Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
SYN310: Deep dive into ShareFile Enterprise functionality
SYN310: Deep dive into ShareFile Enterprise functionality
SYN310: Deep dive into ShareFile Enterprise functionality
SYN310: Deep dive into ShareFile Enterprise functionality
SYN310: Deep dive into ShareFile Enterprise functionality
SYN310: Deep dive into ShareFile Enterprise functionality
SYN310: Deep dive into ShareFile Enterprise functionality
SYN310: Deep dive into ShareFile Enterprise functionality
SYN310: Deep dive into ShareFile Enterprise functionality
SYN310: Deep dive into ShareFile Enterprise functionality
SYN310: Deep dive into ShareFile Enterprise functionality
SYN310: Deep dive into ShareFile Enterprise functionality
SYN310: Deep dive into ShareFile Enterprise functionality
SYN310: Deep dive into ShareFile Enterprise functionality
SYN310: Deep dive into ShareFile Enterprise functionality
SYN310: Deep dive into ShareFile Enterprise functionality
SYN310: Deep dive into ShareFile Enterprise functionality
SYN310: Deep dive into ShareFile Enterprise functionality
SYN310: Deep dive into ShareFile Enterprise functionality
SYN310: Deep dive into ShareFile Enterprise functionality
SYN310: Deep dive into ShareFile Enterprise functionality
SYN310: Deep dive into ShareFile Enterprise functionality
SYN310: Deep dive into ShareFile Enterprise functionality
SYN310: Deep dive into ShareFile Enterprise functionality
SYN310: Deep dive into ShareFile Enterprise functionality
SYN310: Deep dive into ShareFile Enterprise functionality
SYN310: Deep dive into ShareFile Enterprise functionality
SYN310: Deep dive into ShareFile Enterprise functionality
SYN310: Deep dive into ShareFile Enterprise functionality
SYN310: Deep dive into ShareFile Enterprise functionality
SYN310: Deep dive into ShareFile Enterprise functionality
SYN310: Deep dive into ShareFile Enterprise functionality
SYN310: Deep dive into ShareFile Enterprise functionality
SYN310: Deep dive into ShareFile Enterprise functionality
SYN310: Deep dive into ShareFile Enterprise functionality
SYN310: Deep dive into ShareFile Enterprise functionality
SYN310: Deep dive into ShareFile Enterprise functionality
SYN310: Deep dive into ShareFile Enterprise functionality
SYN310: Deep dive into ShareFile Enterprise functionality
SYN310: Deep dive into ShareFile Enterprise functionality
SYN310: Deep dive into ShareFile Enterprise functionality
SYN310: Deep dive into ShareFile Enterprise functionality
SYN310: Deep dive into ShareFile Enterprise functionality
SYN310: Deep dive into ShareFile Enterprise functionality
SYN310: Deep dive into ShareFile Enterprise functionality
SYN310: Deep dive into ShareFile Enterprise functionality
SYN310: Deep dive into ShareFile Enterprise functionality
SYN310: Deep dive into ShareFile Enterprise functionality
SYN310: Deep dive into ShareFile Enterprise functionality
SYN310: Deep dive into ShareFile Enterprise functionality
SYN310: Deep dive into ShareFile Enterprise functionality
SYN310: Deep dive into ShareFile Enterprise functionality
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

SYN310: Deep dive into ShareFile Enterprise functionality

5,878

Published on

Take a deep dive into the most popular features of Citrix ShareFile Enterprise: customer-managed StorageZones for on-premise deployments; StorageZone Connectors for mobile access to existing …

Take a deep dive into the most popular features of Citrix ShareFile Enterprise: customer-managed StorageZones for on-premise deployments; StorageZone Connectors for mobile access to existing enterprise data; and Active Directory integration. Learn how to deploy ShareFile in your Microsoft Azure account. See demos of installation and configuration best practices, such as using Active Directory integration to provision user accounts. This session can help ensure success in your deployments.

