CIVICUS: World Alliance  for Citizen Participation
Mission and Vision Mission :  To strengthen global citizen action and  civil society throughout the world Vision :  CIVICU...
CIVICUS’ 3 E’s <ul><li>Promote Civic Existence ,  by defending people’s fundamental rights to organise and act collectivel...
 
CIVICUS: When and Where <ul><li>Established in 1993 </li></ul><ul><li>Membership-based international b ody representing an...
CIVICUS: A Global Alliance <ul><li>A global membership alliance of 110 countries, consisting of about 450 members. </li></...
Strategic Directions and Key Approaches 2008-12 <ul><li>Strategic Directions </li></ul><ul><li>Protecting the rights of ci...
CIVICUS Members  CIVICUS Members in  RED
Geographical Representation  Regional   Breakdown of CIVICUS Members
<ul><li>A global convening point for civil society stakeholders (including trade unions, faith-based orgs) to dialogue wit...
<ul><li>Save the date: 20-23 August 2010 : </li></ul><ul><li>3 day event including: </li></ul><ul><li>-  Co-located events...
Civil Society Networks <ul><li>AGNA (Affinity Group of National Associations) –more than 54 national networks involved </l...
Civil Society Index (CSI) <ul><li>Action-research project that aims to assess the state of civil society in countries arou...
Civil Society Watch (CSW) <ul><li>Aims to  mobilise  responses to events that threaten civil society’s fundamental rights ...
Participatory Governance <ul><li>Aims to enhance the capacity of southern civil society and government actors to promote a...
Legitimacy, Transparency, and Accountability (LTA) <ul><li>Aims to build the capacity of CSOs to respond to challenges to ...
Volunteering <ul><li>CIVICUS, IAVE and UNV joint MOU:  to promote the value of volunteers and volunteering to civil societ...
Global engagement <ul><li>CIVICUS has consultative status with a range of global bodies, including the ECOSOC of the Unite...
Development Effectiveness and Cooperation <ul><li>Aid Effectiveness international dialogue: CIVICUS is member of the Bette...
Development Effectiveness and Cooperation <ul><li>Accra Agenda for Action (Sept 2008), donors and governments also committ...
Key Opportunities <ul><li>Join CIVICUS’ Membership  http://www.civicus.org/join-civicus </li></ul><ul><li>Be part of CIVIC...
CONCLUSION / QA
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  • Civil Society Networks comprises groupings of CSOs that contribute to the promotion of CIVICUS’ values and mission. They can be constructed on a thematic, regional, or linguistic and cultural basis. They provide a platform for CSOs that share common values and interests to engage in peer-learning, knowledge sharing and joint advocacy. CIVICUS currently serves as the secretariat for two such networks: The Affinity Group of National Associations (AGNA) and the International Advocacy Non-Governmental Organisations Workshop (IANGO Workshop). CIVICUS also hosts the Accountability Charter, an initiative born out of the IANGO Workshop that sets common standards of conduct for CSOs working trans-nationally for the advancement of the public goods. Affinity Group of National Associations (AGNA). Purpose AGNA recognises the important role national associations play in providing a collective voice for civil society, in creating an environment conducive to CSO engagement and citizen action and participation and in serving as interlocutors between civil society and other sectors. AGNA provides the space for national associations to share their knowledge and experiences. In order to facilitate peer learning and cooperation, AGNA members meet annually. The International Advocacy Non-Governmental Organisations (IANGOs) Purpose To provide a forum for leaders of international NGOs working in different fields (poverty alleviation, women’s rights, human rights, environment) to engage in collective reflection and learning in order to improve their individual and collective impacts as international NGOs whose work carries an important advocacy component. To promote and improve accountability and performance of international NGOs through the Accountability Charter. The launch of the Charter merely represents a starting point of an ongoing process to establish and implement a system that not only sets common standards of conduct for INGOs but also creates mechanisms to report, monitor and evaluate compliance as well as provide redress.  
  • CIVICUS has designed and implemented the Civil Society Index (CSI), a participatory needs assessment tool for civil society at the country level, which uses multiple research tools and consultation processes to generate an assessment of the state of civil society in a given country. Initiated in 2000, the programme has successfully completed a pilot phase (2001) and a full implementation phase (2006) involving more than 50 countries. Based on the programme’s findings, CIVICUS has issued a number of publications, most recently the Global Survey of the State of Civil Society, Volumes 1 &amp; 2. It is expected that 50 to 60 countries will implement the second phase of the CSI which will be launched in 2008. Once the partners have been selected, there follows a period of fundraising at country level, this is supported by the CSI in the form of information, guidelines, and support in proposal writing.
