Livable Burbank

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A presentation made in 2009 by Nicholas de Wolff, Chair of the subcommittee on Transportation and Urban Design, City of Burbank, California. (an abridged version (only 39 slides) has since been uploaded)

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  • State Street, Santa Barbara
  • 1. Street vendors - help make streets into destinations. 2. Pedestrian street lamps - people need lighting at least as much as cars. 3. Curb extensions or bulb-outs - narrows the street at crosswalks. 4. Dedicated bus lanes - allows buses to be as efficient as light rail. 5. Dedicated bike lanes - allows bikes to be as efficient as well. 6. Raised, textured sidewalks - huge aesthetic difference, and clear distinction as a pedestrian-first zone. 7. Traffic lights with a leading pedestrian interval - gives pedestrians a headstart before cars start turning into their lane. 8. Bollards - Non-obtrusive pedestrian protectors. 9. Street trees and plantings - arguably the biggest aesthetic enhancer for any street. 10. Speed bump - classic traffic calming.
  • Livable Burbank

    1. 1. Livable BurbankLivable BurbankThe Key to Making Our Citythe Easiest and Most PleasantEnvironment to Navigate
    2. 2. The challengesThe challenges For Local Cars◦ Gas prices◦ Traffic Flow◦ Safety◦ [what else?] For Bicycles◦ Cars◦ Parking◦ Safety◦ [what else?] For Public Transportation◦ Community adoption at large scale◦ Cost overruns◦ Connectivity◦ [what else?] For Pedestrians◦ Cars, bicycles, scooters, public transportation◦ Narrow or non-existent pavement◦ [what else?] For everyone◦ Air quality◦ Congestion◦ Livable streets◦ [what else?]
    3. 3. The SolutionsThe Solutions For Cars◦ Incentives for alternative fuel vehicles (Electric, Hydrogen, etc)◦ [what else?] For Bicycles◦ Protection from moving automotive traffic◦ Usability◦ [what else?] For Public Transportation◦ Community adoption at large scale◦ [what else?] For Pedestrians◦ Increase Safety◦ Increase Point-2-point Connectivity◦ [what else?] For everyone◦ Reduce Emissions◦ Increase Mobility◦ Traffic Calming◦ Complete Streets◦ [what else?]
    4. 4. Traffic Calming – Some DefinitionsTraffic Calming – Some Definitions Definitions of traffic calming vary, but they all share the goal of reducing vehiclespeeds, improving safety, and enhancing quality of life. Most definitions focus onengineering measures to change driver behavior. Some focus on engineeringmeasures that compel drivers to slow down, excluding those that use barriers todivert traffic. The following are some example definitions.◦ INSTITUTE OF TRANSPORTATION ENGINEERSTraffic calming involves changes in street alignment, installation of barriers, and otherphysical measures to reduce traffic speeds and/or cut-through volumes, in the interestof street safety, livability, and other public purposes.◦ TRANSPORTATION ASSOCIATION OF CANADATraffic calming involves altering of motorist behaviour on a street or on a streetnetwork. It also includes traffic management, which involves changing traffic routes orflows within a neighbourhood.◦ MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MARYLANDTraffic calming consists of operational measures such as enhanced police enforcement,speed displays, and a community speed watch program, as well as such physicalmeasures as edgelines, chokers, chicanes, traffic circles, and (for the past years) speedhumps and raised crosswalks.I believe that Traffic Calming is the topic on which Sharon Springer is leading the discussion,so I leave further comment and presentation to her, save to make the final point that TrafficCalming and Complete Streets are, in my opinion, two halves of a wholesolution, the one addressing arterials (Complete Streets), and the other focusing more ontributaries (Traffic Calming), with obvious overlap in some cases.
    5. 5. What is a Complete Street?What is a Complete Street?**A Complete Street is safe, comfortable and convenient fortravel via automobile, foot, bicycle, and transit.
    6. 6. A Complete Street:A Complete Street:Offers a full rangeof travel choices
    7. 7. A Complete Street:A Complete Street:Connects to anetwork that offerschoicesPortland CyclistsCommuting Video
    8. 8. A Complete Street:A Complete Street:Is fully accessibleto all: kids, seniorsand people withdisabilities
    9. 9. A Complete Street:A Complete Street:Supports &contributes to lifein pleasant,convenientneighborhoods
    10. 10. A Complete Street:A Complete Street:Serves transit
    11. 11. Why do we need to complete the streets?Why do we need to complete the streets?