Published in: Technology, Business
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
5,878
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
9
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
160
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. © 2014 Citrix. Confidential.1
  • 2. © 2014 Citrix. Confidential.2 You can tweet about this session!
  • 3. © 2014 Citrix. Confidential.3 • Assuming basic knowledge of ShareFile • Address common questions from PoC / Deployment • Please hold questions to the end, as we’ve got quite a bit to cover
  • 4. © 2014 Citrix. Confidential.4 • Enterprise IT is in a difficult position • Consumer devices and solutions evolving quickly • Consumers are used to finding their own IT solutions • Enterprise IT can’t keep doing what they’ve been doing an expect to close that gap • Enterprise IT tasked with supporting 100’s of applications • Intro: There are many business trends that impact IT. But consumerization is at the top of the list. • Key Points: • Consumerization is being driven by the fact that consumer capabilities are surpassing that of enterprise IT. The first source of this trend is the new generation of people entering the workforce--bringing their personal workspaces, habits, and identity with them. More sophisticated and very popular consumer devices are compounding the trend. These devices have capabilities that far outreach enterprise IT computing capabilities from even a few years ago – and they are easily available at low cost from a variety of retailers. • This proven by analyst like Gartner that have clearly stated that this is the one trend that experts agree will drive the most change is the consumerization of IT. The consensus among analysts is that this trend, which is already underway, will force significant changes in businesses all over the world. • Illustration/Anecdotes/Proof: We all see examples in the news these days, and you probably see many more within your own company…
  • 5. © 2014 Citrix. Confidential.5 4 pillars of ShareFile ‐ Clients, Authentication, SaaS Application (Control Plane), Document Storage Clients • Native client experience across these platforms, while still maintaining consistency • Clients ‐ OS X, Windows (XenApp / XenDesktop), Mobile clients with mobile editor, Outlook Plug‐in Authentication • Not technically part of ShareFile, but important to understand how users are authorized into ShareFile • Potentially an on‐premises component to that as well SaaS Application (Control Plane) • ShareFile.com and ShareFile.eu • Contains the business logic that drives SF as well as the webUI and reporting • Deliberately a SaaS application to help you close the gap between the velocity of consumer and  enterprise IT services • Speed at which we can evolve features 
  • 6. © 2014 Citrix. Confidential.6 • Improves response time to address security issues • 60% of our customers are not on the latest release of the SZC ‐ illustrates the difference between what  IT thinks they can deliver and what they really can • With enterprise software the slower you update the more stable and reliable your system is, this  contrasts with consumer software which the faster you update it the more stable and better the user  experience is Document Storage (StorageZone) • Specifically separate from the rest of the architecture • By splitting this out it allows us to address business logic separately from the data/documents being  stored • By having it be a separate component it allows us to add features to the solution without impacting the  documents stored • Cloud, on‐prem, hybrid • Citrix‐managed, customer‐managed, access to existing repositories
  • 7. © 2014 Citrix. Confidential.7
  • 8. © 2014 Citrix. Confidential.8 Deploying the ShareFile mobile apps can take place in 3 ways: • Via the public app store  • From an MDM solution ‐ ShareFile apps are available for packaging from other vendors (Airwatch,  Mobile Iron) • And of course, as part of an MDX application set with XenMobile
  • 9. © 2014 Citrix. Confidential.9 • Now, if you’ve chosen to restrict app deployment to an administrator‐pushed model ‐ you want to  control which mobile devices are allowed to connect to ShareFile. • By turning off the public app store, IT administrators are now responsible for deployment of the app,  and can apply rules and policies for distribution.   • This isn’t a feature exposed via the ShareFile UI, and needs to be requested through ShareFile support • User experience for this ‐ we don’t block access to the app store (obviously), but when this option  is available, and the user tries to log in from an app the downloaded themselves ‐ they are denied  access As a security feature ‐ this is an account‐wide setting, and it is all or nothing.  
  • 10. © 2014 Citrix. Confidential.10 • On windows and mac devices, we have similar controls to restrict unmanaged devices. • Gives administrators the ability to selectively control which Windows / OSX devices are allowed to  synchronize content.  Typically this is pushed out as part of your software deployment practices. • This is somewhat more granular than the mobile device policies, in that the key could be pushed out to  an individual device.