  • CSW aims to mobilise quick, principled and effective responses to events that threaten civil society’s fundamental rights to collectively express, associate and organise throughout the world. CSW builds on CIVICUS’ long-standing role as a global voice in defence of civic rights. It also contributes to CIVICUS’ mission to strengthen civil society worldwide and protect space for civic expression, particularly in those areas where it is under threat. CSW will expose, and attempt to prevent or overturn those violations. Ultimately, CSW aims to contribute to a world in which rights to civic association are respected. KEY CS ACTIVITIES On occasion, we do specific activities / interventions at the country level. For example- Zim as this is neighboring country- ie rallys, fact finding missions, reports, and working with both intl and national cs. However, CSW’s work is more geared towards intl advocacy efforts i.e. CSW Barometer and the Early Warning System. The Civic Space Barometer aims to monitor the perceived space for civil society around the world. This will be done on a regular basis to assist in identifying trends in the expansion or shrinkage of civic space. The objectives of the Barometer are to: Raise global awareness regarding the extent of space perceived to be available for civil society in countries around the world, as well as future threats to this civic space (which will be addressed by inter-linking the Barometer with the Early Warning System currently being developed); Make this information available to inform CIVICUS and its partners’ efforts to defend civil society; Equip diverse stakeholders (including civil society, media, inter-governmental bodies, governments and donors) with a timely assessment of civic space in selected countries. This can be used to assist with advocacy efforts to defend civil society, effective in-country programme planning and implementation, and reporting by the media. In March, our Civil Society Watch (CSW) programme watched the successful release of two Ethiopian anti-poverty campaigners, Daniel Bekele and Netsanet Demissie, after nearly two and half years in prison. Members can be involved in the CSW programme by helping to identify situations where civil society is under threat, which may require CIVICUS intervention, (i.e. advocacy letters, campaigns, etc.) by contributing updates and analysis from your own regions and countries.  
  • T he aim of this CIVICUS programme is to promote and practice participatory governance, thus contributing to poverty reduction and the achievement of key human development goals (such as the Millennium Development Goals) PG develops a systematic process of building the capacities of CSOs to engage more effectively with inter-governmental agencies (IGOs), regional integration bodies and national governments on issues of governance. This programme is also intended to increase the receptivity of governments and IGOs to civil society engagement. The PG programme is currently in the second year of a three-year phase the objective of which is to enhance the capacity of targeted southern (civil society and government) practitioners to promote and practice participatory governance at local and national levels . Phase 1 (2003 – 2006): Focused mainly on Participatory Governance issues at the international and regional level through focusing on improving civil society involvment in organizations such as the United Nations; World Bank; SADC (studies on Zimbabwe; RSA; and Mozambique). Phase 2 (2006 – 2009): F ocuses on building the capacity of Southern practitioners to engage with government at local and national levels The program seeks to build capacity through: (i) knowledge generation and learning; (ii) skills-building and tools development; (iii) bridgebuilding and networking and; (iv) support for innovation.
  • The LTA programme builds on past CIVICUS commitments to promote ethical practice in civil society organisations, by assisting to strengthen their regulatory mechanisms.   This includes promoting functional and effective CSO boards and other oversight structures, supporting the creation of codes of conduct as well as enhancing general governance measures. (Activities include advocating for LTA mechanisms in the sector, encouraging the formation of communities of practice, information dissemination and knowledge sharing, peer learning)
  • MOU renewed in 2006 with United Nations Volunteer (UNV) Programme and the International Association of Volunteer (IAVE), a network of volunteers and volunteer organisations, which promotes, celebrates, and strengthens volunteerism worldwide. Publication seeks to highlight the commonalities and complementarities between volunteerisng/voluteerism and social activism, particularly in relation to the role of volunteering and social activism in advancing human develop. The discussion paper, which will be launched at he CIVICUS World Assembly in June, was informed by over 55 interviews with representatives from volunteer-involving organisations around the world, many of whom are CIVICUS members, and also by stories of ‘volunteer action’ collected from our members and supporters. The paper seeks to move beyond divisions between the so-called volunteering and social activist communities, to celebrate the diverse forms of participation by volunteers. Profiling this issues essentially means we are looking to foster discussion about the importance of volunteers/volunteering to civil society, particularly around development issues/social justice. Vehicles for this include workshops at World Assembly, e-CIVICUS, linkages across membership (i.e. engaging the more traditional service delivery organisations with more activist focused organisations.)