    12. 12. Americans want to walk and bike moreAmericans want to walk and bike more52% want tobike more thanthey do now.“America Bikes” Poll
    13. 13. Americans want to walk and bike moreAmericans want to walk and bike more55% would ratherdrive less andwalk moreSTPP Poll
    14. 14. About a third of Americans don’t drive:About a third of Americans don’t drive:21% of Americansover 65
    15. 15. About a third of Americans don’t drive:About a third of Americans don’t drive:21% of Americansover 65All children under 16
    16. 16. About a third of Americans don’t drive:About a third of Americans don’t drive:21% of Americansover 65All children under 16Many low incomeAmericans cannotafford automobiles
    17. 17. Streets are inadequate:Streets are inadequate:No room for bikes or pedestrians
    18. 18. Streets are inadequate:Streets are inadequate:No sidewalks
    19. 19. Streets are inadequate:Streets are inadequate:Too narrow to share with bikes
    20. 20. Too dangerous to cross on footStreets are inadequate:Streets are inadequate:
    21. 21. Streets are inadequate:Streets are inadequate:No room for people
    22. 22. Streets are inadequate:Streets are inadequate:25% of walking tripstake place on roadsw/o sidewalks orshouldersNatl. Survey of Ped &Bicyclist Attitudes &Behaviors, 2003 BTS
    23. 23. Streets are inadequate:Streets are inadequate:Bike lanes areavailable for onlyabout 5% of biketripsNatl. Survey of Ped &Bicyclist Attitudes &Behaviors, 2003 BTS
    24. 24. Top pedestrian complaints areTop pedestrian complaints areincomplete streetsincomplete streets2002 Natl. TransportationAvailability & Use Survey
    25. 25. Top bicyclist complaints areTop bicyclist complaints areincomplete streetsincomplete streets2002 Natl. TransportationAvailability & Use Survey
    26. 26. Incomplete streets are unsafe.Incomplete streets are unsafe.FMIS, NHTS, FARSfederal databases
    27. 27. Completing the Streets: Local ActionCompleting the Streets: Local Action What % of arterialstreets in Burbank(CA)have bikelanes?
    28. 28. Completing the Streets: One ExampleCompleting the Streets: One ExampleBoulder, Colorado has built all arterials as multi-modalcorridors for auto, pedestrian, bicycle, and transit use.
    29. 29. Boulder, Colorado has built all arterials as multi-modal corridorsfor auto, pedestrian, bicycle, and transit use.Completing the Streets: One ExampleCompleting the Streets: One Example
    30. 30. Complete Street - BeforeComplete Street - Before
    31. 31. Complete Street - AfterComplete Street - AfterClick here to visit the 21stCentury Street Design Competition Web Site
    32. 32. Pro: A street cyclists can ride comfortablyCon: Single-stripe separation has been proven to work only on side streets with no auto parking lane,or widened for commercial arterials (see next slide).The many types of Complete StreetsThe many types of Complete Streets
    33. 33. A commercial arterial with bike lanes & sidewalksThe many types of Complete StreetsThe many types of Complete Streets
    34. 34. Pro: Grass verge allows for soft “fall zone” if bicyclist is forced off roadPro: Differentiating color scheme of lane clearly identifies zonesCon: Cobbled lane makes for unnecessary discomfort for bicyclistThe many types of Complete StreetsThe many types of Complete Streets
    35. 35. Pro: Exclusive lanePro: Buffered from all other trafficCon: Only really works on one-way streets or wide boulevardsThe many types of Complete StreetsThe many types of Complete Streets
    36. 36. A street school children can safely crossThe many types of Complete StreetsThe many types of Complete Streets
    37. 37. A commercial street with lots of activityThe many types of Complete StreetsThe many types of Complete Streets
    38. 38.  Kids going to school orthe ice cream shop ontheir own Seniors comfortablystrolling and safelycrossing the street More bikes used forutility and recreationaltrips Fewer accidents and lessserious injuries A more smoothlyfunctioning road network Higher values foradjoining propertiesWhat youll see when streets are completeWhat youll see when streets are complete
    39. 39. Benefits: for safetyBenefits: for safety(King/Ewing Report)Designing intersections forpedestrian travel can reducepedestrian risk by 28%
    40. 40. Europe has more bike-ped travelEurope has more bike-ped travelPucher, AJPH Sept2003
    41. 41. ……And far fewer deathsAnd far fewer deathsPucher, AJPH Sept2003
    42. 42. Benefits: for older AmericansBenefits: for older Americans 50% of Americanswill be over 55 in2030 More than half ofolder Americanswalk regularly.