  • 11. © 2014 Citrix. Confidential.11 • ShareFile is sold as both a standalone solution as well as bundled with XenMobile • Features here are available regardless of how ShareFile is purchased / integrated into clients and  Application Tier • Encryption ‐ Using AES 256 for the ShareFile application / requires PIN or Passcode to be set for the  app itself • Poison pill ‐ allows administrators to set a threshold for access ‐ so that if a device doesn’t check in,  or if you lose a device after x days ‐ data is wipe • Remote wipe ‐ only wipes the sharefile container, not a device wipe • Disabling “open in” ‐ Built‐in Mobile editor, ShareFile can be a fully functional standalone tool ‐ preventing open‐in contains your data inside the ShareFile sandbox
  • 12. © 2014 Citrix. Confidential.12 If you’re deploying ShareFile as part of XenMobile ‐ the benefits of MDX are that we’re given significantly  more control Clipboard ‐ copy and paste Blocking Screen Capture Disable Print Require internal network
  • 13. © 2014 Citrix. Confidential.13 As a XenMobile administrator ‐ you have signifcantly more control over the restrictions around access to  ShareFile content on the device • Sandboxed in ShareFile ‐ Data not allowed to leave the App • Sandboxed in XenMobile ‐ Data can be exhcanged between ShareFile and other MDX applications  • Freely accessible ‐ Data can be exchanged between ShareFile and any app on the device Of course, a XenMobile data wipe will destroy the entire managed container ‐ including the ShareFile content.
  • 14. © 2014 Citrix. Confidential.14 • Sometimes the different ways we share content in ShareFile is misunderstood ‐ so we want to clarify  the 3 different ways you can share a file with someone else and the controls around that.
  • 15. © 2014 Citrix. Confidential.15 • In the most basic scenario, we have Anonymous sharing • This is almost the email model of a file share • I send you a link • You can download or view the content ‐ if you don’t have a locally installed application, you can  view it online (with Microsoft Office Web Apps) • The OWA viewer is going to have the most hi‐fidelity rendering of that document, because hey,  it’s Microsoft • As the user ‐ I *can* get confirmation of downloads ‐ as administrator ‐ I can track IP address of the  recipients, timestamps, etc. • Users and administrators can also expire links after they are sent
  • 16. © 2014 Citrix. Confidential.16 • Moving on ‐ I can send file anonymously, but with Request Contact Info enabled • This is the most common way *I* send files ‐ and while it is still an anonymous download, key pieces  of information are requested from the recipient ‐ and in 95% of the cases, I get valid information  back.  • People often ask “but can’t you just fill that out with nonsense?” ‐ of course ‐ but from real world use  of the product, almost everyone puts real information into these fields • This information is auditable ‐ and we’ll track name, email addr, timestamp, IP.  So you can tell if the  link has been sent on to more than your intended recipients, and of course you can always retract  links you’ve sent.
  • 17. © 2014 Citrix. Confidential.17 • The most secure method of sharing with ShareFile is Requiring a Client login. • In this model, I send you a link • As the recipient, you get an email from ShareFile asking you to activate your client account and  choose a password • After setting the password you can download or view the file • Subsequent shared documents will require the user to login as a client using their password prior to  being taken to the download page
  • 18. © 2014 Citrix. Confidential.18 Additional controls around sharing which can be defined account‐wide: • If you NEVER want your users to share documents anonymously ‐ ShareFile can be configured to  require client logins for ALL links shared • Once you’ve gone to that step ‐ required client logins for sharing ‐ Blacklisting or whitelisting can be  configured to only allow your users to share content with specific external parties.  For instance, you  could use blacklist to block out sharing to competitor domains ‐ or whitelist to enabling sharing with  your suppliers.  This is also an all‐or‐nothing configuration. • To enhance security for your clients ‐ we have 2‐step verification with SMS so that your users can opt‐in  to provide an additional layer of security for their logins.
