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You Know What You Write, But Do You Know Your Rights?
You Know What You Write, But Do You Know Your Rights?
You Know What You Write, But Do You Know Your Rights?
You Know What You Write, But Do You Know Your Rights?
You Know What You Write, But Do You Know Your Rights?
You Know What You Write, But Do You Know Your Rights?
You Know What You Write, But Do You Know Your Rights?
You Know What You Write, But Do You Know Your Rights?
You Know What You Write, But Do You Know Your Rights?
You Know What You Write, But Do You Know Your Rights?
You Know What You Write, But Do You Know Your Rights?
You Know What You Write, But Do You Know Your Rights?
You Know What You Write, But Do You Know Your Rights?
You Know What You Write, But Do You Know Your Rights?
You Know What You Write, But Do You Know Your Rights?
You Know What You Write, But Do You Know Your Rights?
You Know What You Write, But Do You Know Your Rights?
You Know What You Write, But Do You Know Your Rights?
You Know What You Write, But Do You Know Your Rights?
You Know What You Write, But Do You Know Your Rights?
You Know What You Write, But Do You Know Your Rights?
You Know What You Write, But Do You Know Your Rights?
You Know What You Write, But Do You Know Your Rights?
You Know What You Write, But Do You Know Your Rights?
You Know What You Write, But Do You Know Your Rights?
You Know What You Write, But Do You Know Your Rights?
You Know What You Write, But Do You Know Your Rights?
You Know What You Write, But Do You Know Your Rights?
You Know What You Write, But Do You Know Your Rights?
You Know What You Write, But Do You Know Your Rights?
You Know What You Write, But Do You Know Your Rights?
You Know What You Write, But Do You Know Your Rights?
You Know What You Write, But Do You Know Your Rights?
You Know What You Write, But Do You Know Your Rights?
You Know What You Write, But Do You Know Your Rights?
You Know What You Write, But Do You Know Your Rights?
You Know What You Write, But Do You Know Your Rights?
You Know What You Write, But Do You Know Your Rights?
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You Know What You Write, But Do You Know Your Rights?

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When you publish a journal article, you sign a copyright agreement. Do you know what you’re agreeing to when you sign it? Different journals have different policies: …

When you publish a journal article, you sign a copyright agreement. Do you know what you’re agreeing to when you sign it? Different journals have different policies:

Some journals require you to relinquish your copyright. (You then have to ask permission or even pay to share your article with students and colleagues!)

Some journals allow you to retain some rights (e.g., the right to post online).

Some journals leave copyright in your hands. (You simply give the journal a non-exclusive license to publish the article.)

How can you find out a journal’s policy? How can you negotiate your contract to make the most of your rights as a scholar, researcher, and author? Come learn how to preserve your rights to reproduce, distribute, and display the work you create.

