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Leading e-Learning Adoption in Schools: Human and Technological Structures and Strategies
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5 March 2010 (Friday) | 15:30 - 17:40 | http://citers2010.cite.hku.hk/abstract/76 | Dr. Norrizan RAZALI, Senior Manager, Smart School Department, Multimedia Development Corporation

5 March 2010 (Friday) | 15:30 - 17:40 | http://citers2010.cite.hku.hk/abstract/76 | Dr. Norrizan RAZALI, Senior Manager, Smart School Department, Multimedia Development Corporation

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    Leading e-Learning Adoption in Schools: Human and Technological Structures and Strategies Leading e-Learning Adoption in Schools: Human and Technological Structures and Strategies Presentation Transcript

    • 1
      TRANSFORMING MALAYSIAN SCHOOLS FOR THE 21ST CENTURY
      March 5th, 2010
      3.30 – 5.30 pm
      FORUM ON LEADING E-LEARNING ADOPTION IN SCHOOLS: HUMAN AND TECHNOLOGICAL INFRASTRUCTURES AND STRATEGIES @ THE CITERS 2010
      Hong Kong
      Dr Norrizan Razali
      Multimedia Development Corporation
      Malaysia
    • Contextual Considerations
    • MSC Malaysia
      • Erosion of comparative advantages in traditional sectors
      • Capitalise on ICT / Multimedia opportunities and create new growth engine
      ECONOMIC
      SOCIAL
      • Digital Divide
      • Roll-out ICT benefits
      GLOBAL
      • Challenge of globalisation
      Migrate Malaysia Seamlessly into the Knowledge-Based Economy
    • Smart School Objectives
      To produce a thinking and technology-literate workforce
      To democratize education
      To increase participation of stakeholders
      To provide all-round development of the individual
      To provide opportunities to enhance individual strengths and abilities
      Smart School Blueprint , 1997
    • 5
      Models & Processes
    • Implementation Phases
      Measuring & monitoring tool: Smart School Qualification Standards (SSQS)
      Target Ratings of All Schools
      Wave 1:
      Pilot Phase (1999 – 2002)
      88 schools nationwide selected
      End of 2010
      10,000 schools rated from 3 to 5 star
      by the end of 2010
      Wave 2:
      Post-Pilot
      (2002–2005)
      Massive computerization phase to all 10,000 schools
      Wave 3:
      Making All Schools Smart (2005 - 2010)
      Leveraging all ICT initiatives
      Making schools smart is a continuous process to enculturate the use of ICT in education to ensure improved quality of teaching and learning, effectiveness of school administration and management and teacher competency
      Malaysia ICT in Education: Cutting Edge Practice 2008
      Wave 4: Consolidate & Stabilize
      (2010 2020)
      Innovative practices using ICT enculturated
      Increased in learning performance and efficiency
      Increased in ICT utilization and acceptance
      Study on Outcomes and Characteristics of Students from Smart Schools and Non Smart Schools 2008
      Impact Study on Rural Smart Schools 2009
      Smart School Roadmap : 2005 – 2020
    • Key Components of a Smart School
      Processes
      People,Skills & Responsibilities
      Management
      Policies
      Technology
      Administration
      Teaching & Learning
      I
      Smart School Blueprint , 1997
    • 138 Benchmarked Smart Schools As Catalyst
      Making 10,000 Schools Smart
      Neighboring Schools Mentored by Catalyst
      in Clusters
      (Multiplier Effect)
      BEST PRACTICE
      SELANGOR
      Mentored schools
      Benchmarked Smart Schools
      Target Ratings of All Schools
      2009
      End of 2010
      7,575 schools rated from 3 to 5 star
      as of October 2009
      • 96 schools - 5-star
      • 2412 schools - 4-star
      • 5067 schools - 3-star
      • 662 schools - 2-star
      • 217 schools - 1-star
      10,000 schools rated from
      3 to 5 star by the end of 2010
      7,575
      3,475
      Legend:
      Benchmarked Smart Schools
      as Catalyst
      8
    • Strategies to Achieve Rapid Exponential Growth
      C
      H
      A
      N
      G
      E
      A
      G
      E
      N
      T
      S
      Schools with potential 5, 4 and 3 star ratings
      EARMARKED!
      SCHOOLS
      ALL SCHOOLS INVOLVED IN THE FOLLOWING PROGRAMMES
      COMMUNITIES
      MOE STATE NETWORKS
    • Smart School Outcomes
      Critical Thinking
      7,575 schools rated from
      3 to 5 star as of October 2009
      • 96 schools - 5-star
      • 2412 schools - 4-star
      • 5067 schools - 3-star
      • 662 schools - 2-star
      • 217 schools - 1-star
      Collaboration
      Technology & media literacy
      Effective Communication
      Problem Solving
      7,525
      3,475
      OUTCOMES:
      TEACHERS AND STUDENTS EQUIPPED WITH
      21st CENTURY SKILLS
      Smart School
      Qualification
      Standards
      Human Capital Development/
      Change Management
      PROGRAMS FOR
      MAKING ALL SCHOOLS SMART
      2006 - 2010
      Leveraging
      all MOE ICT
      Initiatives: Access Centre,
      Computer Lab, Web TV, etc.
      I
      Smart
      Partnership
      Initiatives
    • 11
      Lessons Learnt
    • Lessons Learnt
      12
      For e-Learning adoption to be successful, following are key strategies:
      ICT in education policies
      Outcome driven
      People first
      Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) / Standards
    • Thank You
      norrizan@mdec.com.my