  • 19. © 2014 Citrix. Confidential.19 • Enterprises want to use Active Directory.  They don’t want to have to have another set of passwords to  manage.   You’ve heard us talk about Employees and Clients ‐ Employees are licensed users, who are  entitled to use all the features of ShareFile ‐ and then we have “clients,” users external to your  organization who have been granted access to files.  Provisioning is specifically about setting up those  accounts for Employee users, and utilizing your AD infrastructure to populate your user set.
  • 20. © 2014 Citrix. Confidential.20 • Provisioning is the process of bringing your AD user accounts into sharefile. ShareFile creates an ‘employee record’ which contains firstname, lastname, and email address based off  the information stored in your AD.  Of course, we can also gather group data for bulk management of  access ‐ you can take your existing AD groups and their memberships, and use them effectively within  ShareFile. No additional AD attributes are shared ‐ the actual provisoining process is only capturing a very speicfic  subset of data ‐ there is no impact on your existing AD infrastructure, no extention of AD, etc.
  • 21. © 2014 Citrix. Confidential.21 • Provisoining can take place 1 of 3 ways.  We’re really only focusing on one in this session. • First ‐ Provisioning can take place manually, entering it into our admin console or importing to ShareFile  via CSV file • XenMobile App Control is another option ‐ which gives you complete management of user accounts  from the XenMobile admin interface • But our focus in this section ‐ will be via the User Management Tool, which gives you the most  flexibility for user configuration, and is constantly updated to take advantage of new ShareFile  functionality.
  • 22. © 2014 Citrix. Confidential.22 • The user management tool is a lightweight windows application run on your local network by one of  your ShareFile account administrators.   • The tool needs no special permissions to access your active directory ‐ and will process a set of rules  you define: • Provision Users • Create Groups • Update group membership • Disabling user access 22
  • 23. © 2014 Citrix. Confidential.23 • Rules to provision employee accounts contain configuration options • Each rule can have different options • Options include: StorageZone, Quotas, and ShareFile permissions (create root folders, manage clients,  etc) • Rules can be run on‐demand from the User Management Tool console or can be run on a scheduled  basis via the Windows Scheduler, we expect rules will be scheduled after the initial PoC 23
  • 24. © 2014 Citrix. Confidential.24 • Once employee accounts have been created within your ShareFile account 
  • 25. © 2014 Citrix. Confidential.25 Now that we have taken a deeper look at user provisioning, let’s take a look at the authentication  methods that are available.  • ShareFile Managed – allows the user to login using an email address and password that are stored in  the ShareFile application tier ‐ this is the quickest way to get up and running in a proof of concept, but  we expect that most enterprises will want to integrate with their existing AD. • Customer ‐Managed IDP – solutions such as ADFS, PingFederate, SiteMinder, Okta ‐ where we can  support all the common authentication methods: Forms, Basic, and Windows Integrated.  These are  the supported solutions ‐ we conform to the Saml 2.0 standard, however as with most standards,  we’ve found significant variance between vendors. • XenMobile ‐ The XenMobile App Controller is a SAML 2.0 provider ‐ and if you are deploying ShareFile  as part of a XenMobile deployment, this is the best option.  In this configuration, no additional IdP is  required, and XenMobile provides everything you need. • Note: All users are configured with a password in the ShareFile control plane, but there is an option to  block user logins with password when you configure SAML.  25
  • 26. © 2014 Citrix. Confidential.26 • So why do we use SAML? • The problem that SAML resolves is trust.  ShareFile and its applications are not, and should not be  treated as, trusted entities inside your domain.  Similarly, we at ShareFile don't want to assume  management and security of your Active Directory username and password. • Sometimes people ask us ‐ why don't you just take my credentials, and perform some sort of secure  tunnel back to my Active Directory to validate my password?  The short answer here is that you should  never give your AD username and password to a 3rd party.  But you knew that.  There's a better model  for managing this ‐ SAML is an industry standard for maintaining trusts specifically for the purpose of  validating credentials. • In this model, by configuring a SAML server in your enterprise, you create that 3rd party which  ShareFile can interface with. • Through your configuration, your Active Directory Trusts the Identity Provider.  ShareFile trusts the  Identity Provider.  Therefore ‐ if the IDP validates your credentials for us, we can treat that as a reliable  source.
