1
2
The SELTAS Platform
Keith Humphreys,
Honorary International Consultant (UK), University of Hong Kong
14 June
2014
 Inno...
3
The SELTAS Platform
4
First premise;
 Education is education and the pedagogical
principles are the same for all students.
 Teacher’s need t...
5
Second premise;
 There is an infinite free range of knowledge,
that one person needs to know.
 Teachers have a diversi...
6
7
Challenges for teachers in special schools
 The proliferation of mobile computing devices
and the availability of rich ...
8
Challenges for teachers in special schools
 Enhancing schools’ IT infrastructure and re-
engineering the operations mod...
9
Challenges for teachers in special schools
 Student attainment levels and diversity
 Student’s wide range of barriers ...
10
The students are ahead of the teachers
11
The students are ahead of the teachers
 The use of one computer lab per school
is fast disappearing
 as are the fixed...
12
The students are ahead of the teachers.
 “Today’s students are looking at social
media not as a separate thing that yo...
13
The SAME Network approach to reform
The SELTAS platform is a facilitative tool
14
The SAME Network approach to reform
 To help the principals and senior teachers to
manage their schools.
 To give tea...
15
The SAME Network approach to reform
Schools have identified eight hallmarks of good
practice
16
The rationale underpinning the SELTAS platform
 It provides instant case studies with videos and
lesson plans and arti...
17
The rationale underpinning the SELTAS platform
 It provides collaborative opportunities for
different school to share ...
18
SELTAS platform as an information technology
resource for students
The platform has to be accessible to all students
19
The rationale underpinning the SELTAS platform
 If this is successful it will revolutionise our
concept of learning di...
20
The rationale underpinning the SELTAS platform
 to have an ongoing strategy of using the whole of
the platform as a sc...
21
The rationale underpinning the SELTAS platform
 ‘Teachers are a diversified group of learners
 who at different level...
22
SELTAS as an IT resource for teachers and
students
23
SELTAS as an IT resource for teachers
 ‘There is an emerging political belief
that for viable professional change to
b...
24
SELTAS as an IT resource for teachers
 Those teachers who are traditional in their
approach find IT as being subversiv...
25
SELTAS as an IT resource for teachers
 The complexity of the challenge is to realise
that that teachers are not alread...
26
SELTAS platform as an information technology
resource for students
27
SELTAS platform as an information technology
resource for students
 A systematic approach to the use of assistive devi...
28
SELTAS platform as an information technology
resource for students
 A new found freedom in which to own the world in w...
29 SELTAS contribution to parent partnership
A paradigm shift in parents as partners
30 SELTAS contribution to parent partnership
 The ‘engaged parent’ is now a central issue in
government policies
 as the...
31
SELTAS contribution to parent partnership
 ‘Learning Platform technologies are unlikely
to drive any changes in parent...
32
SELTAS in promoting teacher collaboration
and critical friendship within school.
33
SELTAS in promoting teacher collaboration
and critical friendship within school.
 SELTAS is a professional development...
34
SELTAS in promoting teacher collaboration
and critical friendship within school.
 When teachers seek to improve their
...
35
SELTAS in promoting teacher collaboration and
critical friendship within school.
 In establishing collaborative groups...
36
SELTAS in promoting teacher collaboration
and critical friendship within school.
 Information exchange from the platfo...
37
SELTAS in promoting collegiality as a critical
mass of credibility and quality assurance
Developing a collegial capacit...
38
SELTAS in promoting collegiality as a critical
mass of credibility and quality assurance
 The collegial capacity of SE...
39
SELTAS in promoting collegiality as a critical
mass of credibility and quality assurance
 All the work from the SAME s...
40
SELTAS in promoting collegiality as a critical
mass of credibility and quality assurance
 ‘from teacher perspectives, ...
41
Freedom at last with the SELTAS
but learning has limits
 The State needs to realise the limits it has in
promoting edu...
42
Yes to learning without limits
 Yes to educational reform from
the industrial age to the information age
 Yes to a te...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

