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Arlington National Cemetery

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Take a virtual tour of Arlington National Cemetery where the history of the United States is written in stone. Honor all of our veterans from every age.

Take a virtual tour of Arlington National Cemetery where the history of the United States is written in stone. Honor all of our veterans from every age.

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  • This tour of Arlington is also a tour or our Nation’s history. U.S. History in a nutshell– or cemetery. Ironically, when we tour Arlington and see our nation’s history set in stone, we can easily remember why one historian called the United States a “Nation made by war.” There are many themes in Arlington– Do not forget me, do not forget, the theme of the unkown. Arlington is a reflection of American society during various eras– in politics, sociology, law, science and terrorism. Ultimately in this tour we are going to view the evolution and meaning of a piece of ground.

Arlington National Cemetery Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Arlington National Cemetery The History of Our Nation Set in Stone “Where Valor Proudly Sleeps”
  • 2. “ Each head stone represents a story to be told, a past to be remembered.” Commander Charles E. Bigler
  • 3. “ Gardens of Stone” where the dead rest at attention for all eternity .
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  • 5. Bivouac Of The Dead a poem By Theodore O'Hara (Written in memory of the Kentucky troops killed in the Mexican War - 1846) Portions of this haunting poem are inscribed on placards throughout Arlington, as well as on The McClellan Gate there, and our own Civil War monument on the Derby Green
  • 6. The muffled drum's sad roll has beat The soldier's last tattoo; No more on Life's parade shall meet That brave and fallen few. On fame's eternal camping ground Their silent tents to spread, And glory guards, with solemn round The bivouac of the dead. The Old Guard escorts a soldier to his final resting place.
  • 7. After 9/11, the still-smoldering Pentagon in the background, a funeral takes place at Arlington
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  • 12. Arlington House Civil War Views Union Occupation
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  • 14. Custis Family Graves at Arlington
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  • 17. Arlington 1865 National Archives Photo The Field of the Dead (Section 13). Over 16,000 union soldiers were buried near Arlington House mansion to prevent the Lees from ever returning to their antebellum home. Original grave markers were made of wood.
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  • 23. Regimental Marker of the 2 nd Connecticut Heavy Artillery
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  • 25. And their deeds shall find a record, In the registry of fame; For their blood has cleansed completely Every blot of slavery's shame. So all honor and all glory To these noble Sons of Ham-- To the gallant colored soldiers, Who fought for Uncle Sam! "The Colored Soldiers" Paul Laurence Dunbar
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  • 27. The Old Amphitheatre
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  • 29. General Philip Kearny Gave his left arm at Churubusco, Mexico August 18, 1847 and his life at Chantilly, Va. September 1, 1862
  • 30. General Abner Doubleday Civil War General, Inventor of Baseball?
  • 31. “ In Our Youth, Our Hearts Were Touched by Fire”
  • 32. Union and Confederate Dead Remained Segregated in Death as if on Opposite Sides of a Battle Line The dead from each side were located in their own segregated sections as were officers and black troops.
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  • 34. Fight’n Joe Symbol of Reconciliation Between Blue & Grey
  • 35. The Confederate Memorial
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  • 38. Remember the Maine and to Hell with Spain! A war had torn the nation apart and another war would bind and heal our national schism.
  • 39. The Sailors of the Maine Come Home to Their Final Resting Place in Arlington
  • 40. The USS Maine Memorial
  • 41. Spanish American War Memorial The First Memorial to all American Veterans Who Fought Side by Side in Combat Since the Civil War
  • 42. Rough Riders Monument
  • 43. Stones That Tell The Stories Transformation of Arlington from Potter’s Field to Privileged, Hallowed Resting Place
  • 44. Robert Todd Lincoln Son of the President, Lawyer, Secretary of War, Diplomat 1843-1926
  • 45. President and Chief Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court William Howard Taft
  • 46. Pierre l’Enfant Si monumentum Requiris circumspice –or- If a monument is needed, look around and see
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  • 48. Unknown of the War of 1812
  • 49. Memorial Amphitheatre
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  • 52. Final resting place of America's Unknown Soldier of World War I.
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  • 55. Here Rests in Honored Glory An American Soldier Known But to God”
  • 56. John J. “Black Jack” Pershing General of the Armies
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    • Alone and far removed from earthly care The noble ruins of men lie buried here. You were strong men, good men Endowed with youth and much the will to live I hear no protest from the mute lips of the dead. They rest; there is no more to give. So long my comrades, Sleep ye where you fell upon the field. But tread softly please
    • March o'er my heart with ease March on and on, But to God alone we kneel.
    • -- Audi Murphy
  • 59. “ This is so beautiful. I could stay here forever.” JFK The view that awed President Kennedy on a visit to Arlington seven months before his assassination.
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  • 63. Postcard Kennedy Gravesite 1964
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  • 66. Let the word go forth From this time and place To friend and foe alike That the torch has been passed To a new generation of Americans. Let every nation know Whether it wishes us well or ill That we shall pay any price - bear any burden Meet any hardship - support any friend Oppose any foe to assure the survival And the success of liberty Now the trumpet summons us again Not as a call to bear arms - though embattled we are  But a call to bear the burden of a long twilight struggle  A struggle against the common enemies of man Tyranny –Poverty - Disease - and War itself In the long history of the world Only a few generations have been granted The role of defending freedom In the hour of maximum danger I do not shrink from this responsibility I welcome it The Energy - the Faith - the Devotion Which we bring to this endeavor Will light our country And all who serve it And the glow from that fire Can truly light the world And so my fellow Americans Ask not what your country can do for you Ask what you can do for your country My fellow citizens of the world - ask not What America can do for you - but what together We can do for the freedom of man With a good conscience our only sure reward With history the final judge of our deeds Let us go forth to lead the land we love - asking His blessing And his help - but knowing that here on earth God's work must truly be our own. Inaugural Address - January 20, 1961
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  • 69. Robert Edwin Peary and Matthew Henson Discoverers of the North Pole
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  • 73. Arlington Confronts Us With the Fact that We Live In The Age of Terrorism
  • 74. Rest in Peace - Forever Young
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  • 77. Center Crypt Burial of the Unknown Vietnam Serviceman, Memorial Day, May 28, 1984
  • 78. The Subsequent Disinterment, Identification and Reburial of the “Unknown” Vietnam Soldier Reflects a New Age in Science and in Warfare.
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  • 81. Tell them of us and say, For their tomorrows, We gave our today Old Soldiers never die until they are forgotten…A grateful nation remembers.
  • 82. Bibiliography
    • Arlington National Cemetery Website Title Page - http://www.arlingtoncemetery.com/
    • The Official Web Site of Arlington National Cemetery at http://www.arlingtoncemetery.org/
    • Arlington House, The Robert E. Lee Memorial (National Park Service) at http://www.nps.gov/arho/
    • Hinkel, John, Vincent, Arlington: Monument to Heroes, Prentice Hall, Inc., Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey, 1965
    • Peters, James, Edward, Arlington Natinoal Cemetery: Shrine to America's Heroes, 2 nd Edition Woodbine House, Bethesda, MD 2000.
    • Bigler, Philip, In Honored Glory: Arlington National Cemetery The Final Post, 3 rd Edition, Vandamere Press, Clearwarter, FL, 2003