  • 27. © 2014 Citrix. Confidential.27 • There are 3 components to the system.  The Service Provider, in this case ShareFile.com ‐ we are the  service provider, which is outside of your environment. <click> • In the process of authenticating to the service provider, the user provides his username and password  to the IDP.  <click> • If the authentication was successful, the IDP provides a signed claim back to the user ‐ in our case, the  claim contains a name ID in the form of an email address. <click> • The user then passes that claim (signed by the IDP) back to ShareFile.  ShareFile trusts the signed claim,  and uses the email address supplied to tie this back to a ShareFile employee user.  
  • 28. © 2014 Citrix. Confidential.28
  • 29. © 2014 Citrix. Confidential.29
  • 30. © 2014 Citrix. Confidential.30 • Client requests ShareFile SSO login URL • Client discovers IDP • Client redirected to IDP • Client requests IDP URL • IDP authenticates the user • User is redirected to the ACS URL with the SAML response • User request ACS URL and presents the SAML token • ACS validates the SAML token and generates an OAuth token for client access • ShareFile client provides OAuth token as part of https requests to ShareFile API server • OAuth, that’s something new we haven’t talked about
  • 31. © 2014 Citrix. Confidential.31 • Client requests ShareFile SSO login URL • Client discovers IDP • Client redirected to IDP • Client requests IDP URL • IDP authenticates the user • User is redirected to the ACS URL with the SAML response • User request ACS URL and presents the SAML token • ACS validates the SAML token and generates an OAuth token for client access • ShareFile client provides OAuth token as part of https requests to ShareFile API server • OAuth, that’s something new we haven’t talked about
  • 32. © 2014 Citrix. Confidential.32 • Client requests ShareFile SSO login URL • Client discovers IDP • Client redirected to IDP • Client requests IDP URL • IDP authenticates the user • User is redirected to the ACS URL with the SAML response • User request ACS URL and presents the SAML token • ACS validates the SAML token and generates an OAuth token for client access • ShareFile client provides OAuth token as part of https requests to ShareFile API server • OAuth, that’s something new we haven’t talked about
  • 33. © 2014 Citrix. Confidential.33 • Client requests ShareFile SSO login URL • Client discovers IDP • Client redirected to IDP • Client requests IDP URL • IDP authenticates the user • User is redirected to the ACS URL with the SAML response • User request ACS URL and presents the SAML token • ACS validates the SAML token and generates an OAuth token for client access • ShareFile client provides OAuth token as part of https requests to ShareFile API server • OAuth, that’s something new we haven’t talked about
  • 34. © 2014 Citrix. Confidential.34 • Client requests ShareFile SSO login URL • Client discovers IDP • Client redirected to IDP • Client requests IDP URL • IDP authenticates the user • User is redirected to the ACS URL with the SAML response • User request ACS URL and presents the SAML token • ACS validates the SAML token and generates an OAuth token for client access • ShareFile client provides OAuth token as part of https requests to ShareFile API server • OAuth, that’s something new we haven’t talked about
  • 35. © 2014 Citrix. Confidential.35 • Client requests ShareFile SSO login URL • Client discovers IDP • Client redirected to IDP • Client requests IDP URL • IDP authenticates the user • User is redirected to the ACS URL with the SAML response • User request ACS URL and presents the SAML token • ACS validates the SAML token and generates an OAuth token for client access • ShareFile client provides OAuth token as part of https requests to ShareFile API server • OAuth, that’s something new we haven’t talked about
  • 36. © 2014 Citrix. Confidential.36 • Client requests ShareFile SSO login URL • Client discovers IDP • Client redirected to IDP • Client requests IDP URL • IDP authenticates the user • User is redirected to the ACS URL with the SAML response • User request ACS URL and presents the SAML token • ACS validates the SAML token and generates an OAuth token for client access • ShareFile client provides OAuth token as part of https requests to ShareFile API server • OAuth, that’s something new we haven’t talked about