    43. 43. Benefits: for older AmericansBenefits: for older Americans 21% of Americansover 65 do not drive More than 50% ofnon-drivers stay athome on a givenday because theylack transportationoptions.
    44. 44. Benefits: for encouraging healthy activityBenefits: for encouraging healthy activity Walking &bicycling helpprevent obesity,diabetes, highblood pressure &colon cancer. Residents are65% more likelyto walk in aneighborhoodwith sidewalks.
    45. 45. 20% of Americanshave a disabilitythat limits theirdaily activities.Complete Streetshave curb cuts andother features fordisabled travelers.Complete Streetsreduce isolationand dependence.Benefits: for people with disabilitiesBenefits: for people with disabilities
    46. 46. Benefits: for reducing trafficBenefits: for reducing trafficOf all trips taken in metro areas:50% are three miles or less28% are one mile or less65% of trips under one mileare now taken by automobileSince this 2001 NHTS report, the number has grown dramatically…
    47. 47. Isn’t it expensive?Isn’t it expensive?“The cost is incremental or minimal in terms of the overall constructioncosts for a new facility.”Whit Clement, Virginia Secretary of Transportation“By fully considering the needs of all non-motorized travelers (pedestrians,bicyclists, & persons with disabilities) early in the life of a project, the costsassociated with including facilities for these travelers are minimized.”Jeff Morales, Former Director, CalTrans
    48. 48. Is this supported in design manuals?Is this supported in design manuals?The AASHTO “Green Book”“Because of the demands ofvehicular traffic in congestedareas, it is often extremelydifficult to make adequateprovisions for pedestrians.Yet this should be done,because pedestrians are thelifeblood of our urbanareas..."
    49. 49. Most transportation experts agree this road is poorly designedIs this supported in design manuals?Is this supported in design manuals?
    50. 50. Won’t this mean wider streets?Many overly wide roads could use a “road diet”
    51. 51. What’s a road diet?Classic road diet shrinks 4 lanes to 3 + bike lanes
    52. 52. What else does a road diet do?Creates room for wider sidewalks
    53. 53. What else does a road diet do?An inexpensive tool for retrofitting existing streets
    54. 54. Are street design standards enough?This road meets minimum standards, but is sterile
    55. 55. Start with a stark, plain streetPutting All The Pieces TogetherPutting All The Pieces Together
    56. 56. Narrow travel lanes, add a bike lanePutting All The Pieces TogetherPutting All The Pieces Together
    57. 57. Add a median, trees and some texturePutting All The Pieces TogetherPutting All The Pieces Together
    58. 58. Bring the buildings in closerPutting All The Pieces TogetherPutting All The Pieces Together
    59. 59. Make sure the buildings face the streetPutting All The Pieces TogetherPutting All The Pieces Together
    60. 60. Bring in more buildings (infill)Putting All The Pieces TogetherPutting All The Pieces Together
    61. 61. The street now has a life!Putting All The Pieces TogetherPutting All The Pieces Together
    62. 62. The Case For Buffered LanesThe Case For Buffered LanesCLICK HERE TO PLAY VIDEO
    63. 63. Bike Share ProgramsBike Share ProgramsCLICK HERE TO PLAY VIDEOCLICK HERE TO PLAY 1stANNIVERSARY VIDEOCLICK HERE TO PLAY LAUNCH VIDEO
    64. 64. Further resourcesFurther resources Article about Complete Streets (who coined the term; citiesdeveloping successful programs, etc) The Livable Streets Initiative Web Site GOOD Magazine Livable Street Web Site* - In the interest of transparency, it bears noting that some of the slides in this presentation are direct copies of, or based upon, other presentations I have found on the internet.

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