  • MOU renewed in 2006 with United Nations Volunteer (UNV) Programme and the International Association of Volunteer (IAVE), a network of volunteers and volunteer organisations, which promotes, celebrates, and strengthens volunteerism worldwide. Publication seeks to highlight the commonalities and complementarities between volunteerisng/voluteerism and social activism, particularly in relation to the role of volunteering and social activism in advancing human develop. The discussion paper, which will be launched at he CIVICUS World Assembly in June, was informed by over 55 interviews with representatives from volunteer-involving organisations around the world, many of whom are CIVICUS members, and also by stories of ‘volunteer action’ collected from our members and supporters. The paper seeks to move beyond divisions between the so-called volunteering and social activist communities, to celebrate the diverse forms of participation by volunteers. Profiling this issues essentially means we are looking to foster discussion about the importance of volunteers/volunteering to civil society, particularly around development issues/social justice. Vehicles for this include workshops at World Assembly, e-CIVICUS, linkages across membership (i.e. engaging the more traditional service delivery organisations with more activist focused organisations.)
  • In January 2007, several international CSOs, including CIVICUS, gathered in a “side-meeting” at the World Social Forum in Kenya to discuss and launch CSO preparations for the OECD Third High Level Forum on Aid Effectiveness (HLF3), planned for Accra Ghana in September 2008. An expanded group of CSOs then met in Paris the following March to form the International CSO Steering Group (ISG), which met for the first time the OECD/DAC Working Party on Aid Effectiveness to present and discuss CSO perspectives on aid effectiveness. Since 2007, the ISG has produced a policy paper on the aid effectiveness agenda ( CSO International Steering Group policy paper ) , created a web site ( betteraid.org ) to communicate CSO research and perspectives on aid and development effectiveness, organized independent CSO liaison with the Working Party on the organization and participation of CSOs in HLF3, held informal dialogue with developing country governments involved in the Accra process, organized with the Ghana CSO Facilitating Committee a Parallel CSO Forum in Accra, developed a common branding and national advocacy and media tools, and commented and advocated for changes in various drafts of the Accra Agenda for Action (the official statement coming out of the Accra HLF). Eighty (80) CSO delegates have been accredited to HLF3 and have participated in all of its Marketplace and Roundtable processes, including making a direct contribution to the Ministerial segment of the HLF.   CIVICUS had previously not been directly involved in development issues, and with CSO constituencies involved in those. Therefore, being part of the ISG carried a risk , and an opportunity for the organisation. CIVICUS responded positively, early 2007, to the invitation made to join the ISG for the following key reasons: Development cooperation and aid architecture are issues of global concern; aid and financing for development can be considered as Global Public Goods and CSO networks are currently developing space and voice, at all levels, on those issues. Development NGOs and networks actively engaged in the development cooperation and aid architecture issues are developing relevant regional and global networks and dynamics, and a certain coherence (such as the global initiative NGO-ONG.org, the Open Forum on CSO effectiveness) CIVICUS presence is sought by CSO partners because of its: Broad CSO alliance nature, global positioning and outreach capacity Engagement in Global Governance previous experience Experience on CSO accountability, notably with the Accountability Charter   CIVICUS saw there an important agenda and process for CSOs and strived to bring its added-value to the process, having in mind its key objectives: to amplify the voices of CSOs and disseminate to a broader audience CSOs demands; to open up space for CSOs, at all levels; to bridge some gaps between divided sectors of the broader CSO community; to keep learning from the CSO processes and their engagement with decision-makers, and to keep learning and campaigning on the core global issues that affect us all. As such, the engagement with the ISG, with the newly established GFG and with the various Accra process stakeholders responded to the three strategic directions 2008/2012.   The Working Party on Aid Effectiveness, housed at the DAC had the mandate to monitor the implementation of the Paris Declaration and the preparations for HLF3. Major exception to this assertion would be the support provided since 2004 to the Global Call to Action against Poverty. Through this support, CIVICUS established positive partnerships with several stakeholders working on poverty issues. Many are also involved in the international dialogue on development cooperation and aid.