  • 37. © 2014 Citrix. Confidential.37 • Client requests ShareFile SSO login URL • Client discovers IDP • Client redirected to IDP • Client requests IDP URL • IDP authenticates the user • User is redirected to the ACS URL with the SAML response • User request ACS URL and presents the SAML token • ACS validates the SAML token and generates an OAuth token for client access • ShareFile client provides OAuth token as part of https requests to ShareFile API server • OAuth, that’s something new we haven’t talked about
  • 38. © 2014 Citrix. Confidential.38 • Client requests ShareFile SSO login URL • Client discovers IDP • Client redirected to IDP • Client requests IDP URL • IDP authenticates the user • User is redirected to the ACS URL with the SAML response • User request ACS URL and presents the SAML token • ACS validates the SAML token and generates an OAuth token for client access • ShareFile client provides OAuth token as part of https requests to ShareFile API server • OAuth, that’s something new we haven’t talked about
  • 39. © 2014 Citrix. Confidential.39 • We’ve described the process of authentication between an IdP and SP so why do we use OAuth? • An OAuth token is a long‐life authorication that allows us to authorize the client without re‐prompting  for authentication • This is especially important for the Sync clients that need to constantly be checking for new document  updates when you are away from your computer • OAuth is an industry standard for long‐lived authorization requests and prevents us from having to  store credentials on a machine • OAuth tokens can be configured to automatically expire NEVER, or every 1,7,30 days. They can also be  manually revoked  • When an OAuth token expires or is revoked ShareFile requires the user to reauthenticate to the  Identity Provider • Disabling a ShareFile employee account immediately revokes all of the OAuth tokens associated to  their account
  • 40. © 2014 Citrix. Confidential.40 • Recapping ShareFile authentication with our Architecture • ShareFile clients talk to the IDP, we get a claim back
  • 41. © 2014 Citrix. Confidential.41 • StorageZone Connectors (which we haven’t talked about yet) are handled differently because in this  case we are authenticating to a resource that exists on your network. • Since we don’t have those credentials we prompt the user for their Active Directory credentials when  accessing StorageZone Connectors. The username and password are transferred over a HTTPS  connection only to an on‐prem Customer‐Managed StorageZone Controller. • The StorageZone Controller uses those credentials to impersonate the user when accessing the  resources on the network
  • 42. © 2014 Citrix. Confidential.42 • Storage is a key part of the ShareFile architecture, and we have a number of different options to  discuss.
  • 43. © 2014 Citrix. Confidential.43 • With StorageZones, we can host “ShareFile Data” in either Citrix‐Managed, or Customer‐Managed  repositories.  This can be cloud based, either in Amazon or Azure, or on‐premises in your own  datacenter.  Based on our flexible architecture, you can mix and match these types in your account, for  instance allowing one group of users to use cheaper cloud storage, while storing another set of users’  sensitive data in an on‐prem Zone. • Additionally – we offer Connectors – which gives access to existing data types.  It is important to  remember that Connectors content does not include the full sync and share experience ‐ and instead it  is focused on bringing a single access point to your users.
  • 44. © 2014 Citrix. Confidential.44 • If you choose a Citrix‐Managed Zone for your account, that is fully managed by ShareFile.  That means  you have the benefits of our data reliability with either Amazon or Azure, and our operations team  focused on keeping the system up and running at all times.  This is the traditional SaaS model that  ShareFile was built on, and has been evolving since its beginnings. • In this model, ShareFile runs the “StorageZone Controllers” and hosts them in the geographic region  most convenient for your cloud storage. • Of course, all our data is encrypted in transit and at rest with AES‐256 bit encryption. • There are additional benefits – Citrix‐Managed Zones are the most fully featured option we have, and  include functionality like FTP and AV scanning that again, is managed entirely by our team.  This takes a  lot of pressure off your administrators and makes for a system that can be set up very quickly – if you  requested an account right now, it could be ready to go within the hour.
