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Statewide Implementation of CIT
Statewide Implementation of CIT
Statewide Implementation of CIT
Statewide Implementation of CIT
Statewide Implementation of CIT
Statewide Implementation of CIT
Statewide Implementation of CIT
Statewide Implementation of CIT
Statewide Implementation of CIT
Statewide Implementation of CIT
Statewide Implementation of CIT
Statewide Implementation of CIT
Statewide Implementation of CIT
Statewide Implementation of CIT
Statewide Implementation of CIT
Statewide Implementation of CIT
Statewide Implementation of CIT
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Statewide Implementation of CIT

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Presented by:Erin Leavitt –Smith – CIT Grant Manager, DMHAS …

Presented by:Erin Leavitt –Smith – CIT Grant Manager, DMHAS

Inspector Kenneth Edwards, Jr., Office of the Chief State’s Attorney and President, CABLE

Louise Pyers, M.S., Executive Director, CABLE and Criminal Justice Project Director, NAMI-CT

Published in: Health & Medicine, Education
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  • 1. Statewide Implementation of CIT
    Connecticut
    CT Alliance to Benefit Law Enforcement, Inc.
    CABLE, Inc.
    www.cableweb.org; cable@cableweb.org
    © CABLE, Inc. 2010
  • 2. Advantages
    Ensures fidelity to the CIT model
    State (DMHAS) provides funding and brings locally funded MH agencies to the table
    Brings a variety of providers and stakeholders together for cross-learning and info sharing
    Agencies all receive the same training, with local adaptation to their mental health provider system
  • 3. Disadvantages
    Collaboration can be messy
    Sometimes feels like herding cats
    Roles need to be clearly defined
  • 4. Lead Organization
    CT Alliance to Benefit Law Enforcement (C.A.B.L.E.) started after a family member with bi-polar disorder was wounded by a police officer during a Suicide-by-Cop attempt while manic.
    Officer was justified and reports no long lasting trauma. Never heard of Suicide by Cop. (1997)
    Discovered that there was only about 1-2 hours of training on mental illness at academy and in-service.
    Founded the organization in 1998. Non-profit status established in 2003
  • 5. C.A.B.L.E.
    Purpose
    to bring community and law enforcement resources together to address common issues related to mental heath via
    Crisis Intervention Team Training
    Law Enforcement Peer Support Training
    Research and education collaborative whose mission is to serve as an interdisciplinary resource and catalyst for law enforcement collaboration, support and education.
  • 6. C.A.B.L.E.
    Comprised of a cross-section of stakeholders:
    Municipal and state law enforcement personnel
    Mental health professionals
    Families and persons living with mental illness
    Institutions of higher learning
  • 7. C.A.B.L.E.
    Police driven; family, consumer and mental health informed
    Police leadership encourages police agency participation; also ensures the curriculum is developed and delivered with safety in mind.
    In our case, we are fortunate to have the leadership of Inspector Ken Edwards who brought CIT to the New London Police Department
    Informed by mental health professionals, families and persons with mental illness.
  • 8. C.A.B.L.E.
    Ideal organization for state-wide implementation
    Does not represent one police agency but many
    Does not represent one advocacy group but many
    Faculty includes members of local and state police, Office of the Chief State’s Attorney, NAMI, Yale University, UCONN and others
    Training offered regionally to link local police to their mental health providers
  • 9. Recruitment
    The Pilot
    Presentation made to the Forensic Services Division of DMHAS
    DMHAS secured SAMHSA funding for a 2 year pilot that included specially trained CIT clinicians to work with police
    DMHAS and CABLE selected and met with pilot departments (4 large urban sites) to encourage their participation. Funding included coverage of overtime costs up to $1500 per for backfill and overtime incurred
    Also provided funding for pilot evaluation by a local university
    The Pilot’s Success
    With evidence in hand, DMHAS secured funding from the state legislature for funding to expand the program statewide
  • 10. Recruitment…
    CT does not have a county system of government. Each police agency covering 169 towns must be approached. (101 police agencies – state police oversee rural areas)
    More than one way…
    Most successful method – using law enforcement to recruit their own.
    Our law enforcement voice – Capt. Kenneth Edwards ,Jr. of the New London Police Dept.
    Solicit help of other law enforcement trainers/police attorneys
    Secure POST Certification
    Luncheons hosted by NAMI-CT affiliates
  • 11. Reluctant police agencies
    We are persistent but do not push
    Establish a triage method
    “A” departments – who want the program with little prodding
    “B” departments – who are willing to test it out
    “C” departments – are not ready or willing to consider it
    We work with the A’s and B’s while continuing to approach the C’s once a year
  • 12. Adherence to Core Elements
    DMHAS and CABLE initiate and facilitate ongoing discussions between local police and mental health providers
    Plans are collaboratively established to encourage referrals and follow-up with consumers
    Local mental health clinicians take the 40 hour CIT training with their police partners to encourage networking and relationship building.
  • 13. Adherence to Core Elements…
    Each police agency is asked to develop a CIT policy (sample policies are provided)
    Policy must be approved by CABLE
    DMHAS offers to cover up to $1500 of OT and backfill costs for the training if the department submits and approved CIT policy
  • 14. Adherence to Core Elements…
    The Policy
    Three main components
    People with mental illness with be treated with dignity and respect
    CIT officers will be sent to mental health related calls whenever available
    The person with mental illness will be connected to community based mental health resources when appropriate as part of their collaborative agreement with that mental health provider
  • 15. Adherence to Core Elements…
    Adjusting to changing budgets, policies, etc…
    DMHAS, CABLE, NAMI, Police and their mental health partners work together to find creative solutions for budget cuts
    Changes in leadership require education about CIT and orientation to the model
  • 16. Sustaining the program
    CABLE provides ongoing technical assistance
    CABLE and NAMI-CT co-produce a quarterly newsletter for CIT officers and their clinical partners
    CABLE offers a one day refresher symposium hosted by Central CT State University
    Quarterly meetings held for Law Enforcement CIT coordinators and the clinicians they work with
  • 17. Contact Information
    Erin Leavitt –Smith – CIT Grant Manager, DMHAS
    860 262-5879
    Inspector Kenneth Edwards, Jr., Office of the Chief State’s Attorney and President, CABLE
    860 258-5965
    Louise Pyers, M.S., Executive Director, CABLE and Criminal Justice Project Director, NAMI-CT
    203 848-0320
    Thank You!

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