  • The Open Forum is headed by a Global Facilitation Group composed of 25 member organizations providing overview, coordination, political leadership and visibility to the Open Forum for CSO Development Effectiveness. It ensures that the basic principles of the Open Forum are respected, including transparency, openness, inclusiveness, coherence and accountability. The composition of the GFG reflects the diversity of civil society organisations. It is a mix of national and regional platforms, thematic networks, international CSOs and individual organisations from around the world, committed to facing the challenges of development effectiveness. Its members have been proposed by the Exploratory Meeting on CSO Effectiveness held in Paris on 29 and 30 June. The GFG is accountable to civil society in general and to the annual gatherings of the Open Forum in particular. As decided at the GFG meeting in Kuala Lumpur, on 20/21 January 2009, the GFG is headed by a Consortium of six GFG member organizations: European NGO Confederation for Relief and Development (CONCORD) – support organisation and Europe outreach Asia Pacific Research Network (APRN) - Asia outreach All Africa Council of Churches (AACC) – Africa outreach Asociación Latinoamericana de Organizaciones de Promoción (ALOP) – LAC outreach InterAction – North America Outreach CIVICUS – International CSO networks and INGOs outreach  
  • As part of the network- ask that they increase the voice of their organisation, sector, country, and region. Use this space to dialogue, learn, and connect.
  • Membership Opportunities Take part in a special network of international CS that share in CIVICUS’ mission &amp; vision. Opportunities for member networking and close involvement in CIVICUS’ work and programme activities (Members’ Mattters Newsletter; Membership Lounge). Participate in the Governance of CIVICUS and other strategic activities of the organisation to guide CIVICUS’ work (strategic planning; annual Members’ Meeting, etc). Receive automatic subscriptions to our e-newsletters: e-CIVICUS; CSW Monthly Bulletin, Members’ Newsletter, and others.
  • CIVICUS Membership presentation

    1. 1. CIVICUS: World Alliance for Citizen Participation
    2. 2. Mission and Vision Mission : To strengthen global citizen action and civil society throughout the world Vision : CIVICUS’ vision is of a worldwide community of informed, inspired, committed citizens engaged in confronting the challenges facing humanity.
    3. 3. CIVICUS’ 3 E’s <ul><li>Promote Civic Existence , by defending people’s fundamental rights to organise and act collectively towards the public good; </li></ul><ul><li>Promote Civic Expression , by strengthening the capacities of civil society organisations to freely amplify the voices of ordinary people; and </li></ul><ul><li>Promote Civic Engagement , by fostering interaction between citizens, their associations and other institutions to ensure that public institutions reflect the will of the people and are accountable to them. </li></ul>
    4. 5. CIVICUS: When and Where <ul><li>Established in 1993 </li></ul><ul><li>Membership-based international b ody representing an influential network of civil society organisations </li></ul><ul><li>Moved the headquarters to Johannesburg in 2002 to better represent our primary constituency in the global South </li></ul><ul><li>Registered in South Africa and USA </li></ul><ul><li>Representative in New York and Geneva to liaise with various United Nations forums </li></ul>
    5. 6. CIVICUS: A Global Alliance <ul><li>A global membership alliance of 110 countries, consisting of about 450 members. </li></ul><ul><li>CIVICUS’ members represent a network of an estimate 75,000 further m embers based on a recent survey. </li></ul><ul><li>e-CIVICUS, CIVICUS’s weekly e-newsletter, is subscribed by 85,000. </li></ul>
    6. 7. Strategic Directions and Key Approaches 2008-12 <ul><li>Strategic Directions </li></ul><ul><li>Protecting the rights of civil society actors </li></ul><ul><li>Strengthening good practice within civil society </li></ul><ul><li>Strengthening civil society’s ability to influence the policies and practices </li></ul><ul><li>Key Approaches : </li></ul><ul><li>Knowledge generation and analysis </li></ul><ul><li>Communication </li></ul><ul><li>Convening and multi-stakeholder engagement </li></ul><ul><li>Advocacy </li></ul>
    7. 8. CIVICUS Members CIVICUS Members in RED
    8. 9. Geographical Representation Regional Breakdown of CIVICUS Members
    9. 10. <ul><li>A global convening point for civil society stakeholders (including trade unions, faith-based orgs) to dialogue with govt, business and donors under an overall theme: ‘Acting Together for a Just World’ </li></ul><ul><li>8 World Assemblies since 1995: Mexico, Hungary, Philippines, Canada, Botswana, Scotland (2006-2008) </li></ul><ul><li>800-1000 delegates </li></ul><ul><li>9th-12th WA in Montreal, Canada </li></ul>World Assembly (WA)