The SELTAS Platform: Enabling innovation in special education with technology for e-learning that is collaboratively managed and collegially quality assured

555 views

Published on

CITERS2014 - Learning without Limits?
http://citers2014.cite.hku.hk/program-overview/keynote-humphreys/
14 June 2014 (Saturday)
09:15 – 10:00
Keynote 4: The SELTAS Platform: Enabling innovation in special education with technology for e-learning that is collaboratively managed and collegially quality assured

Speaker: Mr Keith HUMPHREYS (Honorary International Consultant, Centre for the Advancement for Inclusive and Special Education (CAISE), HKU)
Chair: Mr. Andrew TSE (Research Associate, CAISE, HKU)

Published in: Education, Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
555
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
122
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

The SELTAS Platform: Enabling innovation in special education with technology for e-learning that is collaboratively managed and collegially quality assured

  1. 1. 1
  2. 2. 2 The SELTAS Platform Keith Humphreys, Honorary International Consultant (UK), University of Hong Kong 14 June 2014  Innovation in special education with  information technology  collaboratively managed  collegially quality assured A qualitative case study, reporting to the SAME teachers
  3. 3. 3 The SELTAS Platform
  4. 4. 4 First premise;  Education is education and the pedagogical principles are the same for all students.  Teacher’s need to be more concerned with what students are learning  Students have special needs that require creative responses from teachers.  Students only have special education needs at school, not at home at evenings or weekends. There is nothing special about special education
  5. 5. 5 Second premise;  There is an infinite free range of knowledge, that one person needs to know.  Teachers have a diversity of knowledge and learning needs  Students should be able to share what they want to learn with teachers and their parents  There should be an interrelationship between the student’s world at home and at school We are moving from the industrial age of teaching to the information age, which allows teachers and students to control their learning
  6. 6. 6
  7. 7. 7 Challenges for teachers in special schools  The proliferation of mobile computing devices and the availability of rich information on the Internet enable learning to take place beyond the confines of time and space.  Learning will no longer be confined to the classroom or be bound by school timetable and prescribed textbooks.  It will become more interactive, self-directed and collaborative.’ The EDB Hong Kong (2014) The Education Bureau Fourth Strategy on Information Technology
  8. 8. 8 Challenges for teachers in special schools  Enhancing schools’ IT infrastructure and re- engineering the operations mode  Enhancing the quality of e learning resources  Renewing the curriculum, transforming pedagogical and assessment practices  Building professional leadership, capacity and communities of practice  Involving parents, stakeholders and the community The EDB Hong Kong (2014) The EDB propose five key actions;
  9. 9. 9 Challenges for teachers in special schools  Student attainment levels and diversity  Student’s wide range of barriers to learning caused by disabilities  Student learned helplessness from adults  Teacher’s educational and special educational beliefs  Special school cultures and size  Ownership; who is the major stakeholder the State or the student? Six challenges for teachers in special schools;
  10. 10. 10 The students are ahead of the teachers
  11. 11. 11 The students are ahead of the teachers  The use of one computer lab per school is fast disappearing  as are the fixed computer terminals  and rigid competency based software programmes.  Teachers in many of schools are not keeping pace with the rapid change Many schools are out of date
  12. 12. 12 The students are ahead of the teachers.  “Today’s students are looking at social media not as a separate thing that you do occasionally  but as a pervasive part of the way they are living their lives outside of school,  one they want to connect with their lives inside the classroom.” Evans (2014) Classrooms are disconnected from the student lives
  13. 13. 13 The SAME Network approach to reform The SELTAS platform is a facilitative tool
  14. 14. 14 The SAME Network approach to reform  To help the principals and senior teachers to manage their schools.  To give teachers flexible access to the knowledge they need.  To enable all students no matter what their ability or disability to access information.  To collaborate with parents to appreciate student achievement at school and at home. The SELTAS platform is a facilitative tool
  15. 15. 15 The SAME Network approach to reform Schools have identified eight hallmarks of good practice
