients
  32. 32. What are the benefits of recycling biosolids?Recycling biosolids is good for the environment.Organic matter and nutrients have been recycledfor centuries to improve soil fertility andproductivity. When properly applied and managed,biosolids can provide essential plant nutrients,improve soil structure, add organic matter,enhance moisture retention, and reduce soilerosion.
  33. 33. The Department of Health supports and promotes reusefor both Biosolids and Water Reclamation.For biosolids, whatever can be reused saves our valuablelandfill space. Recycled water is wastewater that has beentreated to a level suitable for industrial processing, irrigationand other non-drinking uses. Recycled water is available yearround, even in times of drought. It is good for theenvironment and it costs less than other new water sources..
  34. 34. What’s next?• Start $1.55 million for planning, permitting and designing• Resubmit project in FY13 budget• Conduct Feasibility Study for hauling sludge to WWTPs• Proceed with EA• Address Council Resolution 11-182
  35. 35. City Council Briefing August 3, 2011, 1:00 pm Honolulu HaleWritten and/or oral comments accepted

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