    10. 11. <ul><li>Save the date: 20-23 August 2010 : </li></ul><ul><li>3 day event including: </li></ul><ul><li>- Co-located events, e.g. AGNA meetings, CIVICUS Youth Assembly </li></ul><ul><li>Plenaries, workshops, learning exchanges </li></ul><ul><li>Social events and networking </li></ul><ul><li>Member and CIVICUS programme events </li></ul><ul><li>Visit http://www.civicusassembly.org </li></ul>World Assembly (WA)
    11. 12. Civil Society Networks <ul><li>AGNA (Affinity Group of National Associations) –more than 54 national networks involved </li></ul><ul><li>IANGO - secretariat of the Intl Advocacy NGOs group (64 signatories) and its Accountability Charter </li></ul><ul><li>www.ingoaccountabilitycharter.org </li></ul>
    12. 13. Civil Society Index (CSI) <ul><li>Action-research project that aims to assess the state of civil society in countries around the world. </li></ul>
    13. 14. Civil Society Watch (CSW) <ul><li>Aims to mobilise responses to events that threaten civil society’s fundamental rights </li></ul>
    14. 15. Participatory Governance <ul><li>Aims to enhance the capacity of southern civil society and government actors to promote and practice participatory governance at national and local levels. </li></ul>
    15. 16. Legitimacy, Transparency, and Accountability (LTA) <ul><li>Aims to build the capacity of CSOs to respond to challenges to their authority and right to speak on behalf of constituencies by improving their accountability and transparency structure. </li></ul>
    16. 17. Volunteering <ul><li>CIVICUS, IAVE and UNV joint MOU: to promote the value of volunteers and volunteering to civil society </li></ul><ul><li>Joint publication on relationship between volunteering, activism and development. </li></ul><ul><li>Profiling the role of volunteers and volunteering in CIVICUS’ work and CIVICUS membership </li></ul>
    17. 18. Global engagement <ul><li>CIVICUS has consultative status with a range of global bodies, including the ECOSOC of the United Nations, the World Bank, the Council of Europe, and others. CIVICUS has been working as a key global interlocutor for civil society in its engagement of inter-governmental institutions. This includes: </li></ul><ul><li>Joint facilitation committee of the World Bank (2004-05) </li></ul><ul><li>Participation in the Panel of Eminent Persons on United Nations-Civil Society Relations (Cardoso panel, 2004) </li></ul><ul><li>Participation in the Advisory Boards of the UN Democracy Fund (UNDEF, 2006 and onward), the UN Development Cooperation Forum (UN DCF, 2007 and onward). </li></ul>
    18. 19. Development Effectiveness and Cooperation <ul><li>Aid Effectiveness international dialogue: CIVICUS is member of the Better Aid platform, since 2007, and of its Coordinating Group </li></ul><ul><li>CIVICUS follows up the implementation of the Accra Agenda for Action (Sept 2008), donors and governments commit to: “Deepen our engagement with CSOs as independent development actors in their own right whose efforts complement those of governments and the private sector. We share an interest in ensuring that CSO contributions to development reach their full potential.” </li></ul>
    19. 20. Development Effectiveness and Cooperation <ul><li>Accra Agenda for Action (Sept 2008), donors and governments also committed to: </li></ul><ul><li>“ We welcome the CSOs’ proposal to engage with them in a CSO-led multi stakeholder process to promote CSO development effectiveness .” </li></ul><ul><li>“ We will work with CSOs to provide an enabling environment that maximises their contributions to development.” </li></ul>
    20. 21. Key Opportunities <ul><li>Join CIVICUS’ Membership http://www.civicus.org/join-civicus </li></ul><ul><li>Be part of CIVICUS’ network in solidarity with strengthening civil society globally </li></ul><ul><li>Participate in the CIVICUS programme activities </li></ul><ul><li>Subscribe to CIVICUS newsletters such as Members Matters and E-CIVICUS </li></ul><ul><li>Access to Resources & Toolkits - Writing Effectively; Media Relations; Strategic Planning; Finance/budgeting; Proposal Writing </li></ul><ul><li>Awards Program –The CIVICUS Nelson Mandela Graça Machel Innovation Awards aimed at providing seed funding for innovative ideas emerging from organisations or groups of participants at the CIVICUS World Assembly. </li></ul><ul><li>Group Facilitation - opportunity to create synergies with other CIVICUS members at events and through online social networking platforms such as Facebook and Twitter </li></ul>
    21. 22. CONCLUSION / QA

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