  16. 16. 16 The rationale underpinning the SELTAS platform  It provides instant case studies with videos and lesson plans and articles which the teachers can immediately access according to their own needs for their class of students.  It provides e learning resources with e teaching plan forms, for fast lesson preparation  It provides principals with web counter data to quickly evaluate the effective use of the platform by every member of staff. The platform has a remarkable set of resources
  17. 17. 17 The rationale underpinning the SELTAS platform  It provides collaborative opportunities for different school to share common school schemes of work and teaching plans  It gives the teachers control of the SELTAS website so that the ownership is theirs.  It gives students a means of open access to IT materials  It provides a blog for linking classroom based student’s experiences to the parents at home. The platform has a remarkable set of resources
  18. 18. 18 SELTAS platform as an information technology resource for students The platform has to be accessible to all students
  19. 19. 19 The rationale underpinning the SELTAS platform  If this is successful it will revolutionise our concept of learning disability and student potential.  Many students are trapped by ‘learned helplessness’ and access to the platform may motivate them to discover a new world in themselves.  The platform has to be accessible to all parents so that they can see video clips and photographs of their child in their current work day.  This may have huge potential for raising both the students and the parent’s self- esteem. The platform has to be accessible to all students
  20. 20. 20 The rationale underpinning the SELTAS platform  to have an ongoing strategy of using the whole of the platform as a school based resource for collaboration  to be encouraged to escape from an insular culture and to be challenged by the implications of the new information age classroom  to ensure that all staff have a personal sense of accomplishment that is recognised and celebrated by the school. The leadership of the principals and the senior management team is vital. They need; Without a user strategy the whole platform could rapidly become a piano with no musicians
  21. 21. 21 The rationale underpinning the SELTAS platform  ‘Teachers are a diversified group of learners  who at different levels of ability and preparedness to accept change.  Past experience of innovation have suggested that staff do not embrace change at the same pace or in the same way,  with some more reluctant than others to adopt new technologies into their practice.’ Wilson and Stacy (2004) Without a user strategy the whole platform could rapidly become a piano with no musicians
  22. 22. 22 SELTAS as an IT resource for teachers and students
  23. 23. 23 SELTAS as an IT resource for teachers  ‘There is an emerging political belief that for viable professional change to be cost effective  it should be driven by the teaching profession’s awareness of student’s needs  and not State sponsored initiatives based the scores of attainment data.’ Humphreys (2014) For change to occur in schools;
  24. 24. 24 SELTAS as an IT resource for teachers  Those teachers who are traditional in their approach find IT as being subversive  and threatens their authority.  These teachers tend to purposely avoid the use of IT  and feel that it distracts student’s attention from their lessons.’ Mama, Hennessy (2013) For change to occur in schools;
  25. 25. 25 SELTAS as an IT resource for teachers  The complexity of the challenge is to realise that that teachers are not already behind the students,  but that the students are moving ahead in their use of technology t an even faster rate. Edwards (2014) For change to occur in schools;
  26. 26. 26 SELTAS platform as an information technology resource for students
  27. 27. 27 SELTAS platform as an information technology resource for students  A systematic approach to the use of assistive devices  A library of software information that is appropriate to different levels of attainment  A set of software tools and apps that enable students to be creative  A portfolio library into which they can store and access their own private information  Communication between their parents at home about their school work  Communication with their teachers about their life and achievements at home. It is a resource to enhance classroom practices.
  28. 28. 28 SELTAS platform as an information technology resource for students  A new found freedom in which to own the world in which they live.  In doing so the platform provides a source of independence through which to gain self-respect and develop their self-esteem.  The value of using IT for students with special educational needs is that it already a part of their social culture and a medium that they are motivated to use.  The SELTAS platform provides them with a focussed resource that they can access without adult intervention as they take control of their own world. It is a resource for students to explore at home independently of school.