  • 45. © 2014 Citrix. Confidential.45 We also offer customer‐managed StorageZones.  Typically our customers choose this model for one of  two reasons: • Performance – By physically locating your data repository near your users, you can ensure a fast  connection to data. • Compliance – For data sovereignty regulations or other compliance needs, a customer‐managed  Zone keeps file contents under your control at all times Our on‐prem solution is very straightforward – called the StorageZone Controller, it is a web service that  runs on a server inside your datacenter.  Because it is really a data pump – it can scale up or out; of  course we recommend a minimum deployment to be a load balanced pair and suggest that you assess  capacity in your environment and add capacity as needed. In this model you hold the encryption keys, and you hold the data.   The only information that passes  through ShareFile servers is file metadata – filenames, foldernames, and ACLs – but never the contents  of your sensitive documents.
  • 46. © 2014 Citrix. Confidential.46 • Talking a bit about our architecture, it is important to understand the distinction between what we call  file data, and file metadata.  In native ShareFile storage, we save every revision of a file you make as a  new object – and reference that object with a UUID.  If you were to look into one of our on‐prem (or  even cloud) repositories, you’d see a directory listing much like this – with a different UUID for every  file you upload. • This is part of our “object store” heritage and frankly we believe it is the model more and more of your  data will follow over the next 5‐10 years.  The simplicity of an object store is that it decouples the  mundane task of storing files from the useful stuff – the actual consumption and distribution of those  bits.  That’s very important, because it means that we can define a very simple model for storing your  data – and leave it intact for years and years – while continuously adding new functionality.  This is very  different from, say, an NTFS share – where the directory structure itself contains both file information  (such as name) and also access rights and permissions.   • By using object stores and having this “split” between where we store your file contents and your file  metadata – we gain a tremendous amount of flexibility and future‐proofing.  The fact that we use the  same model anywhere you store ShareFile data allows us to mix‐and‐match, giving you as the  administrator many options for where your files live.
  • 47. © 2014 Citrix. Confidential.47 • StorageZone Connectors, on the other hand – are all about mobilizing existing data, either from your  datacenter or from other cloud services. • On‐prem, we have fully functional solutions for read/write access to Network File Shares, as well as  check‐in/out access to SharePoint 2010 and 2013.   This gives your users a single place to go when they  want to access data – whether it is content that has been on your corporate R: drive for the last 10  years, or a document someone just edited on our ipad app.   To get to your on‐prem environment, we  use that same StorageZone Controller – so there is only one point of entry on your network and a  simple service to maintain.  For Connectors, we always impersonate the user accessing content – so all  of your existing permissions, auditing information, etc are still valid. • We’re putting a lot of effort into connectors, and you’ll see continued evolution here as well as new  document repository sources being added by Citrix and our Partners.  We’ve recently published our  Connectors SDK, and we’re getting great interest in that as a way to take what have traditionally been  on‐prem content management systems and quickly making them available on mobile devices.
  • 48. © 2014 Citrix. Confidential.48 • In summary, when you’re talking about ShareFile and the content it can serve up – these are the  important concepts.  ShareFile Data – fully featured, sync and share, versioning, retention policies, all  of the benefits that ShareFile can get you.  This can live in the cloud or on‐prem, and you can choose to  manage that yourself or take a fully hands‐off approach. • Connectors, on the other hand – limited to the permissions and functionality their original back ends  supported – so that’s read/write, check‐in/out.  In many cases those repositories have been in use for  years, or even decades – we don’t want to re‐architect the security on all that data you’ve already got.   So we’ll honor all the existing permissions, and appear to those sources as if the user were connecting  natively on the desktop.  This is a great feature and brings these documents to ios and Android quickly  and easily, without a lot of new infrastructure and with zero messy conversion of data.
  • 49. © 2014 Citrix. Confidential.49
  • 50. © 2014 Citrix. Confidential.50
  • 51. © 2014 Citrix. Confidential.51
  • 52. © 2014 Citrix. Confidential.52

×