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  • 1. You Know What You Write, But Do You Know Your Rights? Understanding and Protecting Your Rights As an Author Jill Cirasella jcirasella@gc.cuny.edu The Graduate Center, CUNY Slides at: http://tinyurl.com/GCauthorsrights
  • 2. “Sign here!” http://youtu.be/GMIY_4t-DR0
  • 3. Do authors WANT to give up all of their rights to their work?
  • 4. Do authors HAVE to give up all of their rights to their work?
  • 5. Three Kinds of Journals 1) Traditional Toll Access Journals Subscription-based journals that require authors to transfer copyright to the journal, which then has exclusive rights to the article.
  • 6. Three Kinds of Journals 2) Gold Open Access Journals Journals that automatically and immediately make their articles available online to all at no cost. (There are a variety of business models, but the articles are always free to read.) Gold OA journals do not take copyright. They use Creative Commons licenses instead.
  • 7. Three Kinds of Journals 3) Green Open Access Journals Traditional, subscription-based journals that permit authors to self-archive their articles in OA repositories. In general, Green OA journals do take copyright, but “give back” some rights to the author.
  • 8. Is a Journal Green OA? Ugh…
  • 9. Is a Journal Green OA? Easier! SHERPA/RoMEO http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ Search by journal/publisher to learn its copyright and self-archiving policies
  • 10. Very Good...
  • 11. Quite Good...
  • 12. Not Great...
  • 13. Very Bad...
  • 14. Prevalence of Permission? Among Publishers SHERPA/RoMEO covers 1813 publishers as of March 2015. 76% allow some form of self-archiving. For more information: http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/statistics.php
  • 15. Prevalence of Permission? Among Journals Of the 18,000+ journals covered by SHERPA/RoMEO in Nov. 2011: • 87% allow immediate self-archiving of some version of article • 60% allow immediate self-archiving of post-refereed version • 16% allow immediate self-archiving of published PDF • Allowing for embargoes (usually 6 to 24 months), 94% allow self-archiving of post-refereed versions For more information: http://romeo.jiscinvolve.org/wp/2011/11/24/
  • 16. Beyond SHERPA/RoMEO There’s more to a copyright agreement than self-archiving policies! Sometimes you need to read the contract itself.
  • 17. Comparison of Copyright Agreements BioMed Central vs. JAMA vs. Journal of Library Innovation vs. Wiley-Blackwell
  • 18. Creative Commons Licenses Many OA works have Creative Commons (CC) licenses, which grant the public permission to use the work in more ways than traditional copyright allows.
  • 19. Making Sense of CC Licenses
  • 20. Making Sense of CC Licenses Keep some rights or waive all interests?
  • 21. Making Sense of CC Licenses
  • 22. OASPA Favors CC-BY http://oaspa.org/why-cc-by/
  • 23. “Voluntary” vs. Mandated Green OA A growing number of institutions have policies to ensure that faculty and staff articles become green OA (i.e., get archived in an OA repository). Some publishers are now trying to make different rules for “voluntary” self-archiving and policy-mandated self-archiving: “You may self-archive if you wish but not if you must.”
  • 24. “Voluntary” vs. Mandated Green OA Example #1: Emerald “Emerald supports an author’s right to voluntarily self-archive their works without payment or embargo.” “If you are mandated to make your work OA but have no funds for an [article processing charge], you may deposit your work 24 months after official publication, or contact permissions@emeraldinsight.com for consideration for an embargo exception.”
  • 25. “Voluntary” vs. Mandated Green OA Example #2: Elsevier “Elsevier believes that individual authors should be able to distribute their [accepted author manuscript] for their personal voluntary needs and interests…” “…deposit in, or posting to, subject-oriented or centralized repositories (such as PubMed Central), or institutional repositories with systematic posting mandates is permitted only under specific agreements between Elsevier and the repository, agency or institution…”
  • 26. Can I Negotiate My Contract? Sometimes. Your best shot is the Scholar’s Copyright Addendum Engine: http://scholars.sciencecommons.org/
  • 27. Suppose you have the right to self-archive your article. Where can you self-archive? Where should you self-archive?
  • 28. Where to Self-Archive? Institutional Repositories An institutional repository (IR) is an online database offered by an institution to collect, preserve, and make freely available scholarly journal articles and other works created by that institution’s community. Of course, self-archiving in an institutional repository is possible only at institutions with a repository.
  • 29. Where to Self-Archive? CUNY is on the verge of launching a repository! CUNY Academic Works http://academicworks.cuny.edu/ The Graduate Center already has its repository! Graduate Center Academic Works http://works.gc.cuny.edu
  • 30. CUNY Institutional Repository
  • 31. GC Institutional Repository
  • 32. Good News! Graduate Center Faculty You can start submitting now! (Talk to me if interested.) Graduate Center Students As of 2014, all dissertations & theses go into the IR, with an optional embargo period before going OA. Soon, you’ll also be able to submit other works. Other CUNY Faculty Stay tuned!
  • 33. Where Else to Self-Archive? Subject Repositories arXiv.org PubMed Central Research Papers in Economics (RePEc) Social Science Research Network (SSRN) Curious if there's a repository for a certain field? http://oad.simmons.edu/oadwiki/Disciplinary_repositories Note: Not every field has a subject repository.
  • 34. Where Else to Self-Archive? Subject- and Institution-Independent Sites ResearchGate.net Academia.edu Personal Websites A good step in the direction of green OA, but not permanent and therefore not the best option!
  • 35. Advice to Authors 1. Research any journal/publisher you’re considering. (Quality? Peer reviewing process? Copyright policy?) 2. If you have the right to self-archive, exercise that right. 1. If you don’t have the right to self-archive, request it. 1. Choose the best publishing venue for you and your career… 2. …but also think about the system you’re contributing to and the system you want to contribute to. Know your rights to what you write!
  • 36. Credits This slideshow is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License. Specific graphics may have different licenses. “What Is the Problem?” graphic, content by Jill Cirasella / graphic design by Les LaRue, licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License
  • 37. Thank you! Questions? Jill Cirasella jcirasella@gc.cuny.edu The Graduate Center, CUNY Slides at: http://tinyurl.com/GCauthorsrights

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