  29. 29. 29 SELTAS contribution to parent partnership A paradigm shift in parents as partners
  30. 30. 30 SELTAS contribution to parent partnership  The ‘engaged parent’ is now a central issue in government policies  as they try to improve educational standards and shift from parent’s rights to parent’s responsibilities.  ‘Whether parents like it or not and whether teachers like it or not, parents are part of, even central to, the education strategy’ Goodall and Vorhaus (2011) A paradigm shift in parents as partners
  31. 31. 31 SELTAS contribution to parent partnership  ‘Learning Platform technologies are unlikely to drive any changes in parental involvement  unless accompanied by wider shifts in the ‘parent-centeredness’ of a school's organizational culture. Selwyn et al (2011) A paradigm shift in parents as partners
  32. 32. 32 SELTAS in promoting teacher collaboration and critical friendship within school.
  33. 33. 33 SELTAS in promoting teacher collaboration and critical friendship within school.  SELTAS is a professional development resource for teachers that can influence the whole learning culture of a school.  Yet the platform in itself has little value unless it is used effectively.  Teachers need to clearly understand what a platform can do and not do. Teachers use of the platform
  34. 34. 34 SELTAS in promoting teacher collaboration and critical friendship within school.  When teachers seek to improve their professional practice they are vulnerable to the pressures of change.  ‘Increasingly school change processes are being facilitated through the formation and operation of groups of teachers  working together for improved student outcomes.’ Edwards (2012) Vulnerable isolation
  35. 35. 35 SELTAS in promoting teacher collaboration and critical friendship within school.  In establishing collaborative groups  special care should be given to the formation of the groups  taking into account not only a balance of teachers with different willingness to learn,  but also a balance of participants’ interpersonal skills. Oliveira, Tinoca, Pereira (2011) Establishing collaborative groups require careful planning
  36. 36. 36 SELTAS in promoting teacher collaboration and critical friendship within school.  Information exchange from the platform must progress and not be static.  Teaching is an oral culture based on visual events which the platform can foster  What is to be learned should be driven by the teacher’s perception of their own needs Teacher ownership is essential
  37. 37. 37 SELTAS in promoting collegiality as a critical mass of credibility and quality assurance Developing a collegial capacity through SELTAS
  38. 38. 38 SELTAS in promoting collegiality as a critical mass of credibility and quality assurance  The collegial capacity of SELTAS is vital to the SAME project to the implementation of the eight hall marks  each demanding a paradigm shift in the pedagogical practices of each school.  ‘Collegial discussion was found to be important in developing and maintaining community  while critical discussion was vital for its role in transforming teacher’s beliefs. Prestridge (2010) Developing a collegial capacity through SELTAS
  39. 39. 39 SELTAS in promoting collegiality as a critical mass of credibility and quality assurance  All the work from the SAME schools has been uploaded on the platform and is available for use across the collegial community.  This has strengthened the resolve of the teachers to continue what is undoubtedly a huge challenge.  The challenge has the important security of solidarity for the twelve schools The collegial context was adhesive
  40. 40. 40 SELTAS in promoting collegiality as a critical mass of credibility and quality assurance  ‘from teacher perspectives, the collegial capacity of ICT implementation strategies  played a central and mediating role in effecting changes in student learning,  of moving away from a teacher-centred approach to one that is more student-centred’ Wong, E.M.L.; Li, S.C. (2011) The collegial context was adhesive
  41. 41. 41 Freedom at last with the SELTAS but learning has limits  The State needs to realise the limits it has in promoting education reform  Schools need critical collegial communities  Teachers need peer group collaboration  Students have limits to the information that drives their curiosity  Parents have limits to how much want to be in partnership
  42. 42. 42 Yes to learning without limits  Yes to educational reform from the industrial age to the information age  Yes to a teachers culture where they control their professional learning needs  Yes to innovation in special education with information that uses technology  Yes, to student’s having the freedom at last to define their own needs and lifestyle.

×