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The Civil War Homefront
The Civil War Homefront
The Civil War Homefront
The Civil War Homefront
The Civil War Homefront
The Civil War Homefront
The Civil War Homefront
The Civil War Homefront
The Civil War Homefront
The Civil War Homefront
The Civil War Homefront
The Civil War Homefront
The Civil War Homefront
The Civil War Homefront
The Civil War Homefront
The Civil War Homefront
The Civil War Homefront
The Civil War Homefront
The Civil War Homefront
The Civil War Homefront
The Civil War Homefront
The Civil War Homefront
The Civil War Homefront
The Civil War Homefront
The Civil War Homefront
The Civil War Homefront
The Civil War Homefront
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The Civil War Homefront

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Lives and times of soldiers and families during the American Civil War

Lives and times of soldiers and families during the American Civil War

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  • #gallery 2004669982 Uncle Sam, "Go ahead, boys, I'll take care of the wives and babies - God bless you!"1862. | 1 printIllus. in AP2.H32 1862 (Case Y) [P&P] | LC-USZ62-134228 (b&w film copy neg.[Unidentified soldier in Union frock coat holding Co. G, 12th Regiment Infantry, New Hampshire Volunteers forage cap standing next to a woman in front of an American flag]Digital ID: (digital file from original item) ppmsca 26935 http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/ppmsca.26935 Reproduction Number: LC-DIG-ppmsca-26935 (digital file from original item) Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.print
  • Title: [Front page of Frank Leslie's illustrated newspaper with picture of John Brown] Related Names: Lawrence, Martin M., 1808-1859 , Call Number: Illus. in AP2.L52 1859 (Case Y) [P&P] Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA Hon. Abraham Lincoln, born in Kentucky, February 12, 1809Reproduction Number: LC-USZ62-122144 (b&w film copy neg.) Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA
  • NOTES FOR THE TEACHER: Gardner’s original images were put on display in New York City at Brady’s gallery. New Yorkers were shocked and appalled. The New York Times stated that Brady was able to "bring home to us the terrible reality and earnestness of war. If he has not brought bodies and laid them in our door-yards and along streets, he has done something very like it…“Source: http://www.nps.gov/anti/historyculture/photography.htm
  • NOTES FOR THE TEACHER: Activity: Read a soldier’s letter. There is a letter from a wounded soldier dated July 4, 1863 the day after the Battle of Gettysburg in the resources for this lesson plan. See if students can read the handwriting before they read through the transcription. Have students compose their own letter from the home front to a wounded solder from Iraq or Afghanistan. Students can also be encouraged to send letters or cards to the local VA hospital in your area.
  • The Influence of womanpublished 1862 Sept. 6. | 1 printIllus. in AP2.H32 Case Y [P&P] | LC-USZ62-102383
  • NOTES FOR THE TEACHER: With so many men at war, women had to take on more responsibility. In the South, rich women took charge of the plantations, serving as plantation masters and managing vast numbers of slaves while their husbands were away at war while poor women took on the back-breaking strain of agricultural labor, often doing work that their husbands and sons would normally have done. In the North, women took over the brunt of manufacturing jobs and were vital to the success of the war effort to supply the Union army.
  • Filling cartridges at the United States Arsenal at Watertown, Massachusetts1861 July 20. | 1 printIllus. in AP2.H32 1861 Case Y [P&P] | LC-USZ62-96445
  • NOTES FOR THE TEACHER: Early in the war recruiting examinations were inadequate. Later, because of the amount of illness and disease, later recruits received careful and complete physical examination. Bolet, p262 however ,because of lax medical examination early in the war at least 400 women served in the army disguised as men. Private Albert Cashier joined the 95th Illinois Infantry in August 1862 and served for over three years. He participated in many campaigns, including those at Vicksburg, the Red River and Mobile. Cashier continued to wear men’s clothes until 1911, when he was struck by an automobile and fractured a leg. The surgeon attending her discovered he was a she named Jennie Hodgers, born in Belfast in 1844. She continued to receive a soldier’s pension and at her death in 1915, she was buried with full military honors.
  • Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA
  • Library of Congress Map Collection
  • http://www.nps.gov/anti/historyculture/mummabible.htm
  • http://www.nps.gov/gett/historyculture/civilians-at-gettysburg.htm
  • http://www.nps.gov/vick/forteachers/upload/Under%20Siege.pdf
  • Battlefield of ChancellorsvilleDigital ID: (digital file from original item) ppmsca 20688 http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/ppmsca.20688Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA NOTES FOR TEACHERS: Sue Chancellor was 16 in May 1863 when her home was trapped between the armies and General Hooker took it for his headquarter. She left a detailed description of the ordeal she faced in company with 15 other women and girls, including relatives, neighbors, and a young abandoned black girl. Water stood shin deep in the basement where they crouched for protection. “Oh! Such cannonading on all sides,” Sue wrote of May 2, “such shrieks and groans, such commotion of all kinds!”Her home became a hospital, the grand piano became the amputating table. Arms and legs were thrown out the window. The house caught fire from shelling and burned to the ground. Luckily all the family got out alive.
  • Reference: LC Civil War Maps (2nd ed.), 11 Cartoon map illustrating Gen. Winfield Scott's plan to crush the Confederacy, economically. It is sometimes called the "Anacondaplan."
  • Sowing and reapingDigital ID: (digital file from b&w film copy neg.) cph 3a47788 http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/cph.3a47788 Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA
  • The war in Virginia - farmers' families on their way to the Union commissaries for foodReproduction Number: LC-USZ6-1416 (b&w film copy neg.) Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA
  • [Cumberland Landing, Va. Group of "contrabands" at Foller's house]Reproduction Number: LC-DIG-cwpb-01005 (digital file from original neg.) LC-B8171-0383 (b&w film copy neg.) Arrival of Negro family in the linesReproduction Number: LC-DIG-cwpb-01161 (digital file from original neg.)
  • Image from LOC
  • Image from LOC
  • Harper’s Image from LOC
  • "The halt"--a scene in the Georgia campaignRepository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA
  • An incident of Gettysburg - the last thought of a dying fatherDigital ID: (b&w film copy neg.) cph 3b27260 http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/cph.3b27260 Reproduction Number: LC-USZ62-80266 (b&w film copy neg.) Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA NOTES FOR THE TEACHER: Sergeant Amos Humiston (April 26, 1830 – July 1, 1863) was the "unknown soldier" killed at the Battle of Gettysburg.When Humiston's body was found the only identification he had on his person was a picture of three children that he clutched in his hand at his death.This is the picture Sgt. Humiston clutched as he died.A description of the picture was printed on October 19, 1863, in the Philadelphia Inquirer with a story under the provocative headline: "Whose Father Was He?" At that time, newspapers were unable to print photos.The article said "a Union soldier was found in a secluded spot on the battlefield, where, wounded, he had laid himself down to die. In his hands, tightly clasped, was an ambrotype containing the portraits of three small children ... and as he silently gazed upon them his soul died. How touching! How solemn! ... It is earnestly desired that all papers in the country will draw attention to the discovery of this picture and its attendant circumstances, so that, if possible, the family of the dead hero may come into possession of it. Of what inestimable value will it be to these children, proving, as it does, that the last thought of their dying father was for them, and them only."Amos' wife, PhilindaHumiston, living in Portville, New York, eventually came upon a news account of the photo. So much sympathy was poured out for the Humiston family that the proceeds allowed for the creation of an orphanage in Gettysburg for children of soldiers. (source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amos_Humiston)
  •  News from the war [Detail showing woman, holding letter, grieving]Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540
  • Home From War, Harpers, LOC
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